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1.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(6): 1472-1475, 2021 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629955

ABSTRACT

Human lives and nations' economies have been adversely affected worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic. The hyperinflammatory state associated with the disease may be related to mortality. Systemic glucocorticoid is the first-line therapy for cytokine storm. Various immunomodulatory drugs such as tocilizumab and baricitinib have been used in those not responding to glucocorticoid monotherapy. Amid the peak crisis of COVID-19 in India, there was an extreme paucity of medications, oxygen, and hospital beds. We describe three patients with COVID-19 who received low-dose tofacitinib (an oral Janus kinase inhibitor) in addition to moderate-dose glucocorticoid. These patients were treated at their homes, as the hospitals were short of beds. Rapid reduction in hypoxemia along with gradual resolution of other signs of the disease were observed. The results are reassuring regarding the feasibility of managing of severe COVID-19 outside the hospital setting when healthcare resources are overwhelmed by pandemic-related caseload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
2.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 103: 108463, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587490

ABSTRACT

Therapeutics that impair the innate immune responses of the liver during the inflammatory cytokine storm like that occurring in COVID-19 are greatly needed. Much interest is currently directed toward Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors as potential candidates to mitigate this life-threatening complication. Accordingly, this study investigated the influence of the novel JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib (RXB) on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and systemic hyperinflammation in mice to simulate the context occurring in COVID-19 patients. Mice were orally treated with RXB (75 and 150 mg/kg) 2 h prior to the intravenous administration of Con A (20 mg/kg) for a period of 12 h. The results showed that RXB pretreatments were efficient in abrogating Con A-instigated hepatocellular injury (ALT, AST, LDH), necrosis (histopathology), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) and nuclear proliferation due to damage (PCNA). The protective mechanism of RXB were attributed to i) prevention of Con A-enhanced hepatic production and systemic release of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17A, which coincided with decreasing infiltration of immune cells (monocytes, neutrophils), ii) reducing Con A-induced hepatic overexpression of IL-1ß and CD98 alongside NF-κB activation, and iii) lessening Con A-induced consumption of GSH and GSH peroxidase and generation of oxidative stress products (MDA, 4-HNE, NOx) in the liver. In summary, JAK inhibition by RXB led to eminent protection of the liver against Con A-deleterious manifestations primarily via curbing the inflammatory cytokine storm driven by TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17A.


Subject(s)
Concanavalin A/toxicity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/chemically induced , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Nitriles/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Aldehydes/metabolism , Animals , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Inflammation/chemically induced , Liver/drug effects , Liver/metabolism , Male , Malondialdehyde/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nitrates/metabolism , Nitriles/administration & dosage , Nitrites/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Peroxidase/metabolism , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
3.
Pharmacol Res Perspect ; 9(5): e00846, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460269

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced clinical studies to accommodate imposed limitations. In this study, the bioequivalence part could not be conducted as planned. Thus, the aim was to demonstrate bioequivalence, using an adaptive study design, of tadalafil in fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablets of macitentan/tadalafil with single macitentan and tadalafil (Canadian-sourced) tablets and assess the effect of food on FDC tablets in healthy subjects. This Phase 1, single-center, open-label, single-dose, two-part, two-period, randomized, crossover study enrolled 62 subjects. Tadalafil bioequivalence as part of FDC of macitentan/tadalafil (10/40 mg) with single-component tablets of macitentan (10 mg) and tadalafil (40 mg) was determined by pharmacokinetic (PK) assessment under fasted conditions. The effect of food on FDC was evaluated under fed and fasted conditions. Fasted 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for geometric mean ratios (GMRs) were within bioequivalence limits for tadalafil and macitentan. Fed and fasted 90% CIs for area under the curve (AUC) GMR were within bioequivalence limits. However, 90% CIs for maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) GMR for macitentan and tadalafil were outside bioequivalence limits. One FDC-treated subject experienced a serious adverse event of transient ischemic attack (bioequivalence part). To address pandemic-imposed limitations, an adaptive study design was implemented to demonstrate that the FDC tablet was bioequivalent to the free combination of macitentan and tadalafil (Canadian-sourced). No clinically significant differences in PK were determined between fed and fasted conditions; the FDC formulation could be taken irrespective of meals. The FDC formulation under fasted and fed conditions was well tolerated with no clinically relevant differences in safety profiles between the treatment groups. NCT Number: NCT04235270.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fasting/blood , Food-Drug Interactions/physiology , Pyrimidines/blood , Research Design , Sulfonamides/blood , Tadalafil/blood , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Over Studies , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Research Design/trends , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Tadalafil/administration & dosage , Therapeutic Equivalency , Young Adult
4.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(6): 1472-1475, 2021 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450911

ABSTRACT

Human lives and nations' economies have been adversely affected worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic. The hyperinflammatory state associated with the disease may be related to mortality. Systemic glucocorticoid is the first-line therapy for cytokine storm. Various immunomodulatory drugs such as tocilizumab and baricitinib have been used in those not responding to glucocorticoid monotherapy. Amid the peak crisis of COVID-19 in India, there was an extreme paucity of medications, oxygen, and hospital beds. We describe three patients with COVID-19 who received low-dose tofacitinib (an oral Janus kinase inhibitor) in addition to moderate-dose glucocorticoid. These patients were treated at their homes, as the hospitals were short of beds. Rapid reduction in hypoxemia along with gradual resolution of other signs of the disease were observed. The results are reassuring regarding the feasibility of managing of severe COVID-19 outside the hospital setting when healthcare resources are overwhelmed by pandemic-related caseload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389404

ABSTRACT

In the past few years, Bruton's tyrosine Kinase (Btk) has emerged as new target in medicinal chemistry. Since approval of ibrutinib in 2013 for treatment of different hematological cancers (as leukemias and lymphomas), two other irreversible Btk inhibitors have been launched on the market. In the attempt to overcome irreversible Btk inhibitor limitations, reversible compounds have been developed and are currently under evaluation. In recent years, many Btk inhibitors have been patented and reported in the literature. In this review, we summarized the (ir)reversible Btk inhibitors recently developed and studied clinical trials and preclinical investigations for malignancies, chronic inflammation conditions and SARS-CoV-2 infection, covering advances in the field of medicinal chemistry. Furthermore, the nanoformulations studied to increase ibrutinib bioavailability are reported.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Adenine/administration & dosage , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemistry, Pharmaceutical/methods , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
6.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(5): 693-707, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pivotal phase III studies demonstrated that abrocitinib, an oral, once-daily, JAK1-selective inhibitor, is effective treatment for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD) as monotherapy and in combination with topical therapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term safety of abrocitinib 200 mg and 100 mg in an integrated analysis of a phase IIb study, four phase III studies, and one long-term extension study. METHODS: Two cohorts were analyzed: a placebo-controlled cohort from 12- to 16-week studies and an all-abrocitinib cohort including patients who received one or more abrocitinib doses. Adverse events (AEs) of interest and laboratory data are reported. RESULTS: Total exposure in the all-abrocitinib cohort (n = 2856) was 1614 patient-years (PY); exposure was ≥ 24 weeks in 1248 patients and ≥ 48 weeks in 606 (maximum 108 weeks). In the placebo-controlled cohort (n = 1540), dose-related AEs (200 mg, 100 mg, placebo) were nausea (14.6%, 6.1%, 2.0%), headache (7.8%, 5.9%, 3.5%), and acne (4.7%, 1.6%, 0%). Platelet count was reduced transiently in a dose-dependent manner; 2/2718 patients (200-mg group) had confirmed platelet counts of < 50 × 103/mm3 at week 4. Incidence rates (IRs) were 2.33/100PY and 2.65/100 PY for serious infection, 4.34/100PY and 2.04/100PY for herpes zoster, and 11.83/100PY and 8.73/100PY for herpes simplex in the 200-mg and 100-mg groups, respectively. IRs for nonmelanoma skin cancer, other malignancies, and major adverse cardiovascular events were < 0.5/100PY for both doses. Five venous thromboembolism events occurred (IR 0.30/100PY), all in the 200-mg group. There were three deaths due to gastric carcinoma (diagnosed at day 43), sudden death, and COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Abrocitinib, with proper patient and dose selection, has a manageable tolerability and longer-term safety profile appropriate for long-term use in patients with moderate-to-severe AD. TRIAL REGISTRIES: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02780167, NCT03349060, NCT03575871, NCT03720470, NCT03627767, NCT03422822.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Infections/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Acne Vulgaris/chemically induced , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Herpes Simplex/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/chemically induced , Platelet Count , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Risk Factors , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Time Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Muscle Nerve ; 64(4): 487-490, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318732

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION/AIMS: There are currently three medications approved for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), but the use of these medications in combination has not been well described. METHODS: This is a retrospective report of four cases of SMA treated with dual onasemnogene and risdiplam therapy at our institution. RESULTS: Following onasemnogene therapy, all four patients experienced a perceived plateau of therapeutic benefit, at which time daily risdiplam was started. Transient fatigue and weakness was seen in two patients following risdiplam initiation, but this resolved within 1 mo. One patient was hospitalized with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and post-viral pneumonia, weeks following risdiplam initiation. No other adverse effects related to onasemnogene and risdiplam combination therapy were identified and all patients experienced objective and subjective improvement. DISCUSSION: Combination therapy with onasemnogene and risdiplam in patients with SMA appears to be well-tolerated. Further large prospective trials are needed to determine whether dual therapy is more efficacious than monotherapy, and to identify rare adverse events that may occur with the use of combination therapy.


Subject(s)
Azo Compounds/administration & dosage , Biological Products/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/administration & dosage , Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood/diagnosis , Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood/therapy , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Genetic Therapy/methods , Humans , Infant , Male , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood/physiopathology
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3847, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242037

ABSTRACT

Ruxolitinib is the first janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 inhibitor that was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agency for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms. The drug targets the JAK/STAT signalling pathway, which is critical in regulating the gliogenesis process during nervous system development. In the study, we assessed the effect of non-maternal toxic dosages of ruxolitinib (0-30 mg/kg/day between E7.5-E20.5) on the brain of the developing mouse embryos. While the pregnant mice did not show any apparent adverse effects, the Gfap protein marker for glial cells and S100ß mRNA marker for astrocytes were reduced in the postnatal day (P) 1.5 pups' brains. Gfap expression and Gfap+ cells were also suppressed in the differentiating neurospheres culture treated with ruxolitinib. Compared to the control group, adult mice treated with ruxolitinib prenatally showed no changes in motor coordination, locomotor function, and recognition memory. However, increased explorative behaviour within an open field and improved spatial learning and long-term memory retention were observed in the treated group. We demonstrated transplacental effects of ruxolitinib on astrogenesis, suggesting the potential use of ruxolitinib to revert pathological conditions caused by gliogenic-shift in early brain development such as Down and Noonan syndromes.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/drug effects , Learning/drug effects , Maternal Exposure , Memory/drug effects , Neurogenesis/drug effects , Nitriles/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Age Factors , Animals , Astrocytes/metabolism , Behavior, Animal/drug effects , Biomarkers , Female , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Male , Maternal Exposure/adverse effects , Mice , Neurogenesis/genetics , Nitriles/adverse effects , Organ Specificity/drug effects , Pregnancy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects
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