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1.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 10: CD015045, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620089

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The development of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and poor clinical outcomes are associated with hyperinflammation and a complex dysregulation of the immune response. Colchicine is an anti-inflammatory medicine and is thought to improve disease outcomes in COVID-19 through a wide range of anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Patients and healthcare systems need more and better treatment options for COVID-19 and a thorough understanding of the current body of evidence. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of Colchicine as a treatment option for COVID-19 in comparison to an active comparator, placebo, or standard care alone in any setting, and to maintain the currency of the evidence, using a living systematic review approach. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register (comprising CENTRAL, MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and medRxiv), Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded and Emerging Sources Citation Index), and WHO COVID-19 Global literature on coronavirus disease to identify completed and ongoing studies without language restrictions to 21 May 2021. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials evaluating colchicine for the treatment of people with COVID-19, irrespective of disease severity, age, sex, or ethnicity. We excluded studies investigating the prophylactic effects of colchicine for people without severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection but at high risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed standard Cochrane methodology. We used the Cochrane risk of bias tool (ROB 2) to assess bias in included studies and GRADE to rate the certainty of evidence for the following prioritised outcome categories considering people with moderate or severe COVID-19: all-cause mortality, worsening and improvement of clinical status, quality of life, adverse events, and serious adverse events and for people with asymptomatic infection or mild disease: all-cause mortality, admission to hospital or death, symptom resolution, duration to symptom resolution, quality of life, adverse events, serious adverse events. MAIN RESULTS: We included three RCTs with 11,525 hospitalised participants (8002 male) and one RCT with 4488 (2067 male) non-hospitalised participants. Mean age of people treated in hospital was about 64 years, and was 55 years in the study with non-hospitalised participants. Further, we identified 17 ongoing studies and 11 studies completed or terminated, but without published results. Colchicine plus standard care versus standard care (plus/minus placebo) Treatment of hospitalised people with moderate to severe COVID-19 All-cause mortality: colchicine plus standard care probably results in little to no difference in all-cause mortality up to 28 days compared to standard care alone (risk ratio (RR) 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.08; 2 RCTs, 11,445 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Worsening of clinical status: colchicine plus standard care probably results in little to no difference in worsening of clinical status assessed as new need for invasive mechanical ventilation or death compared to standard care alone (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.09; 2 RCTs, 10,916 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Improvement of clinical status: colchicine plus standard care probably results in little to no difference in improvement of clinical status, assessed as number of participants discharged alive up to day 28 without clinical deterioration or death compared to standard care alone (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.01; 1 RCT, 11,340 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Quality of life, including fatigue and neurological status: we identified no studies reporting this outcome. Adverse events: the evidence is very uncertain about the effect of colchicine on adverse events compared to placebo (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.78; 1 RCT, 72 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Serious adverse events: the evidence is very uncertain about the effect of colchicine plus standard care on serious adverse events compared to standard care alone (0 events observed in 1 RCT of 105 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Treatment of non-hospitalised people with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection or mild COVID-19 All-cause mortality: the evidence is uncertain about the effect of colchicine on all-cause mortality at 28 days (Peto odds ratio (OR) 0.57, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.62; 1 RCT, 4488 participants; low-certainty evidence). Admission to hospital or death within 28 days: colchicine probably slightly reduces the need for hospitalisation or death within 28 days compared to placebo (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.03; 1 RCT, 4488 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Symptom resolution: we identified no studies reporting this outcome. Quality of life, including fatigue and neurological status: we identified no studies reporting this outcome. Adverse events: the evidence is uncertain about the effect of colchicine on adverse events compared to placebo . Results are from one RCT reporting treatment-related events only in 4412 participants (low-certainty evidence). Serious adverse events: colchicine probably slightly reduces serious adverse events (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.00; 1 RCT, 4412 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Colchicine versus another active treatment (e.g. corticosteroids, anti-viral drugs, monoclonal antibodies) No studies evaluated this comparison. Different formulations, doses, or schedules of colchicine No studies assessed this. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Based on the current evidence, in people hospitalised with moderate to severe COVID-19 the use of colchicine probably has little to no influence on mortality or clinical progression in comparison to placebo or standard care alone. We do not know whether colchicine increases the risk of (serious) adverse events. We are uncertain about the evidence of the effect of colchicine on all-cause mortality for people with asymptomatic infection or mild disease. However, colchicine probably results in a slight reduction of hospital admissions or deaths within 28 days, and the rate of serious adverse events compared with placebo. None of the studies reported data on quality of life or compared the benefits and harms of colchicine versus other drugs, or different dosages of colchicine. We identified 17 ongoing and 11 completed but not published RCTs, which we expect to incorporate in future versions of this review as their results become available. Editorial note: due to the living approach of this work, we monitor newly published results of RCTs on colchicine on a weekly basis and will update the review when the evidence or our certainty in the evidence changes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colchicine , Cause of Death , Colchicine/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Br J Nurs ; 31(1): S10-S15, 2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622855

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a set of unprecedented challenges for healthcare services and staff. The authors conducted a national online survey of nurses employed to work in HIV services in England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to establish how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on the professional quality of life of HIV nurses. Professional quality of life was assessed using the ProQOL scale; 132 nurses completed the survey, 99 of whom completed the ProQOL scale. Just over 1 in 3 were redeployed in the first pandemic wave, dropping to 1 in 6 in subsequent waves. In multivariate analysis, redeployment in both waves increased burnout scores by nearly 10 points and decreased compassion satisfaction scores by nearly 5 points, with no effect on secondary traumatic stress scores. A supportive workplace environment will have a key role in supporting the path to recovery.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(1): 46-49, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A private university nursing program established the Initiative for Vital Practice in response to increasing levels of compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout among faculty and staff during an undergraduate program revision and accompanying leadership transitions. METHOD: A pilot mixed-method project evaluated self-management practices meant to mitigate CF among faculty and staff. RESULTS: Faculty and staff (N = 34) identified four primary risk factors for CF, including physical symptoms (14 of 34 = 41%); feeling trapped in work (14 of 34 = 41%); lacking time away from work (11 of 34 = 32%); and inability to work hard enough (10 of 34 = 29%). Individual and organizational stressors and alleviators were analyzed; aggregate scores for three Professional Quality of Life scales presented at a "moderate level." CONCLUSION: Preliminary results establish a baseline to measure the effect of burnout and secondary stress and guide further development of our organizational framework and initiative. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(1):46-49.].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Compassion Fatigue , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Leadership , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr ; 73(6): 689-694, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612727

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess how the first phase of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic influenced symptoms in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs) and to characterize their quality of life (QoL), anxiety and global health. METHODS: This was a multicenter, observational, international study conducted between April and July 2020 at six different referral centers. Children diagnosed with FAPDs between October 2019 and February 2020 were enrolled and prospectively interviewed at 4 months of follow-up during the first pandemic phase (Quarantine group). Patients were asked to complete PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scale and PROMIS Anxiety and Global Health questionnaires. A cohort of children diagnosed with FAPDs between October 2018 and February 2019 was used as a Control group. RESULTS: Three-hundred-fifty-six children were enrolled of whom 180 (mean age at diagnosis: 14 ±â€Š2.8 years) in the Quarantine group and 176 (mean age at diagnosis: 13 ±â€Š2.8 years) in the Control group. At 4 months of follow-up, we observed a significant reduction of children reporting >5 episodes of abdominal pain per month when compared to baseline, in both groups (Quarantine group: 63.9% vs 42.2%, P < 0.001; Control group: 83.5% vs 50%, P < 0.001). The Quarantine group had median QoL values of 84.8 with 16.6% of children showing high anxiety values and 55% having decreased global health score. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated symptoms' improvement at 4 months of follow-up in both cohorts. During the first months of the COVID-19 quarantine children with FAPDs showed satisfactory QoL and anxiety scores, suggesting positive effects of school closure and increased parental attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Child , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613757

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the status of community care services regarding traditional Korean medicine (TKM) for older adults and raise awareness on current opinions and services of TKM institutions. METHODS: The National Development Institute of Korean Medicine conducted a survey of 16 local governments by sending official letters through an electronic document system from October 2020 to November 2020. The survey items included basic demographic information and information about TKM service. RESULTS: Eleven (68.8%) of the 16 local governments provided TKM home care services. A total of 136 TKM clinics provided home care services for 598 older adults with musculoskeletal disorders. The number of TKM services provided in five or more local governments were cupping 11 (100.0%), acupuncture 11 (100.0%), education and consulting 10 (90.9%), and moxibustion 9 (81.8%). Moreover, pain (recorded on visual analogue scale) and quality of life significantly improved following TKM services (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Covered under medical policy, TKM homecare services could function as a viable alternative for continued medical care disrupted during the coronavirus disease 19 pandemic. In addition, standardisation and legalisation of these services could ensure and improve their efficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Aged , Humans , Medicine, Korean Traditional , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 18(1)2022 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613390

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Studies on quality of life (QoL) and academic resilience among nursing students during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic remain underreported. This study investigated the relationship between nursing students' QoL and academic resilience and their predictors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A descriptive survey, cross-sectional study that used two self-reported questionnaire scales to evaluate the QoL and academic resilience of Filipino nursing students (n=924). Chi-squared test and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: There was no significant association between the QoL and academic resilience to participants' profile variables. Gender and year level of nursing students were significant predictors of QoL and academic resilience. CONCLUSIONS: Our study concludes that a better understanding of the QoL and academic resilience, which are two distinct concepts critical in developing a student's mental well-being, will help stakeholders in nursing education establish effective psychoeducation programs for nursing students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Trials ; 23(1): 19, 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613249

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to affect the globe. After 18 months of the SARS-CoV-2 emergence, clinicians have clearly defined a subgroup of patients with lasting, disabling symptoms. While big strides have been made in understanding the acute phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the pathophysiology of long COVID is still largely unknown, and evidence-based, effective treatments for this condition remain unavailable. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of 10 mg oral montelukast every 24 h versus placebo in improving quality of life associated with mild to moderate respiratory symptoms in patients with long COVID as measured with the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) questionnaire. The secondary objectives will evaluate the effect of montelukast versus placebo on improving exercise capacity, COVID-19 symptoms (asthenia, headache, mental confusion or brain fog, ageusia, and anosmia), oxygen desaturation during exertion, functional status, and mortality. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Phase III, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. We will include 18- to 80-year-old patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and mild to moderate respiratory symptoms lasting more than 4 weeks. Participants will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (experimental treatment with 10 mg/day montelukast) or the control group (placebo group), during a 28-day treatment. Follow-up will finish 56 days after the start of treatment. The primary outcome will be health-related quality of life associated with respiratory symptoms according to the COPD Assessment Test 4 weeks after starting the treatment. The following are the secondary outcomes: (a) exercise capacity and oxygen saturation (1-min sit-to-stand test); (b) Post-COVID-19 Functional Status Scale; (c) other symptoms: asthenia, headache, mental confusion (brain fog), ageusia, and anosmia (Likert scale); (d) use of healthcare resources; (e) mortality; (f) sick leave duration in days; and (g) side effects of montelukast. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of the IDIAPJGol (reference number 21/091-C). The trial results will be published in open access, peer-reviewed journals and explained in webinars to increase awareness and understanding about long COVID among primary health professionals. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04695704 . Registered on January 5, 2021. EudraCT number 2021-000605-24. Prospectively registered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Acetates , COVID-19/complications , Cyclopropanes , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Quality of Life , Quinolines , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfides , Treatment Outcome
8.
Chron Respir Dis ; 19: 14799731211069391, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613200

ABSTRACT

Survivors of COVID-19 can present with varied and persisting symptoms, regardless of hospitalisation. We describe the ongoing symptoms, quality of life and return to work status in a cohort of non-hospitalised COVID-19 survivors with persisting respiratory symptoms presenting to clinic, who consented and completed patient-reported outcome measures. We identified fatigue, reduced quality of life and dysregulated breathing alongside the breathlessness. Those with co-existent fatigue had worse mood and quality of life and were less likely to have returned to normal working arrangements compared to those without fatigue. For non-hospitalised people with persisting symptoms following COVID-19 referred to a respiratory assessment clinic, there was a need for a wider holistic assessment, including return to work strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
9.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e058932, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613014

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Respiratory rehabilitation is the use of exercise, education, and behavioural interventions to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life. Recent studies highlight that respiratory rehabilitation is effective and safe for patients with COVID-19. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of respiratory telerehabilitation on patients infected with COVID-19 by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Google Scholar and Cochrane Library databases will be searched from inception to the end of November 2021. Randomised controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of telerehabilitation in the management of COVID-19 will be included. The primary outcomes will be functional capacity, cardiopulmonary exercise tests and quality of life. Secondary outcomes will include anxiety/depression level, sleep quality, mortality rate, completion rate, reason for withdrawal, adverse events, service satisfaction, cost-effectiveness and other potential factors. Two reviewers will independently screen and extract data and perform quality assessment of included studies. The Cochrane risk of bias tool will be used to assess risk of bias. Review Manager V.5.4 (Cochrane Collaboration) software will be used for statistical analysis. Heterogeneity will be analysed using I² statistics. Mean difference or standardised mean difference with 95% CI and p value will be used to calculate treatment effect for outcome variables. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not required because this systematic review and meta-analysis is based on previously published data. Final result will be published in peer-reviewed journal and presented at relevant conferences and events. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021287975.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
10.
Home Healthc Now ; 39(6): 302-309, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608482

ABSTRACT

Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) resulting from metastatic spread to the pleura frequently occurs in patients with primary lung, breast, hematological, gastrointestinal, and gynecological cancers. These effusions tend to reaccumulate quickly, and the patient requires increasingly frequent thoracentesis. An indwelling pleural catheter allows for dramatic improvement in quality of life as the patient has the power to ease her/his own suffering by draining the effusion at home when shortness of breath and/or chest pain intensifies. Patients with MPE need home healthcare support to address symptom management related to complications of advanced metastatic cancer and antineoplasm treatment regimens. The financial obstacles for the home healthcare agency are explored by using agency supply costs, per visit costs, and the patient-driven groupings reimbursement mode grouper to estimate reimbursement. Care for a home healthcare patient with MPE costs Medicare approximately $64.50 per day, markedly less than costs for hospitalization and outpatient thoracentesis. Unfortunately, agencies must absorb the cost of vacuum drainage bottles. Whereas a small positive balance of $291 was estimated for the first 30-day posthospital episode, losses were estimated at $1,185 to $1,633 for subsequent 30-day episodes. Absorbing these costs has become extremely difficult as home healthcare agencies are experiencing unprecedented COVID-19 infection control and staffing-related costs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pleural Effusion, Malignant , Aged , Catheters, Indwelling/adverse effects , Drainage , Female , Humans , Medicare , Pleural Effusion, Malignant/therapy , Pleurodesis , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
11.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3348-3359, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607398

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To assess neurological manifestations and health-related quality of life (QoL) 3 months after COVID-19. METHODS: In this prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study we systematically evaluated neurological signs and diseases by detailed neurological examination and a predefined test battery assessing smelling disorders (16-item Sniffin Sticks test), cognitive deficits (Montreal Cognitive Assessment), QoL (36-item Short Form), and mental health (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-5) 3 months after disease onset. RESULTS: Of 135 consecutive COVID-19 patients, 31 (23%) required intensive care unit (ICU) care (severe), 72 (53%) were admitted to the regular ward (moderate), and 32 (24%) underwent outpatient care (mild) during acute disease. At the 3-month follow-up, 20 patients (15%) presented with one or more neurological syndromes that were not evident before COVID-19. These included polyneuro/myopathy (n = 17, 13%) with one patient presenting with Guillain-Barré syndrome, mild encephalopathy (n = 2, 2%), parkinsonism (n = 1, 1%), orthostatic hypotension (n = 1, 1%), and ischemic stroke (n = 1, 1%). Objective testing revealed hyposmia/anosmia in 57/127 (45%) patients at the 3-month follow-up. Self-reported hyposmia/anosmia was lower (17%) at 3 months, however, improved when compared to the acute disease phase (44%; p < 0.001). At follow-up, cognitive deficits were apparent in 23%, and QoL was impaired in 31%. Assessment of mental health revealed symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders in 11%, 25%, and 11%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite recovery from the acute infection, neurological symptoms were prevalent at the 3-month follow-up. Above all, smelling disorders were persistent in a large proportion of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Cohort Studies , Humans , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2142100, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603397

ABSTRACT

Importance: Although negative associations of COVID-19 pandemic high school closures with adolescents' health have been demonstrated repeatedly, some research has reported a beneficial association of these closures with adolescents' sleep. The present study was, to our knowledge, the first to combine both perspectives. Objective: To investigate associations between adolescents' sleep and health-related characteristics during COVID-19 pandemic school closures in Switzerland. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study used cross-sectional online surveys circulated among the students of 21 public high schools in Zurich, Switzerland. The control sample completed the survey under regular, prepandemic conditions (May to July 2017) and the lockdown sample during school closures (May to June 2020). Survey respondents were included in the study if they provided their sex, age, and school. Exposures: High school closures during the first COVID-19 pandemic wave in Switzerland (March 13 to June 6, 2020). Main Outcomes and Measures: Sleep-wake patterns, health-related quality of life (HRQoL, assessed by the KIDSCREEN-10 questionnaire), substance use (caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine), and depressive symptoms (lockdown sample only; assessed using the withdrawn/depressed scale from the Youth Self Report). Multilevel regression models were used to assess sample differences and associations of health-related characteristics with sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Results: The total sample consisted of 8972 students, including 5308 (59.2%) in the control sample (3454 [65.1%] female) and 3664 (40.8%) in the lockdown sample (2429 [66.3%] female); the median age in both samples was 16 years (IQR, 15-17 years). During school closures, the sleep period on scheduled days was 75 minutes longer (semipartial R2 statistic [R2ß*], 0.238; 95% CI, 0.222-0.254; P < .001) and the students had better HRQoL (R2ß*, 0.007; 95% CI, 0.004-0.012; P < .001) and less consumption of caffeine (R2ß*, 0.010; 95% CI, 0.006-0.015; P < .001) and alcohol (R2ß*, 0.014; 95% CI, 0.008-0.022; P < .001). Longer sleep duration was associated with better HRQoL (R2ß*, 0.027; 95% CI, 0.020-0.034; P < .001) and less caffeine consumption (R2ß*, 0.013; 95% CI, 0.009-0.019; P < .001). In the lockdown sample, an inverse association was found between depressive symptoms and HRQoL (R2ß*, 0.285; 95% CI, 0.260-.0311; P < .001) and a positive association was found with caffeine consumption (R2ß*, 0.003; 95% CI, 0.000-0.008; P = .01). Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey study, 2 opposing associations between school closures and adolescents' health were identified: a negative association with psychological distress and a beneficial association with increased sleep duration. These findings should be considered when evaluating and implementing school closures. Furthermore, the findings provide support for delaying school start times for adolescents.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Health , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Schools , Sleep , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Caffeine/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599612

ABSTRACT

Parents of children with ASD experience a higher incidence of mental health difficulties, including stress, depression, and anxiety, than parents of children without ASD. According to studies related to ASD, parent-child physical activity programs are an effective approach to encourage both parents and their children with ASD to exercise together, thus improving the mental health of parents due to this interactive family activity. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of this web-based parent-child physical activity program on the mental health of parents of children with ASD. A total of 94 parent-child pairs consented to participate in this study, and 75 parent-child pairs completed the study. Three instruments-DASS-21, PSI-4-SF, and WHOQOL-26-were used to measure mental health, parental stress, and quality of life, respectively. A randomized controlled trial design was implemented to examine the effectiveness of the 10-week web-based parent-child physical activity program on improving the mental health of parents of children with ASD. The results showed that after the 10-week parent-child physical activity program, there were significant differences in overall DASS-21 and PSI-4-SF for the experimental group, compared with control group (p < 0.05), which indicated that the parent-child physical activity program has a positive influence on mental health in parents of children with ASD. One sub-area of WHOQOL-26 between the experimental and control groups across pre-/post-testing intervals also showed greater reductions in the item of psychological health (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the findings demonstrated the efficacy of the web-based parent-child physical activity program for improving mental health in parents of children with ASD.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Mental Health , Exercise , Humans , Internet , Parent-Child Relations , Quality of Life
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598775

ABSTRACT

An online cross-sectional survey using a "snowball" sampling method was carried out to assess the adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures among dental care workers (DCWs) during the pandemic. Six questions concerning the COVID-19 preventive guidelines issued by the Vietnam Ministry of Health were used to evaluate DCWs' adherence to preventive measures at dental care clinics. The quality of life of DCWs was assessed using the WHO-5 questionnaire and was defined as low if the total score was less than 13 points. Factors relating to adherence to COVID-19 prevention measures of DCWs were determined by multivariate linear regression analysis. In total, 514 DCWs completed the questionnaire. A total of 37% DCWs rated their quality of life as low. Regression analysis suggested that older age, a better quality of life, living in an urban area, and training on COVID-19 prevention were associated with better adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures, while being a dentist and lack of personal protective equipment was associated with less adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures. The pandemic had a significant negative impact on the physical and mental health of DCWs. Therefore, specific national guidelines for the prevention and control of the spread of COVID-19 in dental facilities should be issued.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Care , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vietnam/epidemiology
15.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 28(4): 551-557, 2021 Dec 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595556

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Poland is engaged in the implementation of activation programmes for seniors at governmental as well as non-governmental levels. Among these programmes may be mentioned, 'Active+', 'Senior+', 'Care 75+', and 'Senior Caritas'. The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the need for the inclusion of seniors into social life, and concern about their health. An important challenge for social and ageing policy is the provision of proper standards of care and health protection, especially during an increased sanitary regime. The aim of the study was analysis of the ageing policy strategy and the quality of life of seniors before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. REVIEW METHODS: The study was conducted by the method of analysis of data in the area of national initiatives concerning activation programmes for seniors implemented during 2020-2021. The starting point was the well-established definition of the quality of life by the WHO. ABBREVIATED DESCRIPTION OF THE STATE OF KNOWLEDGE: The analysis performed showed a multitude of factors determining the needs of seniors at the time of the pandemic, which often differed from those observed earlier. The latest studies of the quality of life of the elderly in Poland demonstrated that nearly 60% of respondents assessed their psychological condition as worse than before the pandemic. Another problem was the issue of physical activity, which was limited by more than 62% of seniors, and difficulties with access to health care system services. SUMMARY: It seems necessary to implement forms of assistance which could be adjusted to the changing epidemiological conditions, in order to improve the quality of life of persons who, in the near future, will constitute a considerable percentage of Polish society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Aging , Humans , Poland/epidemiology , Policy , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595516

ABSTRACT

The Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) has been used to assess the impact that oral health problems can have on an individual's life. Different theoretical models were proposed to evaluate the results. The aims of this study were to evaluate the fit of different factorial models of the OHIP-14 to non-dental patients (NDP) and dental patients (DP) samples from Brazil and Finland and to estimate the differential functioning of the items in the OHIP-14 between the samples. Two studies were conducted, one in Brazil and the other in Finland, composed of five samples (Brazil-Sample 1 (S1): DP, n = 434, age: 25.3 [SD = 6.3] years; S2: NDP, n = 1486, age: 24.7 [SD = 5.6] years; S3: DP, n = 439, age: 29.0 [SD = 6.7] years; Finland-S4: DP, n = 482, age: 26.3 [SD = 5.4] years; S5: NDP, n = 2425, age: 26.7 [DP = 5.5] years). The fit of the OHIP-14 models to the data was estimated using a confirmatory strategy (validity based on the internal structure). Differential item functioning (DIF) between samples was estimated. For NDP from both countries, the response pattern severely violated the normality assumption in six items of the OHIP-14, indicating that the instrument does not fit for these samples. For DP, the model with the best fit was unifactorial, which deals with the estimation of the general impact of oral health on an individual's life, without addressing specific dimensions. Configural invariance was refuted between samples. DIF indicated that the characteristic of the sample (NDP and DP) in both countries interfered in the response given to the items, with the response level being more adequate for the latent PD trait. The validity of data related to the impact of oral health problems on an individual's life was confirmed through a unifactorial model. OHIP-14 works properly in DP samples and was limited in NDP samples, being also influenced by cultural context and age.


Subject(s)
Oral Health , Quality of Life , Adult , Brazil , Humans , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
17.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501319211067674, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593923

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is increasingly recognized as having significant long-term impact on physical and mental health. The Primary Care Wellbeing Service (PCWBS) in Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust (BDCFT) is a psychology-led specialist interdisciplinary team of health professionals specializing in persistent physical symptoms (PPS) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) with an emphasis on holistic integrated care. The PCWBS quickly recognized the risk of the long-term effects of COVID-19, particularly for social, health and care staff, and developed a 7-week virtual rehabilitation course which was piloted in October 2020. The "Recovering from COVID" course takes a whole system, biopsychosocial approach to understanding COVID-19 and post-viral fatigue (PVF) and is delivered by an interdisciplinary team consisting of a clinical psychologist, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietitian, speech and language therapist, assistant psychologist, and a personal support navigator with support from a team administrator. The course focuses on understanding PVF, sleep optimization, nutrition, swallowing, activity management, energy conservation, stress management, breathing optimization, managing setbacks, and signposting to appropriate resources and services. Since the pilot, PCWBS has delivered 7 courses to support over 200 people suffering from post-COVID-19 syndrome. One hundred and forty-nine individuals that enrolled on the "Recovering from COVID" course completed the EQ-5D-5L to assess Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across 5 dimensions, including problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression. Subsequently, 76 individuals completed these measures at the end of the rehabilitation course showing that patient ratings were significantly improved. In response to the NIHR recommendation for rapid evaluation of different service models for supporting people with post-COVID-19 syndrome, this data offers hope that rehabilitation is effective in reversing some of the problems faced by people living with the long-term effects of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593858

ABSTRACT

The aim was to examine the association between oral health-related quality of life and loneliness and perceived as well as objective social isolation. Data were used from a nationally representative survey with n = 3075 (late Summer 2021). The established Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-G5) was used to quantify oral health-related quality of life. Moreover, established tools were used to quantify the outcome measures (De Jong Gierveld loneliness scale, Bude/Lantermann scale and Lubben Social Network Scale). It was adjusted for several covariates in regression analysis. Linear regressions showed that low oral health-related quality of life is associated with higher loneliness (B = 0.03, p < 0.001), higher perceived social isolation (B = 0.06, p < 0.001) and higher objective social isolation (B = 0.07, p < 0.05). Further regressions were performed (e.g., stratified by denture usage). Our study stressed the importance of low oral health-related quality of life for loneliness and social isolation (both perceived and objective). This knowledge is important to address individuals at risk. Future studies should clarify the underlying mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Loneliness , Quality of Life , Humans , Linear Models , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(1): 51-58, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593811

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the association of daily screen time and quality of sleep with the prevalence of dry eye among college-going women. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional, comparative questionnaire-based study of 547 college-going women in northern India. A 10-item Mini Sleep Questionnaire was used to check the quality of sleep, and the Standard Patient Evaluation of Eye Dryness (SPEED) scale was used to examine the prevalence of dry eye among college-going women. Results: Multinomial logistic regression showed a significant association between dry eye with daily screen time spent (P < 0.05) and the quality of sleep (P < 0.05) among college-going girls. Using Latent Class Analysis, two latent classes were selected based on the Bayesian Information Criteria. It was found that the majority population falls in class two and was having Severe Sleep-Wake difficulty. It was seen that the participants in class two belonged to the age bracket of 18-21 years, were from stream Humanities, education of father and mother equal to graduation, father working only, belonging to the nuclear family, having one sibling, hailing from the urban locality, spending more than 6 h daily on-screen, a majority of them using mobile phones, not using eye lubricants, and reported an increase in screen time during COVID-19. Conclusion: Dry eye and sleep quality are essential global health issues, and coupled with increased screen time, may pose a challenge in the present era. Preventive strategies need to be incorporated in school and college curriculums to promote physical, social, and psychological well-being and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dry Eye Syndromes , Adolescent , Adult , Bayes Theorem , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dry Eye Syndromes/diagnosis , Dry Eye Syndromes/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Screen Time , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
Front Public Health ; 9: 744514, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592963

ABSTRACT

Background: Older adult quality of life (QoL) is facing huge challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. New normal lifestyle behaviors, including getting adequate physical activity (PA), consuming sufficient fruits and vegetables (FV) and enacting individual preventive behaviors (frequent hand washing, facemask wearing, and social distancing), as a significant determinant for QoL, have not been adequately addressed in older adults during the pandemic. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of QoL in Chinese older adults after the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Hubei China. The objective of the study was to examine any associations of lifestyle behaviors with QoL, and to identify the moderating role of socioeconomic indicators in the associations identified. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Hubei, China, from June 15, 2020, to July 10, 2020. Five hundred sixteen older adults completed an online survey (mean age = 67.6 ± 6.6; 57.9% women). The questionnaire consisted of demographic information, covariates (chronic diseases and infected cases of acquaintances), lifestyle behaviors [PA stage, FV intake (FVI) stage and three preventive behaviors], and QoL. T-tests, ANOVA tests, multiple linear regression models with simple slope analyses were used to test the hypotheses. Results: QoL significantly differed in relation to economic situation, chronic diseases, marital status, education, living situation, age group, and professional status. Participants' economic situation (ß average vs. below average = 0.17, p < 0.01; ß above average vs. below average = 0.15, p < 0.01), chronic diseases (ß yes vs. no = 0.19, p < 0.001), FVI stage (ß = 0.21, p < 0.001), and preventive behaviors (ß = 0.10, p < 0.05) indicated a significant association with QoL. Education level and economic situation significantly interacted with preventive behaviors on QoL, respectively (ß preventive behaviors × educational level = -1.3, p < 0.01; ß preventive behaviors × economic situation = -0.97, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Findings emphasize the importance of enhancing FVI and preventive behaviors on QoL improvement in older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Older adults who are in a lower economic situation with lower education levels should be given priority when implementing interventions to improve preventive behaviors and QoL in older adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Aged , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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