Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 687397, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477818

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like hyperinflammation and endothelial dysfunction, that can lead to respiratory and multi organ failure and death. Interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and pulmonary fibrosis confer an increased risk for severe disease, while a subset of COVID-19-related ARDS surviving patients will develop a fibroproliferative response that can persist post hospitalization. Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D, largely responsible for the extracellular production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a pleiotropic signaling lysophospholipid with multiple effects in pulmonary and immune cells. In this review, we discuss the similarities of COVID-19, ARDS and ILDs, and suggest ATX as a possible pathologic link and a potential common therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lysophospholipids/metabolism , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/immunology
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19979, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462032

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic led to a worldwide increase of hospitalizations for interstitial pneumonia with thrombosis complications, endothelial injury and multiorgan disease. Common CT findings include lung bilateral infiltrates, bilateral ground-glass opacities and/or consolidation whilst no current laboratory parameter consents rapidly evaluation of COVID-19 risk and disease severity. In the present work we investigated the association of sFLT-1 and CA 15.3 with endothelial damage and pulmonary fibrosis. Serum sFlt-1 has been associated with endothelial injury and sepsis severity, CA 15.3 seems an alternative marker for KL-6 for fibrotic lung diseases and pulmonary interstitial damage. We analysed 262 SARS-CoV-2 patients with differing levels of clinical severity; we found an association of serum sFlt-1 (ROC AUC 0.902, decision threshold > 90.3 pg/mL, p < 0.001 Sens. 83.9% and Spec. 86.7%) with presence, extent and severity of the disease. Moreover, CA 15.3 appeared significantly increased in COVID-19 severe lung fibrosis (ICU vs NON-ICU patients 42.6 ± 3.3 vs 25.7 ± 1.5 U/mL, p < 0.0001) and was associated with lung damage severity grade (ROC AUC 0.958, decision threshold > 24.8 U/mL, p < 0.0001, Sens. 88.4% and Spec. 91.8%). In conclusion, serum levels of sFlt-1 and CA 15.3 appeared useful tools for categorizing COVID-19 clinical stage and may represent a valid aid for clinicians to better personalise treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Mucin-1/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/blood , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
3.
Cytokine ; 148: 155618, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory disease; approximately 5% of patients developing severe COVID-19. It is known that cytokine release is associated with disease severity, but the relationship between the different clinical phenotypes and inflammatory endotypes is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association between inflammatory biomarker-based endotypes and severe COVID-19 phenotypes. METHODS: Interleukin (IL) -6, C-reactive protein (CRP), C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL) 9, IL-18, C-C motif chemokine (CCL) 3, CCL17, IL-10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in 57 COVID-19 patients, and their association with clinical characteristics was examined using a cluster analysis. RESULTS: Significantly higher blood levels of the eight inflammatory markers were noted in patients who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) than in those who did not develop ARDS (non-ARDS). Using a cluster analysis, the patient groups were classified into four clusters, of which two had patients with high IL-6 and CRP levels. In the cluster with high levels of Type 1 (T1) inflammatory markers such as CXCL9 and IL-18, 85% of the patients had ARDS, 65% of the patients developed acute kidney injury (AKI), and 78% of the patients developed pulmonary fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: In the cluster with high levels of T1 inflammatory markers, the patients frequently suffered from tissue damage, manifested as ARDS and AKI. Our findings identified distinct T1 inflammatory endotypes of COVID-19 and suggest the importance of controlling inflammation by monitoring T1 biomarkers and treating accordingly to limit the severity of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Inflammation/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/physiopathology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cluster Analysis , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/complications , Lung Compliance , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
4.
Cell Transplant ; 30: 963689721996217, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181030

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has spread worldwide, including the United States, United Kingdom, and Italy, along with its site of origin in China, since 2020. The virus was first found in the Wuhan seafood market at the end of 2019, with a controversial source. The clinical symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, and respiratory tract inflammation, with some severe patients developing an acute and chronic lung injury, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis (PF). It has already claimed approximately 300 thousand human lives and the number is still on the rise; the only way to prevent the infection is to be safe till vaccines and reliable treatments develop. In previous studies, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in clinical trials had been proven to be effective in immune modulation and tissue repair promotion; however, their efficacy in treating COVID-19 remains underestimated. Here, we report the findings from past experiences of SARS and MSCs, and how SARS could also induce PF. Such studies may help to understand the rationale for the recent cell-based therapies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/therapy , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy , Transforming Growth Factor beta/blood
5.
Clin Chim Acta ; 517: 48-53, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101132

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is still spreading worldwide, which may progress to pulmonary fibrosis (PF), leading to the worsen outcome. As the markers of lung injury, the correlation of Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) and fibronectin (Fn) with pulmonary fibrosis in COVID-19 was still unclear. METHODS: 113 patients diagnosed as COVID-19 were enrolled in this retrospective study, and divided into three categories as mild, moderate and severe cases. The concentrations of serum KL-6 and Fn at hospital admission were tested using the method of latex agglutination assay and immunoturbidimetic assay, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with that in the non-severe COVID-19 cases and normal control subjects, serum KL-6 concentration on admission was significantly higher in the severe group, which was positively correlated with C-reactive protein, and negatively correlated with lymphocytes count. Whereas, no obvious elevation in serum Fn concentration was investigated in COVID-19 patients with the different phenotypes. The severe cases displayed the higher incident rate of pulmonary fibrosis at hospital discharge. Compared with non-PF patients, the COVID-19 cases with PF had the higher serum KL-6 values. CONCLUSION: Serum KL-6 concentration was significantly elevated in severe COVID-19 patients, which may be useful for evaluating the disease severity. For early prevention of the development of pulmonary fibrosis, high concentrations of serum KL-6 in the early stage of COVID-19 should be paid close attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibronectins/blood , Mucin-1/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
6.
Front Immunol ; 11: 585647, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-874483

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm resulting from SARS-CoV-2 infection is one of the leading causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and lung fibrosis. We investigated the effect of inflammatory molecules to identify any marker that is related to lung fibrosis in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Seventy-six COVID-19 patients who were admitted to Youan Hospital between January 21 and March 20, 2020 and recovered were recruited for this study. Pulmonary fibrosis, represented as fibrotic volume on chest CT images, was computed by an artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted program. Plasma samples were collected from the participants shortly after admission, to measure the basal inflammatory molecules levels. At discharge, fibrosis was present in 46 (60.5%) patients whose plasma interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels were twofold lower than those without fibrosis (p > 0.05). The multivariate-adjusted logistic regression analysis demonstrated the inverse association risk of having lung fibrosis and basal circulating IFN-γ levels with an estimate of 0.43 (p = 0.02). Per the 1-SD increase of basal IFN-γ level in circulation, the fibrosis volume decreased by 0.070% (p = 0.04) at the discharge of participants. The basal circulating IFN-γ levels were comparable with c-reactive protein in the discrimination of the occurrence of lung fibrosis among COVID-19 patients at discharge, unlike circulating IL-6 levels. In conclusion, these data indicate that decreased circulating IFN-γ is a risk factor of lung fibrosis in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Interferon-gamma/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Aged , Artificial Intelligence , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Risk Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL