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1.
Science ; 374(6571): 1127-1133, 2021 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723460

ABSTRACT

Humans differ in their susceptibility to infectious disease, partly owing to variation in the immune response after infection. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to quantify variation in the response to influenza infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from European- and African-ancestry males. Genetic ancestry effects are common but highly cell type specific. Higher levels of European ancestry are associated with increased type I interferon pathway activity in early infection, which predicts reduced viral titers at later time points. Substantial population-associated variation is explained by cis-expression quantitative trait loci that are differentiated by genetic ancestry. Furthermore, genetic ancestry­associated genes are enriched among genes correlated with COVID-19 disease severity, suggesting that the early immune response contributes to ancestry-associated differences for multiple viral infection outcomes.


Subject(s)
African Americans/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , /genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Susceptibility , Gene Expression Regulation , Genetic Variation , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Quantitative Trait Loci , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcription, Genetic , Viral Load , Young Adult
2.
Genome Med ; 14(1): 16, 2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding the host genetic architecture and viral immunity contributes to the development of effective vaccines and therapeutics for controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. Alterations of immune responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells play a crucial role in the detrimental progression of COVID-19. However, the effects of host genetic factors on immune responses for severe COVID-19 remain largely unknown. METHODS: We constructed a computational framework to characterize the host genetics that influence immune cell subpopulations for severe COVID-19 by integrating GWAS summary statistics (N = 969,689 samples) with four independent scRNA-seq datasets containing healthy controls and patients with mild, moderate, and severe symptom (N = 606,534 cells). We collected 10 predefined gene sets including inflammatory and cytokine genes to calculate cell state score for evaluating the immunological features of individual immune cells. RESULTS: We found that 34 risk genes were significantly associated with severe COVID-19, and the number of highly expressed genes increased with the severity of COVID-19. Three cell subtypes that are CD16+monocytes, megakaryocytes, and memory CD8+T cells were significantly enriched by COVID-19-related genetic association signals. Notably, three causal risk genes of CCR1, CXCR6, and ABO were highly expressed in these three cell types, respectively. CCR1+CD16+monocytes and ABO+ megakaryocytes with significantly up-regulated genes, including S100A12, S100A8, S100A9, and IFITM1, confer higher risk to the dysregulated immune response among severe patients. CXCR6+ memory CD8+ T cells exhibit a notable polyfunctionality including elevation of proliferation, migration, and chemotaxis. Moreover, we observed an increase in cell-cell interactions of both CCR1+ CD16+monocytes and CXCR6+ memory CD8+T cells in severe patients compared to normal controls among both PBMCs and lung tissues. The enhanced interactions of CXCR6+ memory CD8+T cells with epithelial cells facilitate the recruitment of this specific population of T cells to airways, promoting CD8+T cell-mediated immunity against COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSIONS: We uncover a major genetics-modulated immunological shift between mild and severe infection, including an elevated expression of genetics-risk genes, increase in inflammatory cytokines, and of functional immune cell subsets aggravating disease severity, which provides novel insights into parsing the host genetic determinants that influence peripheral immune cells in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Monocytes/virology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , COVID-19/immunology , Computational Biology/methods , GPI-Linked Proteins/metabolism , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Megakaryocyte Progenitor Cells/immunology , Megakaryocyte Progenitor Cells/virology , Monocytes/metabolism , Quantitative Trait Loci , Receptors, CCR1/immunology , Receptors, CCR1/metabolism , Receptors, CXCR6/immunology , Receptors, CXCR6/metabolism , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index
3.
EBioMedicine ; 74: 103695, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The heterogeneity in symptomatology and phenotypic profile attributable to COVID-19 is widely unknown. The objective of this manuscript is to conduct a trans-ancestry genome wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of COVID-19 severity to improve the understanding of potentially causal targets for SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: This cross-sectional study recruited 646 participants in the UAE that were divided into two phenotypic groups based on the severity of COVID-19 phenotypes, hospitalized (n=482) and non-hospitalized (n=164) participants. Hospitalized participants were COVID-19 patients that developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia or progression to respiratory failure that required supplemental oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilation support or had severe complications such as septic shock or multi-organ failure. We conducted a trans-ancestry meta-analysis GWAS of European (n=302), American (n=102), South Asian (n=99), and East Asian (n=107) ancestry populations. We also carried out comprehensive post-GWAS analysis, including enrichment of SNP associations in tissues and cell-types, expression quantitative trait loci and differential expression analysis. FINDINGS: Eight genes demonstrated a strong association signal: VWA8 gene in locus 13p14·11 (SNP rs10507497; p=9·54 x10-7), PDE8B gene in locus 5q13·3 (SNP rs7715119; p=2·19 x10-6), CTSC gene in locus 11q14·2 (rs72953026; p=2·38 x10-6), THSD7B gene in locus 2q22·1 (rs7605851; p=3·07x10-6), STK39 gene in locus 2q24·3 (rs7595310; p=4·55 x10-6), FBXO34 gene in locus 14q22·3 (rs10140801; p=8·26 x10-6), RPL6P27 gene in locus 18p11·31 (rs11659676; p=8·88 x10-6), and METTL21C gene in locus 13q33·1 (rs599976; p=8·95 x10-6). The genes are expressed in the lung, associated to tumour progression, emphysema, airway obstruction, and surface tension within the lung, as well as an association to T-cell-mediated inflammation and the production of inflammatory cytokines. INTERPRETATION: We have discovered eight highly plausible genetic association with hospitalized cases in COVID-19. Further studies must be conducted on worldwide population genetics to facilitate the development of population specific therapeutics to mitigate this worldwide challenge. FUNDING: This review was commissioned as part of a project to study the host cell receptors of coronaviruses funded by Khalifa University's CPRA grant (Reference number 2020-004).


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , Quantitative Trait, Heritable , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Population Groups/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Treatment Outcome , United Arab Emirates , Young Adult
4.
Science ; 374(6569): eabj1541, 2021 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526448

ABSTRACT

Characterization of the genetic regulation of proteins is essential for understanding disease etiology and developing therapies. We identified 10,674 genetic associations for 3892 plasma proteins to create a cis-anchored gene-protein-disease map of 1859 connections that highlights strong cross-disease biological convergence. This proteo-genomic map provides a framework to connect etiologically related diseases, to provide biological context for new or emerging disorders, and to integrate different biological domains to establish mechanisms for known gene-disease links. Our results identify proteo-genomic connections within and between diseases and establish the value of cis-protein variants for annotation of likely causal disease genes at loci identified in genome-wide association studies, thereby addressing a major barrier to experimental validation and clinical translation of genetic discoveries.


Subject(s)
Blood Proteins/genetics , Disease/genetics , Genome, Human , Genomics , Proteins/genetics , Proteome , Aging , Alternative Splicing , Blood Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , Connective Tissue Diseases/genetics , Disease/etiology , Drug Development , Female , Gallstones/genetics , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Variation , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Internet , Male , Phenotype , Proteins/metabolism , Quantitative Trait Loci , Sex Characteristics
5.
Cell Rep ; 37(7): 110020, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509641

ABSTRACT

Variability in SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and COVID-19 disease severity between individuals is partly due to genetic factors. Here, we identify 4 genomic loci with suggestive associations for SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and 19 for COVID-19 disease severity. Four of these 23 loci likely have an ethnicity-specific component. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in 11 loci colocalize with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) associated with the expression of 20 genes in 62 tissues/cell types (range: 1:43 tissues/gene), including lung, brain, heart, muscle, and skin as well as the digestive system and immune system. We perform genetic fine mapping to compute 99% credible SNP sets, which identify 10 GWAS loci that have eight or fewer SNPs in the credible set, including three loci with one single likely causal SNP. Our study suggests that the diverse symptoms and disease severity of COVID-19 observed between individuals is associated with variants across the genome, affecting gene expression levels in a wide variety of tissue types.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Chromosome Mapping/methods , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study/methods , Humans , Organ Specificity/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome/genetics
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21415, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506470

ABSTRACT

Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars adapted to specific environments and resistant to prevalent pathogens are preferred for obtaining high yield. This study aimed to identify wheat genotypes with superior grain yield (GY) and yield associated traits from 168 genotypes of International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center's 13th Stem Rust Resistance Screening Nursery evaluated over two seasons during 2019 and 2020 under high disease pressure of both stem rust (SR) and yellow rust (YR) in a 21 × 8 α-lattice design with 3 replications in Kenya. Effects due to seasons were significant for YRAud, SRAud, 1000-kernel weight (TKW), days to heading (DH), plant height (PH) and number of spikelets spike-1 (SS), while genotypes and genotypes × season interaction effects were significant for all traits except number of kernels spike-1. Respectively, heritability values of 0.95, 0.93, 0.87, 0.86, 0.77 and 0.75 were observed for area under disease progress curve for SR (SRAud), YR (YRAud), TKW, DH, biomass (BM) and GY. Path analysis showed positive direct effects on GY via PH, SS, BM, and TKW. Biplot analysis identified 16 genotypes with superior desirable traits GY, BM and harvest index. The SR contributed the highest reduction in GY and TKW while YR contributed the most reduction in BM. These identified genotypes with superior GY combined with adequate resistance to both SR and YR are potentially valuable resources for improvement of locally adapted wheat cultivars.


Subject(s)
Edible Grain/genetics , Plant Diseases/genetics , Triticum/genetics , Alleles , Animals , Aphids , Basidiomycota/genetics , Biomass , Bread , Climate , Genome-Wide Association Study , Genotype , Kenya , Phenotype , Quantitative Trait Loci , Regression Analysis , Seasons , Temperature , Zea mays
7.
Theor Appl Genet ; 134(9): 3083-3109, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453686

ABSTRACT

KEY MESSAGE: Based on the large-scale integration of meta-QTL and Genome-Wide  Association Study, 76 high-confidence MQTL regions and 237 candidate genes that affected wheat yield and yield-related traits were discovered. Improving yield and yield-related traits are key goals in wheat breeding program. The integration of accumulated wheat genetic resources provides an opportunity to uncover important genomic regions and candidate genes that affect wheat yield. Here, a comprehensive meta-QTL analysis was conducted on 2230 QTL of yield-related traits obtained from 119 QTL studies. These QTL were refined into 145 meta-QTL (MQTL), and 89 MQTL were verified by GWAS with different natural populations. The average confidence interval (CI) of these MQTL was 2.92 times less than that of the initial QTL. Furthermore, 76 core MQTL regions with a physical distance less than 25 Mb were detected. Based on the homology analysis and expression patterns, 237 candidate genes in the MQTL involved in photoperiod response, grain development, multiple plant growth regulator pathways, carbon and nitrogen metabolism and spike and flower organ development were determined. A novel candidate gene TaKAO-4A was confirmed to be significantly associated with grain size, and a CAPS marker was developed based on its dominant haplotype. In summary, this study clarified a method based on the integration of meta-QTL, GWAS and homology comparison to reveal the genomic regions and candidate genes that affect important yield-related traits in wheat. This work will help to lay a foundation for the identification, transfer and aggregation of these important QTL or candidate genes in wheat high-yield breeding.


Subject(s)
Chromosomes, Plant/genetics , Edible Grain/genetics , Genome, Plant , Genome-Wide Association Study , Plant Proteins/metabolism , Quantitative Trait Loci , Triticum/genetics , Chromosome Mapping/methods , Edible Grain/growth & development , Gene Expression Regulation, Plant , Phenotype , Plant Breeding , Plant Proteins/genetics , Triticum/growth & development
8.
Cell ; 184(20): 5247-5260.e19, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415259

ABSTRACT

3' untranslated region (3'UTR) variants are strongly associated with human traits and diseases, yet few have been causally identified. We developed the massively parallel reporter assay for 3'UTRs (MPRAu) to sensitively assay 12,173 3'UTR variants. We applied MPRAu to six human cell lines, focusing on genetic variants associated with genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and human evolutionary adaptation. MPRAu expands our understanding of 3'UTR function, suggesting that simple sequences predominately explain 3'UTR regulatory activity. We adapt MPRAu to uncover diverse molecular mechanisms at base pair resolution, including an adenylate-uridylate (AU)-rich element of LEPR linked to potential metabolic evolutionary adaptations in East Asians. We nominate hundreds of 3'UTR causal variants with genetically fine-mapped phenotype associations. Using endogenous allelic replacements, we characterize one variant that disrupts a miRNA site regulating the viral defense gene TRIM14 and one that alters PILRB abundance, nominating a causal variant underlying transcriptional changes in age-related macular degeneration.


Subject(s)
3' Untranslated Regions/genetics , Biological Evolution , Disease/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , Algorithms , Alleles , Gene Expression Regulation , Genes, Reporter , Genetic Variation , Humans , Phenotype , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Polyribosomes/metabolism , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , RNA/genetics
9.
Genome Biol ; 22(1): 242, 2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370944

ABSTRACT

To date, the locus with the most robust human genetic association to COVID-19 severity is 3p21.31. Here, we integrate genome-scale CRISPR loss-of-function screens and eQTLs in diverse cell types and tissues to pinpoint genes underlying COVID-19 risk. Our findings identify SLC6A20 and CXCR6 as putative causal genes that modulate COVID-19 risk and highlight the usefulness of this integrative approach to bridge the divide between correlational and causal studies of human biology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci , Receptors, CXCR6/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Humans , Phenotype
10.
Hum Genet ; 140(9): 1313-1328, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279450

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease that mainly affects the host respiratory system with ~ 80% asymptomatic or mild cases and ~ 5% severe cases. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic loci associated with the severe COVID-19 symptoms. Delineating the genetic variants and genes is important for better understanding its biological mechanisms. We implemented integrative approaches, including transcriptome-wide association studies (TWAS), colocalization analysis, and functional element prediction analysis, to interpret the genetic risks using two independent GWAS datasets in lung and immune cells. To understand the context-specific molecular alteration, we further performed deep learning-based single-cell transcriptomic analyses on a bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) dataset from moderate and severe COVID-19 patients. We discovered and replicated the genetically regulated expression of CXCR6 and CCR9 genes. These two genes have a protective effect on lung, and a risk effect on whole blood, respectively. The colocalization analysis of GWAS and cis-expression quantitative trait loci highlighted the regulatory effect on CXCR6 expression in lung and immune cells. In the lung-resident memory CD8+ T (TRM) cells, we found a 2.24-fold decrease of cell proportion among CD8+ T cells and lower expression of CXCR6 in the severe patients than moderate patients. Pro-inflammatory transcriptional programs were highlighted in the TRM cellular trajectory from moderate to severe patients. CXCR6 from the 3p21.31 locus is associated with severe COVID-19. CXCR6 tends to have a lower expression in lung TRM cells of severe patients, which aligns with the protective effect of CXCR6 from TWAS analysis.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 , Immunologic Memory/genetics , Lung/immunology , Quantitative Trait Loci/immunology , Receptors, CXCR6 , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcriptome/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Lung/virology , Male , Receptors, CCR/genetics , Receptors, CCR/immunology , Receptors, CXCR6/genetics , Receptors, CXCR6/immunology , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Hum Mol Genet ; 30(13): 1247-1258, 2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216653

ABSTRACT

The systematic identification of host genetic risk factors is essential for the understanding and treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). By performing a meta-analysis of two independent genome-wide association summary datasets (N = 680 128), a novel locus at 21q22.11 was identified to be associated with COVID-19 infection (rs9976829 in IFNAR2-IL10RB, odds ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-1.23, P = 2.57 × 10-6). The rs9976829 represents a strong splicing quantitative trait locus for both IFNAR2 and IL10RB genes, especially in lung tissue (P = 1.8 × 10-24). Integrative genomics analysis of combining genome-wide association study with expression quantitative trait locus data showed the expression variations of IFNAR2 and IL10RB have prominent effects on COVID-19 in various types of tissues, especially in lung tissue. The majority of IFNAR2-expressing cells were dendritic cells (40%) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (38.5%), and IL10RB-expressing cells were mainly nonclassical monocytes (29.6%). IFNAR2 and IL10RB are targeted by several interferons-related drugs. Together, our results uncover 21q22.11 as a novel susceptibility locus for COVID-19, in which individuals with G alleles of rs9976829 have a higher probability of COVID-19 susceptibility than those with non-G alleles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 , Interleukin-10 Receptor beta Subunit/genetics , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , Alleles , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genome-Wide Association Study , Genomics/methods , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Quantitative Trait Loci
12.
Genome Med ; 13(1): 66, 2021 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197350

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The large airway epithelial barrier provides one of the first lines of defense against respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19. Substantial inter-individual variability in individual disease courses is hypothesized to be partially mediated by the differential regulation of the genes that interact with the SARS-CoV-2 virus or are involved in the subsequent host response. Here, we comprehensively investigated non-genetic and genetic factors influencing COVID-19-relevant bronchial epithelial gene expression. METHODS: We analyzed RNA-sequencing data from bronchial epithelial brushings obtained from uninfected individuals. We related ACE2 gene expression to host and environmental factors in the SPIROMICS cohort of smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and replicated these associations in two asthma cohorts, SARP and MAST. To identify airway biology beyond ACE2 binding that may contribute to increased susceptibility, we used gene set enrichment analyses to determine if gene expression changes indicative of a suppressed airway immune response observed early in SARS-CoV-2 infection are also observed in association with host factors. To identify host genetic variants affecting COVID-19 susceptibility in SPIROMICS, we performed expression quantitative trait (eQTL) mapping and investigated the phenotypic associations of the eQTL variants. RESULTS: We found that ACE2 expression was higher in relation to active smoking, obesity, and hypertension that are known risk factors of COVID-19 severity, while an association with interferon-related inflammation was driven by the truncated, non-binding ACE2 isoform. We discovered that expression patterns of a suppressed airway immune response to early SARS-CoV-2 infection, compared to other viruses, are similar to patterns associated with obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, which may thus contribute to a COVID-19-susceptible airway environment. eQTL mapping identified regulatory variants for genes implicated in COVID-19, some of which had pheWAS evidence for their potential role in respiratory infections. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide evidence that clinically relevant variation in the expression of COVID-19-related genes is associated with host factors, environmental exposures, and likely host genetic variation.


Subject(s)
Bronchi , COVID-19/genetics , Respiratory Mucosa , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Asthma/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/immunology , Gene Expression , Genetic Variation , Humans , Middle Aged , Obesity/genetics , Obesity/immunology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci , Risk Factors , Smoking/genetics
13.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 668-676, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174686

ABSTRACT

Drug repurposing provides a rapid approach to meet the urgent need for therapeutics to address COVID-19. To identify therapeutic targets relevant to COVID-19, we conducted Mendelian randomization analyses, deriving genetic instruments based on transcriptomic and proteomic data for 1,263 actionable proteins that are targeted by approved drugs or in clinical phase of drug development. Using summary statistics from the Host Genetics Initiative and the Million Veteran Program, we studied 7,554 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and >1 million controls. We found significant Mendelian randomization results for three proteins (ACE2, P = 1.6 × 10-6; IFNAR2, P = 9.8 × 10-11 and IL-10RB, P = 2.3 × 10-14) using cis-expression quantitative trait loci genetic instruments that also had strong evidence for colocalization with COVID-19 hospitalization. To disentangle the shared expression quantitative trait loci signal for IL10RB and IFNAR2, we conducted phenome-wide association scans and pathway enrichment analysis, which suggested that IFNAR2 is more likely to play a role in COVID-19 hospitalization. Our findings prioritize trials of drugs targeting IFNAR2 and ACE2 for early management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Drug Repositioning , Mendelian Randomization Analysis/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Interleukin-10 Receptor beta Subunit/genetics , Interleukin-10 Receptor beta Subunit/physiology , Quantitative Trait Loci , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/physiology
14.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 29(6): 1019-1026, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111983

ABSTRACT

Germline variants in genes involved in SARS-CoV-2 cell entry and in host innate immune responses to viruses may influence the susceptibility to infection. This study used whole-genome analyses of lung tissue to identify polymorphisms acting as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for 60 genes of relevance to SARS-CoV-2 infection susceptibility. The expression of genes with confirmed or possible roles in viral entry-replication and in host antiviral responses was studied in the non-diseased lung tissue of 408 lung adenocarcinoma patients. No gene was differently expressed by sex, but APOBEC3H levels were higher and PARP12 levels lower in older individuals. A total of 125 cis-eQTLs (false discovery rate < 0.05) was found to modulate mRNA expression of 15 genes (ABO, ANPEP, AP2A2, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3G, BSG, CLEC4G, DDX58, DPP4, FURIN, FYCO1, RAB14, SERINC3, TRIM5, ZCRB1). eQTLs regulating ABO and FYCO1 were found in COVID-19 susceptibility loci. No trans-eQTLs were identified. Genetic control of the expression of these 15 genes, which encode putative virus receptors, proteins required for vesicle trafficking, enzymes that interfere with viral replication, and other restriction factors, may underlie interindividual differences in risk or severity of infection with SARS-CoV-2 or other viruses.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Galactosyltransferases/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Microtubule-Associated Proteins/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Polymorphism, Genetic , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
15.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 659-667, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104522

ABSTRACT

To identify circulating proteins influencing Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) susceptibility and severity, we undertook a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) study, rapidly scanning hundreds of circulating proteins while reducing bias due to reverse causation and confounding. In up to 14,134 cases and 1.2 million controls, we found that an s.d. increase in OAS1 levels was associated with reduced COVID-19 death or ventilation (odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, P = 7 × 10-8), hospitalization (OR = 0.61, P = 8 × 10-8) and susceptibility (OR = 0.78, P = 8 × 10-6). Measuring OAS1 levels in 504 individuals, we found that higher plasma OAS1 levels in a non-infectious state were associated with reduced COVID-19 susceptibility and severity. Further analyses suggested that a Neanderthal isoform of OAS1 in individuals of European ancestry affords this protection. Thus, evidence from MR and a case-control study support a protective role for OAS1 in COVID-19 adverse outcomes. Available pharmacological agents that increase OAS1 levels could be prioritized for drug development.


Subject(s)
2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/physiology , COVID-19/etiology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , SARS-CoV-2 , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10 Receptor beta Subunit/genetics , Male , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Middle Aged , Neanderthals , Protein Isoforms/physiology , Quantitative Trait Loci , Severity of Illness Index
17.
Hum Genet ; 140(6): 969-979, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092066

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the current health crisis. Despite intensive research efforts, the genes and pathways that contribute to COVID-19 remain poorly understood. We, therefore, used an integrative genomics (IG) approach to identify candidate genes responsible for COVID-19 and its severity. We used Bayesian colocalization (COLOC) and summary-based Mendelian randomization to combine gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) from the Lung eQTL (n = 1,038) and eQTLGen (n = 31,784) studies with published COVID-19 genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative. Additionally, we used COLOC to integrate plasma protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL) from the INTERVAL study (n = 3,301) with COVID-19 loci. Finally, we determined any causal associations between plasma proteins and COVID-19 using multi-variable two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR). The expression of 18 genes in lung and/or blood co-localized with COVID-19 loci. Of these, 12 genes were in suggestive loci (PGWAS < 5 × 10-05). LZTFL1, SLC6A20, ABO, IL10RB and IFNAR2 and OAS1 had been previously associated with a heightened risk of COVID-19 (PGWAS < 5 × 10-08). We identified a causal association between OAS1 and COVID-19 GWAS. Plasma ABO protein, which is associated with blood type in humans, demonstrated a significant causal relationship with COVID-19 in the MR analysis; increased plasma levels were associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 and, in particular, severe COVID-19. In summary, our study identified genes associated with COVID-19 that may be prioritized for future investigations. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate a causal association between plasma ABO protein and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Lung/metabolism , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Quantitative Trait Loci , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , ABO Blood-Group System/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Risk Factors
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(9)2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087558

ABSTRACT

It was recently shown that the major genetic risk factor associated with becoming severely ill with COVID-19 when infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is inherited from Neandertals. New, larger genetic association studies now allow additional genetic risk factors to be discovered. Using data from the Genetics of Mortality in Critical Care (GenOMICC) consortium, we show that a haplotype at a region on chromosome 12 associated with requiring intensive care when infected with the virus is inherited from Neandertals. This region encodes proteins that activate enzymes that are important during infections with RNA viruses. In contrast to the previously described Neandertal haplotype that increases the risk for severe COVID-19, this Neandertal haplotype is protective against severe disease. It also differs from the risk haplotype in that it has a more moderate effect and occurs at substantial frequencies in all regions of the world outside Africa. Among ancient human genomes in western Eurasia, the frequency of the protective Neandertal haplotype may have increased between 20,000 and 10,000 y ago and again during the past 1,000 y.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Neanderthals/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Haplotypes , Humans , Quantitative Trait Loci
19.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 147(3): 857-869.e7, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039418

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is commonly associated with skin manifestations, and may also exacerbate existing skin diseases, yet the relationship between COVID-19 and skin diseases remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: By investigating this relationship through a multiomics approach, we sought to ascertain whether patients with skin conditions are more susceptible to COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study and then compared gene expression across 9 different inflammatory skin conditions and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-infected bronchial epithelial cell lines, and then performed a genome-wide association study transdisease meta-analysis between COVID-19 susceptibility and 2 skin diseases (psoriasis and atopic dermatitis). RESULTS: Skin conditions, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, increase the risk of COVID-19 (odds ratio, 1.55; P = 1.4 × 10-9) but decrease the risk of mechanical ventilation (odds ratio, 0.22; P = 8.5 × 10-5). We observed significant overlap in gene expression between the infected normal bronchial epithelial cells and inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. For genes that are commonly induced in both the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection and skin diseases, there are 4 S100 family members located in the epidermal differentiation complex, and we also identified the "IL-17 signaling pathway" (P = 4.9 × 10-77) as one of the most significantly enriched pathways. Furthermore, a shared genome-wide significant locus in the epidermal differentiation complex was identified between psoriasis and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, with the lead marker being a significant expression quantitative trait locus for S100A12 (P = 3.3 × 10-7). CONCLUSIONS: Together our findings suggest association between inflammatory skin conditions and higher risk of COVID-19, but with less severe course, and highlight shared components involved in anti-COVID-19 immune response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Atopic , Gene Expression Regulation , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Psoriasis , Quantitative Trait Loci , S100A12 Protein , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/genetics , Dermatitis, Atopic/metabolism , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Genomics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Psoriasis/genetics , Psoriasis/metabolism , Risk Factors , S100A12 Protein/biosynthesis , S100A12 Protein/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Skin/metabolism , Skin/virology
20.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 6397, 2020 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023894

ABSTRACT

Understanding the genetic architecture of host proteins interacting with SARS-CoV-2 or mediating the maladaptive host response to COVID-19 can help to identify new or repurpose existing drugs targeting those proteins. We present a genetic discovery study of 179 such host proteins among 10,708 individuals using an aptamer-based technique. We identify 220 host DNA sequence variants acting in cis (MAF 0.01-49.9%) and explaining 0.3-70.9% of the variance of 97 of these proteins, including 45 with no previously known protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL) and 38 encoding current drug targets. Systematic characterization of pQTLs across the phenome identified protein-drug-disease links and evidence that putative viral interaction partners such as MARK3 affect immune response. Our results accelerate the evaluation and prioritization of new drug development programmes and repurposing of trials to prevent, treat or reduce adverse outcomes. Rapid sharing and detailed interrogation of results is facilitated through an interactive webserver ( https://omicscience.org/apps/covidpgwas/ ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , ABO Blood-Group System/metabolism , Aptamers, Peptide/blood , Aptamers, Peptide/metabolism , Blood Coagulation , Drug Delivery Systems , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Derived Cellular Factors/metabolism , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics
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