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1.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 22(1): 191, 2022 07 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1965798

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the high usage of mobile phones in daily life in developing countries like Bangladesh, the adoption and usage of mHealth services have been significantly low among the elderly population. When searching previous studies, the researchers have found that no studies have empirically investigated whether the quality of life and service quality are significant for mHealth adoption by elderlies in Bangladesh. Hence, this study aimed to extend the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology by adding service quality and the quality of life to empirically find the key factors that influence elderlies' intention to adopt and use mHealth services in Bangladesh. METHODS: A face-to-face structured questionnaire survey method was used to collect data from 493 elderlies (aged 60 years and above) in Bangladesh. The data were analyzed with the Structural Equations Modelling (SEM) and Fuzzy Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA). RESULTS: SEM results suggested that Social Influence, Hedonic Motivation, Price Value, Habit, and Service Quality had significant impact (p < 0.05) on the elderlies' behavioral intention to adopt mHealth services. Service Quality, Quality of Life, and elderlies' Habit were found significant in explaining the Use Behavior of mHealth services. Quality of Life did not show significant (p > 0.05) effect on Behavioral Intention, which is inconsistent with existing literature. In addition, fsQCA findings suggest how the intensity of the influencers may contribute to high versus low m-health behavioral outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings have significant implications for theory, practice and future research as explained in the paper. The originality of this study is the integration of quality of life and service quality into UTUAT2 to explain the users' behavioural intention and use behaviour. Overall, the findings may contribute to shaping appropriate policies for designing and implementing mHealth services effectively for elderlies in developing countries.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Telemedicine , Aged , Humans , Intention , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
BMC Cancer ; 22(1): 141, 2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2162322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the combination of systemic and targeted chemotherapies is associated with severe adverse side effects and long-term health complications, there is interest in reducing treatment intensity for patients with early-stage breast cancer (EBC). Clinical trials are needed to determine the feasibility of reducing treatment intensity while maintaining 3-year recurrence-free survival of greater than 92%. To recruit participants for these trials, it is important to understand patient perspectives on reducing chemotherapy. METHODS: We collected qualitative interview data from twenty-four patients with Stage II-III breast cancer and sixteen patient advocates. Interviews explored potential barriers and facilitators to participation in trials testing reduced amounts of chemotherapy. As the COVID-19 pandemic struck during data collection, seventeen participants were asked about the potential impact of COVID-19 on their interest in these trials. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed, and researchers used qualitative content analysis to code for dominant themes. RESULTS: Seventeen participants (42.5%) expressed interest in participating in a trial of reduced chemotherapy. Barriers to reducing chemotherapy included (1) fear of recurrence and inefficacy, (2) preference for aggressive treatment, (3) disinterest in clinical trials, (4) lack of information about expected outcomes, (5) fear of regret, and (6) having young children. Facilitators included (1) avoiding physical toxicity, (2) understanding the scientific rationale of reducing chemotherapy, (3) confidence in providers, (4) consistent monitoring and the option to increase dosage, (5) fewer financial and logistical challenges, and (6) contributing to scientific knowledge. Of those asked, nearly all participants said they would be more motivated to reduce treatment intensity in the context of COVID-19, primarily to avoid exposure to the virus while receiving treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals with EBC, there is significant interest in alleviating treatment-related toxicity by reducing chemotherapeutic intensity. Patients will be more apt to participate in trials testing reduced amounts of chemotherapy if these are framed in terms of customizing treatment to the individual patient and added benefit-reduced toxicities, higher quality of life during treatment and lower risk of long-term complications-rather than in terms of taking treatments away or doing less than the standard of care. Doctor-patient rapport and provider support will be crucial in this process.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Advocacy/psychology , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Decision Making , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Middle Aged , Motivation , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life
3.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 10(6): 1485-1496, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2159175

ABSTRACT

Treatment with immune-modifying biologics has positively impacted disease control and quality of life in many patients with immune-mediated disorders. However, the higher susceptibility to common and opportunistic pathogens is of concern. Thus, immunization strategies to control vaccine-preventable diseases represent a critical issue in this population. However, limited data exist on the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of available vaccines in patients on biologics, particularly in children. Here, according to published literature and real-life experience and practice, we report the interim indications of the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) Vaccine Committee and of the Italian Primary Immunodeficiency Network (IPINet) Centers on immunization of children and adolescents receiving biologics. Our aim is to provide a practical guidance for the clinician to ensure optimal protection for patients and the community.


Subject(s)
Biological Products , Vaccines , Adolescent , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Child , Humans , Immunization , Quality of Life , Vaccination , Vaccines/therapeutic use
4.
J Headache Pain ; 23(1): 142, 2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2153502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The fully human monoclonal antibody erenumab, which targets the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor, was licensed in Switzerland in July 2018 for the prophylactic treatment of migraine. To complement findings from the pivotal program, this observational study was designed to collect and evaluate clinical data on the impact of erenumab on several endpoints, such as quality of life, migraine-related impairment and treatment satisfaction in a real-world setting. METHODS: An interim analysis was conducted after all patients completed 6 months of erenumab treatment. Patients kept a headache diary and completed questionnaires at follow up visits. The overall study duration comprises 24 months. RESULTS: In total, 172 adults with chronic or episodic migraine from 19 different sites across Switzerland were enrolled to receive erenumab every 4 weeks. At baseline, patients had 16.6 ± 7.2 monthly migraine days (MMD) and 11.6 ± 7.0 acute migraine-specific medication days per month. After 6 months, erenumab treatment reduced Headache Impact Test (HIT-6™) scores by 7.7 ± 8.4 (p < 0.001), the modified Migraine Disability Assessment (mMIDAS) by 14.1 ± 17.8 (p < 0.001), MMD by 7.6 ± 7.0 (p < 0.001) and acute migraine-specific medication days per month by 6.6 ± 5.4 (p < 0.001). Erenumab also reduced the impact of migraine on social and family life, as evidenced by a reduction of Impact of Migraine on Partners and Adolescent Children (IMPAC) scores by 6.1 ± 6.7 (p < 0.001). Patients reported a mean effectiveness of 67.1, convenience of 82.4 and global satisfaction of 72.4 in the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM-9). In total, 99 adverse events (AE) and 12 serious adverse events (SAE) were observed in 62 and 11 patients, respectively. All SAE were regarded as not related to the study medication. CONCLUSIONS: Overall quality of life improved and treatment satisfaction was rated high with erenumab treatment in real-world clinical practice. In addition, the reported impact of migraine on spouses and children of patients was reduced. TRIAL REGISTRATION: BASEC ID 2018-02,375 in the Register of All Projects in Switzerland (RAPS).


Subject(s)
Migraine Disorders , Quality of Life , Humans , Adult , Adolescent , Child , Switzerland , Migraine Disorders/drug therapy , Migraine Disorders/prevention & control , Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide , Headache , Delivery of Health Care
5.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 674-680, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152246

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we had to approach hospital- and intensive care unit (ICU)-related resource management, especially for demanding techniques required for advanced support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). RECENT FINDINGS: Availability of ICU beds and ECMO machines widely varies around the world. In critical conditions, such a global pandemic, the establishment of contingency capacity tiers might help in defining to which conditions and subjects ECMO can be offered. A frequent reassessment of the resource saturation, possibly integrated within a regional healthcare coordination system, may be of help to triage the patients who most likely will benefit from advanced techniques, especially when capacities are limited. SUMMARY: Indications to ECMO during the pandemic should be fluid and may be adjusted over time. Candidacy of patients should follow the same prepandemic rules, taking into account the acute disease, the burden of any eventual comorbidity and the chances of a good quality of life after recovery; but the current capacity of healthcare system should also be considered, and frequently reassessed, possibly within a wide hub-and-spoke healthcare system. VIDEO ABSTRACT: http://links.lww.com/COCC/A43.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Triage , SARS-CoV-2 , Patient Selection , Quality of Life
6.
Circ Heart Fail ; 14(3): e007767, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2153215

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The expense of clinical trials mandates new strategies to efficiently generate evidence and test novel therapies. In this context, we designed a decentralized, patient-centered randomized clinical trial leveraging mobile technologies, rather than in-person site visits, to test the efficacy of 12 weeks of canagliflozin for the treatment of heart failure, regardless of ejection fraction or diabetes status, on the reduction of heart failure symptoms. METHODS: One thousand nine hundred patients will be enrolled with a medical record-confirmed diagnosis of heart failure, stratified by reduced (≤40%) or preserved (>40%) ejection fraction and randomized 1:1 to 100 mg daily of canagliflozin or matching placebo. The primary outcome will be the 12-week change in the total symptom score of the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes will be daily step count and other scales of the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire. RESULTS: The trial is currently enrolling, even in the era of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: CHIEF-HF (Canagliflozin: Impact on Health Status, Quality of Life and Functional Status in Heart Failure) is deploying a novel model of conducting a decentralized, patient-centered, randomized clinical trial for a new indication for canagliflozin to improve the symptoms of patients with heart failure. It can model a new method for more cost-effectively testing the efficacy of treatments using mobile technologies with patient-reported outcomes as the primary clinical end point of the trial. Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT04252287.


Subject(s)
Canagliflozin/therapeutic use , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Telemedicine , Actigraphy/instrumentation , Canagliflozin/adverse effects , Double-Blind Method , Exercise Tolerance/drug effects , Fitness Trackers , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Mobile Applications , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Recovery of Function , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/adverse effects , Stroke Volume/drug effects , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States , Ventricular Function, Left/drug effects
7.
Indian J Public Health ; 66(Supplement): S51-S55, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144165

ABSTRACT

Background: It was observed that post-COVID patients reported persistent exertional dyspnea, cough, fatigue, or chest pain. About 10%-20% of patients may progress to pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation has been proven to be useful in improving effort tolerance and quality of life in chronic respiratory diseases. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation in improving 6-min walk distance (6 MWD), peak flow, fatigue, anxiety, and depression in early postacute COVID disease. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted during January 2021 to March 2021. The patients who recovered from COVID-19 and having persistent exertional dyspnea and fatigue after 3 weeks of recovery were included in the study. Baseline and postintervention assessment of 6 MWD, Visual Analog Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F), peak flow, and Hamilton rating scales (HAM) scales after 4 weeks were done. Compliance was ensured with weakly telemonitoring. Results: Significant improvement in peak flow, 6 MWD, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and VAS-F (P < 0.01) after 4 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation. Conclusion: Early pulmonary rehabilitation in post-COVID syndrome can contribute to statistically significant improvement in functional and psychological parameters as well as post-COVID fatigue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , India , Fatigue , Dyspnea/etiology
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143096

ABSTRACT

Physical inactivity is prevalent in older adults and contributes to age-related decline in function, health, well-being, and quality of life. Recreational football for older adults has shown promise for promoting health benefits. This study explores the lived experiences of older adults engaging in a walking and recreational football intervention and identifies factors that affect behaviours and can encourage change in this population. A purposive sample (n = 14; aged 67 ± 5 years) of the lived experiences of those participating in a recreational football intervention took part in two focus groups. The participants' responses were grouped into three-time reflecting specific points in their lives: what stopped them from playing football, what got them playing, and what is needed for them to continue playing in the future. Within each of these time points in their lives, themes were identified. The key findings and practical recommendations were that football needs to be adapted and local, that the priority to play football changes over time, and that football itself is a fundamentally intrinsic motivator; 'it's in your blood'. The findings can be used to inform future interventions, encourage participation, and advise on the best practices for key stakeholders in the physical activity domain.


Subject(s)
Football , Soccer , Humans , Aged , Quality of Life , Soccer/physiology , Exercise , Walking
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1040714, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142363

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to analyze the effects of a combined training (CT) program performed during the first national lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic on body composition, metabolic profile, quality of life and stress in sedentary workers, and examines whether changes in the metabolic profile are associated with changes in health-related outcomes which are modifiable by exercise. We evaluated 31 sedentary workers (48.26 ± 7.89 years old). Participants were randomly assigned to a CT group (i.e., performed 16 weeks of exercise) or to a non-exercise control group. The CT program consisted of 16-week of resistance and aerobic exercise. Body composition, glycemic and lipidic profiles, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), health-related quality of life and stress levels were assessed pre- and post-intervention. After the intervention period, the CT group demonstrated significantly lower waist and hip circumference (p < 0.05) values than the control group. The control group significantly increased the fasting glucose and HOMA-IR after 16 weeks follow-up (+4.74 mg/dL, p = 0.029; and +0.41 units, p = 0.010, respectively), whiles no significant changes were observed in the CT group in the same parameters (+3.33 mg/dL, p = 0.176; and +0.04 units, p = 0.628, respectively). No changes were observed in the lipid profile for either group (p > 0.05). A significant positive relationship was detected between the change in BMI with the changes in insulin and HOMA-IR (r = 0.643, p = 0.024; and r = 0.605, p = 0.037, respectively). In addition, the changes in CRF were negatively associated with the changes in total cholesterol (r = -0.578, p = 0.049). We observed differences between groups on perceived stress levels and physical, psychological, and environmental domains of quality of life, with the CT group showing better results. Moreover, the CT group improved perceived life satisfaction (+3.17 points, p = 0.038). The findings of the present study suggest that the participants who remained physically active during the first pandemic-related lockdown were able to mitigate the deleterious effects associated with a sedentary lifestyle.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1003876, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142340

ABSTRACT

Background: Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, previous studies have shown that the physical as well as the mental health of children and adolescents significantly deteriorated. Future anxiety caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and its associations with quality of life has not previously been examined in school children. Methods: As part of a cross-sectional web-based survey at schools in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, two years after the outbreak of the pandemic, school children were asked about COVID-19-related future anxiety using the German epidemic-related Dark Future Scale for children (eDFS-K). Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed using the self-reported KIDSCREEN-10. The eDFS-K was psychometrically analyzed (internal consistency and confirmatory factor analysis) and thereafter examined as a predictor of HRQoL in a general linear regression model. Results: A total of N = 840 8-18-year-old children and adolescents were included in the analysis. The eDFS-K demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.77), and the confirmatory factor analysis further supported the one-factor structure of the four-item scale with an acceptable model fit. Over 43% of students were found to have low HRQoL. In addition, 47% of the students sometimes to often reported COVID-19-related fears about the future. Children with COVID-19-related future anxiety had significantly lower HRQoL (B = - 0.94, p < 0.001). Other predictors of lower HRQoL were older age (B = - 0.63, p < 0.001), and female (B = - 3.12, p < 0.001) and diverse (B = - 6.82, p < 0.001) gender. Conclusion: Two years after the outbreak of the pandemic, school-aged children continue to exhibit low HRQoL, which is further exacerbated in the presence of COVID-19-related future anxiety. Intervention programs with an increased focus on mental health also addressing future anxiety should be provided.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Reproducibility of Results , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology
11.
Front Public Health ; 10: 975992, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142329

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Many patients have prolonged symptoms after COVID-19 infection, which can affect patient quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study is to determine the quality of life in patients with long COVID, compared with healthy controls. Material and methods: The study was a prospective cross-sectional study using an anonymous online survey. The SF-36 questionnaire was chosen for quality of life measurement. The survey was distributed through the Facebook social media platform targeting groups of patients with long COVID. The control group was made up of physiotherapy and physical education students. Results: There was a significant difference in physical function, with a mean score of 94.9 (±9.4) among the students, compared to long COVID patients with a mean score of 66.2 (±25.4) (p < 0.001). A similar result was found in the physical role (p < 0.001). The overall quality of life score for college students was 578.0 (±111.9), and the overall score for patients with long COVID was 331.9 (±126.9). Conclusions: Patients with long COVID had a lower quality of life compared to the healthy control group, and this was associated with the negative effect of long-COVID. Lower quality of life in patients with long COVID is an important therapeutic goal, which requires attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Control Groups , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prospective Studies
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 917128, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142314

ABSTRACT

Background: Assessment of the quality of life (QoL) among healthcare workers (HCWs) is vital for better healthcare and is an essential indicator for competent health service delivery. Since the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic strike, the frontline position of HCWs subjected them to tremendous mental and psychological burden with a high risk of virus acquisition. Aim: This study evaluated the QoL and its influencing factors among HCWs residing in the Arab countries. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using a self-administered online questionnaire based on the World Health Organization QoL-BREF instrument with additional questions related to COVID-19. The study was conducted in three different languages (Arabic, English, and French) across 19 Arab countries between February 22 and March 24, 2022. Results: A total of 3,170 HCWs were included in the survey. The majority were females (75.3%), aged 18-40 years (76.4%), urban residents (90.4%), married (54.5%), and were living in middle-income countries (72.0%). The mean scores of general health and general QoL were 3.7 ± 1.0 and 3.7 ± 0.9, respectively. Those who attained average physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL were 40.8, 15.4, 26.2, and 22.3%, respectively. The income per capita and country income affected the mean scores of all QoL domains. Previous COVID-19 infection, having relatives who died of COVID-19, and being vaccinated against COVID-19 significantly affected the mean scores of different domains. Conclusion: A large proportion of the Arab HCWs evaluated in this study had an overall poor QoL. More attention should be directed to this vulnerable group to ensure their productivity and service provision.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Female , Male , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Arabs , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel
13.
Oral Health Prev Dent ; 20(1): 449-455, 2022 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141661

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the level of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its predictors among individuals with dental conditions requiring treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic in Jordan, and to highlight COVID-19 impacts on these individuals' mental health and dental care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional online-based survey was conducted. The study questionnaire was composed of items related to stress during COVID-19. Descriptive analyses were used to describe the study's main outcome measures, and multiple variable regression analysis was conducted to identify the quality of life predictors. RESULTS: Participants' HRQoL mean scores as measured by SF-12 were 69.5 (± 19.3) for the physical component and 58.9 (± 21.1) for the mental component. Mean scores for depression, anxiety, and stress measured by DASS21 were 10.1, 7.8, and 11.7, respectively. The regression model showed depression (ß = -0.76 [95%CI -0.92 to -0.59], p < 0.001), stress (ß = -1.74 [95%CI -2.53 to -0.94], p < 0.001), and oral HRQoL (ß = -1.25 [95%CI -1.95 to -0.55], p = 0.001) as statistically significant negative predictors for HRQoL. Finally, family income was identified as positive significant predictor for HRQoL (ß = 2.51 [95%CI 0.06 to 4.95], p = 0.045). CONCLUSION: This study found that patients with dental issues had a low quality of life and a high level of mental health symptoms during COVID-19 in Jordan. Healthcare policymakers should consider the continuation of dental services when planning for similar emergencies in the future, particularly if accompanied by lockdowns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Jordan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control
14.
Orv Hetil ; 163(43): 1704-1712, 2022 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140898

ABSTRACT

An increasing proportion of cancer patients remains permanently tumor-free after primary care due to modern curative treatments. However, the life expectancy and quality of life deteriorate significantly in most relapsed cases in spite of different palliative therapies. To detect the early relapse in asymptomatic stage, patients undergo a pre-planned care process, targeting primarily their improved survival. Several studies and reviews have been conducted in recent decades to determine the optimal and rational frequency and methods of control examinations. The data of different follow-up strategies were analyzed from several perspectives. Recommended follow-up protocols differ significantly based on the origin, histological characteristics, stage, prognostic factors and typical sites of recurrences, such as local, "oligometastatic" or systemic relapse of tumors. In addition to the detection of recurrence, the importance of quality of life, monitoring of psychological status and psychosomatic complaints as well as the cost-effectiveness of protocols also came to the focus. Involving family doctors or qualified nurses in routine oncology follow-up may function as an alternative option to reducing the workload of specialists. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the use of telemedicine methods in the evaluation of examinations and follow-up strategies coming to the fore, while at the same time this made the re-evaluation of control care algorithms even more important. In this paper, we review the results of studies comparing the different follow-up strategies, highlighting which protocols help to optimize the use of health care capacity while preserving the survival chance of cancer patients in relapse. Orv Hetil. 2022; 163(43): 1704-1712.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cost-Benefit Analysis
15.
Orv Hetil ; 163(23): 895-901, 2022 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140890

ABSTRACT

Cancer and the various medical treatments and tests are a major physical and psychological challenge for patients, their relatives and for the medical staff as well. Adherence and compliance become critical factors during prolonged oncological therapies. The mental health of people with malignant cancer, untreated psychological symptoms can affect survival by increasing distress and suffering, weakening quality of life and reducing adherence. Furthermore, they have a particularly high comorbidity with psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study is to introduce the tools of cognitive behavioural therapy and the therapeutic indications in the context of mental disorders associated with chronic somatic illness. Our study presents the case of a 66-year-old woman with breast cancer. She was diagnosed with mild depressive episodes and hypochondriasis based on psychodiagnostic assessment. Instead of interpreting the patient's symptoms as a serious organic illness, the goal of psychotherapy is to develop new, more adaptive attitudes and more comforting perspective of the symptoms, and to reduce secondary depression. The elements of the 16-session cognitive behavioural therapy included behavioural activation, analysis of symptomatic behaviour, diary management, development of new alternatives and behavioural experiments, conceptualisation, and summarising learned techniques and future planning. Orv Hetil. 2022; 163(23): 895-901.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Female , Humans , Psychotherapy/methods , Quality of Life
16.
BMC Womens Health ; 22(1): 444, 2022 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), which causes involuntarily leakage of urine, has an impact on many women and may affect self-efficacy, which, in turn, can lead to poor health-related quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to explore the effects of sociodemographic and health information, symptom distress, self-efficacy, and positive thinking on the health-related QOL (general QOL and urinary incontinence-specific QOL) of women with SUI. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was used. Women with SUI were recruited from the obstetrics and gynecology outpatient department and urodynamics examination room of a hospital by convenience sampling from August 2021 to March 2022. Participants were surveyed on the following questionnaires: Urogenital Distress Inventory, Geriatric Self-efficacy Index for Urinary Incontinence, Positive Thinking Scale, 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12), and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire Short Form. RESULTS: Participants (N = 135) had a mean age of 53.76 years old. The mean SF-12 physical component summary score was 48.48 (physical QOL), and the mental component summary score was 46.56 (mental QOL). The urinary incontinence-specific QOL score was 16.01. Women with greater positive thinking and higher self-efficacy for urinary incontinence had better physical and mental QOL. Women with less symptom distress of urinary incontinence and higher self-efficacy for urinary incontinence had better urinary incontinence-specific QOL. CONCLUSION: The health-related QOL of women with SUI is affected by many factors, including positive thinking, self-efficacy, and symptom distress. Healthcare professionals can provide multifaceted programs to improve the health-related QOL of women with SUI.


Subject(s)
Urinary Incontinence, Stress , Urinary Incontinence , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Aged , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Self Efficacy , Optimism , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2147, 2022 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139232

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Low-income is one of the well-established determinants of people's health and health-related behavior, including susceptibility to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Two social welfare services are available in Japan to support financial and medical care among low-income patients: Public Assistance (PA), which provide both minimum income and medical costs; and Free/Low-Cost Medical Care (FLCMC), wherein only medical costs were covered. In this study, changes in Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) scores of low-income patients on PA and FLCMC, before and after COVID-19 pandemic, were described and compared against those that are not utilizing the said services (comparison group) to evaluate the contribution of social welfare services in protecting the HRQOL of the beneficiaries during the pandemic. METHODS: We used repeated cross-sectional data of adult beneficiaries of FLCMC and PA, as well as those without social welfare services, who regularly visit the Kamigyo clinic in Kyoto, Japan. We collected the data from 2018 and 2021 using a questionnaire on patients' socioeconomic attributes and the Japanese version of Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). The Japanese version of SF-12 can calculate the three components scores: physical health component summary (PCS), the mental health component summary (MCS), and the role-social component summary (RCS), which can be transformed to a 0-100 range scale with a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10. RESULTS: Data of 200 and 174 beneficiaries in 2018 and 2021, respectively, were analyzed. Low-income patients on social welfare services had lower PCS, and RCS than the comparison group in both years. Multiple linear regression analyses with cluster-adjusted standard error estimator showed that the decline in MCS was significantly higher among FLCMC beneficiaries than in those without welfare services (Beta: -4.71, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: -5.79 to -3.63, p < 0.01), and a decline in MCS among PA recipients was also observed (Beta: -4.27, 95% CI: -6.67 to -1.87 p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Low-income beneficiaries of social welfare may have experienced mental health deterioration during the COVID-19 pandemic. To maintain healthy lives during the pandemic, additional support on mental health for low-income recipients of social welfare services may be required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quality of Life , Japan/epidemiology , Social Welfare
18.
BMC Neurol ; 22(1): 440, 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139186

ABSTRACT

The Greek Society of Migraine and Headache Patients (GSMHP), maintaining a strong commitment to research and information, conducted its second web-based online survey named "Migraine in Greece-2020", following its first one conducted in 2018. The 2020 study included 2,105 migraine patients who were called to answer 151 questions. The purposes of the current research were to record the demographic and clinical characteristics of migraine patients in Greece, including the severity and effects of migraine on respondents' quality of life, as well as to survey the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on the course of migraine. Our population, internet-based study provides data that will hopefully contribute to better comprehend the clinical phenotype and course of migraine during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Greece/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Internet
19.
Mult Scler ; 28(14): 2160-2170, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138771

ABSTRACT

Recent interest in multiple sclerosis research warrants literature analysis to evaluate the current state of the discipline and new research domains. This bibliometric review summarised the research trends and analysed research areas in multiple sclerosis over the last decade. The documents containing the term 'multiple sclerosis' in the article title were retrieved from the Scopus database. We used Harzing's Publish or Perish and VOSviewer for citation analysis and data visualisation, respectively. We found a total of 18,003 articles published in journals in the English language between 2012 and 2021. The emerging keywords identified utilising the enhanced strategic diagram were 'covid-19', 'teriflunomide', 'clinical trial', 'microglia', 'b cells', 'myelin', 'brain', 'white matter', 'functional connectivity', 'pain', 'employment', 'health-related quality of life', 'meta-analysis' and 'comorbidity'. This study demonstrates the tremendous growth of multiple sclerosis literature worldwide, which is expected to grow more than double during the next decade especially in the identified emerging topics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Quality of Life , Sclerosis , Myelin Sheath
20.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2022: 7692215, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138248

ABSTRACT

Stroke is the most common cause of epilepsy and ultimately leads to a decrease in the quality of life of those affected. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes can both lead to poststroke epilepsy (PSE). Significant risk factors for PSE include age < 65age less than 65 years, stroke severity measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), cortical involvement, and genetic factors such as TRPM6 polymorphism. The diagnosis of PSE is made by using imaging modalities, blood biomarkers, and prognostic criteria. Electroencephalography (EEG) is currently the gold standard to diagnose PSE, while new combinations of modalities are being tested to increase diagnostic specificity. This literature review uncovers a newly found mechanism for the pathology of poststroke epilepsy. The pathogenesis of early-onset and late-onset is characterized by sequelae of neuronal cellular hypoxia and disruption of the blood-brain barrier, respectively. Interleukin-6 is responsible for increasing the activity of glial cells, causing gliosis and hyperexcitability of neurons. Epinephrine, high-mobility group protein B1, downregulation of CD32, and upregulation of HLA-DR impact the pathology of poststroke epilepsy by inhibiting the normal neuronal immune response. Decreased levels of neuropeptide Y, a neurotransmitter, act through multiple unique mechanisms, such as inhibiting intracellular Ca2+ accumulation and acting as an anti-inflammatory, also implemented in the worsening progression of poststroke epilepsy. Additionally, CA1 hippocampal resonant neurons that increase theta oscillation are associated with poststroke epilepsy. Hypertensive small vessel disease may also have an implication in the temporal lobe epilepsy by causing occult microinfarctions. Furthermore, this review highlights the potential use of statins as primary prophylaxis against PSE, with multiple studies demonstrating a reduction in incidence using statins alone, statins in combination with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and statins with aspirin. The evidence strongly suggests that the second generation AEDs are a superior treatment method for PSE. Data from numerous studies demonstrate their relative lack of significant drug interactions, increased tolerability, and potential superiority in maintaining seizure-free status.


Subject(s)
Epilepsy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Stroke , Humans , Aged , Incidence , Quality of Life , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Seizures/drug therapy , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Stroke/complications , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/epidemiology , Risk Factors
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