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1.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 27(10): 4801-4811, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237114

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There is a paucity of information on the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on young volunteers. Therefore, the aim of this survey was to examine the QoL and mental health of young volunteers of the Novi Sad Voluntary Service during the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional prospective study included 255 members of the Novi Sad Voluntary Service, Serbia. The survey instrument probed into the respondents' demographic characteristics and was followed by the anonymous WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire that measured their quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic and DASS-21 scale. All statistical analyses were carried out using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, vers. 24.0. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 255 young volunteers (71.4% females, 28.6% males), 62.0% of whom were aged 18-25 years, and 52.2% were students. Lower Physical Capacity scores could be predicted by female gender (p < 0.01) and COVID-19 infection among friends (p < 0.05). Male gender (p < 0.05) and being employed (p < 0.05) predicted greater QoL in the Psychological domain. The only predictor of a lower QoL in the Social Relationships domain was the internet as the main COVID-19-related information source (p < 0.05). On the other hand, being female (p < 0.05) and having COVID-19-positive household members (p = 0.01) predicted lower environment domain scores. For the lower overall DASS-21 score, having COVID-19-positive household members was the only significant predictor (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Mental health support should pursue strategies to improve all domains of QoL, especially for vulnerable sub-groups of the population, such as young females and the unemployed. Bearing in mind the importance of public engagement and community support in pandemic circumstances, as well as generally in public health, these results are relevant for interventions far beyond the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Quality of Life/psychology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Serbia/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 70(3): 26-36, 2023 Jun.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233980

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knee osteoarthritis is prevalent in older adults worldwide. Quality of life was negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. PURPOSE: This study was designed to examine osteoarthritis severity and health-related quality of life (QOL) in older adults with knee osteoarthritis before total knee replacement during the COVID-19 pandemic and to identify the related predictors of QOL. METHODS: This cross-sectional correlation study involved convenience sampling in the orthopedic ward of a regional teaching hospital in central Taiwan from June 2020 to June 2021 using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and the SF-36v2 Health Survey. The data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis, independent samples t test, and one-way analysis of variance to determine correlations among demographic variables, osteoarthritis severity, and QOL. The predictors of QOL were examined using stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 60 older adults diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were sampled. The average age was 70 years and the average osteoarthritis severity score was 70.45. Being male, having comorbidities, and having a relatively high level of monthly disposable income were associated with poorer QOL. Moreover, more severe knee pain, stiffness, and physical dysfunction were associated with better psychological QOL. CONCLUSIONS / IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the severity of knee osteoarthritis affects preoperative quality of life in older adults. Clinicians should detect signs of pain and physical dysfunction in these patients in advance and intervene in a timely manner to improve their QOL before surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Osteoarthritis, Knee , Humans , Male , Aged , Female , Osteoarthritis, Knee/surgery , Osteoarthritis, Knee/epidemiology , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Pain/psychology
4.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0278728, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long COVID patients suffer a negative impact on their quality of life, as well as their functioning, productivity or socialization. There is a need to better understand the individual experience and circumstances surrounding these patients. OBJECTIVE: To characterize clinical picture of Long COVID patients and to identify factors associated with quality of life. METHODS: A secondary data analysis from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) was carried out with 100 Long COVID patients treated by Primary Health Care and residents in the territory of Aragon (northeast of Spain). The main variable of the study was quality of life, evaluated using the SF-36 Questionnaire, in relation to socio-demographic and clinical variables. In addition, ten validated scales were used that contemplated their cognitive, affective, functional and social status, as well as personal constructs. Correlation statistics and linear regression model were calculated. RESULTS: Long COVID patients suffer a decrease in their levels of physical and mental health. On the one hand, the higher number of persistent symptoms (b = -0.900, p = 0.008), worse physical functioning (b = 1.587, p = 0.002) and sleep quality (b = -0.538, p = 0.035) are predictors of worse quality of life, physical subscale. On the other hand, higher educational level (b = 13.167, p = 0.017), lower number of persistent symptoms (b = -0.621, p = 0.057) and higher affective affectation (b = -1.402, p<0.001) are predictors of worse quality of life, mental subscale. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to design rehabilitation programs that consider both the physical and mental health of these patients, thus obtaining an improvement in their quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Humans , Secondary Data Analysis , Quality of Life/psychology , Mental Health
5.
Nutrients ; 15(7)2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317797

ABSTRACT

Advancements in cancer treatments over the past several decades have led to improved cancer survival in adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15-39 years). However, AYA cancer survivors are at an increased risk for "late effects", including cardiovascular, pulmonary and bone diseases as well as fatigue, infertility and secondary cancers. The treatments for cancer may also alter taste, lead to nutritional deficiencies and increase financial burdens that, when taken together, may increase the risk of food and nutrition security in AYA cancer survivors. Furthermore, although AYAs are often merged together in cancer survivorship studies, adolescents and young adults have distinct developmental, psychosocial and pathophysiological differences that may modify their risk of nutritional challenges. In this narrative review and "Call to Action", rationale is provided for why there is a need to better understand nutritional challenges and food insecurity in AYA cancer survivors as a special population. Then, recommendations for next steps to advance knowledge and policy in this field are provided. In particular, integrating screening for food and nutrition insecurity and enhancing awareness of existing resources (e.g., the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, SNAP) might help AYA cancer survivors combat nutritional deficiencies and reduce late effects while improving their overall survival and quality of life.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Malnutrition , Neoplasms , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Malnutrition/etiology , Food Insecurity
6.
Cancer Med ; 12(11): 12765-12776, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317326

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Therapeutic advances in lung cancer have turned attention toward patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) as important clinical outcomes. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) is a common endpoint in lung cancer trials. This study calculated FACT-L reference values for the United States (US) general population. METHODS: Adults from the US general population (N = 2001) were surveyed between September 2020 and November 2020. Surveys contained 126 questions, including the FACT-L [36 items; FACT-G and four subscales (Physical Well-Being [PWB], Social Well-Being [SWB], Emotional Well-Being [EWB], and Functional Well-Being [FWB]) and the Lung Cancer Subscale (LCS), and a Trial Outcome Index (TOI)]. Reference values for each FACT-L scale were calculated with means for the total sample and separately for participants with: no comorbidities, COVID-19 as only comorbidity, no COVID-19. RESULTS: In the total sample, the reference scores were as follows: PWB = 23.1; SWB = 16.8; EWB = 18.5; FWB = 17.6; FACT-G = 76.0; LCS = 23.0, TOI = 63.7, and FACT-L Total = 99.0. Scores were lower for those reporting a prior diagnosis of COVID-19, especially for SWB (15.7) and FWB (15.3). SWB scores were lower than previous references values. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide US general adult population reference value set for FACT-L. While some of the subscale results were lower than those found in the reference data for other PROMs, these data were obtained in a more contemporaneous time frame juxtaposed with the COVID-19 pandemic and may represent a new peri-pandemic norm. Thus, these reference values will be useful for future clinical research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Adult , Humans , Reference Values , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Lung , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 7717, 2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316890

ABSTRACT

A growing number of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections experience long-lasting symptoms. Even patients who suffered from a mild acute infection show a variety of persisting and debilitating neurocognitive, respiratory, or cardiac symptoms (Long-Covid syndrome), consequently leading to limitations in everyday life. Because data on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is scarce, we aimed to characterize the impact of Long-Covid symptoms after a mild or moderate acute infection on HRQoL. In this observational study, outpatients seeking counseling in the interdisciplinary Post-Covid consultation of the University Hospital Zurich with symptoms persisting for more than 4 weeks were included. Patients who received an alternative diagnosis or suffered from a severe acute Covid-19 infection were excluded. St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), Euroquol-5D-5L (EQ-5D-5L), and the Short form 36 (SF-36) were distributed to assess HRQoL. 112 patients were included, 86 (76.8%) were female, median (IQR) age was 43 (32.0, 52.5) years with 126 (91, 180) days of symptoms. Patients suffered frequently from fatigue (81%), concentration difficulties (60%), and dyspnea (60%). Patients mostly stated impairment in performing usual activities and having pain/discomfort or anxiety out of the EQ-5D-5L. EQ index value and SGRQ activity score component were significantly lower in females. SF-36 scores showed remarkably lower scores in the physical health domain compared to the Swiss general population before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Long-Covid syndrome has a substantial impact on HRQoL. Long-term surveillance of patients must provide clarity on the duration of impairments in physical and mental health.Trial registration: The study is registered on www.ClinicalTrials.gov , NCT04793269.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Female , Male , Quality of Life/psychology , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Int J Occup Med Environ Health ; 36(2): 274-290, 2023 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320968

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The study assessed quality of life and depression in working people during COVID-19 pandemic, relative to their physical activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study involved 1194 people living in south-eastern Poland, and assessed life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Questionnaire - 9 [LISAT-9]), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life - BREF [WHOQoL-BREF]), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]) and physical activity. RESULTS: The respondents on average scored 4.32 in LISAT-9; respectively 66.2, 68.3, 69.6 and 63.5 in physical, psychological, social and environment domains of WHOQoL-BREF and 9.2 in BDI. Regularly performed physical activity positively affected the scores in all the psychometric tests in women with higher and secondary education and in men with vocational education. Women presented lower life satisfaction, poorer quality of life and higher level of depression than men. The psychometric scores were also differentiated by type of employment and job. Depression was identified in 44% of all the respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals who are economically active during the pandemic report good quality of life and no or only mild signs of depression. Working people with higher education cope more effectively with adversities of the pandemic, compared to those with lower education. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2023;36(2):274-90.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Male , Humans , Female , Quality of Life/psychology , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0277741, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320260

ABSTRACT

While research has widely explored stress, coping, and quality of life (QOL) individually and the potential links between them, a critical dearth exists in the literature regarding these constructs in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our study aims to identify the salient stressors experienced, describe the coping strategies used, and examine the relationships between stressors, coping, and QOL among individuals during the pandemic. Data are from a sample of 1,004 respondents who completed an online survey. Key measures included stressful life events (SLEs), coping strategies, and the physical and psychological health domains of QOL. Staged multivariate linear regression analyses examined the relationships between SLEs and the two QOL domains, controlling for sociodemographic and pre-existing health conditions and testing for the effects of coping strategies on these relationships. The most common SLEs experienced during the pandemic were a decrease in financial status, personal injury or illness, and change in living conditions. Problem-focused coping (ß = 0.42, σ = 0.13, p < 0.001 for physical QOL; ß = 0.57, σ = 0.12, p < 0.001 for psychological QOL) and emotion-focused coping (ß = 0.86, σ = 0.13, p < 0.001 for psychological QOL) were significantly related to higher levels of QOL, whereas avoidant coping (ß = -0.93, σ = 0.13, p < 0.001 for physical QOL; ß = -1.33, σ = 0.12, p < 0.001 for psychological QOL) was associated with lower QOL. Avoidant coping partially mediated the relationships between experiencing SLEs and lower physical and psychological QOL. Our study informs clinical interventions to help individuals adopt healthy behaviors to effectively manage stressors, especially large-scale, stressful events like the pandemic. Our findings also call for public health and clinical interventions to address the long-term impacts of the most prevalent stressors experienced during the pandemic among vulnerable groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological
15.
Dementia (London) ; 22(6): 1205-1226, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313779

ABSTRACT

Emotional wellbeing of family carers and people with dementia is associated with not only how each individual copes with stress and conflict, but also by how they cope together. Finding ways to positively cope together was particularly important during COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, when other avenues of emotional support were less available. We explored how carers experienced and used emotion-focused dyadic coping styles during the COVID-19 pandemic. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted during the pandemic with 42 family carers, supplemented by quality of life scores collected both pre- and during the pandemic and household status. Abductive thematic analysis identified five styles of emotion-focused dyadic coping: common, supportive, hostile, disengaged avoidance and protective. The COVID-19 pandemic left many dyads unsupported. While many carers adapted, reporting increases in quality of life and enjoying the extra time with the person with dementia, others experienced dyadic conflict and reductions in quality of life. This variation was associated with dyadic coping styles, including challenges in using 'positive' styles and the protective use of 'negative' disengaged avoidance in the right situations. Dyadic coping styles also differed as a function of whether the dyad lived together. As many people with dementia are supported by an informal carer, considering how they cope together could help us to better support them. We make suggestions for dyadic interventions tailored by co-residency status that could help dyads identify and communicate coping needs, reconnect following avoidance coping, and replenish their coping resources through social support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Humans , Caregivers/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Dementia/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Emotions , Adaptation, Psychological
17.
Midwifery ; 123: 103727, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312807

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Social capital means having resources and support in relationships and social ties. It can affect the individual's quality of life and mental health. The present study investigated the association between social capital with psychological status and quality of life among low-risk and high-risk pregnant women. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study was conducted with the participation of 394 pregnant women receiving prenatal care in urban comprehensive health centers in Qazvin, Iran. Two-stage sampling was used to select comprehensive health centers by random cluster sampling and then pregnant women randomly. Social capital, quality of life (QoL), psychological status, and demographic and obstetric characteristics were assessed. Uni-variable and multivariable linear regression models were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Among the participants, 267 had low-risk pregnancies (67.77%) and the remainder were high-risk. The mean age of participants was 27.94 years (SD=5.86), the mean gestational age was 23.63 weeks (SD=7.71). The mean overall quality of life score among low-risk pregnant women was 32.00 (SD=5.27) and among high-risk pregnant women was 29.70 (SD=3.65). High-risk pregnant women experienced significantly higher anxiety and depression and fear of COVID-19. Social capital had a significant and weak relationship with anxiety among low-risk pregnant women (r = 0.22, p < 0.001). Also, a weak and significant relationship between social capital and anxiety (r = 0.24, p = 0.007), depression (r = 0.24, p = 0.007) and fear of COVID-19 (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) was found among high-risk pregnant women. CONCLUSION: Women with high-risk pregnancies experienced lower quality of life, higher anxiety and depression, and greater fear of COVID-19. There was also a weak relationship between social capital and the aforementioned variables among high-risk pregnant women. Designing and implementing interventions to increase quality of life and reduce anxiety and stress among high-risk pregnant women appears to be warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Capital , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Adult , Infant , Pregnant Women/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Depression/epidemiology
20.
J Neurol ; 270(4): 2162-2173, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309815

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Caring for a partner or family member with Parkinson's disease (PD) negatively affects the caregiver's own physical and emotional well-being, especially those caring for people with advanced PD (APD). This study was designed to examine the impact of APD on caregiver perceived burden, quality of life (QoL), and health status. METHODS: Dyads of people with PD and their primary caregivers were identified from the Adelphi Parkinson's Disease Specific Program (DSP™) using real-world data from the United States, Japan and five European countries. Questionnaires were used to capture measures of clinical burden (people with PD) and caregiver burden (caregivers). RESULTS: Data from 721 patient-caregiver dyads in seven countries were captured. Caregivers had a mean age 62.6 years, 71.6% were female, and 70.4% were a spouse. Caregivers for people with APD had a greater perceived burden, were more likely to take medication and had lower caregiver treatment satisfaction than those caring for people with early or intermediate PD; similar findings were observed for caregivers of people with intermediate versus early PD. Caregivers for people with intermediate PD were also less likely to be employed than those with early PD (25.3% vs 42.4%) and spent more time caring (6.6 vs 3.2 h/day). CONCLUSIONS: This real-world study demonstrates that caregivers of people with APD experience a greater burden than those caring for people with early PD. This highlights the importance of including caregiver-centric measures in future studies, and emphasizes the need for implementing treatments that reduce caregiver burden in APD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: N/A.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease , Quality of Life , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , Quality of Life/psychology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Cost of Illness , Caregivers/psychology , Health Status , Surveys and Questionnaires
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