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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26854, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191051

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prompted by the need to measure the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 on main areas of quality of life related to mental health (MH), the COV-19-impact on quality of life (COV19-QoL) scale has been developed recently. We measured how patients seeking face-to-face MH care perceived the coronavirus disease 2019 impact on QoL and how socio-demographic factors, stress, and personality contributed to QoL in this diagnostically diverse population.Patients aged 18 to 65 years (n = 251) who came for the first time to the outpatient units during the 6-week index-period (May 21-July 1, 2020) were included. The cross-sectional assessment involved sociodemographic variables, working diagnosis, personality traits (7-dimension model, including HEXACO and DELTA), stress (list of threatening experiences and proximity to virus), and COV19-QoL.The perceived impact of the pandemic on QoL was above the theoretical mean of a 5-point scale (COV19-Qol = 3.1 ±â€Š1.2). No association between total COV19-QoL score, sociodemographic parameters, and working diagnoses was found in the present sample. After testing whether positional (threatening experiences), or dispositional (personality) factors were predominant in the perceived impact of COV-19 on QoL, significant predictors of the outcome were personality traits Disintegration (B = 0.52; P < .01) and Emotionality (B = 0.18; P < .05).It seems that pervasiveness and uncertainty of the pandemic threat triggers-especially in those high on Disintegration trait-a chain of mental events with the decrease of QoL as a final result. Present findings could be used to establish a profile of MH help seeking population in relation to this biological disaster, and to further explore QoL and personality in different contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique ; 70(4): 183-189, 2022 Aug.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2182744

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic generated "risks" and uncertainties as well as organizational changes among French perinatal caregivers. Our study aimed to investigate the psychosocial impact of the first wave on this population. METHOD: Our participants (N=565) were invited to answer an online questionnaire that included questions on various indices of health and quality of life at work (e.g., ProQoL, perceived stress) and other questions on the impact of the pandemic on work organization. An open-ended question was designed to identify the participants' three most frequently perceived preoccupations with regard to the health situation. RESULTS: In addition to highlighting the multifactorial nature of participants' preoccupations, our results illustrated the effect of professional status and type of motherhood on the different indices of health and quality of life at work. When it was found that the pandemic had an impact on work organization and on teams, lower health and quality of work life scores were recorded. On the other hand, when positive impacts on organization were reported, mainly in terms of reduced work intensity, they were associated with higher health and quality of work life scores. CONCLUSION: We explain this last result as either one actual effect of the pandemic on work organization, or as a phenomenon of cognitive rationalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1003876, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142340

ABSTRACT

Background: Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, previous studies have shown that the physical as well as the mental health of children and adolescents significantly deteriorated. Future anxiety caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and its associations with quality of life has not previously been examined in school children. Methods: As part of a cross-sectional web-based survey at schools in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, two years after the outbreak of the pandemic, school children were asked about COVID-19-related future anxiety using the German epidemic-related Dark Future Scale for children (eDFS-K). Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed using the self-reported KIDSCREEN-10. The eDFS-K was psychometrically analyzed (internal consistency and confirmatory factor analysis) and thereafter examined as a predictor of HRQoL in a general linear regression model. Results: A total of N = 840 8-18-year-old children and adolescents were included in the analysis. The eDFS-K demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.77), and the confirmatory factor analysis further supported the one-factor structure of the four-item scale with an acceptable model fit. Over 43% of students were found to have low HRQoL. In addition, 47% of the students sometimes to often reported COVID-19-related fears about the future. Children with COVID-19-related future anxiety had significantly lower HRQoL (B = - 0.94, p < 0.001). Other predictors of lower HRQoL were older age (B = - 0.63, p < 0.001), and female (B = - 3.12, p < 0.001) and diverse (B = - 6.82, p < 0.001) gender. Conclusion: Two years after the outbreak of the pandemic, school-aged children continue to exhibit low HRQoL, which is further exacerbated in the presence of COVID-19-related future anxiety. Intervention programs with an increased focus on mental health also addressing future anxiety should be provided.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Reproducibility of Results , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 917128, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142314

ABSTRACT

Background: Assessment of the quality of life (QoL) among healthcare workers (HCWs) is vital for better healthcare and is an essential indicator for competent health service delivery. Since the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic strike, the frontline position of HCWs subjected them to tremendous mental and psychological burden with a high risk of virus acquisition. Aim: This study evaluated the QoL and its influencing factors among HCWs residing in the Arab countries. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using a self-administered online questionnaire based on the World Health Organization QoL-BREF instrument with additional questions related to COVID-19. The study was conducted in three different languages (Arabic, English, and French) across 19 Arab countries between February 22 and March 24, 2022. Results: A total of 3,170 HCWs were included in the survey. The majority were females (75.3%), aged 18-40 years (76.4%), urban residents (90.4%), married (54.5%), and were living in middle-income countries (72.0%). The mean scores of general health and general QoL were 3.7 ± 1.0 and 3.7 ± 0.9, respectively. Those who attained average physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL were 40.8, 15.4, 26.2, and 22.3%, respectively. The income per capita and country income affected the mean scores of all QoL domains. Previous COVID-19 infection, having relatives who died of COVID-19, and being vaccinated against COVID-19 significantly affected the mean scores of different domains. Conclusion: A large proportion of the Arab HCWs evaluated in this study had an overall poor QoL. More attention should be directed to this vulnerable group to ensure their productivity and service provision.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Female , Male , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Arabs , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel
5.
Oral Health Prev Dent ; 20(1): 449-455, 2022 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141661

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the level of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its predictors among individuals with dental conditions requiring treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic in Jordan, and to highlight COVID-19 impacts on these individuals' mental health and dental care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional online-based survey was conducted. The study questionnaire was composed of items related to stress during COVID-19. Descriptive analyses were used to describe the study's main outcome measures, and multiple variable regression analysis was conducted to identify the quality of life predictors. RESULTS: Participants' HRQoL mean scores as measured by SF-12 were 69.5 (± 19.3) for the physical component and 58.9 (± 21.1) for the mental component. Mean scores for depression, anxiety, and stress measured by DASS21 were 10.1, 7.8, and 11.7, respectively. The regression model showed depression (ß = -0.76 [95%CI -0.92 to -0.59], p < 0.001), stress (ß = -1.74 [95%CI -2.53 to -0.94], p < 0.001), and oral HRQoL (ß = -1.25 [95%CI -1.95 to -0.55], p = 0.001) as statistically significant negative predictors for HRQoL. Finally, family income was identified as positive significant predictor for HRQoL (ß = 2.51 [95%CI 0.06 to 4.95], p = 0.045). CONCLUSION: This study found that patients with dental issues had a low quality of life and a high level of mental health symptoms during COVID-19 in Jordan. Healthcare policymakers should consider the continuation of dental services when planning for similar emergencies in the future, particularly if accompanied by lockdowns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Jordan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control
6.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 18761, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133606

ABSTRACT

Those with underlying autoimmune conditions were met with unparalleled challenges and were disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. As such, we aimed to measure the impact of the pandemic on symptoms and the health and vision related quality of life (HR-QoL, VR-QoL) in patients with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS). Nineteen (55.9%) participants returned questionnaires for analysis, (17 female and 2 male, 61.6 years ± 9.9). There was no significant change in participants HR-QoL or VR-QoL, indicating that those with pSS remained resilient with regard to their physical and mental health throughout the pandemic. Furthermore, QoL was maintained despite 73.7% of participants having had outpatient appointments cancelled, delayed or rescheduled. Participants reported a lower QoL and feeling tenser in the COV19-QoL (3.3 ± 1.4 and 3.2 ± 1.3) representing feelings of apprehension and stress felt amongst the general population since the pandemic. Overall, and in spite of the concern caused by the COVID-19 pandemic for patients with autoimmune diseases, the health and well-being of patients with pSS remained stable. These findings strongly support the use of validated HR and VR-QoL questionnaires as an adjunct to the telemedicine consultation when assessing patients with pSS, offering an alternative to face-to-face consultations in post-pandemic era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sjogren's Syndrome , Humans , Male , Female , Quality of Life/psychology , Sjogren's Syndrome/diagnosis , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 20346, 2022 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133603

ABSTRACT

To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the variables of sleep quality, fatigue, anxiety, and depression in healthy Brazilian women. Longitudinal observational study conducted through an online questionnaire with women in 2020 and 2021. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. The data were analyzed descriptively and the comparison between the data obtained in the first and second evaluation was performed using the McNemar test. A logistic regression was applied to test the association between the variables that showed a significant difference. A total of 235 women responded to the questionnaires. There was a significant increase in fatigue between the two moments (p < 0.05). In the first assessment, depression (OR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.14-4.99), anxiety (OR: 2.68; 95% CI: 1.37-5.22) and sleep quality (OR: 4.01; 95% CI: 1.71-9.67) were associated with fatigue. In the second assessment, depression (OR: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.19-7.18) and anxiety (OR: 2.69; 95% CI: 1.27-5.71) were associated with fatigue. There was an impact on biopsychosocial aspects during the COVID-19 pandemic, with worsening of fatigue symptoms within a 6-month interval. In addition, fatigue was associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety, and worse sleep quality in the first year of the pandemic, remaining associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety in the second year of the pandemic in the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Female , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Sleep Quality , Depression/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Fatigue/psychology
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 993531, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119747

ABSTRACT

Background: A growing body of research shows that individuals with non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and heart disease, are more likely to suffer from severe COVID-19 and, subsequently, death. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of COVID-19-related knowledge on mental health, healthcare behaviors, and quality of life among the elderly with NCDs in Northern Thailand. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the participants were 450 elderly people with NCDs, living in the Chiang Rai province, Northern Thailand. Random sampling was applied to select the subjects. Data collection included demographic information, COVID-19-related knowledge, healthcare behaviors, the Suanprung Stress Test-20, the Thai General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) for the assessment of mental health, and the Thai version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF. Results: Almost half of the participants (45.6%) had poor knowledge about COVID-19. More than half of the sample had high stress (52.0%) and a low score in healthcare behaviors (64.9%), while approximately one-third of the participants had mental health problems (34.0%). The overall quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic was moderate (70.7%). The score of COVID-19-related knowledge was significantly correlated with scores of stress (r = -0.85), mental health (r = -0.74), healthcare behaviors (r = 0.50), and quality of life (r = 0.33). Multiple linear regression found that history of COVID-19 detection and COVID-19-related knowledge were associated with scores of stress and quality of life (p < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression showed that history of COVID-19 detection (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.45-13.84) and COVID-19-related knowledge (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.17-0.31) were associated with mental health problem (p < 0.05). Discussion: The findings emphasize the importance of COVID-19-related knowledge concerning the improvement of self-care behaviors and quality of life in the elderly population with NCDs during the pandemic, especially due to the high rate of stress and mental health problems documented in our sample. Health education interventions for this vulnerable population should be organized.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Humans , Aged , Mental Health , Quality of Life/psychology , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Thailand/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Self Care , Pandemics
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 986158, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119504

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Physical activity is essential for a healthy life and quality of life, representing a fundamental role in individuals' physical and mental health. Concomitantly, the physical therapist, through the promotion of physical activity and exercise, can improve mental health, an essential factor in the current pandemic, triggering anxiety, fear, and depression crisis. Objective: To verify physical activity among Portuguese physical therapists and its association with mental health during pandemic times. Methods: An online questionnaire was applied through social media to all Portuguese physical therapists between October 21, 2021, and January 14, 2022. It contained general characterization questions of the sample, the IPAQ-SF questionnaire to assess physical activity levels, the Goldberg General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), which assesses the levels of mental health and the WHO Well-Being Index (WHO-5) to assess the subjective wellbeing. Results: The sample totaled 286 respondents (82% female), with a mean age of 33. Of the total answers, 82% practiced physical activity, 45% had moderate levels of physical activity, and 19% vigorous. Physical therapists in these categories had lower values in the GHQ-28 and higher in the WHO-5. Those with better mental health also showed better subjective wellbeing (r = -0.571, p = 0.000). Conclusion: The data obtained showed that physical therapists mostly have moderate and vigorous levels of physical activity and that physical activity positively influences individuals' mental health and wellbeing, which proved to be a key factor due to the pandemic situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Humans , Female , Adult , Male , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Portugal/epidemiology , Exercise
10.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277694, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119282

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study aims to investigate the health-related quality of life and coping strategies among COVID-19 survivors in Bangladesh. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 2198 adult, COVID-19 survivors living in Bangladesh. Data were collected from previously diagnosed COVID-19 participants (confirmed by an RT-PCR test) via door-to-door interviews in the eight different divisions in Bangladesh. For data collection, Bengali-translated Brief COPE inventory and WHO Brief Quality of Life (WHO-QoLBREF) questionnaires were used. The data collection period was from October 2020 to March 2021. RESULTS: Males 72.38% (1591) were more affected by COVID-19 than females 27.62% (607). Age showed significant correlations (p<0.005) with physical, psychological and social relationships, whereas gender showed only a significant correlation with physical health (p<0.001). Marital status, occupation, living area, and co-morbidities showed significant co-relation with all four domains of QoL (p<0.001). Education and affected family members showed significant correlation with physical and social relationship (p<0.001). However, smoking habit showed a significant correlation with both social relationship and environment (p<0.001). Age and marital status showed a significant correlation with avoidant coping strategies (p<0.001); whereas gender and co-morbidities showed a significant correlation with problem-focused coping strategies (p<0.001). Educational qualification, occupation and living area showed significant correlation with all three coping strategies(p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Survivors of COVID-19 showed mixed types of coping strategies; however, the predominant coping strategy was avoidant coping, followed by problem-focused coping, with emotion-focused coping reported as the least prevalent. Marital status, occupation, living area and co-morbidities showed a greater effect on QoL in all participants. This study represents the real scenario of nationwide health-associated quality of life and coping strategies during and beyond the Delta pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adult , Male , Female , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Survivors
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116074

ABSTRACT

Evidence shows that university students, especially healthcare students, experienced considerable health impacts during COVID-19. This study examined Hong Kong general nursing students' mental health and quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic. An online questionnaire composed of personal demographics, the Fear of COVID-19 scale (FCV-19S), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale short version (DASS21), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) was used for data collection in early 2021. Among 380 respondents, 170 (45%) did not attend clinical practicum during the pandemic. Students who did not participate in clinical training scored lower in FCV-19S but higher in WHOQOL-BREF than those who participated (p = 0.001 or p < 0.001). FCV-19S and WHOQOL-BREF were negatively correlated (r = -0.623 to -0.446, p < 0.001). Slight negative correlations were found between the FCV-19S and DASS-21 scores. Although there were no significant differences in DASS21 (p = 0.294-0.931) between these two student groups, there was a considerably high prevalence rate of depression (57.1%), anxiety (47.6%), and stress (39.5%). Hong Kong nursing students, especially those who attended clinical practicum during the pandemic, experienced substantial emotional and quality of life implications. Local universities are recommended to organize appropriate interventions to prepare and support nursing students' wellbeing and health in coping with future disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , Mental Health , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hong Kong/epidemiology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110078

ABSTRACT

This was a systematic review of studies examining the effect of COVID-19 on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children and adolescents. The review was conducted by examining the current literature and analyzing up-to-date evidence. The studies were extracted from three major databases (CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE, and Web of Science) and analyzed. Studies on children and adolescents whose HRQoL has been affected by COVID-19 were included based on the eligibility criteria. Ultimately, eight studies met these criteria. The evidence of the selected studies was analyzed; the research design, age categories, respondents, evaluation tools, gender differences, and variability before and during COVID-19 were systematically reviewed. This review found differences in these groups regarding oral symptoms, functional limitations, emotional well-being, and social well-being. Furthermore, this review highlighted the relative paucity of studies that comprehensively investigate the latest evidence of changes in the HRQoL of children and adolescents due to COVID-19 in preparation for the post-COVID era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sex Factors
13.
Trials ; 23(1): 923, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108881

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Considering the confinement recommended by the World Health Organization due to the pandemic caused by COVID-19, many community physical exercise programmes for older adults have had their activities cancelled. In this context, proposing strategies to recover the possible adverse effects of the confinement period is pertinent. The use of self-management strategies associated with regular physical activity reduces sedentary behaviour and improves physical capacity in older adults. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe a multicomponent training programme combined with a self-management strategy protocol to mitigate the effects of interruptions in physical exercise programmes on functionality, physical capacity, mental health, body composition and quality of life in older adults. METHODS: This will be a blinded, randomized and controlled clinical trial performed in São Carlos, SP, Brazil. Eighty older adults will be divided into two groups: multicomponent training (Multi) and multicomponent training + self-management strategies (Multi+SM). The intervention will be performed over 16 weeks on three alternate days of every week, with 50-min sessions. The assessment of physical capacity will be performed before the interruption of physical exercise programmes (T0: initial assessment, March 2020), preintervention (T1: immediately after the return of the exercise programme) and postintervention (T2). The assessments of physical activity level, quality of life, mental health, functionality and body composition will be performed at T1 and T2. DISCUSSION: The results from this MC+SM protocol will allow us to contribute clinical support to evaluate the variables analysed and to guide future public health policies with the aim of minimizing the possible deleterious effects arising from the physical exercise interruption periods caused by epidemics and pandemics. TRIAL REGISTRATION: RBR-10zs97gk . Prospectively registered in Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC) on 17 June 2021. Registry name: Use of self-management strategies combined with multicomponent training to mitigate the effects of social distancing due to COVID-19 on capacity, physical capacity, mental health and quality of life in older adults - A blind, randomized and controlled clinical trial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Management , Humans , Aged , Sedentary Behavior , Quality of Life/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Self-Management/methods , Mental Health , Exercise , Exercise Therapy/methods , Body Composition , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
14.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276590, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098751

ABSTRACT

Prolonged periods of social isolation are known to have significant negative health consequences and reduce quality of life, an effect that is particularly pronounced in older populations. Despite the known deleterious effects of social isolation, a key component of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been the issuance of stay at home and/or shelter in place orders. Relatively little is known about the potential effects these periods of social isolation could have on older adults, and less still is known about potential risk factors or protective factors that modulate these effects. Here, we describe results from a longitudinal study in which we measured quality of life both prior to and immediately following a one-month period of social isolation associated with the issuance and revocation of a shelter in place order (April 6, 2020 through May 4, 2020) in the state of South Carolina. Healthy adult participants (N = 62) between the ages of 60 and 80 who had already completed quality of life questionnaires prior to isolation again completed the questionnaires following a one-month order to shelter in place. Quality of life significantly decreased during the social isolation period, with older participants showing the greatest declines. Participants with higher levels of physical activity and better physical/mental health going into the isolation period tended to show greater decreases in quality of life over time. These results highlight the negative consequences of even short bouts of social isolation for the elderly and suggest that reductions in social contact related to COVID-19 may have significant effects on mental health and emotional well-being, at least among older individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Middle Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Quality of Life/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Depression/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology
15.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 422, 2022 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, there is limited evidence about the long-term impact on physical, social and emotional functioning, i.e. health-related quality of life (HRQL) after mild or moderate COVID-19 not requiring hospitalization. We compared HRQL among persons with initial mild, moderate or severe/critical COVID-19 at 1 and 12 months following illness onset with Dutch population norms and investigated the impact of restrictive public health control measures on HRQL. METHODS: RECoVERED, a prospective cohort study in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, enrolled adult participants after confirmed SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis. HRQL was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-item health survey (SF-36). SF-36 scores were converted to standard scores based on an age- and sex-matched representative reference sample of the Dutch population. Differences in HRQL over time were compared among persons with initial mild, moderate or severe/critical COVID-19 using mixed linear models adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: By December 2021, 349 persons were enrolled of whom 269 completed at least one SF-36 form (77%). One month after illness onset, HRQL was significantly below population norms on all SF-36 domains except general health and bodily pain among persons with mild COVID-19. After 12 months, persons with mild COVID-19 had HRQL within population norms, whereas persons with moderate or severe/critical COVID-19 had HRQL below population norms on more than half of the SF-36 domains. Dutch-origin participants had significantly better HRQL than participants with a migration background. Participants with three or more COVID-19 high-risk comorbidities had worse HRQL than part participants with fewer comorbidities. Participants who completed the SF-36 when restrictive public health control measures applied reported less limitations in social and physical functioning and less impaired mental health than participants who completed the SF-36 when no restrictive measures applied. CONCLUSIONS: Twelve months after illness onset, persons with initial mild COVID-19 had HRQL within population norms, whereas persons with initial moderate or severe/critical COVID-19 still had impaired HRQL. Having a migration background and a higher number of COVID-19 high-risk comorbidities were associated with worse HRQL. Interestingly, HRQL was less impaired during periods when restrictive public health control measures were in place compared to periods without.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adult , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Neurol Sci ; 443: 120487, 2022 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095674

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Limited data exists evaluating predictors of long-term outcomes after hospitalization for COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of patients hospitalized for COVID-19. The following outcomes were collected at 6 and 12-months post-diagnosis: disability using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), activities of daily living assessed with the Barthel Index, cognition assessed with the telephone Montreal Cognitive Assessment (t-MoCA), Neuro-QoL batteries for anxiety, depression, fatigue and sleep, and post-acute symptoms of COVID-19. Predictors of these outcomes, including demographics, pre-COVID-19 comorbidities, index COVID-19 hospitalization metrics, and life stressors, were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 790 COVID-19 patients who survived hospitalization, 451(57%) completed 6-month (N = 383) and/or 12-month (N = 242) follow-up, and 77/451 (17%) died between discharge and 12-month follow-up. Significant life stressors were reported in 121/239 (51%) at 12-months. In multivariable analyses, life stressors including financial insecurity, food insecurity, death of a close contact and new disability were the strongest independent predictors of worse mRS, Barthel Index, depression, fatigue, and sleep scores, and prolonged symptoms, with adjusted odds ratios ranging from 2.5 to 20.8. Other predictors of poor outcome included older age (associated with worse mRS, Barthel, t-MoCA, depression scores), baseline disability (associated with worse mRS, fatigue, Barthel scores), female sex (associated with worse Barthel, anxiety scores) and index COVID-19 severity (associated with worse Barthel index, prolonged symptoms). CONCLUSIONS: Life stressors contribute substantially to worse functional, cognitive and neuropsychiatric outcomes 12-months after COVID-19 hospitalization. Other predictors of poor outcome include older age, female sex, baseline disability and severity of index COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Activities of Daily Living , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life/psychology , Longitudinal Studies , Hospitalization , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology
17.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 49: 101688, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095244

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity has been a great public health concern among breast cancer survivors (BCS), especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, as it is closely related to a higher risk of cancer recurrence and mortality. The positive impacts of psychosocial beliefs in promoting physical activity (PA) have been well acknowledged. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the effects of psychosocial beliefs on PA in BCS to prevent physical inactivity. Furthermore, we examined the relationships between daily activities, trip behaviors, and associated subjective well-being. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional, descriptive study design. Female BCS who were able to exercise regularly completed the battery of assessments in March 2021. Specifically, the international PA questionnaires and the adapted PA-related psychosocial beliefs questionnaires were used to assess BCS's PA and psychosocial beliefs, respectively. In addition, the smartphone-based Day Reconstruction Method was utilized to measure subjective well-being. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-squared test, analyses of variance, and correlation analysis. RESULTS: In the context of investigations during the COVID-19 pandemic, our study showed that 77.8% of BCS reported meeting PA guidelines. As the components of psychosocial beliefs, the change strategies, social support, and confidence were significantly associated with higher PA levels. Additionally, the protective effect of leisure/recreation activities among BCS on their emotional well-being was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study demonstrated the importance of understanding the relationship between BCS's psychosocial beliefs and PA during the pandemic. Notably, this study is unique because it used an application-based method to assess BCS' subjective well-being objectively.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Female , Humans , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Exercise/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology
19.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 63(2): E231-E239, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081074

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of the study was to ascertain Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQOL) and evaluate oralhygiene practices in patients visiting a dental institution during COVID-19 time. Materials and methods: Face-to face interviews were conducted using a semi-structured close-ended questionnaire,assessing oral hygiene practices and self-reported oral problems perceived in last 6 months, using both Hindi and English version of Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) Questionnaire. Frequency distribution of oral hygiene practices were obtained, and Descriptive statistics computed the scores of OHIP-14. Kruskal-wallis test and Independent t-test were used to match the association of OHIP-14 with demographic variables. Multiple linear regression analysis was utilized to compute the association of OHIP-14 with independent variables, age and gender. Results: Subjective evaluation of OHRQOL (Oral Health Related Quality of Life) using OHIP-14 Porforma resulted in high score for physical pain and psychological discomfort but subjects expressed less discomfort in connection to functional limitation, physical disability, psychological discomfort, social disability and handicap domains of OHIP-14. With progressive increase in age OHRQOL worsened. Females had poor OHRQOL, with significant difference as compared to males. Gender and marital status observed variance in OHIP-14 with statistically significant difference (P <0.000). Conclusion: More than two-third subjects preferred cleaning their teeth using toothbrush and toothpaste. Therefore, COVID-19 consequently impacted OHRQOL of the general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Female , Humans , India , Male , Oral Health , Oral Hygiene , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
20.
West Afr J Med ; 39(10): 1021-1025, 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2073027

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused millions of mortalities globally. Although the prevalence and fatality rates of COVID-19 among adolescents is low, its impact on their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is not adequately known. This study was carried out to determine the burden COVID-19 pandemic has on the HRQoL of adolescents. METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out among adolescents in public and private secondary schools in Jos North Local Government Area of Plateau State. A multistage sampling technique was employed to select the schools and recruit the participants in April/May 2021. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire containing the participants' socio-demographic characteristics, questions on being burdened by COVID-19 pandemic, and the KIDSCREEN-10 tool for assessing the HRQoL. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 25.0 and a p-value of < 0.05 was regarded as significant. RESULTS: A total of 405 adolescents participated in the study with a mean age of 14.6 ± 2.06 years. Majority (52.8%) of the participants were girls. More than half (53.3%) of the participants reported being burdened by the COVID-19 pandemic. Also, 45.7% of the participants experienced a lower HRQoL. There was a statistically significant association between being burdened by the COVID-19 pandemic and their HRQoL (χ2 = 7.108, p = 0.01). In addition, the participants' HRQoL was significantly associated with their age (χ2= 5.112, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: This study highlights the significant burden of COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents' wellbeing. Therefore, there is the need to intensify health intervention strategies among adolescents to reduce the physical, emotional, and mental burden imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic in order to optimize their quality of life.


CONTEXTE: La maladie de coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) a causé des millions de décès dans le monde. Bien que la prévalence et les taux de mortalité du COVID-19 chez les adolescents soient faibles, son impact sur leur qualité de vie liée à la santé (QVLS) n'est pas suffisamment connu. Cette étude a été menée pour déterminer le poids de la pandémie de COVID-19 sur la QVLS des adolescents. MÉTHODES: Une étude descriptive transversale a été menée parmi les adolescents des écoles secondaires publiques et privées de la région de Jos North Local Government Area de l'Etat du Plateau. Une technique d'échantillonnage à plusieurs degrés a été utilisée pour sélectionner les écoles et recruter les participants en avril/mai 2021. Les données ont été collectées à l'aide d'un questionnaire auto-administré contenant les caractéristiques sociodémographiques des participants, des questions sur le fardeau que représente la pandémie de COVID-19, et l'outil KIDSCREEN-10 pour évaluer la qualité de vie. Les données ont été analysées à l'aide de SPSS version 25.0 et une valeur p < 0,05 a été considérée comme significative. RÉSULTATS: Un total de 405 adolescents ont participé à l'étude avec un âge moyen de 14,6 ± 2,06 ans. La majorité (52,8%) des participants étaient des filles. Plus de la moitié (53,3%) des participants ont déclaré être accablés par la pandémie de COVID-19. En outre, 45,7 % des participants ont connu une baisse de leur qualité de vie. Il y avait une association statistiquement significative entre le fait d'être accablé par la pandémie de COVID-19 et leur QVLS (χ2 = 7,108, p = 0,01). De plus, la QVLS des participants était significativement associée à leur âge (χ2 = 5,112, p = 0,02). CONCLUSION: Cette étude met en évidence le poids important de la pandémie de COVID-19 sur le bien-être des adolescents. Il est donc nécessaire d'intensifier les stratégies d'intervention sanitaire auprès des adolescents pour réduire le fardeau physique, émotionnel et mental imposé par la pandémie de COVID-19 afin d'optimiser leur qualité de vie. Mots clés: Adolescents, École secondaire, COV ID-19, Qualité de vie liée à la santé (QVLS), Jos.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Female , Adolescent , Humans , Child , Male , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Nigeria/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Schools , Students
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