Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 47
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(47): e27980, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604285

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Pulmonary fibrosis is an infamous sequela of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia leading to long-lasting respiratory problems and activity limitations. Pulmonary rehabilitation is beneficial to improve the symptoms of lung fibrosis. We experienced a post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis patient who received a structured exercise-based pulmonary rehabilitation program. PATIENT CONCERNS: This article presents a case of successful pulmonary rehabilitation of a patient with post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis. The patient could not cut off the oxygen supplement even after a successful recovery from COVID-19. DIAGNOSIS: Diagnosis of COVID-19 was based on the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Pulmonary fibrosis was diagnosed by patient's complaint, clinical appearance, and computed tomography (CT) on chest. INTERVENTION: The patient underwent ten sessions of exercise-based rehabilitation program according to Consensus Document on Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Korea, 2015. OUTCOME: On the 8th day, he could cut off the oxygen supplementation and complete the one-hour exercise without oxygen. He was discharged after completing the 10-session program without any activity limitations. LESSONS: Exercise-based pulmonary rehabilitation will help the post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis patients. This case suggested the importance of pulmonary rehabilitation program to the post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/rehabilitation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
2.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 169, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566818

ABSTRACT

Twenty months into the COVID-19 pandemic, we are still learning about the various long-term consequences of COVID-19 infection. While many patients do recover with minimal long-term consequences, some patients develop irreversible parenchymal and interstitial lung damage leading to diffuse pulmonary fibrosis. Unfortunately, these are some of the consequences of post-SARS-CoV-2 infection which thousands more people around the world will experience and which will outlast the pandemic for a long time to come. It is now being observed at various leading medical centres around the world that lung transplantation may be the only meaningful treatment available to a select group of patients experiencing serious lung damage and non-resolving COVID-19-associated respiratory failure, resulting from the triad of coronavirus infection, a hyper-inflammatory immune response to it and the inability of the human body to repair that injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Transplantation , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Humans , Incidence , Lung/pathology , Pandemics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/epidemiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 487-497, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung transplantation is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease; however, it is infrequently considered for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributable to infectious causes. We aimed to describe the course of disease and early post-transplantation outcomes in critically ill patients with COVID-19 who failed to show lung recovery despite optimal medical management and were deemed to be at imminent risk of dying due to pulmonary complications. METHODS: We established a multi-institutional case series that included the first consecutive transplants for severe COVID-19-associated ARDS known to us in the USA, Italy, Austria, and India. De-identified data from participating centres-including information relating to patient demographics and pre-COVID-19 characteristics, pretransplantation disease course, perioperative challenges, pathology of explanted lungs, and post-transplantation outcomes-were collected by Northwestern University (Chicago, IL, USA) and analysed. FINDINGS: Between May 1 and Sept 30, 2020, 12 patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS underwent bilateral lung transplantation at six high-volume transplant centres in the USA (eight recipients at three centres), Italy (two recipients at one centre), Austria (one recipient), and India (one recipient). The median age of recipients was 48 years (IQR 41-51); three of the 12 patients were female. Chest imaging before transplantation showed severe lung damage that did not improve despite prolonged mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The lung transplant procedure was technically challenging, with severe pleural adhesions, hilar lymphadenopathy, and increased intraoperative transfusion requirements. Pathology of the explanted lungs showed extensive, ongoing acute lung injury with features of lung fibrosis. There was no recurrence of SARS-CoV-2 in the allografts. All patients with COVID-19 could be weaned off extracorporeal support and showed short-term survival similar to that of transplant recipients without COVID-19. INTERPRETATION: The findings from our report show that lung transplantation is the only option for survival in some patients with severe, unresolving COVID-19-associated ARDS, and that the procedure can be done successfully, with good early post-transplantation outcomes, in carefully selected patients. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. VIDEO ABSTRACT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness/therapy , Lung Transplantation/methods , Lung , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Blood Transfusion/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/surgery , Critical Care/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Humans , Intraoperative Care/methods , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/surgery , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
4.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 193: 114812, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474355

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is characterised by several grades of chronic inflammation and collagen deposition in the interalveolar space and is a hallmark of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Recently, infectious agents have emerged as driving causes for PF development; however, the role of viral/bacterial infections in the initiation and propagation of PF is still debated. In this context, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has been associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and PF development. Although the infection by SARS-CoV-2 can be eradicated in most cases, the development of fibrotic lesions cannot be precluded; furthermore, whether these lesions are stable or progressive fibrotic events is still unknown. Herein, an overview of the main molecular mechanisms driving the fibrotic process together with the currently approved and newly proposed therapeutic solutions was given. Then, the most recent data that emerged from post-COVID-19 patients was discussed, in order to compare PF and COVID-19-dependent PF, highlighting shared and specific mechanisms. A better understanding of PF aetiology is certainly needed, also to develop effective therapeutic strategies and COVID-19 pathology is offering one more chance to do it. Overall, the work reported here could help to define new approaches for therapeutic intervention in the diversity of the ILD spectrum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology
6.
Respir Med ; 188: 106602, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401830

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Survivors of COVID-19 infection may develop post-covid pulmonary fibrosis (PCF) and suffer from long term multi-system complications. The magnitude and risk factors associated with these are unknown. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the prevalence and risk factors associated with PCF and other complications in patients discharged after COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Patients had phone assessment 6 weeks post hospital discharge after COVID-19 infection using a set protocol. Those with significant respiratory symptoms were investigated with a CTPA, Pulmonary Function Tests and echocardiogram. Prevalence of myalgia, fatigue, psychological symptoms and PCF was obtained. Risk factors associated with these were investigated. RESULTS: A large number of patients had persistent fatigue (45.1%), breathlessness (36.5%), myalgia (20.5%) and psychological symptoms (19.5%). PCF was seen in 9.5% of the patients and was associated with persistent breathlessness at 6 weeks and inpatient ventilation [adjusted OR 5.02(1.76-14.27) and 4.45(1.27-15.58)] respectively. It was more common in men and in patients with peak CRP >171.5 mg/L, peak WBC count ≥12 × 10 9/L, severe inpatient COVID-19 CXR changes and CT changes. Ventilation was also a risk factor for persisting fatigue and myalgia, the latter was also more common in those with severe cytokine storm and severe COVID-19 inpatient CXR changes. CONCLUSIONS: All the patients discharged after COVID-19 should be assessed using a set protocol by a multidisciplinary team. Patients who had severe COVID-19 infection particularly those who were intubated and who have persistent breathlessness are at risk of developing PCF. They should have a CT Chest and have respiratory follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lung/physiopathology , Pandemics , Patient Discharge/trends , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Fibrosis/physiopathology , Respiratory Function Tests , Risk Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
Eur J Clin Pharmacol ; 76(11): 1615-1618, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384377

ABSTRACT

AIM: SARS-CoV-2 infection has been divided by scientific opinion into three phases: the first as asymptomatic or slightly symptomatic and the second and the third with greater severity, characterized by a hyperinflammatory and fibrotic state, responsible for lung lesions, in some cases fatal. The development of antiviral drugs directed against SARS-CoV-2 and effective vaccines is progressing; meanwhile, the best pharmacological objective is related to the management of all the complications caused by this viral infection, mainly controlling the inflammatory and fibrotic state and preventing the infection from moving into the most serious phases. SUBJECT AND METHOD: Describe the scientific rationale related to the use of an antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone, as monotherapy and/or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs to manage and control complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Based on the scientific literature and epidemiological results and considering the pathophysiological, biological, and molecular characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, an antifibrotic drug such as pirfenidone as monotherapy or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs can be (acting early, at the right doses and at the right time) therapeutically effective to avoid serious complications during viral infection. The same approach can also be effective as postinfection therapy in patients with residual pulmonary fibrotic damage. Management of inflammation and fibrotic status with a combination therapy of pirfenidone and IL-6 or IL-1 inhibitors could represent a pharmacological synergy with added value. CONCLUSION: In this article, we consider the role of antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection on going or in the stage of postinfection with pulmonary fibrotic consequences. The scientific rationale for its use is also described.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
JCI Insight ; 6(14)2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDIndividuals recovering from COVID-19 frequently experience persistent respiratory ailments, which are key elements of postacute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC); however, little is known about the underlying biological factors that may direct lung recovery and the extent to which these are affected by COVID-19 severity.METHODSWe performed a prospective cohort study of individuals with persistent symptoms after acute COVID-19, collecting clinical data, pulmonary function tests, and plasma samples used for multiplex profiling of inflammatory, metabolic, angiogenic, and fibrotic factors.RESULTSSixty-one participants were enrolled across 2 academic medical centers at a median of 9 weeks (interquartile range, 6-10 weeks) after COVID-19 illness: n = 13 participants (21%) had mild COVID-19 and were not hospitalized, n = 30 participants (49%) were hospitalized but were considered noncritical, and n = 18 participants (30%) were hospitalized and in the intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-three participants (85%) had lingering symptoms, most commonly dyspnea (69%) and cough (58%). Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) declined as COVID-19 severity increased (P < 0.05) but these values did not correlate with respiratory symptoms. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis of plasma biomarker profiles clustered participants by past COVID-19 severity. Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), MMP-7, and HGF identified by our analysis were significantly higher in the ICU group (P < 0.05), inversely correlated with FVC and DLCO (P < 0.05), and were confirmed in a separate validation cohort (n = 53).CONCLUSIONSubjective respiratory symptoms are common after acute COVID-19 illness but do not correlate with COVID-19 severity or pulmonary function. Host response profiles reflecting neutrophil activation (LCN2), fibrosis signaling (MMP-7), and alveolar repair (HGF) track with lung impairment and may be novel therapeutic or prognostic targets.FundingNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (K08HL130557 and R01HL142818), American Heart Association (Transformational Project Award), the DeLuca Foundation Award, a donation from Jack Levin to the Benign Hematology Program at Yale University, and Duke University.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hepatocyte Growth Factor/analysis , Lipocalin-2/analysis , Matrix Metalloproteinase 7/analysis , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Respiratory Function Tests , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Prognosis , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Recovery of Function/immunology , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Respiratory Function Tests/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Respir Med ; 186: 106531, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300990

ABSTRACT

The covid-19 pandemic has been affecting many countries across the world and lost precious lives. Most patients suffer from respiratory disease which progresses to the severe acute respiratory syndrome, termed as SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. A systemic inflammatory response occurs in SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia severely ill patients, The inflammation process if uncontrolled has a detrimental effect, and the release of cytokines play an important role leading to lung fibrosis. Radiation therapy used in low doses has an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effect. Its low cost, wider availability, and decreased risk of acute side effects can reduce the burden on the health care system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/radiotherapy , Radiotherapy/methods , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/radiotherapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Progression , Humans , Inflammation , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Macrophages , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/radiotherapy , Radiotherapy Dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/etiology , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 663303, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291384

ABSTRACT

The release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), a process termed NETosis, avoids pathogen spread but may cause tissue injury. NETs have been found in severe COVID-19 patients, but their role in disease development is still unknown. The aim of this study is to assess the capacity of NETs to drive epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lung epithelial cells and to analyze the involvement of NETs in COVID-19. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of severe COVID-19 patients showed high concentration of NETs that correlates with neutrophils count; moreover, the analysis of lung tissues of COVID-19 deceased patients showed a subset of alveolar reactive pneumocytes with a co-expression of epithelial marker and a mesenchymal marker, confirming the induction of EMT mechanism after severe SARS-CoV2 infection. By airway in vitro models, cultivating A549 or 16HBE at air-liquid interface, adding alveolar macrophages (AM), neutrophils and SARS-CoV2, we demonstrated that to trigger a complete EMT expression pattern are necessary the induction of NETosis by SARS-CoV2 and the secretion of AM factors (TGF-ß, IL8 and IL1ß). All our results highlight the possible mechanism that can induce lung fibrosis after SARS-CoV2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Adult , Biopsy , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism
12.
Arch Pharm Res ; 44(5): 499-513, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245757

ABSTRACT

In 2019, an unprecedented disease named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged and spread across the globe. Although the rapid transmission of COVID-19 has resulted in thousands of deaths and severe lung damage, conclusive treatment is not available. However, three COVID-19 vaccines have been authorized, and two more will be approved soon, according to a World Health Organization report on December 12, 2020. Many COVID-19 patients show symptoms of acute lung injury that eventually leads to pulmonary fibrosis. Our aim in this article is to present the relationship between pulmonary fibrosis and COVID-19, with a focus on angiotensin converting enzyme-2. We also evaluate the radiological imaging methods computed tomography (CT) and chest X-ray (CXR) for visualization of patient lung condition. Moreover, we review possible therapeutics for COVID-19 using four categories: treatments related and unrelated to lung disease and treatments that have and have not entered clinical trials. Although many treatments have started clinical trials, they have some drawbacks, such as short-term and small-group testing, that need to be addressed as soon as possible.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Development , Drug Repositioning , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Radiography, Thoracic , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Am J Emerg Med ; 49: 440.e5-440.e6, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213003

ABSTRACT

Spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) is characterized by the escape of broncho-alveolar air into presence of air in the pleural space without preceding blunt or penetrating trauma. SP requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. SP is divided into two groups as primary and secondary. Primary SP is usually seen in tall and thin patients with no clinically evident underlying lung disease (especially in tall and thin subjects), whereas secondary SP cases have an underlying lung disease, such as cystic lung disease, cavitary lung lesions, severe asthma, emphysema or pneumonia. Patients with Coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) may experience the SP during the diagnosis and treatment processes, and it is a significant cause of morbidity. However, late-onset SP after recovering from COVID-19 is unusual. Herein we present a case with post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis-like changes and subsequent late onset spontaneous pneumothorax (SP). We also present the patient's radiological findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pneumothorax/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male , Pneumothorax/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
15.
Expert Rev Respir Med ; 15(6): 791-803, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203511

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is still increasing worldwide, and as a result, the number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis secondary to COVID-19 will expand over time. Risk factors, histopathological characterization, pathophysiology, prevalence, and management of post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed these issues.Areas covered:This article reviews the current evidence regarding post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis, with an emphasis on the potential risk factors, histopathology, pathophysiology, functional and tomographic features, and potential therapeutic modalities. A search on the issue was performed in the MEDLINE, Embase, and SciELO databases and the Cochrane library between 1 December 2019, and 25 January 2021. Studies were reviewed and relevant topics were incorporated into this narrative review. Expert opinion: Pulmonary sequelae may occur secondary to COVID-19, which needs to be included as a potential etiology in the current differential diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, serial clinical, tomographic, and functional screening for pulmonary fibrosis is recommended after COVID-19, mainly in patients with pulmonary involvement in the acute phase of the disease. Further studies are necessary to determine the risk factors, markers, pathophysiology, and appropriate management of post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Databases, Factual , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Progression , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
17.
J Med Virol ; 93(3): 1378-1386, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196511

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has rapidly swept the world. So far, more than 30 million people have been infected and nearly one million have died. Although the world is still in the stage of COVID-19 pandemic, the treatment of new cases and critically ill patients is the focus of the current work. However, COVID-19 patients lead to pulmonary fibrosis, such a serious threat to the prognosis of complications were also worthy of our attention. First of all, we proposed the possible mechanism of pulmonary fibrosis caused by SARS-CoV-2, based on the published data of COVID-19 ((i) Direct evidence: pulmonary fibrosis was found in autopsy and pulmonary puncture pathology. (ii) Indirect evidence: increased levels of fibrosis-related cytokines[transforming growth factor [TGF]- ß, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]- α, interleukin [IL]-6, etc] in peripheral blood of severe patients.) What is more, we summarized the role of three fibrosis-related signaling pathways (TGF- ß signal pathway, WNT signal pathway and YAP/TAZ signal pathway) in pulmonary fibrosis. Finally, we suggested the therapeutic value of two drugs (pirfenidone and nintedanib) for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in COVID-19-induced pulmonary fibrosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Indoles/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Patient Discharge , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 636118, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190312

ABSTRACT

Following respiratory viral infections or local immunizations, lung resident-memory T cells (TRM) of the CD8 lineage provide protection against the same pathogen or related pathogens with cross-reactive T cell epitopes. Yet, it is now clear that, if homeostatic controls are lost following viral pneumonia, CD8 TRM cells can mediate pulmonary pathology. We recently showed that the aging process can result in loss of homeostatic controls on CD8 TRM cells in the respiratory tract. This may be germane to treatment modalities in both influenza and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients, particularly, the portion that present with symptoms linked to long-lasting lung dysfunction. Here, we review the developmental cues and functionalities of CD8 TRM cells in viral pneumonia models with a particular focus on their capacity to mediate heterogeneous responses of immunity and pathology depending on immune status.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Immunologic Memory , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Age Factors , Animals , Biomarkers , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Resistance/immunology , Homeostasis , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/pathology
19.
Cell Transplant ; 30: 963689721996217, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181030

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has spread worldwide, including the United States, United Kingdom, and Italy, along with its site of origin in China, since 2020. The virus was first found in the Wuhan seafood market at the end of 2019, with a controversial source. The clinical symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, and respiratory tract inflammation, with some severe patients developing an acute and chronic lung injury, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis (PF). It has already claimed approximately 300 thousand human lives and the number is still on the rise; the only way to prevent the infection is to be safe till vaccines and reliable treatments develop. In previous studies, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in clinical trials had been proven to be effective in immune modulation and tissue repair promotion; however, their efficacy in treating COVID-19 remains underestimated. Here, we report the findings from past experiences of SARS and MSCs, and how SARS could also induce PF. Such studies may help to understand the rationale for the recent cell-based therapies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/therapy , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy , Transforming Growth Factor beta/blood
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...