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1.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(1): 54-58, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636663

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have established indications, according to recent guidelines for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including pulmonary embolism (PE), with a safer profile compared to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) in terms of a lower risk for major bleeding and no need of blood coagulation tests. However, DOACs are not indicated in the treatment of patients with triple-positive antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This limitation is often extended in clinical practice to patients with isolated positivity. The COVID-19 pandemic has sometimes made it difficult to maintain a safe VKA treatment, due to the practical difficulties of performing INR. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated 39 patients with a previous unprovoked VTE/PE, who were no longer eligible for VKA treatment due to the difficulty of performing INR during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown, in Italy. All patients had a positive LAC and refused a long-term anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin. They were shifted to edoxaban. RESULTS: Any recurrence of VTE/PE occurred during the observation period (up to eight months of treatment), while only one minor bleeding event was recorded (Hazard ratio=0.06, 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.11, p=0.094). No arterial events occurred during the observation period. Hemoglobin, platelets, and creatinine were unchanged during the observation period. CONCLUSIONS: Edoxaban treatment may be safe and effective in preventing the recurrence of VTE/PE in patients with isolated LAC positivity, without the occurrence of arterial events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor/drug effects , Pandemics , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Thiazoles/therapeutic use , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pyridines/adverse effects , Quarantine , Thiazoles/adverse effects
2.
Chest ; 161(1): e5-e11, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595933

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 67-year-old obese man (BMI 38.0) with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic atrial fibrillation, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia stage II, stable for 8 years after chemotherapy, and a history of smoking presented to the ED with progressive dyspnea and fever due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. He was admitted to a general ward and treated with dexamethasone (6 mg IV once daily) and oxygen. On day 3 of hospital admission, he became progressively hypoxemic and was admitted to the ICU for invasive mechanical ventilation. Dexamethasone treatment was continued, and a single dose of tocilizumab (800 mg) was administered. On day 9 of ICU admission, voriconazole treatment was initiated after tracheal white plaques at bronchoscopy, suggestive of invasive Aspergillus tracheobronchitis, were noticed. However, his medical situation dramatically deteriorated.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Aged , Amphotericin B/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Atrial Fibrillation/complications , Bronchoscopy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/complications , Male , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Obesity/complications , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Smoking/adverse effects , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Triazoles/therapeutic use , Voriconazole/therapeutic use
3.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e922281, 2020 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a sudden and serious disease with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is a novel target for inflammatory disease, and ibudilast (IBU), a PDE4 inhibitor, inhibits inflammatory response. Our study investigated the effect of IBU on the pathogenesis of neonatal ARDS and the underlying mechanism related to it. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of PDE4, CXCR4, SDF-1, CXCR5, CXCL1, inflammatory cytokines, and proteins related to cell apoptosis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the pathological morphology of lung tissue. Pulmonary edema score was used to assess the degree of lung water accumulation after pulmonary injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-alpha, IL-1ß, IL-6, and MCP-1) in serum. TUNEL assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. RESULTS Increased expression of PDE4 was observed in an LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model, and IBU ameliorated LPS-induced pathological manifestations and pulmonary edema in lung tissue. In addition, IBU attenuated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by inactivating the chemokine axis in the LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model. Finally, IBU significantly reduced LPS-induced cell apoptosis in lung tissue. CONCLUSIONS IBU, a PDE4 inhibitor, protected against ARDS by interfering with pulmonary inflammation and apoptosis. Our findings provide a novel and promising strategy to regulate pulmonary inflammation in ARDS.


Subject(s)
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/drug therapy , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/pathology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(16): 5310-5317, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395678

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected the treatment of cancer patients, with particular regard to the management of both chemotherapy and side effects. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are amongst the most troublesome side effects that impair patients' adherence to treatments and their quality of life (QoL). NEPA (Akynzeo®), is an oral fixed-dose combination of netupitant [a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (NK1RA), 300 mg] and palonosetron [(5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin or 5HT) type3 receptor antagonist (5HT3RA), 0.5 mg] which has been shown to be effective in preventing CINV. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This prospective study started before the outbreak of COVID-19 and was carried out during the pandemic period. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single oral dose NEPA plus 12 mg of dexamethasone (DEX) in patients treated with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab and Folfirinox. The patients were diagnosed with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) or advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). They were divided into two groups: naïve patients and patients previously treated with serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3-RA) and neurokin-1 receptor antagonists (NK1-RA). RESULTS: During the overall phase, the complete response (CR) rate was 96.8% in naïve patients treated with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab, and 94.6% in patients treated with Folfirinox. During the acute and delayed phases, the CR rate was 92.8% and 94.2%, with Folfoxiri and Bevacizumab, as well as 96.2% and 94.6%, with Folfirinox. There was no adequate control of CINV events in patients on antiemetic prophylaxis with 5HT3-RA or NK1-RA associated with cortisone. During the overall phase, the CR rate was 74.6% with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab and 75.8% with Folfirinox. During the acute and delayed phases, the CR rate was 72.5% and 74.8% with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab, as well as 75.2% and 74.6% with Folfirinox. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown the therapeutic benefits of NEPA in the management and prophylaxis of CINV events, both in naive patients and patients previously treated with 5HT3-RA and NK1-RA. In addition, NEPA has been shown to be safe, both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiemetics/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bevacizumab/therapeutic use , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Palonosetron/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Aged , Antiemetics/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Bevacizumab/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Female , Fluorouracil/administration & dosage , Fluorouracil/therapeutic use , Humans , Irinotecan/administration & dosage , Irinotecan/therapeutic use , Leucovorin/administration & dosage , Leucovorin/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/prevention & control , Oxaliplatin/administration & dosage , Oxaliplatin/therapeutic use , Palonosetron/administration & dosage , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Pyridines/administration & dosage , Vomiting/prevention & control
5.
N Engl J Med ; 385(9): 815-825, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor is a small-molecule cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulator regimen shown to be efficacious in patients with at least one Phe508del allele, which indicates that this combination can modulate a single Phe508del allele. In patients whose other CFTR allele contains a gating or residual function mutation that is already effectively treated with previous CFTR modulators (ivacaftor or tezacaftor-ivacaftor), the potential for additional benefit from restoring Phe508del CFTR protein function is unclear. METHODS: We conducted a phase 3, double-blind, randomized, active-controlled trial involving patients 12 years of age or older with cystic fibrosis and Phe508del-gating or Phe508del-residual function genotypes. After a 4-week run-in period with ivacaftor or tezacaftor-ivacaftor, patients were randomly assigned to receive elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor or active control for 8 weeks. The primary end point was the absolute change in the percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) from baseline through week 8 in the elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor group. RESULTS: After the run-in period, 132 patients received elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor and 126 received active control. Elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor resulted in a percentage of predicted FEV1 that was higher by 3.7 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8 to 4.6) relative to baseline and higher by 3.5 percentage points (95% CI, 2.2 to 4.7) relative to active control and a sweat chloride concentration that was lower by 22.3 mmol per liter (95% CI, 20.2 to 24.5) relative to baseline and lower by 23.1 mmol per liter (95% CI, 20.1 to 26.1) relative to active control (P<0.001 for all comparisons). The change from baseline in the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised respiratory domain score (range, 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating better quality of life) with elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor was 10.3 points (95% CI, 8.0 to 12.7) and with active control was 1.6 points (95% CI, -0.8 to 4.1). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the two groups; adverse events led to treatment discontinuation in one patient (elevated aminotransferase level) in the elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor group and in two patients (anxiety or depression and pulmonary exacerbation) in the active control group. CONCLUSIONS: Elexacaftor-tezacaftor-ivacaftor was efficacious and safe in patients with Phe508del-gating or Phe508del-residual function genotypes and conferred additional benefit relative to previous CFTR modulators. (Funded by Vertex Pharmaceuticals; VX18-445-104 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04058353.).


Subject(s)
Aminophenols/therapeutic use , Benzodioxoles/therapeutic use , Chloride Channel Agonists/therapeutic use , Cystic Fibrosis/drug therapy , Indoles/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Quinolines/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aminophenols/adverse effects , Benzodioxoles/adverse effects , Child , Chloride Channel Agonists/adverse effects , Chlorides/analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/genetics , Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator/genetics , Double-Blind Method , Drug Combinations , Female , Genotype , Humans , Indoles/adverse effects , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyridines/adverse effects , Quinolines/adverse effects , Sweat/chemistry
6.
N Engl J Med ; 385(8): 695-706, 2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Atogepant is an oral, small-molecule, calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist that is being investigated for the preventive treatment of migraine. METHODS: In a phase 3, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned adults with 4 to 14 migraine days per month in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to receive a once-daily dose of oral atogepant (10 mg, 30 mg, or 60 mg) or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary end point was the change from baseline in the mean number of migraine days per month across the 12 weeks. Secondary end points included headache days per month, a reduction from baseline of at least 50% in the 3-month average of migraine days per month, quality of life, and scores on the Activity Impairment in Migraine-Diary (AIM-D). RESULTS: A total of 2270 participants were screened, 910 were enrolled, and 873 were included in the efficacy analysis; 214 were assigned to the 10-mg atogepant group, 223 to the 30-mg atogepant group, 222 to the 60-mg atogepant group, and 214 to the placebo group. The mean number of migraine days per month at baseline ranged from 7.5 to 7.9 in the four groups. The changes from baseline across 12 weeks were -3.7 days with 10-mg atogepant, -3.9 days with 30-mg atogepant, -4.2 days with 60-mg atogepant, and -2.5 days with placebo. The mean differences from placebo in the change from baseline were -1.2 days with 10-mg atogepant (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.8 to -0.6), -1.4 days with 30-mg atogepant (95% CI, -1.9 to -0.8), and -1.7 days with 60-mg atogepant (95% CI, -2.3 to -1.2) (P<0.001 for all comparisons with placebo). Results for the secondary end points favored atogepant over placebo with the exceptions of the AIM-D Performance of Daily Activities score and the AIM-D Physical Impairment score for the 10-mg dose. The most common adverse events were constipation (6.9 to 7.7% across atogepant doses) and nausea (4.4 to 6.1% across atogepant doses). Serious adverse events included one case each of asthma and optic neuritis in the 10-mg atogepant group. CONCLUSIONS: Oral atogepant once daily was effective in reducing the number of migraine days and headache days over a period of 12 weeks. Adverse events included constipation and nausea. Longer and larger trials are needed to determine the effect and safety of atogepant for migraine prevention. (Funded by Allergan; ADVANCE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03777059.).


Subject(s)
Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptor Antagonists/administration & dosage , Migraine Disorders/prevention & control , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Pyridines/administration & dosage , Pyrroles/administration & dosage , Spiro Compounds/administration & dosage , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Constipation/chemically induced , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/chemically induced , Piperidines/adverse effects , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/adverse effects , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Pyrroles/adverse effects , Pyrroles/therapeutic use , Spiro Compounds/adverse effects , Spiro Compounds/therapeutic use , Young Adult
7.
Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol ; 14(10): 1289-1294, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360277

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate the clinical performance of edoxaban for the treatment of pulmonary embolism (PE) in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis selecting hospitalized patients with COVID-19 admitted to our Institution from 20 May 2020 to 20 November 2020 with computer tomography (CT) detected PE at admission, treated with edoxaban after initial parenteral therapy. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without ARDS at admission and between those with and without CT confirmed PE resolution. RESULTS: 50 patients were included. Mean follow-up was 42.5 ± 10 days. No baseline differences were found between patients with ARDS (30%) and those without ARDS at admission. Patients with PE resolution (84%) were younger (P = 0.03), had a shorter duration of fondaparinux therapy (9.9 ± 3.8 vs 15.8 ± 7.5 days; P = 0.0015) and length of hospitalization (36 ± 8 vs 46 ± 9 days: P = 0.0023) compared with those without PE resolution. 2 patients experienced major bleedings. At multivariate analysis the time to edoxaban switch was the only predictor of the PE resolution (HR: 0.92; 95% C.I. 0.86 to 0.99). CONCLUSION: Edoxaban was an effective and safe treatment for acute PE in COVID-19 setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pyridines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Thiazoles/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Female , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Proportional Hazards Models , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Retrospective Studies
8.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211010626, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195899

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic had a huge impact on all sectors around the world. In particular, the healthcare system has been subject to an enormous pressure that has surpassed its ability in many instances. Additionally, the pandemic has called for a review of our daily medical practices, including our approach to colorectal cancer management where treatment puts patients at high risk of virus exposure. Given their higher median age, patients are at an increased risk for severe symptoms and complications in cases of infection, especially in the setting of immunosuppression. Therefore, a review of the routine colorectal cancer practices is needed to minimize risk of exposure. Oncologists should weigh risk of exposure versus the patient's oncologic benefits when approaching management. In addition, treatment protocols should be modified to minimize hospital visits and admissions while maintaining the same treatment efficacy. In this review, we will focus on challenges that colorectal cancer patients face during the pandemic, while highlighting the priority in each case. We will also discuss the evidence for potential modifications to existing treatment plans that could reduce infectious exposure without compromising care. Finally, we will discuss the impact of the socio-economic difficulties faced by Lebanese patients due to a poor economy toppled by an unexpected pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Management , Fluorouracil/therapeutic use , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Lebanon/epidemiology , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Neoplasm Staging , Neoplasms/pathology , Organoplatinum Compounds/therapeutic use , Palliative Care/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Telemedicine/methods
9.
Trials ; 22(1): 270, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181120

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of MATIS is to determine the efficacy of ruxolitinib (RUX) or fostamatinib (FOS) compared to standard of care (SOC) with respect to reducing the proportion of hospitalised patients progressing from mild or moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Secondary objectives, at 14 and 28 days, are to: Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce mortality Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for invasive ventilation or ECMO Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for non-invasive ventilation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the proportion of participants suffering significant oxygen desaturation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for renal replacement therapy Determine the efficacy of RUX and FOS to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism Determine the efficacy of RUX and FOS to reduce the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia [graded by a 9-point modified WHO Ordinal Scale* Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce systemic inflammation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to the incidence of renal impairment Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce duration of hospital stay Evaluate the safety of RUX and FOS for treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia. TRIAL DESIGN: A multi-arm, multi-stage (3-arm parallel-group, 2-stage) randomised controlled trial that allocates participants 1:1:1 and tests for superiority in experimental arms versus standard of care. PARTICIPANTS: Patients will be recruited while inpatients during hospitalisation for COVID-19 in multiple centres throughout the UK including Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. INCLUSION: Patients age ≥ 18 years at screening Patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 pneumonia, defined as Grade 3 or 4 severity by the WHO COVID-19 Ordinal Scale Patients meeting criteria: Hospitalization AND SARS-CoV2 infection (clinically suspected or laboratory confirmed) AND Radiological change consistent with COVID-19 disease CRP ≥ 30mg/L at any time point Informed consent from patient or personal or professional representative Agreement to abstain from sexual intercourse or use contraception that is >99% effective for all participants of childbearing potential for 42 days after the last dose of study drug. For male participants, agreement to abstain from sperm donation for 42 days after the last dose of study drug. EXCLUSION: Requiring either invasive or non-invasive ventilation including CPAP or high flow nasal oxygen at any point after hospital admission but before baseline, not related to a pre-existing condition (e.g., obstructive sleep apnoea) Grade ≥ 5 severity on the modified WHO COVID-19 Ordinal Scale, i.e. SpO2 < 90% on ≥ 60% inspired oxygen by facemask at baseline; non-invasive ventilation; or invasive mechanical ventilation In the opinion of the investigator, progression to death is inevitable within the next 24 hours, irrespective of the provision of therapy Known severe allergic reactions to the investigational agents Child-Pugh B or C grade hepatic dysfunction Use of drugs within the preceding 14 days that are known to interact with any study treatment (FOS or RUX), as listed in the Summary of Product Characteristics Pregnant or breastfeeding Any medical condition or concomitant medication that in the opinion of the investigator would compromise subjects' safety or compliance with study procedures. Any medical condition which in the opinion of the principal investigator would compromise the scientific integrity of the study Non-English speakers will be able to join the study. If participants are unable to understand verbal or written information in English, then hospital translation services will be requested at the participating site for the participant where possible. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: RUXOLITINIB (RUX) (14 days): An oral selective and potent inhibitor of Janus Associated Kinases (JAK1 and JAK2) and cell proliferation (Verstovek, 2010). It is approved for the treatment of disease-related splenomegaly or constitutional symptoms in myelofibrosis, polycythaemia vera and graft-versus-host-disease. RUX will be administered orally 10mg bd Day 1-7 and 5mg bd Day 8-14. FOSTAMATINIB (FOS) (14 days): An oral spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of thrombocytopenia in adult participants with chronic immune thrombocytopenia. FOS will be administered orally 150mg bd Day 1-7 and 100mg bd Day 8-14. Please see protocol for recommended dose modifications where required. COMPARATOR (Standard of Care, SOC): experimental arms will be compared to participants receiving standard of care. It is accepted that SOC may change during a rapidly evolving pandemic. Co-enrolment to other trials and rescue therapy, either pre- or post-randomisation, is permitted and will be accounted for in the statistical analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES: Pairwise comparison (RUX vs SOC and FOS vs SOC) of the proportion of participants diagnosed with severe COVID-19 pneumonia within 14 days. Severe COVID-19 pneumonia is defined by a score ≥ 5 on a modified WHO COVID-19 Ordinal Scale, comprising the following indicators of disease severity: Death OR Requirement for invasive ventilation OR Requirement for non-invasive ventilation including CPAP or high flow oxygen OR O2 saturation < 90% on ≥60% inspired oxygen RANDOMISATION: Participants will be allocated to interventions using a central web-based randomisation service that generates random sequences using random permuted blocks (1:1:1), with stratification by age (<65 and ≥65 years) and site. BLINDING (MASKING): No participants or caregivers are blinded to group assignment. Clinical outcomes will be compared blind to group assignment. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): For an early informal dose examination by the Data Monitoring Committee a minimum of 30 participants will be recruited. For Stage 1 of this multi-arm multi-stage study, 171 participants will be randomised, with 57 participants in each arm. If at least one experimental intervention shows promise, then Stage 2 will recruit a further 95 participants per arm. Sample size calculations are given in the protocol. TRIAL STATUS: Recruitment is ongoing and started 2nd October 2020. We anticipate completion of Stage 1 by July 2021 and Stage 2 by April 2022. The current protocol version 2.0 of 11th February 2021 is appended. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT: 2020-001750-22 , 9th July 2020 ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04581954 , 9th October 2020 FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest of expediting dissemination of this material, familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Oxazines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Adult , Aminopyridines , Humans , Morpholines , Nitriles , Pandemics , Pyrimidines , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial , Treatment Outcome , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
10.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(1): 53-58, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066445

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review summarizes recent original publications addressing the topic of risk-adapted adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer (EBC). As neoadjuvant therapy has become a standard for triple negative and HER2+ EBC, it focusses on luminal EBC. RECENT FINDINGS: Gene expression assays have become standard of care in luminal EBC, at least for patients with node negative disease. Two prospective randomized clinical trials, TAILORx (Oncotype DX) and MINDACT (MammaPrint) have presented additional analyses underlining the clinical utility of the tests. In times of COVID-19, immunohistochemically determined ER, PR, and Ki67 and early Ki67 response to endocrine therapy can be used to safely allocate patients for preoperative endocrine therapy and delay surgeries if resources are scarce. In patients with luminal high-risk disease, adding a CDK 4/6 inhibitor (abemaciclib) improves patient outcome already after short-term follow-up. SUMMARY: Determination of recurrence risk will remain important in luminal EBC for optimal therapy decisions. In the future, risk-adapted treatment concepts will include decision making for chemotherapy but also for endocrine-based approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Piperazines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/genetics , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/genetics , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(2): 308-315, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064166

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the leading preventable cause of death in hospitalized patients and data consistently show that acutely ill medical patients remain at increased risk for VTE-related morbidity and mortality in the post-hospital discharge period. Prescribing extended thromboprophylaxis for up to 45 days following an acute hospitalization in key patient subgroups that include more than one-quarter of hospitalized medically-ill patients represents a paradigm shift in the way hospital-based physicians think about VTE prevention. Advances in the field of primary thromboprophylaxis in acutely-ill medical patients using validated VTE and bleeding risk assessment models have established key patient subgroups at high risk of VTE and low risk of bleeding that may benefit from both in-hospital and extended thromboprophylaxis. The direct oral anticoagulants betrixaban and rivaroxaban are now U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved for in-hospital and extended thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients and provide net clinical benefit in these key subgroups. Coronavirus disease-2019 may predispose patients to VTE due to excessive inflammation, platelet activation, endothelial dysfunction, and hemostasis. The optimum preventive strategy for these patients requires further investigation. This article aims to review the latest concepts in predicting and preventing VTE and discuss the new era of extended thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized medically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Duration of Therapy , Hospitalization , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control , Benzamides/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Critical Care , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Humans , Medical Informatics , Patient Discharge , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Risk Assessment , Rivaroxaban/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 234, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065928

ABSTRACT

A new pathogen severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide and become pandemic with thousands new deaths and infected cases globally. To address coronavirus disease (COVID-19), currently no effective drug or vaccine is available. This necessity motivated us to explore potential lead compounds by considering drug repurposing approach targeting main protease (Mpro) enzyme of SARS-CoV-2. This enzyme considered to be an attractive drug target as it contributes significantly in mediating viral replication and transcription. Herein, comprehensive computational investigations were performed to identify potential inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro enzyme. The structure-based pharmacophore modeling was developed based on the co-crystallized structure of the enzyme with its biological active inhibitor. The generated hypotheses were applied for virtual screening based PhaseScore. Docking based virtual screening workflow was used to generate hit compounds using HTVS, SP and XP based Glide GScore. The pharmacological and physicochemical properties of the selected lead compounds were characterized using ADMET. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the binding affinities of the considered lead compounds. Binding energies revealed that compound ABBV-744 binds to the Mpro with strong affinity (ΔGbind -45.43 kcal/mol), and the complex is more stable in comparison with other protein-ligand complexes. Our study classified three best compounds which could be considered as promising inhibitors against main protease SARS-CoV-2 virus.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Pyrroles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Protein Binding , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Pyrroles/therapeutic use
13.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(1): 53-58, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990853

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review summarizes recent original publications addressing the topic of risk-adapted adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer (EBC). As neoadjuvant therapy has become a standard for triple negative and HER2+ EBC, it focusses on luminal EBC. RECENT FINDINGS: Gene expression assays have become standard of care in luminal EBC, at least for patients with node negative disease. Two prospective randomized clinical trials, TAILORx (Oncotype DX) and MINDACT (MammaPrint) have presented additional analyses underlining the clinical utility of the tests. In times of COVID-19, immunohistochemically determined ER, PR, and Ki67 and early Ki67 response to endocrine therapy can be used to safely allocate patients for preoperative endocrine therapy and delay surgeries if resources are scarce. In patients with luminal high-risk disease, adding a CDK 4/6 inhibitor (abemaciclib) improves patient outcome already after short-term follow-up. SUMMARY: Determination of recurrence risk will remain important in luminal EBC for optimal therapy decisions. In the future, risk-adapted treatment concepts will include decision making for chemotherapy but also for endocrine-based approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Piperazines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/genetics , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/genetics , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(12)2020 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971145

ABSTRACT

A 70-year-old man presented with gradually worsening throat discomfort. He had no prior diagnosis of cancer and no travel history of note. Examination revealed a right-sided painless neck lump. He underwent an MRI of the neck, revealing a gadolinium-enhancing tonsillar mass and two brain lesions. Biopsy of the tonsil lesion was in keeping with an epithelial neoplasm, suggesting metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This was confirmed following a staging CT, which revealed a left renal mass and lung metastases. Due to his brain metastases, the patient has been started on the tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib. A brief discussion on the diagnostic evaluation of a tonsil mass as a rare presentation of renal cell cancer follows this report.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/secondary , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Kidney Neoplasms/secondary , Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Palatine Tonsil/pathology , Aged , Anilides/therapeutic use , Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/drug therapy , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Palatine Tonsil/drug effects , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/therapeutic use , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
15.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 23(2): e13501, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949310

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) might increase the risk of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Although several case reports and small series have been reported in the general population, scarce information is available regarding coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated IPA in the setting of solid organ transplantation. We describe a case of a kidney transplant recipient with severe COVID-19 that was subsequently diagnosed with probable IPA on the basis of the repeated isolation of Aspergillus fumigatus in sputum cultures, repeatedly increased serum (1 â†’ 3)-ß-d-glucan levels, and enlarging cavitary nodules in the CT scan. The evolution was favorable after initiation of isavuconazole and nebulized liposomal amphotericin B combination therapy and the withdrawal of immunosuppression.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Kidney Transplantation , Acute Kidney Injury , Administration, Inhalation , Amphotericin B/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Deprescriptions , Female , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Hyperoxaluria, Primary/complications , Hyperoxaluria, Primary/diagnosis , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnostic imaging , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/immunology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/etiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/pathology , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/adverse effects , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Prednisone/adverse effects , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sputum , Tacrolimus/adverse effects , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Triazoles/therapeutic use
18.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2750, 2020 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680538

ABSTRACT

Influenza viruses annually kill 290,000-650,000 people worldwide. Antivirals can reduce death tolls. Baloxavir, the recently approved influenza antiviral, inhibits initiation of viral mRNA synthesis, whereas oseltamivir, an older drug, inhibits release of virus progeny. Baloxavir blocks virus replication more rapidly and completely than oseltamivir, reducing the duration of infectiousness. Hence, early baloxavir treatment may indirectly prevent transmission. Here, we estimate impacts of ramping up and accelerating baloxavir treatment on population-level incidence using a new model that links viral load dynamics from clinical trial data to between-host transmission. We estimate that ~22 million infections and >6,000 deaths would have been averted in the 2017-2018 epidemic season by administering baloxavir to 30% of infected cases within 48 h after symptom onset. Treatment within 24 h would almost double the impact. Consequently, scaling up early baloxavir treatment would substantially reduce influenza morbidity and mortality every year. The development of antivirals against the SARS-CoV2 virus that function like baloxavir might similarly curtail transmission and save lives.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Epidemics , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Oxazines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Thiepins/therapeutic use , Triazines/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Cell Proliferation , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Dibenzothiepins , Humans , Influenza, Human/virology , Morpholines , Oseltamivir/pharmacology , Oseltamivir/therapeutic use , Oxazines/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Public Health , Pyridines/pharmacology , Pyridones , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Thiepins/pharmacology , Triazines/pharmacology , Viral Load , Virus Replication/drug effects
19.
J Clin Neurosci ; 79: 30-32, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665630

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which was first reported in Wuhan, China in December 2019, and is ongoing pandemic. While a majority of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection shows asymptomatic or mild disease, hospitalized patients can develop critical condition, such as pneumonia, sepsis, and respiratory failure. Some cases deteriorate into sever systemic disease and multiorgan failure. Many patients of severe COVID-19 show hypercoagulable state and complicate with venous thromboembolism and atrial thrombosis. We herein reported a case of COVID-19 who developed cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) co-incidence with pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). A 56-year-old Japanese man was presented with fever and malaise and diagnosed with COVID-19. He was treated with ciclesonide and azithromycin, but his respiratory condition deteriorated. Thus, systemic corticosteroids and favipiravir were initiated and these treatments resulted in afebrile state, improving malaise and respiratory failure. However, he suddenly developed severe headache and vomiting with increased concentration of D-dimer. Brain CT and MRI showed typical images of CVT in the left transvers sinus and CT pulmonary angiography showed PE. Administration of unfractionated heparin followed by edoxaban treatment reduced the levels of D-dimer and improved his clinical presentation and thrombosis. Monitoring coagulopathy is important in COVID-19 patients and in case of venous thromboembolism, including cerebral venous system, appropriate anticoagulant therapy should be initiated.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , COVID-19 , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Thrombosis/drug therapy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pyridines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Thiazoles/therapeutic use , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
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