Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 16 de 16
Filter
1.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 127, 2022 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1849735

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation associated with chronic inflammation in the airways. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are unconventional, innate-like T cells highly abundant in mucosal tissues including the lung. We hypothesized that the characteristics of MAIT cells in circulation may be prospectively associated with COPD morbidity. METHODS: COPD subjects (n = 61) from the Tools for Identifying Exacerbations (TIE) study were recruited when in stable condition. At study entry, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was measured and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cryopreserved for later analysis by flow cytometry. Patients were followed for 3 years to record clinically meaningful outcomes. RESULTS: Patients who required hospitalization at one or more occasions during the 3-year follow-up (n = 21) had lower MAIT cell counts in peripheral blood at study inclusion, compared with patients who did not get hospitalized (p = 0.036). In contrast, hospitalized and never hospitalized patients did not differ in CD8 or CD4 T cell counts (p = 0.482 and p = 0.221, respectively). Moreover, MAIT cells in hospitalized subjects showed a more activated phenotype with higher CD38 expression (p = 0.014), and there was a trend towards higher LAG-3 expression (p = 0.052). Conventional CD4 and CD8 T cells were similar between the groups. Next we performed multi-variable logistic regression analysis with hospitalizations as dependent variable, and FEV1, GOLD 2017 group, and quantity or activation of MAIT and conventional T cells as independent variables. MAIT cell count, CD38 expression on MAIT cells, and LAG-3 expression on both MAIT and CD8 T cells were all independently associated with the risk of hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that MAIT cells might reflect a novel, FEV1-independent immunological dimension in the complexity of COPD. The potential implication of MAIT cells in COPD pathogenesis and MAIT cells' prognostic potential deserve further investigation.


Subject(s)
Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Hospitalization , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Lymphocyte Count , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism
2.
Cells ; 11(1)2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580996

ABSTRACT

Patients with COPD may be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 because of ACE2 upregulation, the entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, the main risk factor for COPD, increases pulmonary ACE2. How ACE2 expression is controlled is not known but may involve HuR, an RNA binding protein that increases protein expression by stabilizing mRNA. We hypothesized that HuR would increase ACE2 protein expression. We analyzed scRNA-seq data to profile ELAVL1 expression in distinct respiratory cell populations in COVID-19 and COPD patients. HuR expression and cellular localization was evaluated in COPD lung tissue by multiplex immunohistochemistry and in human lung cells by imaging flow cytometry. The regulation of ACE2 expression was evaluated using siRNA-mediated knockdown of HuR. There is a significant positive correlation between ELAVL1 and ACE2 in COPD cells. HuR cytoplasmic localization is higher in smoker and COPD lung tissue; there were also higher levels of cleaved HuR (CP-1). HuR binds to ACE2 mRNA but knockdown of HuR does not change ACE2 protein levels in primary human lung fibroblasts (HLFs). Our work is the first to investigate the association between ACE2 and HuR. Further investigation is needed to understand the mechanistic underpinning behind the regulation of ACE2 expression.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , ELAV-Like Protein 1/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Lung/metabolism , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , ELAV-Like Protein 1/metabolism , Female , Fibroblasts/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/genetics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , RNA Interference , RNA-Seq/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323266

ABSTRACT

Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and causes remodeling of the small airways. However, the exact smoke-induced effects on the different types of small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) are poorly understood. Here, using air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures, single-cell RNA-sequencing reveals previously unrecognized transcriptional heterogeneity within the small airway epithelium and cell type-specific effects upon acute and chronic cigarette smoke exposure. Smoke triggers detoxification and inflammatory responses and aberrantly activates and alters basal cell differentiation. This results in an increase of inflammatory basal-to-secretory cell intermediates and, particularly after chronic smoke exposure, a massive expansion of a rare inflammatory and squamous metaplasia associated KRT6A+ basal cell state and an altered secretory cell landscape. ALI cultures originating from healthy non-smokers and COPD smokers show similar responses to cigarette smoke exposure, although an increased pro-inflammatory profile is conserved in the latter. Taken together, the in vitro models provide high-resolution insights into the smoke-induced remodeling of the small airways resembling the pathological processes in COPD airways. The data may also help to better understand other lung diseases including COVID-19, as the data reflect the smoke-dependent variable induction of SARS-CoV-2 entry factors across SAEC populations.


Subject(s)
Airway Remodeling/drug effects , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Cigarette Smoking/adverse effects , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Cigarette Smoking/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Humans , Neoplasms, Basal Cell/metabolism , Primary Cell Culture , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/pathology , Smoke , Smoking/adverse effects , Smoking/metabolism
5.
COPD ; 18(4): 469-475, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294627

ABSTRACT

Healthcare access and delivery for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who live in remote areas or who are susceptible to contracting communicable diseases, such as COVID-19, may be a challenge. Telehealth and remote monitoring devices can be used to overcome this issue. However, the accuracy of these devices must be ensured before forming healthcare decisions based on their outcomes. Therefore, a systematic review was performed to synthesize the evidence on the reliability, validity and responsiveness of digital devices used for tracking oxygen saturation (SpO2) and/or respiratory rate (RR) in individuals with COPD, in remote settings. Three electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE (1996 to October 8, 2020), EMBASE (1996 to October 8, 2020) and CINAHL (1998 to October 8, 2020). Studies were included if they aimed to evaluate one or more measurement properties of a digital device measuring SpO2 or RR in individuals with COPD. Six-hundred and twenty-five articles were identified and after screening, 7 studies matched the inclusion criteria; covering 11 devices measuring SpO2 and/or RR. Studies reported on the reliability (n = 1), convergent validity (n = 1), concurrent validity (n = 2) and predictive validity (n = 2) of SpO2 devices and on the convergent validity (n = 1), concurrent validity (n = 1) and predictive validity (n = 1) of RR devices. SpO2 and RR devices were valid when compared against other respiration monitoring devices but were not precise in predicting exacerbation events. More well-designed measurement studies are needed to make firm conclusions about the accuracy of such devices.Supplemental data for this article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/15412555.2021.1945021 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Oximetry/instrumentation , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/physiopathology , Respiratory Rate , Telemedicine/instrumentation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Reproducibility of Results
6.
STAR Protoc ; 2(3): 100663, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275773

ABSTRACT

Patients with chronic lung disease are vulnerable to getting severe diseases associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Here, we describe protocols for subculturing and differentiating primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease. The differentiation of NHBE cells in air-liquid interface mimics an in vivo airway and provides an in vitro model for studying SARS-CoV-2 infection. We also describe a protocol for detecting proteins in the sectioned epithelium for detailing SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced pathobiology with a vertical view.


Subject(s)
Bronchi/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/analysis , Epithelium/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Bronchi/pathology , Bronchi/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Epithelium/pathology , Epithelium/virology , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Paraffin Embedding , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , Virus Replication
7.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 164, 2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at increased risk of poor outcome from Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Early data suggest elevated Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) receptor angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression, but relationships to disease phenotype and downstream regulators of inflammation in the Renin-Angiotensin system (RAS) are unknown. We aimed to determine the relationship between RAS gene expression relevant to SARS-CoV-2 infection in the lung with disease characteristics in COPD, and the regulation of newly identified SARS-CoV-2 receptors and spike-cleaving proteases, important for SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: We quantified gene expression using RNA sequencing of epithelial brushings and bronchial biopsies from 31 COPD and 37 control subjects. RESULTS: ACE2 gene expression (log2-fold change (FC)) was increased in COPD compared to ex-smoking (HV-ES) controls in epithelial brushings (0.25, p = 0.042) and bronchial biopsies (0.23, p = 0.050), and correlated with worse lung function (r = - 0.28, p = 0.0090). ACE2 was further increased in frequent exacerbators compared to infrequent exacerbators (0.51, p = 0.00045) and associated with use of ACE inhibitors (ACEi) (0.50, p = 0.0034), having cardiovascular disease (0.23, p = 0.048) or hypertension (0.34, p = 0.0089), and inhaled corticosteroid use in COPD subjects in bronchial biopsies (0.33, p = 0.049). Angiotensin II receptor type (AGTR)1 and 2 expression was decreased in COPD bronchial biopsies compared to HV-ES controls with log2FC of -0.26 (p = 0.033) and - 0.40, (p = 0.0010), respectively. However, the AGTR1:2 ratio was increased in COPD subjects compared with HV-ES controls, log2FC of 0.57 (p = 0.0051). Basigin, a newly identified potential SARS-CoV-2 receptor was also upregulated in both brushes, log2FC of 0.17 (p = 0.0040), and bronchial biopsies, (log2FC of 0.18 (p = 0.017), in COPD vs HV-ES. Transmembrane protease, serine (TMPRSS)2 was not differentially regulated between control and COPD. However, various other spike-cleaving proteases were, including TMPRSS4 and Cathepsin B, in both epithelial brushes (log2FC of 0.25 (p = 0.0012) and log2FC of 0.56 (p = 5.49E-06), respectively) and bronchial biopsies (log2FC of 0.49 (p = 0.00021) and log2FC of 0.246 (p = 0.028), respectively). CONCLUSION: This study identifies key differences in expression of genes related to susceptibility and aetiology of COVID-19 within the COPD lung. Further studies to understand the impact on clinical course of disease are now required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Lung/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/genetics , Transcriptome , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Basigin/genetics , Basigin/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Forced Expiratory Volume , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/physiopathology , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/genetics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2/genetics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2/metabolism , Vital Capacity
8.
J Pathol Clin Res ; 7(5): 446-458, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224964

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) poses a serious threat to healthcare systems worldwide. Binding of the virus to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important step in the infection mechanism. However, it is unknown if ACE2 expression in patients with chronic lung diseases (CLDs), such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), or pulmonary fibrosis (PF), is changed as compared to controls. We used lung samples from patients with COPD (n = 28), IPAH (n = 10), and PF (n = 10) as well as healthy control donor (n = 10) tissue samples to investigate the expression of ACE2 and related cofactors that might influence the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Expression levels of the ACE2 receptor, the putative receptor CD147/BSG, and the viral entry cofactors TMPRSS2 (transmembrane serine protease 2), EZR, and FURIN were determined by quantitative PCR and in open-access RNA sequencing datasets. Immunohistochemical and single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq) analyses were used for localization and coexpression, respectively. Soluble ACE2 (sACE2) plasma levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In COPD as compared to donor, IPAH, and PF lung tissue, gene expression of ACE2, TMPRSS2, and EZR was significantly elevated, but circulating sACE2 levels were significantly reduced in COPD and PF plasma compared to healthy control and IPAH plasma samples. Lung tissue expressions of FURIN and CD147/BSG were downregulated in COPD. None of these changes were associated with changes in pulmonary hemodynamics. Histological analysis revealed coexpression of ACE2, TMPRSS2, and Ezrin in bronchial regions and epithelial cells. This was confirmed by scRNAseq analysis. There were no significant expression changes of the analyzed molecules in the lung tissue of IPAH and idiopathic PF as compared to control. In conclusion, we reveal increased ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression in lung tissue with a concomitant decrease of protective sACE2 in COPD patients. These changes represent the possible risk factors for an increased susceptibility of COPD patients to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Familial Primary Pulmonary Hypertension/pathology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Basigin/genetics , Basigin/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Disease Susceptibility , Familial Primary Pulmonary Hypertension/enzymology , Familial Primary Pulmonary Hypertension/virology , Female , Furin/genetics , Furin/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , Risk Factors , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization
9.
Allergy ; 76(2): 483-496, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impacts of chronic airway diseases on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are far from understood. OBJECTIVE: To explore the influence of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) comorbidity on disease expression and outcomes, and the potential underlying mechanisms in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A total of 961 hospitalized COVID-19 patients with a definite clinical outcome (death or discharge) were retrospectively enrolled. Demographic and clinical information were extracted from the medical records. Lung tissue sections from patients suffering from lung cancer were used for immunohistochemistry study of angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2) expression. BEAS-2B cell line was stimulated with various cytokines. RESULTS: In this cohort, 21 subjects (2.2%) had COPD and 22 (2.3%) had asthma. After adjusting for confounding factors, COPD patients had higher risk of developing severe illness (OR: 23.433; 95% CI 1.525-360.135; P < .01) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (OR: 19.762; 95% CI 1.461-267.369; P = .025) than asthmatics. COPD patients, particularly those with severe COVID-19, had lower counts of CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells and B cells and higher levels of TNF-α, IL-2 receptor, IL-10, IL-8, and IL-6 than asthmatics. COPD patients had increased, whereas asthmatics had decreased ACE2 protein expression in lower airways, compared with that in control subjects without asthma and COPD. IL-4 and IL-13 downregulated, but TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-17A upregulated ACE2 expression in BEAS-2B cells. CONCLUSION: Patients with asthma and COPD likely have different risk of severe COVID-19, which may be associated with different ACE2 expression.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2021: 6646923, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1093883

ABSTRACT

Inflammatory lung disease results in a high global burden of death and disability. There are no effective treatments for the most severe forms of many inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, corticosteroid-resistant asthma, and coronavirus disease 2019; hence, new treatment options are required. Here, we review the role of oxidative imbalance in the development of difficult-to-treat inflammatory lung diseases. The inflammation-induced overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) means that endogenous antioxidants may not be sufficient to prevent oxidative damage, resulting in an oxidative imbalance in the lung. In turn, intracellular signaling events trigger the production of proinflammatory mediators that perpetuate and aggravate the inflammatory response and may lead to tissue damage. The production of high levels of ROS in inflammatory lung diseases can induce the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, the inactivation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling and histone deacetylase 2, a decrease in glucocorticoid binding to its receptor, and thus resistance to glucocorticoid treatment. Hence, antioxidant treatment might be a therapeutic option for inflammatory lung diseases. Preclinical studies have shown that antioxidants (alone or combined with anti-inflammatory drugs) are effective in the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases, although the clinical evidence of efficacy is weaker. Despite the high level of evidence for the efficacy of antioxidants in the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases, the discovery and clinical investigation of safer, more efficacious compounds are now a priority.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/metabolism , Lung Diseases/drug therapy , Lung Diseases/metabolism , Animals , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung Diseases/immunology , Oxidation-Reduction/drug effects , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
11.
Biofactors ; 47(1): 6-18, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-950385

ABSTRACT

Specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) are endogenous lipid metabolites of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that are involved in promoting the resolution of inflammation. Many disease conditions characterized by excessive inflammation have impaired or altered SPM biosynthesis, which may lead to chronic, unresolved inflammation. Exogenous administration of SPMs in infectious conditions has been shown to be effective at improving infection clearance and survival in preclinical models. SPMs have also shown tremendous promise in the context of inflammatory lung conditions, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly in preclinical settings. To date, SPMs have not been studied in the context of the novel Coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), however their preclinical efficacy in combatting infections and improving acute respiratory distress suggest they may be a valuable resource in the fight against Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). Overall, while the research on SPMs is still evolving, they may offer a novel therapeutic option for inflammatory conditions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Docosahexaenoic Acids/therapeutic use , Lipoxins/therapeutic use , Lung Injury/drug therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Herpes Simplex/drug therapy , Herpes Simplex/metabolism , Herpes Simplex/pathology , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung Injury/metabolism , Lung Injury/pathology , Lung Injury/virology , Periodontitis/drug therapy , Periodontitis/metabolism , Periodontitis/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/pathology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/metabolism , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology
12.
BMC Pulm Med ; 20(1): 269, 2020 Oct 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873971

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread to almost 100 countries, infected over 31 M patients and resulted in 961 K deaths worldwide as of 21st September 2020. The major clinical feature of severe COVID-19 requiring ventilation is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with multi-functional failure as a result of a cytokine storm with increased serum levels of cytokines. The pathogenesis of the respiratory failure in COVID-19 is yet unknown, but diffuse alveolar damage with interstitial thickening leading to compromised gas exchange is a plausible mechanism. Hypoxia is seen in the COVID-19 patients, however, patients present with a distinct phenotype. Intracellular levels of nitric oxide (NO) play an important role in the vasodilation of small vessels. To elucidate the intracellular levels of NO inside of RBCs in COVID-19 patients compared with that of healthy control subjects. METHODS: We recruited 14 COVID-19 infected cases who had pulmonary involvement of their disease, 4 non-COVID-19 healthy controls (without pulmonary involvement and were not hypoxic) and 2 hypoxic non-COVID-19 patients subjects who presented at the Masih Daneshvari Hospital of Tehran, Iran between March-May 2020. Whole blood samples were harvested from patients and intracellular NO levels in 1 × 106 red blood cells (RBC) was measured by DAF staining using flow cytometry (FACS Calibour, BD, CA, USA). RESULTS: The Mean florescent of intensity for NO was significantly enhanced in COVID-19 patients compared with healthy control subjects (P ≤ 0.05). As a further control for whether hypoxia induced this higher intracellular NO, we evaluated the levels of NO inside RBC of hypoxic patients. No significant differences in NO levels were seen between the hypoxic and non-hypoxic control group. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrates increased levels of intracellular NO in RBCs from COVID-19 patients. Future multi-centre studies should examine whether this is seen in a larger number of COVID-19 patients and whether NO therapy may be of use in these severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Carbon Dioxide/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Oxygen/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus , Blood Gas Analysis , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Partial Pressure , Pilot Projects , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/blood , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Vasodilation , Young Adult
14.
Sci Adv ; 6(33): eabb7238, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733188

ABSTRACT

Cigarette smoking, the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has been implicated as a risk factor for severe disease in patients infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here we show that mice with lung epithelial cell-specific loss of function of Miz1, which we identified as a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling, spontaneously develop progressive age-related changes resembling COPD. Furthermore, loss of Miz1 up-regulates the expression of Ace2, the receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Concomitant partial loss of NF-κB/RelA prevented the development of COPD-like phenotype in Miz1-deficient mice. Miz1 protein levels are reduced in the lungs from patients with COPD, and in the lungs of mice exposed to chronic cigarette smoke. Our data suggest that Miz1 down-regulation-induced sustained activation of NF-κB-dependent inflammation in the lung epithelium is sufficient to induce progressive lung and airway destruction that recapitulates features of COPD, with implications for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phenotype , Protein Inhibitors of Activated STAT/genetics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/genetics , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Up-Regulation/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Gene Knockout Techniques , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Inhibitors of Activated STAT/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/genetics , Smoking/adverse effects , Transcription Factor RelA/metabolism , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism
15.
Cells ; 9(9)2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-727401

ABSTRACT

The preservation of cellular homeostasis requires the synthesis of new proteins (proteostasis) and organelles, and the effective removal of misfolded or impaired proteins and cellular debris. This cellular homeostasis involves two key proteostasis mechanisms, the ubiquitin proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway. These catabolic pathways have been known to be involved in respiratory exacerbations and the pathogenesis of various lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Briefly, proteostasis and autophagy processes are known to decline over time with age, cigarette or biomass smoke exposure, and/or influenced by underlying genetic factors, resulting in the accumulation of misfolded proteins and cellular debris, elevating apoptosis and cellular senescence, and initiating the pathogenesis of acute or chronic lung disease. Moreover, autophagic dysfunction results in an impaired microbial clearance, post-bacterial and/or viral infection(s) which contribute to the initiation of acute and recurrent respiratory exacerbations as well as the progression of chronic obstructive and restrictive lung diseases. In addition, the autophagic dysfunction-mediated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) immune response impairment further exacerbates the lung disease. Recent studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of novel autophagy augmentation strategies, in alleviating the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive or restrictive lung diseases and exacerbations such as those commonly seen in COPD, CF, ALI/ARDS and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Autophagy/immunology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Disease Progression , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cystic Fibrosis/immunology , Cystic Fibrosis/metabolism , Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator/metabolism , Homeostasis , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Lysosomes/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL