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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261818, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1623662

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Our project aims to provide: an overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the field of mental health professionals in 23 countries;a model of recommendations for good practice and proposals for methods and digital tools to improve the well-being at work of mental health professionals and the quality of services offered during crisis and post-crisis periods;an in-depth ethics review of the assessment of the use of numerical tools for psychiatry professionals and patient support, including teleconsulting. METHODS: This is a large international survey conducted among 2,000 mental health professionals in 23 countries over a 12-month period. This survey will be based on 30 individual interviews and 20 focus group sessions, and a digital questionnaire will be sent online to 2,000 professionals based on the criteria of gender, age, professional experience, psychiatric specialty, context of work in psychiatry, and geographical location. Regarding the development of telepsychiatry during the COVID-19 pandemic, a pilot study on the use of digital tools will be carried out on 100 clients of psychiatry professionals in France and Belgium. DISCUSSION-CONCLUSION: This study will contribute to the co-construction of an international organization and monitoring system that takes into account psychiatric health professionals as major resources to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and to develop efficient processes for preparing and anticipating crises by reducing psychosocial risks as much as possible. This project also aims to design tools for remote medicine and to develop the use of numerical tools for monitoring and supporting professionals and helping professionals to build the conditions for satisfactory operational work during crises and post-crisis situations, using adapted organizational methods. Our ongoing research should support professionals in the search for existing concrete solutions to cope with emergency work situations while maintaining an optimal quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health , Pandemics , Professional Practice , Psychotherapists/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e21615, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has shined a harsh light on a critical deficiency in our health care system: our inability to access important information about patients' values, goals, and preferences in the electronic health record (EHR). At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), we have integrated and systematized health-related values discussions led by oncology nurses for newly diagnosed cancer patients as part of routine comprehensive cancer care. Such conversations include not only the patient's wishes for care at the end of life but also more holistic personal values, including sources of strength, concerns, hopes, and their definition of an acceptable quality of life. In addition, health care providers use a structured template to document their discussions of patient goals of care. OBJECTIVE: To provide ready access to key information about the patient as a person with individual values, goals, and preferences, we undertook the creation of the Patient Values Tab in our center's EHR to display this information in a single, central location. Here, we describe the interprofessional, interdisciplinary, iterative process and user-centered design methodology that we applied to build this novel functionality as well as our initial implementation experience and plans for evaluation. METHODS: We first convened a working group of experts from multiple departments, including medical oncology, health informatics, information systems, nursing informatics, nursing education, and supportive care, and a user experience designer. We conducted in-depth, semistructured, audiorecorded interviews of over 100 key stakeholders. The working group sought consensus on the tab's main content, homing in on high-priority areas identified by the stakeholders. The core content was mapped to various EHR data sources. We established a set of high-level design principles to guide our process. Our user experience designer then created wireframes of the tab design. The designer conducted usability testing with physicians, nurses, and other health professionals. Data validation testing was conducted. RESULTS: We have already deployed the Patient Values Tab to a pilot sample of users in the MSK Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Service, including physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, and administrative staff. We have early evidence of the positive impact of this EHR innovation. Audit logs show increasing use. Many of the initial user comments have been enthusiastically positive, while others have provided constructive suggestions for additional tab refinements with respect to format and content. CONCLUSIONS: It is our challenge and obligation to enrich the EHR with information about the patient as a person. Realization of this capability is a pressing public health need requiring the collaboration of technological experts with a broad range of clinical leaders, users, patients, and families to achieve solutions that are both principled and practical. Our new Patient Values Tab represents a step forward in this important direction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Electronic Health Records/organization & administration , Medical Informatics/methods , Palliative Care/methods , Quality of Life/psychology , User-Centered Design , Humans
3.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 84(2): 883-893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518456

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with advanced dementia often exhibit responsive behaviors such as apathy, depression, agitation, aggression, and psychosis. Non-pharmacological approaches (e.g., listening to music, watching television, doing arts and crafts) are now considered as a first-line strategy to manage responsive behaviors in clinical practice due to the potential risks associated with the antipsychotic medications. To date, no evaluations of immersive non-head mounted virtual reality (VR) experience as a non-pharmacologic approach for people with advanced dementia living in nursing homes have been reported. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility (acceptance and safety) of VR experience. METHODS: A single site case series (nonrandomized and unblinded) with a convenience sample (N = 24; age = 85.8±8.6 years; Cognitive Performance Scale score = 3.4±0.6) measuring depression and agitation before and after the intervention. The intervention was a 30-min long research coordinator- facilitated VR experience for two weeks (10 sessions). RESULTS: The intervention was feasible (attrition rate = 0% ; adverse events = 0). A reduction in depression and in agitation was observed after the intervention. However, we suggest extreme caution in interpreting this result considering the study design and small sample size. CONCLUSION: This study provides the basis for conducting a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of VR experience on responsive behaviors in nursing homes. Since our intervention uses a smart remote-controlled projector without a headset, infectious exposure can be avoided following the COVID-19 pandemic-induced physical distancing policy in care homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virtual Reality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aggression/psychology , Dementia/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Quality of Life/psychology
4.
Qual Life Res ; 30(8): 2123-2135, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509285

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) has been used successfully for the past decade in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) refractory to conventional ventilatory support. However, knowledge of the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in VV-ECMO patients is still limited. Thus, this study aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the HRQoL following VV-ECMO support in ARDS patients. METHODS: A systematic search was performed on PubMed and Web of Science databases from January 1st, 2009 to October 19th, 2020. Studies reporting on HRQoL following VV-ECMO for ARDS in adults were included. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed methodological quality. RESULTS: Eight studies were eligible for inclusion, consisting of seven observational studies and one randomized controlled trial (total N = 441). All eight studies had a quantitative design and reported 265 VV-ECMO survivors to have a reduced HRQoL compared to a generally healthy population. Follow-up time varied between six months to three years. Additionally, only four studies (total N = 335) compared the HRQoL of VV-ECMO (N = 159) to conventionally treated survivors (N = 176), with one study showing a significantly better HRQoL in VV-ECMO survivors, while three studies were stating comparable HRQoL across groups. Notably, most survivors in these studies appeared to experience varying degrees of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). CONCLUSIONS: ARDS survivors supported by VV-ECMO have a decline in HRQoL and suffered from physical and psychological impairments. This HRQoL reduction is comparable or even better to the HRQoL in conventionally treated ARDS survivors.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Health Status , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/psychology , Survivors , Treatment Outcome
5.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259164, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496530

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (Covid-19) has led to a global pandemic since its emergence in December 2019. The majority of research into Covid-19 has focused on transmission, and mortality and morbidity associated with the virus. However, less attention has been given to its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with Covid-19. METHODS: We searched for original studies published between December 2019 and Jan 2021 in PubMed, Scopus and Medline databases using a specific search strategy. We also explored literature on websites of distinguished public health organisations and hand-searched reference lists of eligible studies. The studies were screened by two reviewers according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) flowchart using pre-determined eligibility criteria. Data were synthesised, analysed descriptively and reported in line with PRISMA guidelines. RESULTS: In total, 1276 studies were identified through the search strategy. Of these, 77 studies were selected for full-text reading after screening the studies. After reading full-text, 12 eligible studies were included in this review. The majority of the studies used a generic HRQoL assessment tool; five studies used SF-36, five studies used EQ-5D-5L, and three used pulmonary disease-specific HRQoL tools (two studies used two tools each). The impact of Covid-19 on HRQoL was found to be considerable in both Acute Covid and Long Covid patients. Higher impact on HRQoL was reported in Acute Covid, females, older ages, patients with more severe disease and patients from low-income countries. CONCLUSION: The impact of Covid-19 on HRQoL of Acute and Long Covid patients is substantial. There was disproportional impact on patients by gender, age, severity of illness and study country. The long-term impact of Covid-19 is still in its initial stage. The findings of the review may be useful to researchers, policymakers, and clinicians caring for people following Covid-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
6.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(3): 791-805, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on sexual quality of life (SQoL) is a well-established survivorship issue for gynaecological cancer survivors (GCS), yet little is known on how to intervene. PURPOSE: The aim of this systematic review was to identify the factors explaining the variability in SQoL for GCS. METHODS: We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework and the software Covidence. Electronic databases Scopus, Web of Science, PUBMED and CINAHL were searched for original research on GCS published between 2002 and 2018. We performed a two-stage screening process against selection criteria and quality assessment of individual studies. The Salutogenic Theory and the PRECEDE-PROCEED model were used as theoretical frameworks to identify and categorise factors. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 3,505 articles resulting in a total of 46 studies used to examine the association between factors of SQoL and gynaecological cancers. Our findings suggested that SQoL varies across subgroups based on age, menopausal status, relationship status, and treatment modality. Protective factors included clinicians' knowledge and confidence, preventive medical approach, risk and needs assessment, patient-clinician communication, relationship quality, psychosocial support, symptom management, accessibility of psychosexual care, and self-efficacy in the rediscovery of sexuality. CONCLUSION: Despite the high incidence and long-term impact of sexual health issues on quality of life, supportive care needs are not being met. A better understanding of the evidence base around the factors of SQoL can help health professionals take steps to protect and improve SQoL in GCS.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors/psychology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/psychology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology , Australia , Female , Humans , Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/etiology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology
7.
Nat Struct Mol Biol ; 28(8): 627, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434131
8.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256643, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398934

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has impacted people around the globe. Countries, including Indonesia, implemented large-scale social restrictions. Since marriage is found to be beneficial to people's quality of life (QoL), the study aimed to examine the QoL of married people in Indonesia during a large-scale social restriction of the COVID-19 pandemic. An online cross-sectional survey using Qualtrics was conducted in June 2020. Respondents' sociodemographic data, spouse data (as reported by the respondents), and pandemic-related data were collected, followed by QoL data, measured by WHQOOL-BREF. WHOQL-BREF consists of 26 questions grouped into four domains: physical, psychological, social relationships, and environmental. Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H and Spearman correlation analyses were employed to compare QoL between groups of sociodemographic characteristics. In total, 603 respondents were recruited. The respondents' mean age is 35.3 years (SD = 7.61), most are females (82%), bachelor degree graduate (95%), Islam (78%), employed (69%), and assigned to work from home during the pandemic (76%). Married men reported better QoL in almost all domains than women; employed respondents reported higher QoL scores than unemployed; higher educated respondents reported higher QoL than those with lower education; respondents with higher income reported higher QoL than those with lower income. We found significant positive correlations between the QoL scores and age, spouse's age, and marriage length, although they were considered small. Compared to Indonesian population normative scores pre-pandemic, our sample reported no difference in physical and social domains, lower in the psychological domain, but higher in the environmental domain. Indonesian married people, especially women, those with low level of education, currently out of work, and below-average financial condition are the ones who reported worse quality of life during the lockdown. These results can help direct the Indonesian government efforts in dealing with psychosocial problems during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially for married couples.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Marriage/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
9.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 42(5): 403-408, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394715

ABSTRACT

Background: The demonstration that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) enters the cell via the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor has raised concerns that, in hereditary angioedema (HAE), a disease characterized by bradykinin-mediated angioedema attacks, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may trigger angioedema attacks, increase the frequency and/or severity of attacks, or cause more severe symptoms of COVID-19. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the severity of COVID-19 in patients with HAE, the course of HAE attacks, angioedema activity, and the quality-of-life scores during COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Patients diagnosed with HAE for at least 6 months were included in the study. The 7-day Angioedema Activity Score and the Angioedema Quality of Life (AE-QoL) Questionnaire were first completed at the onset of the pandemic between March 12 and June 1, 2020, then during SARS-CoV-2 infection, and in the third month after recovering from COVID-19. Results: Ten of 67 patients with HAE (14.9%) were diagnosed with COVID-19. The median (interquartile range) age of the 10 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 was 35.5 years (28.0-55.0 years). Six of the 10 patients (60%) were women. During COVID-19, five of the 10 patients (50%) had no angioedema attack. Two patients with severe HAE experienced a significant increase in angioedema activity during COVID-19 compared with their basal activity scores. The remaining three patients had a similar or lower attack frequency than their basal level. Four (40%) of the 10 patients had a relative increase in their attacks during the convalescence period. There was no statistically significant difference among pre-COVID-19, during COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 periods in function, mood, fear and/or shame, nutrition, and total scores of the AE-QoL Questionnaire although the fear dimension was relatively more affected (p = 0.06). Conclusion: Although the sample size was small, analysis of our data supported that the symptoms of COVID-19 were not more severe in HAE. Also, there was no significant difference in the AE-QoL Questionnaire scores, the frequency, and severity of angioedema attacks during the course of COVID-19 in the patients with HAE.


Subject(s)
Angioedemas, Hereditary/complications , COVID-19/complications , Disease Progression , Quality of Life , Severity of Illness Index , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angioedemas, Hereditary/diagnosis , Angioedemas, Hereditary/physiopathology , Angioedemas, Hereditary/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life/psychology
10.
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol ; 147(5): 1469-1479, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384445

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The severe acute respiratory syndrome-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic disrupted medical care for persons with cancer including those with lymphoma. Many professional societies recommend postponing, decreasing, or stopping anti-cancer therapy in selected persons during the pandemic. Although seemingly sensible, these recommendations are not evidence-based and their impact on anxiety and health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) is unknown. METHODS: We surveyed 2532 subjects including 1060 persons with lymphoma, 948 caregivers, and 524 normals using a purposed-designed questionnaire on a patient organization website. Respondents also completed the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety and patient respondents, the EORTC QLQ-C30 instruments to quantify anxiety, and HRQoL. We also evaluated caregiver support and an online education programme of the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO). Data of HRQoL from a 2019 pre-pandemic online survey of 1106 persons with lymphoma were a control. RESULTS: 33% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30, 36%) of lymphoma patients and 31% (28, 34%) of caregivers but only 21% (17, 24%) of normals had any level of anxiety (both pair-wise P < 0.001). Among lymphoma respondents, physical exercise and better caregiver support were associated with less anxiety, whereas female sex, receiving therapy, and reduced therapy intensity were associated with more anxiety. Paradoxically, lymphoma respondents during the pandemic had better HRQoL than pre-pandemic controls. Reduced therapy intensity was associated with worse HRQoL, whereas respondents who scored caregiver support and the online patient education programme high had better HRQoL. CONCLUSION: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, lymphoma patients and their caregivers had significantly higher incidences of anxiety compared with normals. Lymphoma respondents reported better HRQoL compared with pre-pandemic controls. Reduced therapy intensity in persons with cancer may have unanticipated adverse effects on anxiety and HRQoL. Regular and intense support by caregivers and online education programmes alleviate anxiety and improve HRQoL.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Lymphoma/therapy , Quality of Life/psychology , Withholding Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet , Lymphoma/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Psychosocial Support Systems , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 188, 2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381260

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As a result of high transmission and mortality rates, the Covid-19 pandemic has led to a worldwide health crisis, isolation, and widespread fear, therefore negatively influencing people's quality of life (QOL). The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties (validity and reliability) of the Persian version of the COVID-19-Impact on Quality of Life (COV19-QoL) scale. METHODS: After translating the scale using the forward-backward method, face and content validly was qualitatively assessed. Then the scale was distributed to 488 individuals from the general population via online platforms. Construct validity was assessed using exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory (CFA) factor analysis. In addition, internal consistency was examined using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and McDonald's omega, relative stability was assessed using interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and absolute stability was calculated through examination of standard error of measurement. RESULTS: The EFA revealed one factor that explained 55.96% of the total variance of the scale. Internal consistencies of 0.823 and 0.882 were found using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and McDonald's omega, respectively. In addition, an ICC of 0.837 (with a two-week interval) was found. Covid-19 had a greater impact on the QOL of healthy participants than that of those with underling conditions (p = 0.004), and also on the QOL of single participants than that of married ones (p = 0.032). CONCLUSION: The Persian version of the COV19-QoL is a valid and reliable instrument that can be used to examine the impact of Covid-19 on QOL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Psychometrics/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 207, 2021 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376587

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of COVID-19 on Health-Care Professionals' mental health has received increased attention in the last year's literature. However, previous studies essentially evaluated psychopathological symptoms and not the presence of positive mental health. Therefore, the first objective of the present research is to evaluate health-care professionals' mental illness (i.e., anxiety and traumatic intensity) and positive mental health (i.e., well-being) using the Complete State Model of Health. Our second objective is to study the effect of Personal Protection Equipment availability on professionals' mental health. METHODS: Two-hundred and thirty-two health-care professionals working in Spain in the first line of COVID-19 patient care participated in the study. To measure anxiety, traumatic intensity and well-being participants completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Davidson Trauma Scale, and the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form. Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationships between all scales. In order to test the two continua model of mental health, we used parallel analysis and exploratory factor analysis. To analyze anxiety, traumatic intensity, and well-being differences between health-care professionals with and without Personal Protection Equipment availability we conducted different ANOVAS. To test our hypothesis regarding the moderating role of Personal Protection Equipment availability in the effect of mental illness on positive mental health, data were subjected to a hierarchical regression analysis. RESULTS: As in previous studies, health-care professionals showed high levels of anxiety and traumatic intensity. They also presented low levels of well-being indicators. According to our hypothesis, results of parallel analysis and exploratory factorial analysis indicated that the measures of mental illness and positive mental health loaded on separate but correlated factors. Finally, Personal Protection Equipment availability moderated the effects of state anxiety and traumatic intensity on professionals' well-being. CONCLUSIONS: Health-care professionals' mental illness and positive mental health reflect distinct continua, rather than the extreme ends of a single spectrum. Therefore, it is essential to measure both psychopathology and the presence of positive health to comprehensively evaluate professionals' mental health. Finally, our results indicated that Personal Protection Equipment availability is essential not only for professionals' physical health, but also for their mental health.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
13.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(10): 918-925, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376163

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and postponement of elective surgical procedures for profoundly deaf patients awaiting cochlear implantation. METHOD: Open-ended questionnaires were sent to all adult patients awaiting cochlear implantation surgery. Qualitative analysis was performed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Participants described a primarily negative impact on wellbeing from the surgery delay, expressing feelings of isolation or loneliness. Low mood, depression or hopelessness were commonly expressed by elderly participants; frustration and anxiety were described by young adults. Participants described a negative impact on their general daily life, describing difficulties communicating with facemasks and struggles with reliance on telephone communication because of social distancing. Despite these significant psychosocial challenges, only a minority described adaptive coping strategies. DISCUSSION: Profoundly deaf patients may be at greater psychosocial risk because of unique challenges from their hearing disability. Our findings can be used to develop evidence-driven strategies to improve communication, wellbeing and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cochlear Implantation/methods , Cochlear Implants/statistics & numerical data , Deafness/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cochlear Implants/supply & distribution , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Frustration , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
14.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 198, 2021 Aug 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365358

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant disruptions in the implementation of programs across educational institutions. Nursing students, being both young adults and by practical training, part of the health care system, may be particularly vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to explore the associations between self-reported fear of COVID-19, general health, psychological distress and overall quality of life (QoL) in a sample of Norwegian baccalaureate nursing students compared to reference data. METHODS: The survey targeted baccalaureate nursing students from five universities in February 2021. An electronic questionnaire consisted of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S), the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 5 (SCL-5), one general health and one overall QoL question. The respondents' mean scores were compared to reference data. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted, and effect sizes (Cohen's d) were evaluated. RESULTS: In total, 2605 out of 6088 (43%) students responded. Their FCV-19S scores (mean 2.45, CI 2.42, 2.48) were significantly higher than those of the reference population (mean 1.8, P < 0.001). Nursing students scores showed significantly lower general health (mean 3.50 ± 0.93 SD, population mean = 3.57, Cohen's d = 0.07), higher levels of psychological distress (mean 2.68 ± 1.03 SD, population mean = 2.12, Cohen's d = 0.55) and lower overall QoL (mean 5.50 ± 2.16 SD, population mean = 8.00, Cohen's d = 1.16) compared to pre-pandemic reference data. FCV-19S scores were significantly associated with levels of general health (Cohen's d = 0.26), psychological distress (Cohen's d = 0.76) and overall QoL (Cohen's d = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS: Baccalaureate nursing students reported worse outcomes during the Covid-19 pandemic on general health, psychological distress and overall QoL compared to the reference population. Level of fear of Covid-19, however, accounted for few of these differences. Other factors related to the pandemic may have reduced nursing students' overall QoL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Universities , Young Adult
15.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362085

ABSTRACT

With more than 82 million cases worldwide and almost two million deaths, the Covid-19 global pandemic shows little sign of abating. However, its effect on quality of life (QoL) in skin cancer patients has not been systematically evaluated to date. Given that QoL impairments may be associated with increased psychological morbidity, and may interfere with engagement with cancer therapy and follow-up, we prospectively evaluated quality of life in skin cancer patients using the Covid-19 Emotional Impact Survey (C-19EIS) and the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaires. 101 patients (48 females and 53 males) completed both questionnaires. The mean C-19EIS score was 3.8 on a scale from 0 (no impact) to 12 (severe impact). Patients undergoing systemic therapy showed significantly impaired physical (p = 0.006) and social functioning (p = 0.003). However, when compared to the published normative EORTC QLQ-C30 data, there was no evidence that the Covid-19 pandemic had significantly impacted upon overall quality of life. Subscales of the EORTC QLQ-C30 were significantly inversely correlated with the C-19EIS, validating its use in skin cancer patients. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, skin cancer patients in our tertiary referral center were surprisingly resilient. However, given the geographical variations in the rates of Sars-CoV-2 infection it is possible that the low incidence in Northern Germany may have resulted in a lack of general QoL impairments. Multi-center studies are required to further determine the impact of Covid-19 on psychological wellbeing in skin cancer patients in order to develop supportive interventions and to ensure that engagement with cancer care services is maintained in order to enable early detection of cancer progression and/or recurrence.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quality of Life/psychology , Skin Neoplasms/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Germany , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Resilience, Psychological , Skin Neoplasms/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(24)2020 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362362

ABSTRACT

Informal caregivers are people providing some type of unpaid, ongoing assistance to a person with a chronic illness or disability. Long-term care measures and policies cannot take place without taking into account the quantitatively crucial role played by informal caregivers. We use the European Health Interview Survey (EHIS), the European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS), and the Study on Health and Ageing in Europe (SHARE) to measure the prevalence of informal caregivers in the European population, and analyze associated socio-demographic factors. This rate ranges between about 13 percent in Portugal and Spain, and more than 22 percent in Luxembourg, Belgium, and Denmark. It declines in older age groups and, on average, is lower in men than in women in all countries studied, and lower among the poorly educated compared to those with higher levels of education. However, large variance was observed in the average share of informal caregivers for most countries between the three surveys. Our findings, estimated through the three surveys, reveal common trends, but also a series of disparities. Additional research will be needed to enable policy makers to access a richer and more harmonized body of data, allowing them to adopt truly evidence-based and targeted policies and interventions in this field.


Subject(s)
Caregivers/statistics & numerical data , Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Caregivers/psychology , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Care/psychology , Prevalence
17.
Ann Clin Psychiatry ; 33(3): 232-240, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current study aimed to determine the role of psychological experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic (depression, anxiety, loneliness, and COVID-19-related grief and worry) on young adult physical and mental health functioning as measured by health-related quality of life (HRQoL). METHODS: Using hierarchical multiple regression analyses, this cross-sectional study examined psychological predictors of physical and mental health functioning among young adults (age 18 to 30 years) from April 13 to September 5, 2020. RESULTS: Pre-existing depression diagnoses (beta = -0.124, P < .001), current depression symptoms (beta = -0.298, P < .001), and COVID-19-related worry (beta = -0.142, P < .001) significantly predicted poorer physical health functioning. Current depression and anxiety symptoms (beta = -0.342 and beta = -0.268), loneliness (beta = -0.135), and COVID-19-related grief (beta = -0.180) predicted lower self-reported mental health functioning (P < .001). Black (beta = -0.072) and Hispanic/Latinx participants (beta = -0.082) were more likely to indicate poorer physical health functioning (P < .01) relative to White participants, whereas women reported poorer mental health relative to men (beta = -0.047, P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies potential negative impacts of pandemic-related psychological experiences for young adults' health during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a need to consider mental health symptomatology, COVID-19-related experiences, race, and gender when designing efforts to address long-term implications on health.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Depression/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Young Adult
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26854, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354342

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prompted by the need to measure the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 on main areas of quality of life related to mental health (MH), the COV-19-impact on quality of life (COV19-QoL) scale has been developed recently. We measured how patients seeking face-to-face MH care perceived the coronavirus disease 2019 impact on QoL and how socio-demographic factors, stress, and personality contributed to QoL in this diagnostically diverse population.Patients aged 18 to 65 years (n = 251) who came for the first time to the outpatient units during the 6-week index-period (May 21-July 1, 2020) were included. The cross-sectional assessment involved sociodemographic variables, working diagnosis, personality traits (7-dimension model, including HEXACO and DELTA), stress (list of threatening experiences and proximity to virus), and COV19-QoL.The perceived impact of the pandemic on QoL was above the theoretical mean of a 5-point scale (COV19-Qol = 3.1 ±â€Š1.2). No association between total COV19-QoL score, sociodemographic parameters, and working diagnoses was found in the present sample. After testing whether positional (threatening experiences), or dispositional (personality) factors were predominant in the perceived impact of COV-19 on QoL, significant predictors of the outcome were personality traits Disintegration (B = 0.52; P < .01) and Emotionality (B = 0.18; P < .05).It seems that pervasiveness and uncertainty of the pandemic threat triggers-especially in those high on Disintegration trait-a chain of mental events with the decrease of QoL as a final result. Present findings could be used to establish a profile of MH help seeking population in relation to this biological disaster, and to further explore QoL and personality in different contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26813, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a fatal epidemic has swept across the world, especially in India where the epidemic situation is the most serious. For COVID-19 patients, pulmonary rehabilitation training plays a significant role. However, it is still a controversial issue regarding the efficacy of WeChat APP-based pulmonary rehabilitation training in improving lung function, quality of life and bad mood of COVID-19 patients. To clarify this issue, a meta-analysis was conducted in this present study, so as to provide a basis for rehabilitation guidance of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed, medRxiv, Web of Science, Scopus, Chinese Science Citation Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Wan-fang databases in May 2021 to identify randomized controlled trials and evaluate the effects of WeChat APP-based pulmonary rehabilitation training for COVID-19. Two researchers independently carried out data extraction. On the other hand, literature quality evaluation on the quality and meta-analysis of the included literature was performed with Revman5.3 software. RESULTS: The results of this meta-analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSION: This study will provide reliable evidence-based evidence on the effects of WeChat APP-based pulmonary rehabilitation training on lung function, bad mood, and quality of life in patients with COVID-19. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was not required for this study. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, presented at conferences, and shared on social media platforms. OSF REGISTRATION NUMBER: DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/MKXCH.


Subject(s)
Clinical Protocols , Rehabilitation/instrumentation , Social Media/instrumentation , Teaching/standards , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Mood Disorders/etiology , Mood Disorders/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/psychology , Systematic Reviews as Topic
20.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(3): 1047-1056, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has negatively affected the mental health of the general population. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the determinants of quality of life (QOL) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Impacts of lifestyle changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic on 100 patients with PD and their caregivers/spouses were assessed. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression. The physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores of the short form (SF)-8 were used to evaluate health-related QOL. RESULTS: Regarding health-related QOL, physical function, role physical, general health, vitality and the PCS score were significantly worse in PD patients than in caregivers. Worsening of PD-related symptoms, increased stress, and decreased physical activity were observed in 29.0%, 37.0% and 44.0% of PD patients, respectively. Sixteen patients (16.0%) experienced problems with hospital access, but none reported medication shortages. Strong concerns about COVID-19 were reported by 47.0% of caregivers and 50.0% of PD patients. In PD patients, increased gait disturbance and rigidity, disease severity, smoking, the levodopa equivalent dose and decreased body weight predicted a worse PCS score; anxiety, depression, female sex, stress and long disease duration predicted a worse MCS score. In caregivers, age and smoking contributed to a worse PCS score; depression, stress and worsening patient mood contributed to a worse MCS score. CONCLUSION: We report the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on health-related QOL and its determinants in PD patients and their caregivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers/psychology , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Spouses/psychology , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Health Surveys , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Parkinson Disease/nursing , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Time Factors
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