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1.
Acta Paul. Enferm. (Online) ; 35: eAPE01406, 2022. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20234685

ABSTRACT

Resumo Objetivo Identificar, a partir das evidências presentes na literatura, os impactos da COVID-19 na saúde mental de mulheres grávidas. Métodos Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa da literatura, realizada nas bases de dados/biblioteca eletrônica MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBCOVID19 e MEDRXIV. A busca aconteceu de forma pareada no mês de dezembro de 2020, com artigos disponíveis na íntegra abordando a saúde mental das grávidas na pandemia. Resultados Os estudos que compuseram a amostra foram publicados entre os meses de abril e dezembro de 2020 e nos 10 estudos incluídos, a depressão e a ansiedade são apontados como fatores impactantes na saúde das gestantes, tendo como elementos contribuintes o medo da COVID-19, estresse e preocupações associadas à pandemia. Conclusão Houve impacto na saúde mental das gestantes na pandemia com repercussões de ordem psicossocial, socioeconômica e de assistência à saúde. Nesse contexto, a abordagem do componente psicológico na consulta de enfermagem pode fazer a diferença na atenção à gestação.


Resumen Objetivo Identificar, a partir de evidencias presentes en la literatura, los impactos del COVID-19 en la salud mental de mujeres embarazadas. Métodos Se trata de una revisión integradora de la literatura, realizada en las bases de datos/biblioteca electrónica MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBCOVID19 y MEDRXIV. La búsqueda se realizó de forma pareada en el mes de diciembre de 2020, con artículos con texto completo disponible que abordaban la salud mental de embarazadas en la pandemia. Resultados Los estudios que formaron la muestra fueron publicados entre los meses de abril y diciembre de 2020. En los diez estudios incluidos, la depresión y la ansiedad son señaladas como factores impactantes en la salud de las mujeres embarazadas, donde los elementos contribuyentes son el miedo al COVID-19, el estrés y las preocupaciones relacionadas con la pandemia. Conclusión Hubo impacto en la salud mental de las mujeres embarazadas en la pandemia, con repercusiones de orden psicosocial, socioeconómica y de atención a la salud. En este contexto, el enfoque del componente psicológico en la consulta de enfermería puede marcar una diferencia en la atención al embarazo.


Abstract Objective To identify the impacts of COVID-19 on pregnant women's mental health from evidence in the literature. Methods This is an integrative literature review performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBCOVID19 and MEDRXIV databases/electronic libraries. The search took place in pairs in December 2020, with articles available in full addressing pregnant women's mental health in the pandemic. Results The studies that made up the sample were published between April and December 2020 and in the ten studies included, depression and anxiety were identified as factors exerting impact on pregnant women's health, and the fear of COVID-19, stress and worries associated with the pandemic as contributing elements. Conclusion There was an impact on pregnant women's mental health in the pandemic with psychosocial, socioeconomic and health care repercussions. In this context, the approach to the psychological component in the nursing consultation can make a difference in pregnancy care.


Subject(s)
Humans , Social Isolation/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Women's Health , Pregnant Women , COVID-19/psychology , Anxiety , Delivery of Health Care
4.
Postgrad Med J ; 96(1137): 399-402, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234171

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV-2) that initially originated from Wuhan, China, in December 2019 has already caused a pandemic. While this novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) frequently induces mild diseases, it has also generated severe diseases among certain populations, including older-aged individuals with underlying diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. As of 31 March 2020, a total of 9786 confirmed cases with COVID-19 have been reported in South Korea. South Korea has the highest diagnostic rate for COVID-19, which has been the major contributor in overcoming this outbreak. We are trying to reduce the reproduction number of COVID-19 to less than one and eventually succeed in controlling this outbreak using methods such as contact tracing, quarantine, testing, isolation, social distancing and school closure. This report aimed to describe the current situation of COVID-19 in South Korea and our response to this outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Quarantine/organization & administration , Basic Reproduction Number , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Epidemiological Monitoring , Evidence-Based Medicine , Human Activities , Humans , Physical Distancing , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241411

ABSTRACT

In May 2021, there was a COVID-19 outbreak on board a construction support ship traveling from India to Thailand. Controlling the outbreak on this offshore vessel from 11 May to 2 June 2021 was applied. This case report describes the teamwork management of COVID-19 control on the vessel in the Gulf of Thailand. We summarized the COVID-19 outbreak control process on board, including active COVID-19-infected cases (CoIC) and close contacts (CoCC) identification, isolation, quarantine, treatment, and clinical monitoring using telemedicine to report their health measurements twice daily, including emergency conditions if they occurred. Active COVID-19 cases were identified by two rounds of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests in all crew members, in which 7 of 29 (24.1%) showed positive results. Both the CoIC and CoCC were strictly and absolutely isolated and quarantined on the vessel. No serious medical conditions were reported during the monitoring. The third-round RT-PCR tests were conducted, and all tested negative one week later. Teamwork management in proactive COVID-19 case identification, isolation, comprehensive treatment, and close monitoring of health conditions using telemedicine devices is beneficial for controlling the COVID-19 outbreak on board.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thailand/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods
7.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 996, 2023 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact global health and China requires a 14-day quarantine for individuals on flights with positive COVID-19 cases. This quarantine can impact mental well-being, including sleep. This study aims to examine the impact of psychosocial and behavioral factors on insomnia among individuals undergoing quarantine in hotels. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional survey carried out in Guangzhou, China. The data was gathered through online questionnaires distributed to international passengers who arrived in Guangzhou on flights and were required to undergo a 14-day quarantine in hotels arranged by the local government. The questionnaires were sent to the participants through the government health hotline "12,320." RESULTS: Of the 1003 passengers who were quarantined, 6.7% reported significant anxiety and 25.0% had varying degrees of insomnia. Anxiety was positively associated with insomnia (ß = 0.92, P < 0.001), while collectivism (ß = -0.07, P = 0.036), indoor exercise (ß = -0.50, P < 0.001), and the perceived people orientation of the public health service (ß = -0.20, P = 0.001) were negatively associated with insomnia. The study also identified moderating effects, such that a higher sense of collectivism, a greater frequency of indoor exercise, and a higher perception of the people-oriented of the public health service were associated with a lower impact of anxiety on insomnia. These moderating effects were also observed in participants with varying degrees of insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that a proportion of people undergoing entry quarantine experience insomnia and confirms how psychosocial and behavioral factors can alleviate insomnia in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
8.
Wiad Lek ; 76(4): 772-777, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237626

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim: To present a comparative analysis of the educational technologies effectiveness that were used in the process of professional training of masters of dentistry during quarantine restrictions and martial law. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and methods: To perform the set tasks, the following the empirical methods of scientific research were used: quantitative data were collected based on analyzing the results of students' educational achievements, as well as implementing special questionnaire that was sent to the students of the Faculty of Dentistry of NMU; qualitative data were collected with the help of several focus groups formed from students and teachers of the faculty. Analysis was undertaken using statistical methods (Pearson's test), and qualitative data were analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: Results: This paper analyzes the effectiveness of educational technologies used during quarantine restrictions and martial law, the role of phantom classes in providing professional training of dentistry specialists, summarizes the results of a comprehensive analysis of scientific literature, teaching experience at the dental faculty and the results of sociological research (student surveys, discussion in focus groups). CONCLUSION: Conclusions: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and the full-scale war unleashed by the russian federation in Ukraine forced to quickly find and implement mixed forms of teaching future masters of dentistry, which, in combination with digital technologies, enables implementing high-quality and effective training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Students , Dentistry
9.
Epidemiol Infect ; 151: e99, 2023 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236964

ABSTRACT

Large gatherings of people on cruise ships and warships are often at high risk of COVID-19 infections. To assess the transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 on warships and cruise ships and to quantify the effectiveness of the containment measures, the transmission coefficient (ß), basic reproductive number (R0), and time to deploy containment measures were estimated by the Bayesian Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered model. A meta-analysis was conducted to predict vaccine protection with or without non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). The analysis showed that implementing NPIs during voyages could reduce the transmission coefficients of SARS-CoV-2 by 50%. Two weeks into the voyage of a cruise that begins with 1 infected passenger out of a total of 3,711 passengers, we estimate there would be 45 (95% CI:25-71), 33 (95% CI:20-52), 18 (95% CI:11-26), 9 (95% CI:6-12), 4 (95% CI:3-5), and 2 (95% CI:2-2) final cases under 0%, 10%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90% vaccine protection, respectively, without NPIs. The timeliness of strict NPIs along with implementing strict quarantine and isolation measures is imperative to contain COVID-19 cases in cruise ships. The spread of COVID-19 on ships was predicted to be limited in scenarios corresponding to at least 70% protection from prior vaccination, across all passengers and crew.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ships , SARS-CoV-2 , Bayes Theorem , Travel , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Quarantine
10.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1073141, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236900

ABSTRACT

Background: Childhood trauma confers risks to mental health. However, little is known about whether home quarantine (HQ) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic exaggerated or mitigated the effect of childhood trauma on mental health. Objective: To examine the modulating effects of prior childhood traumas on the longitudinal changes of psychiatric symptoms in college students before and after HQ during the pandemic. Methods: This was a two-wave longitudinal study on the mental health of 2,887 college students before and after HQ during the COVID-19 pandemic. The relationships between the changes in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), 16-item Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ-16), Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) scores were analyzed. Results: The students with childhood trauma showed a significantly greater decrement in psychiatric symptoms after HQ (F = 17.21, 14.11, 18.87, and 17.42 for PHQ-9, PQ-16 objective and distress, and SCL-90, respectively). The correlation coefficients between the CTQ and these symptoms scales were significant at baseline (r = 0.42, 0.34, 0.37, and 0.39), and decreased after HQ (r = 0.17, 0.20, 0.18, and 0.19). The decrement of depressive, psychotic, and overall symptoms was positively correlated with the scores of the CTQ (r = 0.08-0.27) but negatively correlated with SSRS (r = -0.08--0.14). Multilinear regression analysis confirmed the results of the CTQ and SSRS regarding the modulation of the dynamic changes in psychiatric symptoms. A constructed structural equation model indicated that the total effects of childhood trauma on decreased psychiatric symptoms were partly mediated by lower baseline social support. Conclusion: Home quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic could blunt the adverse effects of childhood trauma on mental health, especially for prodromal psychotic symptoms in college students. Changes in relative deprivation and social support may be mediating factors.


Subject(s)
Adverse Childhood Experiences , COVID-19 , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Quarantine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236880

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study investigated the experiences, wellbeing impacts, and coping strategies of frontline workers who participated in "Hotels for Heroes", an Australian voluntary hotel quarantine program during the COVID-19 pandemic. The program was open to those who were COVID-19 positive or exposed to COVID-19 as part of their profession. METHODS: Frontline workers who had stayed in voluntary quarantine between April 2020 and March 2021 were invited to participate in a voluntary, anonymous, cross-sectional online survey including both quantitative and qualitative responses. Complete responses were collected from 106 participants, which included data on sociodemographic and occupational characteristics, experiences of the Hotels for Heroes program, and validated mental health measures. RESULTS: Mental health problems were prevalent amongst frontline workers (e.g., moderate anxiety symptoms, severe depression symptoms, and greater than usual impact of fatigue). For some, quarantine appeared to be helpful for anxiety and burnout, but quarantine also appeared to impact anxiety, depression, and PTSD negatively, and longer stays in quarantine were associated with significantly higher coronavirus anxiety and fatigue impacts. The most widely received support in quarantine was from designated program staff; however, this was reportedly accessed by less than half of the participants. CONCLUSIONS: The current study points to specific aspects of mental health care that can be applied to participants of similar voluntary quarantine programs in the future. It seems necessary to screen for psychological needs at various stages of quarantine, and to allocate appropriate care and improve its accessibility, as many participants did not utilise the routine support offered. Support should especially target disease-related anxiety, symptoms of depression and trauma, and the impacts of fatigue. Future research is needed to clarify specific phases of need throughout quarantine programs, and the barriers for participants receiving mental health supports in these contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Quarantine/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Australia , Anxiety/epidemiology
12.
Epidemiology ; 34(4): 589-600, 2023 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guidance on COVID-19 quarantine duration is often based on the maximum observed incubation periods assuming perfect compliance. However, the impact of longer quarantines may be subject to diminishing returns; the largest benefits of quarantine occur over the first few days. Additionally, the financial and psychological burdens of quarantine may motivate increases in noncompliance behavior. METHODS: We use a deterministic transmission model to identify the optimal length of quarantine to minimize transmission. We modeled the relation between noncompliance behavior and disease risk using a time-varying function of leaving quarantine based on studies from the literature. RESULTS: The first few days in quarantine were more crucial to control the spread of COVID-19; even when compliance is high, a 10-day quarantine was as effective in lowering transmission as a 14-day quarantine; under certain noncompliance scenarios a 5-day quarantine may become nearly protective as 14-day quarantine. CONCLUSION: Data to characterize compliance dynamics will help select optimal quarantine strategies that balance the trade-offs between social forces governing behavior and transmission dynamics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Group Dynamics , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Guideline Adherence , Public Policy
13.
Science ; 380(6649): 1059-1064, 2023 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243994

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 lockdowns in early 2020 reduced human mobility, providing an opportunity to disentangle its effects on animals from those of landscape modifications. Using GPS data, we compared movements and road avoidance of 2300 terrestrial mammals (43 species) during the lockdowns to the same period in 2019. Individual responses were variable with no change in average movements or road avoidance behavior, likely due to variable lockdown conditions. However, under strict lockdowns 10-day 95th percentile displacements increased by 73%, suggesting increased landscape permeability. Animals' 1-hour 95th percentile displacements declined by 12% and animals were 36% closer to roads in areas of high human footprint, indicating reduced avoidance during lockdowns. Overall, lockdowns rapidly altered some spatial behaviors, highlighting variable but substantial impacts of human mobility on wildlife worldwide.


Subject(s)
Animal Migration , Animals, Wild , COVID-19 , Mammals , Quarantine , Animals , Humans , Animals, Wild/physiology , Animals, Wild/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mammals/physiology , Mammals/psychology , Movement
14.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 42(6): 841-848, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242349

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been an unprecedented challenge in carceral facilities. As COVID-19 outbreaks spread in the US in early 2020, many jails, prisons, juvenile detention centers, and other carceral facilities undertook infection control measures such as increased quarantine and reduced outside visitation. However, the implementation of these decisions varied widely across facilities and jurisdictions. We explored how carceral decision makers grappled with ethically fraught public health challenges during the pandemic. We conducted semistructured interviews during May-October 2021 with thirty-two medical and security leaders from a diverse array of US jails and prisons. Although some facilities had existing detailed outbreak plans, most plans were inadequate for a rapidly evolving pandemic such as COVID-19. Frequently, this caused facilities to enact improvised containment plans. Quarantine and isolation were rapidly adopted across facilities in response to COVID-19, but in an inconsistent manner. Decision makers generally approached quarantine and isolation protocols as a logistical challenge, rather than an ethical one. Although they recognized the hardships imposed on incarcerated people, they generally saw the measures as justified. Comprehensive outbreak control guidelines for pandemic diseases in carceral facilities are urgently needed to ensure that future responses are more equitable and effective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Prisons , Jails , Quarantine , Infection Control
15.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1170085, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231258

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The study aimed to identify potential risk factors for family transmission and to provide precautionary guidelines for the general public during novel Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) waves. Methods: A retrospective cohort study with numerous COVID-19 patients recruited was conducted in Shanghai. Epidemiological data including transmission details, demographics, vaccination status, symptoms, comorbidities, antigen test, living environment, residential ventilation, disinfection and medical treatment of each participant were collected and risk factors for family transmission were determined. Results: A total of 2,334 COVID-19 patients participated. Compared with non-cohabitation infected patients, cohabitated ones were younger (p = 0.019), more commonly unvaccinated (p = 0.048) or exposed to infections (p < 0.001), and had higher rates of symptoms (p = 0.003) or shared living room (p < 0.001). Risk factors analysis showed that the 2019-nCov antigen positive (OR = 1.86, 95%CI 1.40-2.48, p < 0.001), symptoms development (OR = 1.86, 95%CI 1.34-2.58, p < 0.001), direct contact exposure (OR = 1.47, 95%CI 1.09-1.96, p = 0.010) were independent risk factors for the cohabitant transmission of COVID-19, and a separate room with a separate toilet could reduce the risk of family transmission (OR = 0.62, 95%CI 0.41-0.92, p = 0.018). Conclusion: Patients showing negative 2019-nCov antigen tests, being asymptomatic, living in a separate room with a separate toilet, or actively avoiding direct contact with cohabitants were at low risk of family transmission, and the study recommended that avoiding direct contact and residential disinfection could reduce the risk of all cohabitants within the same house being infected with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , China/epidemiology , Risk Factors
16.
Comput Methods Programs Biomed ; 236: 107526, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231106

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We provide a compartmental model for the transmission of some contagious illnesses in a population. The model is based on partial differential equations, and takes into account seven sub-populations which are, concretely, susceptible, exposed, infected (asymptomatic or symptomatic), quarantined, recovered and vaccinated individuals along with migration. The goal is to propose and analyze an efficient computer method which resembles the dynamical properties of the epidemiological model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A non-local approach is utilized for finding approximate solutions for the mathematical model. To that end, a non-standard finite-difference technique is introduced. The finite-difference scheme is a linearly implicit model which may be rewritten using a suitable matrix. Under suitable circumstances, the matrices representing the methodology are M-matrices. RESULTS: Analytically, the local asymptotic stability of the constant solutions is investigated and the next generation matrix technique is employed to calculate the reproduction number. Computationally, the dynamical consistency of the method and the numerical efficiency are investigated rigorously. The method is thoroughly examined for its convergence, stability, and consistency. CONCLUSIONS: The theoretical analysis of the method shows that it is able to maintain the positivity of its solutions and identify equilibria. The method's local asymptotic stability properties are similar to those of the continuous system. The analysis concludes that the numerical model is convergent, stable and consistent, with linear order of convergence in the temporal domain and quadratic order of convergence in the spatial variables. A computer implementation is used to confirm the mathematical properties, and it confirms the ability in our scheme to preserve positivity, and identify equilibrium solutions and their local asymptotic stability.


Subject(s)
Models, Theoretical , Quarantine , Humans , Computer Simulation , Vaccination
17.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1132575, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324619

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Among the various impacts of disasters in terms of emotions, quarantine has been proven to result in significant increases in mental health problems. Studies of psychological resilience during outbreaks of epidemics tend to focus on long-term social quarantine. In contrast, insufficient studies have been conducted examining how rapidly negative mental health outcomes occur and how these outcomes change over time. We evaluated the time course of psychological resilience (over three different phases of quarantine) among students at Shanghai Jiao Tong University to investigate the influence of unexpected changes on college students. Methods: An online survey was conducted from 5 to 7 April 2022. A structured online questionnaire was administered using a retrospective cohort trial design. Before 9 March (Period 1), individuals engaged in their usual activities without restrictions. From 9 to 23 March (Period 2), the majority of students were asked to remain in their dormitories on campus. From 24 March to early April (Period 3), restrictions were relaxed, and students were gradually allowed to participate in essential activities on campus. We quantified dynamic changes in the severity of students' depressive symptoms over the course of these three periods. The survey consisted of five sets of self-reported questions: demographic information, lifestyle/activity restrictions, a brief mental health history, COVID-19-related background, and the Beck Depression Inventory, second edition. Results: A total of 274 college students aged 18-42 years (mean = 22.34; SE = 0.24) participated in the study (58.39% undergraduate students, 41.61% graduate students; 40.51% male, 59.49% female). The proportion of students with depressive symptoms was 9.1% in Period 1, 36.1% in Period 2, and 34.67% in Period 3. Depressive symptoms increased notably with the introduction of the quarantine in Periods 2 and 3. Lower satisfaction with the food supplied and a longer duration of physical exercise per day were found to be positively associated with changes in depression severity in Periods 2 and 3. Quarantine-related psychological distress was more evident in students who were in a romantic relationship than in students who were single. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms in university students rapidly increased after 2 weeks of quarantine and no perceptible reversal was observed over time. Concerning students in a relationship, ways to take physical exercise and to relax should be provided and the food supplied should be improved when young people are quarantined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Quarantine/psychology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , China/epidemiology , Students/psychology
18.
Acta sci., Health sci ; 44: e57231, Jan. 14, 2022.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2317160

ABSTRACT

Aim of the present study was to assess physical activity, nutrition and psychological status of the population during lockdown due to covid-19. Online survey was conductedamong 534 participants within the age range of 16-78 years using convenient sampling. Participantsfrom varied regions within India and abroad were enrolled for the present study. Volunteered participants were solicited to take part in a survey that has to be carried out by filling an online questionnaire form available to them as a URL link in the invitation through WhatsApp/Messenger. The gathered data has been compiled, coded and cleaned using Microsoft Excel. Analysis has been carried out employing descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS 17.0.Majority of participants in the studied population showed significant change in their nutrition and physical activity status due to lockdown. Covid-19 lockdown did limit their daily activities. It also had impacted their psychological status.The current investigation accentuates the need to pursue suitable life style for the maintenance of optimum metabolism and physiology. Sticking to more regular timetable of meals, effective management of stress levels and continued physical activity during the quarantine and in all the following phases of living is desirable.


Subject(s)
Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Exercise/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Mental Health , Feeding Behavior/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep , Social Behavior , Pandemics/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , Life Style
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