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1.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 9(1): e19727, 2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177912

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: eHealth and mobile health (mHealth) are an evolving trend in the medical field. The acceptance of digital tools is high, and the need is growing. OBJECTIVE: Young adults (18-40 years) confronted with a cancer diagnosis present unique needs and require special care. They often have a strong affinity and are familiar with modern technology. On that account, we implemented a web-based symptom and quality of life (QoL) assessment to address patients' attitudes and willingness to use mHealth tools. The study also aims to evaluate sociodemographic parameters that could influence patients' opinions. METHODS: A total of 380 young patients aged 18-40 treated with radiotherapy between 2002 and 2017 were included in the trial. We assessed QoL via the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Core 30 (EORTC C30) questionnaire and added general questions about mHealth technology. The added questions inquired patients' opinions regarding general aspects, including technical advances in medicine, mobile and app assistance during cancer treatment, data transfer, and app-specific features. The survey was conducted for 12 months. Participation was voluntary and pseudonymized; prior written consent was obtained. RESULTS: We achieved a participation rate of 57.6% (219/380) and a completion rate of 50.2% (110/219). The median age was 33 years (range 18-40). Of all participants, 89.1% (98/110) considered new technologies in medicine as positive; 10.9% (12/110) answered with neutral. Nearly all patients (96.4%, 106/110) stated that they would send further data via a web-based platform. Of all, 96.4% (106/110) considered the provided pseudonymization of their data as safe. We further asked the patients if they would use a mobile app for symptom and QoL assessment similar to the present web-based system: 74.5% (82/110) answered with yes and 25.5% (28/110) said they would not use a mobile app in the future. We tested the willingness to use an app on several sociodemographic parameters, such as age, gender, education, health insurance status, and cancer-related parameters: tumor stage, time since radiation treatment, and treatment intention. None of these parameters correlated with app use in this group of young adults. Patients who were generally positive regarding using an app rated several possible functions of a future app. The 3 most requested features were appointment reminders (89.0%, 73/82), contact overview of all involved clinics and physicians (87%, 71/82), and making an appointment via app (78%, 64/82). CONCLUSIONS: eHealth and mHealth tools should be available as an integrated part of a comprehensive cancer care approach. It provides automated, thorough documentation of health parameters during therapy and follow-up for doctors, medical staff, and tumor patients to optimize treatment. With this study, we could show that young adults are the ideal patient population to use eHealth/mHealth tools. Such tools offer further digital support and improve the patients' need for constant QoL during cancer care.


Subject(s)
Internet , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Quality of Life , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
2.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(7)2021 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167701

ABSTRACT

High stress levels and sleep deprivation may cause several mental or physical health issues, such as depression, impaired memory, decreased motivation, obesity, etc. The COVID-19 pandemic has produced unprecedented changes in our lives, generating significant stress, and worries about health, social isolation, employment, and finances. To this end, nowadays more than ever, it is crucial to deliver solutions that can help people to manage and control their stress, as well as to reduce sleep disturbances, so as to improve their health and overall quality of life. Technology, and in particular Ambient Intelligence Environments, can help towards that direction, when considering that they are able to understand the needs of their users, identify their behavior, learn their preferences, and act and react in their interest. This work presents two systems that have been designed and developed in the context of an Intelligent Home, namely CaLmi and HypnOS, which aim to assist users that struggle with stress and poor sleep quality, respectively. Both of the systems rely on real-time data collected by wearable devices, as well as contextual information retrieved from the ambient facilities of the Intelligent Home, so as to offer appropriate pervasive relaxation programs (CaLmi) or provide personalized insights regarding sleep hygiene (HypnOS) to the residents. This article will describe the design process that was followed, the functionality of both systems, the results of the user studies that were conducted for the evaluation of their end-user applications, and a discussion about future plans.


Subject(s)
Sleep Hygiene , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Relaxation Therapy , Software , Wearable Electronic Devices
3.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(4): 440-447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to abrupt restrictions of life-space mobility. The impact of shelter-in-place orders on older adults' health and well-being is still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between life-space mobility and quality of life (QoL) in older adults with and without frailty during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Multicenter prospective cohort study based on structured telephone interviews. SETTING: Four geriatric outpatient clinics in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 557 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older. MEASUREMENTS: The Life-Space Assessment was used to measure community mobility before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and a previously validated decrease of ≥ 5 points defined restricted life-space mobility. Frailty was assessed through the FRAIL (fatigue, resistance, ambulation, illnesses, and loss of weight) scale. The impact of shelter-in-place orders on QoL was evaluated with the question «How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting your QoL?¼, to which participants could respond «not at all¼, «to some extent¼, or «to a great extent¼. We used ordinal logistic regressions to investigate the relationship between restricted life-space mobility and impact on QoL, adjusting our analyses for demographics, frailty, comorbidities, cognition, functionality, loneliness, depression, and anxiety. We explored whether frailty modified the association between life-space mobility and impact on QoL. RESULTS: Participants were on average 80±8 years old, 65% were women, and 33% were frail. The COVID-19 quarantine led to a restriction of community mobility in 79% of participants and affected the QoL for 77% of participants. We found that restricted life-space mobility was associated with impact on QoL in older adults during the pandemic, although frailty modified the magnitude of the association (P-value for interaction=0.03). Frail participants who experienced restricted life-space mobility had twice the odds of reporting an impact on QoL when compared with non-frail individuals, with respective adjusted odds ratios of 4.20 (95% CI=2.36-7.50) and 2.18 (95% CI=1.33-3.58). CONCLUSION: Older adults experienced substantial decreases in life-space mobility during the COVID-19 pandemic, and this unexpected change impacted their QoL. Providers should be particularly watchful for the consequences of abrupt life-space restrictions on frail individuals.


Subject(s)
/psychology , Frail Elderly/psychology , Frailty/psychology , Geriatric Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/psychology , Brazil , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Independent Living , Interviews as Topic , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(13): e25339, 2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158880

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To the best of our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on recovered COVID-19 patients after weaning from mechanical ventilation. Therefore, this study assessed the efficacy of IMT on recovered COVID-19 patients following mechanical ventilation. METHODS: Forty-two recovered COVID-19 patients (33 men and 9 women) weaned from mechanical ventilation with a mean age of 48.05 ±â€Š8.85 years were enrolled in this pilot control clinical study. Twenty-one patients were equipped to 2-week IMT (IMT group) and 21 matched peers were recruited as a control (control group). Forced vital capacity (FVC%), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), dyspnea severity index (DSI), quality of life (QOL), and six-minute walk test (6-MWT) were assessed initially before starting the study intervention and immediately after intervention. RESULTS: Significant interaction effects were observed in the IMT when compared to control group, FVC% (F = 5.31, P = .041, ηP2 = 0.13), FEV1% (F = 4.91, P = .043, ηP2 = 0.12), DSI (F = 4.56, P = .032, ηP2 = 0.15), QOL (F = 6.14, P = .021, ηP2 = 0.17), and 6-MWT (F = 9.34, P = .028, ηP2 = 0.16). Within-group analysis showed a significant improvement in the IMT group (FVC%, P = .047, FEV1%, P = .039, DSI, P = .001, QOL, P < .001, and 6-MWT, P < .001), whereas the control group displayed nonsignificant changes (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: A 2-week IMT improves pulmonary functions, dyspnea, functional performance, and QOL in recovered intensive care unit (ICU) COVID-19 patients after consecutive weaning from mechanical ventilation. IMT program should be encouraged in the COVID-19 management protocol, specifically with ICU patients.


Subject(s)
Breathing Exercises/methods , Respiratory Muscles/physiopathology , Ventilator Weaning/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154389

ABSTRACT

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has been disrupting the daily lives of people across the world, causing a major concern for psychological well-being in children. This study aimed to examine (1) how life satisfaction and its potential predictors have been affected by the pandemic among school-aged children in Korea, and (2) which factors would predict their life satisfaction during the pandemic. We surveyed 166 fourth-graders in the Seoul metropolitan area to assess their psychological well-being and potentially related variables during the pandemic. The data were compared with those available from two pre-COVID-19 surveys, the 2018 Korean Children and Youth Panel Survey (n = 1236) and the 2019 Korean Children and Youth Well-being Index Survey (n = 334). Higher levels of stress were observed in children during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the level of their life satisfaction remained unchanged when compared with data from the pre-COVID-19 surveys. The pandemic also affected peer relationship quality and susceptibility to smartphone addiction, but not perceived parenting style nor academic engagement. Interestingly, peer relationship quality no longer predicted life satisfaction during the pandemic; perceived parenting styles and parent-child conversation time predicted life satisfaction. The results suggest a central role of parent-child relationship in supporting the psychological well-being of school-aged children during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Quality of Life , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Schools , Seoul
6.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249098, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing homes (NH) for the elderly have been particularly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic mainly due to their hosted vulnerable populations and poor outbreak preparedness. In Belgium, the medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) implemented a support project for NH including training on infection prevention and control (IPC), (re)-organization of care, and psychosocial support for NH staff. As psychosocial and mental health needs of NH residents in times of Covid-19 are poorly understood and addressed, this study aimed to better understand these needs and how staff could respond accordingly. METHODS: A qualitative study adopting thematic content analysis. Eight focus group discussions with direct caring staff and 56 in-depth interviews with residents were conducted in eight purposively and conveniently selected NHs in Brussels, Belgium, June 2020. RESULTS: NH residents experienced losses of freedom, social life, autonomy, and recreational activities that deprived them of their basic psychological needs. This had a massive impact on their mental well-being expressed in feeling depressed, anxious, and frustrated as well as decreased meaning and quality of life. Staff felt unprepared for the challenges posed by the pandemic; lacking guidelines, personal protective equipment and clarity around organization of care. They were confronted with professional and ethical dilemmas, feeling 'trapped' between IPC and the residents' wellbeing. They witnessed the detrimental effects of the measures imposed on their residents. CONCLUSION: This study revealed the insights of residents' and NH staff at the height of the early Covid-19 pandemic. Clearer outbreak plans, including psychosocial support, could have prevented the aggravated mental health conditions of both residents and staff. A holistic approach is needed in NHs in which tailor-made essential restrictive IPC measures are combined with psychosocial support measures to reduce the impact on residents' mental health impact and to enhance their quality of life.


Subject(s)
/pathology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Quality of Life , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes , Personal Autonomy , Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Quarantine
7.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 304, 2021 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease once thought to be a respiratory infection is now recognised as a multi-system disease affecting the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neurological, immune, and hematopoietic systems. An emerging body of evidence suggests the persistence of COVID-19 symptoms of varying patterns among some survivors. This study aimed to describe persistent symptoms in COVID-19 survivors and investigate possible risk factors for these persistent symptoms. METHODS: The study used a retrospective study design. The study population comprised of discharged COVID-19 patients. Demographic information, days since discharge, comorbidities, and persistent COVID-19 like symptoms were assessed in patients attending the COVID-19 outpatient clinic in Lagos State. Statistical analysis was done using STATA 15.0 software (StataCorp Texas) with significance placed at p-value < 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 274 patients were enrolled in the study. A majority were within the age group > 35 to ≤49 years (38.3%), and male (66.1%). More than one-third (40.9%) had persistent COVID-19 symptoms after discharge, and 19.7% had more than three persistent COVID-like symptoms. The most persistent COVID-like symptoms experienced were easy fatigability (12.8%), headaches (12.8%), and chest pain (9.8%). Symptomatic COVID-19 disease with moderate severity compared to mild severity was a predictor of persistent COVID-like symptoms after discharge (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Findings from this study suggests that patients who recovered from COVID-19 disease may still experience COVID-19 like symptoms, particularly fatigue and headaches. Therefore, careful monitoring should be in place after discharge to help mitigate the effects of these symptoms and improve the quality of life of COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
/complications , Survivors , Adult , Chest Pain/virology , Comorbidity , Fatigue/virology , Female , Headache/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , Patient Discharge , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies
8.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249107, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150556

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a major health crisis that has changed the life of millions globally. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the pandemic on mental health and quality of life among the general population in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. A total of 6142 adults from eighteen countries within the MENA region completed an online questionnaire between May and June 2020. Psychological impact was assessed using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and the social and family support impact was assessed with questions from the Perceived Support Scale (PSS). The IES-R mean score was 29.3 (SD = 14.8), corresponding to mild stressful impact with 30.9% reporting severe psychological impact. Most participants (45%-62%) felt horrified, apprehensive, or helpless due to COVID-19. Furthermore, over 40% reported increased stress from work and financial matters. Higher IES-R scores were found among females, participants aged 26-35 years, those with lower educational level, and participants residing in the North Africa region (p<0.005). About 42% reported receiving increased support from family members, 40.5% were paying more attention to their mental health, and over 40% reported spending more time resting since the pandemic started. The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with mild psychological impact while it also encouraged some positive impact on family support and mental health awareness among adults in the MENA region. Clinical interventions targeted towards vulnerable groups such as females and younger adults are needed.


Subject(s)
/pathology , Mental Health , Quality of Life , Adolescent , Adult , Africa, Northern , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Middle East , Social Support , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150244

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 has restricted access to face-to-face delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Evidence suggests that telehealth-PR is non-inferior to outpatient PR. However, it is unknown whether patients who have been referred to face-to-face programmes can feasibly complete an online-PR programme. METHODS: This service evaluation used a mixed-methods approach to investigate a rapid PR service remodelling using the University of Gloucestershire eLearn Moodle platform. Quantitative baseline demographic and PR outcome data were collected from online-PR participants, and semistructured interviews were completed with PR staff and participants. RESULTS: Twenty-five individuals were eligible from a PR waiting list. Thirteen declined participation and 14 completed PR. Significant pre-post online PR improvements were achieved in 1 min sit-to-stand (CI 2.1 to 9 (p=0.004)), Generalised Anxiety Disorder (CI -0.3 to -2.6 (p=0.023)), Primary Health Questionnaire-9 (CI -0.3 to -5.1 (p=0.029)), Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire dyspnoea (CI 0.5 to 1.3 (p=0.001)), fatigue (CI 0.7 to 2 (p=0.0004)), emotion (CI 0.7 to 1.7 (p=0.0002)), mastery (CI 0.4 to 1.3 (p=0.001)). Interviews indicated that patient PR inclusion was made possible with digital support and a PR introduction session improved participant engagement and safety. Incremental progression of exercise was perceived as more successful online compared with face-to-face PR. However, perceptions were that education sessions were less successful. Online-PR required significant staff time resource. DISCUSSION: Online-PR improves patient outcomes and is feasible and acceptable for individuals referred for face-to-face PR in the context of a requirement for social distancing. Face-to-face programmes can be adapted in a rapid fashion with both staff and participants perceiving benefit. Future pragmatic trials are now warranted comparing online-PR including remote assessments to centre-based PR with suitably matched outcomes, and patient and staff perceptions sought regarding barriers and facilitators of online delivery.


Subject(s)
Internet , Physical Therapy Modalities , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/psychology , Asthma/physiopathology , Asthma/psychology , Asthma/rehabilitation , Depression/psychology , Exercise Tolerance , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/physiopathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/psychology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/rehabilitation , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/physiopathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/psychology , Quality of Life , Treatment Outcome
10.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 21(2): 147-149, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148746

ABSTRACT

Social determinants of health are responsible for a large proportion of disease which disproportionately affects deprived population groups, resulting in striking disparities in life expectancy and quality of life. Even systems with universal access to healthcare (such as the UK's NHS) can only mitigate some consequences of health inequalities. Instead substantial societal measures are required both to reduce harmful exposures and to improve standards of housing, education, work, nutrition and exercise. The case for such measures is widely accepted among healthcare professionals but, in wider discourse, scepticism has remained about the role of government and society in improving life chances along with the belief that responsibility for health and wellbeing should rest with individuals themselves. The stark inequalities exposed by the coronavirus pandemic could be an opportunity to challenge this thinking. This paper argues that doctors should do more to persuade others of the need to address health inequalities and that to achieve this, it is important to understand the ethical and philosophical perspectives that are sceptical of such measures. An approach to gaining greater support for interventions to address health inequalities is presented along with reflections on effective political advocacy which is consistent with physicians' professional values.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Health Status Disparities , Social Determinants of Health , /epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Politics , Quality of Life
11.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 103, 2021 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: More than 210,000 medical workers have fought against the outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hubei in China since December 2019. However, the prevalence of mental health problems in frontline medical staff after fighting COVID-19 is still unknown. METHODS: Medical workers in Wuhan and other cities in Hubei Province were invited to participate a cross-sectional and convenience sampling online survey, which assessed the prevalence of anxiety, insomnia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). RESULTS: A total of 1,091 responses (33% male and 67% female) were valid for statistical analysis. The prevalence was anxiety 53%, insomnia 79%, depression 56%, and PTSD 11%. Healthcare workers in Wuhan were more likely to face risks of anxiety (56% vs. 52%, P = 0.03) and PTSD (15% vs. 9%, P = 0.03) than those in other cities of Hubei. In terms of educational attainment, those with doctoral and masters' (D/M) degrees may experience more anxiety (median of 7.0, [interquartile range (IQR) 2.0-8.5] vs. median 5.0 [IQR 5.0-8.0], P = 0.02) and PTSD (median 26.0 [IQR 19.5-33.0] vs. median 23.0 [IQR 19.0-31.0], P = 0.04) than those with lower educational degrees. CONCLUSIONS: The mental problems were an important issue for the healthcare workers after COVID-19. Thus, an early intervention on such mental problems is necessary for healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Prevalence , Psychometrics , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
Bone Joint J ; 103-B(4): 672-680, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146934

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life of patients on the waiting list for a total hip (THA) or knee arthroplasty (KA) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Secondary aims were to assess whether length of time on the waiting list influenced quality of life and rate of deferral of surgery. METHODS: During the study period (August and September 2020) 843 patients (THA n = 394, KA n = 449) from ten centres in the UK reported their EuroQol five dimension (EQ-5D) scores and completed a waiting list questionnaire (2020 group). Patient demographic details, procedure, and date when listed were recorded. Patients scoring less than zero for their EQ-5D score were defined to be in a health state "worse than death" (WTD). Data from a retrospective cohort (January 2014 to September 2017) were used as the control group. RESULTS: The 2020 group had a significantly worse EQ-5D score compared to the control group for both THA (p < 0.001) and KA (p < 0.001). Over one-third (35.0%, n = 138/394) of patients waiting for a THA and nearly a quarter (22.3%, n = 100/449) for KA were in a health state WTD, which was significantly greater than the control group (odds ratio 2.30 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.83 to 2.93) and 2.08 (95% CI 1.61 to 2.70), respectively; p < 0.001). Over 80% (n = 680/843) of the 2020 group felt that their quality of life had deteriorated while waiting. Each additional month spent on the waiting list was independently associated with a decrease in quality of life (EQ-5D: -0.0135, p = 0.004). There were 117 (13.9%) patients who wished to defer their surgery and the main reason for this was health concerns for themselves and or their family (99.1%, n = 116/117). CONCLUSION: Over one-third of patients waiting for THA and nearly one-quarter waiting for a KA were in a state WTD, which was approaching double that observed prior to the pandemic. Increasing length of time on the waiting list was associated with decreasing quality of life. Level of evidence: Level III retrospective case control study Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2021;103-B(4):672-680.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Health Services Accessibility , Health Status Indicators , Quality of Life/psychology , Waiting Lists , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , /prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Medical Audit , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Quality Improvement , Time Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
BMC Geriatr ; 21(1): 199, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146623

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older people are particularly vulnerable to severe COVID-19. Little is known about long-term consequences of COVID-19 on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and functional status in older people, and the impact of age in this context. We aimed to study age-related change in health-related quality of life, functional decline and mortality among older patients 6 months following hospitalisation due to COVID-19. METHODS: This was a cohort study including patients aged 60 years and older admitted to four general hospitals in South-Eastern Norway due to COVID-19, from March 1 up until July 1, 2020. Patients who were still alive were invited to attend a six-month follow-up. Change in HR-QoL and functional status compared to before the COVID-19 hospitalisation were assessed using the EuroQol 5-dimensional-5 levels questionnaire (EQ. 5D-5L). A change in visual analogue scale (VAS) score of 7 or more was considered clinically relevant. RESULTS: Out of 216 patients aged 60 years and older that were admitted to hospital due to COVID-19 during the study period, 171 were still alive 180 days after hospital admission, and 106 patients (62%) attended the six-month follow-up. Mean age was 74.3 years, 27 patients (26%) had experienced severe COVID-19. Fifty-seven participants (54%) reported a decrease in the EQ. 5D-5L VAS score after 6 months, with no significant difference between persons aged 75 years and older compared to younger. Seventy participants (66%) reported a negative change in any of the dimensions of the EQ. 5D-5L, with impaired ability to perform activities of daily life (35%), reduced mobility (33%) and having more pain or discomfort (33%) being the most commonly reported changes. Forty-six participants (43%) reported a negative change in cognitive function compared to before the COVID-19 hospitalisation. Six-month mortality was 21%, and increased with increasing age. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the patients reported a negative change in HR-QoL 6 months following hospitalisation due to COVID-19, and one out of three experienced a persistently impaired mobility and ability to carry out activities of daily living. The results suggest awareness of long-term functional decline in older COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Front Public Health ; 9: 600330, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145594

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a global disaster since WHO declared Covid-19 as a pandemic. With the increase in cases & mortality rate, various health issues viz., stress, mental disorders and altered health-related quality of life have been noted as a result of pandemic and lockdowns. This study aimed to assess the association of COVID-19 pandemic stress with health-related quality of life in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methodology: It was a cross-sectional analytical study. Subjects included 878 citizens and residents of Saudi Arabia aged 18 years and above. Convenience, non-probability sampling technique was used. A web-based, self-administered, electronic questionnaire in Arabic language having three sections; Sociodemographic & clinical profile, Standard PSS-10, and Standard SF-12 was used as the study tool and distributed through various social media means. The study period was of 2 months. Data were analyzed using SPS version 25. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation coefficient, independent sample t-test and the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed for suitable statistical analysis. Results: Almost two-thirds of the subjects were between the age of 18 to < 40 and majority (74.1%) being females. Majority (83.0%) reported as having no chronic diseases, and 69.5% had no contact history with COVID-19 cases. The mean of MCS & PCS was (32.34 ± 25.30) & (41.65 ± 11.82), respectively. Majority (67.6%) had a moderate level of COVID-19 stress. A significant negative relationship between total stress scores and HRQOL domains was observed. Conclusion: Majority subjects had a moderate level of stress related to COVID-19 lockdown. Stress during COVID-19 has a significant negative association with both physical and mental HRQOL in which MCS was significantly lower than PCS. It is recommended to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management program and follow a holistic approach.


Subject(s)
Health Status , Quality of Life/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia , Self Report , Social Media , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(6)2021 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145626

ABSTRACT

The most frequent form of dementia is Alzheimer's Disease (AD), a severe progressive neurological pathology in which the main cognitive functions of an individual are compromised. Recent studies have found that loneliness and living in isolation are likely to cause an acceleration in the cognitive decline associated with AD. Therefore, understanding social behaviours of AD patients is crucial to promote sociability, thus delaying cognitive decline, preserving independence, and providing a good quality of life. In this work, we analyze the localization data of AD patients living in assisted care homes to gather insights about the social dynamics among them. We use localization data collected by a system based on iBeacon technology comprising two components: a network of antennas scattered throughout the facility and a Bluetooth bracelet worn by the patients. We redefine the Relational Index to capture wandering and casual encounters, these being common phenomena among AD patients, and use the notions of Relational and Popularity Indexes to model, visualize and understand the social behaviour of AD patients. We leverage the data analyses to build predictive tools and applications to enhance social activities scheduling and sociability monitoring and promotion, with the ultimate aim of providing patients with a better quality of life. Predictions and visualizations act as a support for caregivers in activity planning to maximize treatment effects and, hence, slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease. We present the Community Behaviour Prediction Table (CBPT), a tool to visualize the estimated values of sociability among patients and popularity of places within a facility. Finally, we show the potential of the system by analyzing the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown time-frame between February and June 2020 in a specific facility. Through the use of the indexes, we evaluate the effects of the pandemic on the behaviour of the residents, observing no particular impact on sociability even though social distancing was put in place.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Patient Identification Systems , Social Behavior , Alzheimer Disease/diagnosis , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Quality of Life
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145614

ABSTRACT

Early in the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) containment strategy, people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were identified as extremely clinically vulnerable and subsequently asked to 'shield' at home where possible. The aim of this study was to investigate how these restrictions and the transition to an increased reliance on telemedicine within clinical care of people living with kidney disease impacted the physical activity (PA), wellbeing and quality of life (QoL) of adults dialysing at home (HHD) or receiving in-centre haemodialysis (ICHD) in the UK. Individual semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with adults receiving HHD (n = 10) or ICHD (n = 10), were transcribed verbatim and, subsequently, thematically analysed. As result of the COVID-19 restrictions, PA, wellbeing and QoL of people with ESRD were found to have been hindered. However, widespread support for the continued use of telemedicine was strongly advocated and promoted independence and satisfaction in patient care. These findings highlight the need for more proactive care of people with ESRD if asked to shield again, as well as increased awareness of safe and appropriate PA resources to help with home-based PA and emotional wellbeing.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Telemedicine , Adult , Exercise , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Quality of Life , United Kingdom
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143505

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic itself and related public health measurements have had substantial impacts on individual social lives and psychological and mental health, all to the detriment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). There have been extensive studies investigating the mental health of people in different populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, few studies have explored the impact of COVID-19 and its association with HRQoL. To fill this research gap and provide further empirical evidence, this study examined the impact of COVID-19 on Hong Kong people and evaluated its association with HRQoL. A total of 500 participants were randomly recruited to complete an online questionnaire on their concerns related to COVID-19. This entailed responding to the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF instrument. Data were collected between 24 April and 3 May 2020. Independent t-tests and multiple linear regressions were used to examine the association between the impact of COVID-19 and HRQoL. Overall, 69.6% of participants were worried about contracting COVID-19, and 41.4% frequently suspected themselves of being infected. Furthermore, 29.0% were concerned by the lack of disinfectants. All of these findings were associated with poorer HRQoL in the physical and psychological health, social relationships, and environment domains. On the other hand, 47.4% of participants were concerned that they may lose their job because of the pandemic, while 39.4% were bothered by the insufficient supply of surgical masks. These two factors were associated with poorer HRQoL in the physical and psychological health and environment domains. The adverse impact of COVID-19 on individuals is multifactorial, affecting all aspects of HRQoL. In addition to enhancing anti-epidemic efforts, it is equally important to implement public health and social welfare measures, thereby diminishing the adverse impact of COVID-19 on overall well-being.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143498

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 can cause important sequels in the respiratory system and frequently presents loss of strength, dyspnea, polyneuropathies and multi-organic affectation. Physiotherapy interventions acquire a fundamental role in the recovery of the functions and the quality of life. Regarding the recovery phases after hospital discharge, the current evidence available is very preliminary. Telerehabilitation is presented as a promising complementary treatment method to standard physiotherapy. The main objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of a personalized telerehabilitation intervention after discharge from hospital for the improvement of functional capacity and quality of life compared to a program of health education and/or care in a rehabilitation center. As secondary objectives, to identify the satisfaction and perception of patients with the telerehabilitation intervention and the presence of barriers to its implementation, as well as to evaluate the cost-effectiveness from the perspective of the health system. This study protocol will be carried out through a single blind multicenter randomized clinical trial in the south of Spain. We hypothesize that the implementation of a telerehabilitation program presents results not inferior to those obtained with the current standard intervention. If the hypothesis is confirmed, it would be an opportunity to define new policies and interventions to address this disease and its consequences. Trial registration NCT04742946.


Subject(s)
Telerehabilitation , Hospitals , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Single-Blind Method , Spain , Treatment Outcome
19.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(4): 313-320, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142742

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with COVID-19 can present functional status and disability alterations in the medium- and long-term. On the international level, a multicentered study is being carried out to validate the Post-COVID-19 Functional Status scale for different nations, thus allowing visualizing the needs for a multidisciplinary approach and planning intervention plans. The objective of this study was to perform a linguistic validation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Post-COVID-19 Functional Status scale for people infected with COVID-19 for the Chilean population. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of scale validation was carried out. The study was performed in two phases: (1) forward-translation, reverse-translation and (2) apparent cross-validity adaptation. For the apparent validity analysis, 29 individuals who had been hospitalized in Hospital del Salvador with a COVID-19 infection diagnosis and at the time of the interview were in their homes participated. RESULTS: In phase 1 forward-translation, an item required semantical changes. The reverse-translation versions were similar, and the most relevant doubts were resolved in a consensus meeting. In phase 2, the pilot study confirmed adequate understanding and scale applicability. CONCLUSIONS: Using a systematic and rigorous methodology allowed obtaining a Spanish version of the Post-COVID-19 Functional Status scale for Chile, which is conceptually and linguistically equivalent to the original instrument and adequate to assess the functional status of people infected with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Adult , Chile , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Psychometrics , Quality of Life/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , Translations
20.
CMAJ Open ; 9(1): E261-E270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emergency physicians lack high-quality evidence for many diagnostic and treatment decisions made for patients with suspected or confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our objective is to describe the methods used to collect and ensure the data quality of a multicentre registry of patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. METHODS: This methodology study describes a population-based registry that has been enrolling consecutive patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 since Mar. 1, 2020. Most data are collected from retrospective chart review. Phone follow-up with patients at 30 days captures the World Health Organization clinical improvement scale and contextual, social and cultural variables. Phone follow-up also captures patient-reported quality of life using the Veterans Rand 12-Item Health Survey at 30 days, 60 days, 6 months and 12 months. Fifty participating emergency departments from 8 provinces in Canada currently enrol patients into the registry. INTERPRETATION: Data from the registry of the Canadian COVID-19 Emergency Department Rapid Response Network will be used to derive and validate clinical decision rules to inform clinical decision-making, describe the natural history of the disease, evaluate COVID-19 diagnostic tests and establish the real-world effectiveness of treatments and vaccines, including in populations that are excluded or underrepresented in clinical trials. This registry has the potential to generate scientific evidence to inform our pandemic response, and to serve as a model for the rapid implementation of population-based data collection protocols for future public health emergencies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov, no. NCT04702945.


Subject(s)
Emergency Medicine , Registries , /diagnosis , Canada , Data Accuracy , Data Collection , Data Management , Emergency Service, Hospital , Evidence-Based Emergency Medicine , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies , Telephone
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