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1.
Med Sci Monit ; 28: e935567, 2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The COVID-19 pandemic affected drinking behaviors among adolescents. This remote questionnaire-based study aimed to compare alcohol use in 1030 final-year high school students in Split-Dalmatia County (SDC), Croatia before and during the national lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS An online self-reported questionnaire survey was conducted among 1030 final-year high school students (57.96% female; mean age 17.71 years, SD=0.66) in SDC. The data were collected from June 6 to July 20, 2020 and from October 12 to December 28, 2020. Differences in drinking habits between groups were detected with the chi-squared (χ²) test and before and during the COVID-19 lockdown using the Z test. RESULTS Before the lockdown, 84.66% of students were consuming alcohol, most frequently with friends (78.64%) and "to feel better" (29.51%), while during the lockdown, 44.76% of them were drinking, most frequently with friends (34.37%) and due to boredom (17.48%). Drinking alone (P=0.005) and with family members (P=0.003) significantly increased during the lockdown. No difference in drinking between girls and boys was found before the lockdown, but boys were drinking more during the lockdown (P<0.001). There was no difference in drinking prevalence in different schools before the lockdown, but during the lockdown, more students from vocational schools were drinking (P<0.001) and with higher frequency (P=0.002). Among 53.98% of students during the lockdown, a reduction in frequency of drinking was found (P<0.001), most significantly on islands (P=0.05). CONCLUSIONS During the lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, alcohol consumption by final-year high school students in SDC significantly decreased, particularly in girls and in gymnasium/private school students.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Adolescent , Boredom , COVID-19/virology , Croatia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Schools , Self Report
2.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265207, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Various forms of contact restrictions have been adopted in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Around February 2021, rapid testing appeared as a new policy instrument. Some claim it may serve as a substitute for contact restrictions. We study the strength of this argument by evaluating the effects of a unique policy experiment: In March and April 2021, the city of Tübingen set up a testing scheme while relaxing contact restrictions. METHODS: We compare case rates in Tübingen county to an appropriately identified control unit. We employ the synthetic control method. We base interpretations of our findings on an extended SEIR model. FINDINGS: The experiment led to an increase in the reported case rate. This increase is robust across alternative statistical specifications. This is also due to more testing leading initially to more reported cases. An epidemiological model that corrects for 'more cases due to more testing' and 'reduced testing and reporting during the Easter holiday' confirms that the overall effect of the experiment led to more infections. INTERPRETATION: The number of rapid tests were not sufficiently high in this experiment to compensate for more contacts and thereby infections caused by relaxing contact restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mass Screening/methods , Quarantine/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Germany/epidemiology , Humans
3.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265014, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742017

ABSTRACT

The objective of this research was to examine residents' awareness, attitudes, and compliance with COVID-19 public health guidelines in Vermont, which emerged as an early leader in national pandemic response. Our methods included conducting an online survey of adult Vermont residents between January and April 2021. We analyzed demographics associated with awareness and compliance, and identified features associated with non-compliance. Our results show that of the 2,208 adult Vermont residents who completed the survey, 90% were extremely aware of the state's COVID-19 guidelines, and 95% reported knowing exactly what to do to follow recommended actions. Political affiliation emerged as a primary factor related to attitudes and compliance. Self-identified Republicans were less likely to agree that public health measures keep people safe or help businesses stay open, and were less likely to follow masking, quarantine, social distancing, and vaccine guidance than Independents, Progressives, and Democrats. The large differences in COVID-19 infection and death rates across the country, and recent shift toward a "pandemic of the unvaccinated," underscore the need for identifying public health strategies that work in some areas in order to adapt and apply them to areas that have struggled with controlling the virus. Consistent with national surveys, our results show that resistance to public health guidance is a partisan challenge even in states with high compliance. Identifying populations that are less supportive or hesitant to follow guidelines while understanding factors that motivate compliance can help inform strategies for developing targeted programs to encourage collective action on pandemic response. Developing communication strategies that reach people who do not believe COVID-19 guidelines keep them safe is necessary to reach universal compliance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/methods , Adult , Aged , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vermont/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 3970, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740467

ABSTRACT

We study the problem of synthesizing lockdown policies-schedules of maximum capacities for different types of activity sites-to minimize the number of deceased individuals due to a pandemic within a given metropolitan statistical area (MSA) while controlling the severity of the imposed lockdown. To synthesize and evaluate lockdown policies, we develop a multiscale susceptible, infected, recovered, and deceased model that partitions a given MSA into geographic subregions, and that incorporates data on the behaviors of the populations of these subregions. This modeling approach allows for the analysis of heterogeneous lockdown policies that vary across the different types of activity sites within each subregion of the MSA. We formulate the synthesis of optimal lockdown policies as a nonconvex optimization problem and we develop an iterative algorithm that addresses this nonconvexity through sequential convex programming. We empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed approach by applying it to six of the largest MSAs in the United States. The developed heterogeneous lockdown policies not only reduce the number of deceased individuals by up to 45 percent over a 100 day period in comparison with three baseline lockdown policies that are less heterogeneous, but they also impose lockdowns that are less severe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Geography , Quarantine/methods , Cities , Humans , Quarantine/legislation & jurisprudence , United States
5.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 3620, 2022 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730312

ABSTRACT

The quarantine of identified close contacts has been vital to reducing transmission rates and averting secondary infection risk before symptom onset and by asymptomatic cases. The effectiveness of this contact tracing strategy to mitigate transmission is sensitive to the adherence to quarantines, which may be lower for longer quarantine periods or in vaccinated populations (where perceptions of risk are reduced). This study develops a simulation model to evaluate contact tracing strategies based on the sequential testing of identified contacts after exposure as an alternative to quarantines, in which contacts are isolated only after confirmation by a positive test. The analysis considers different number and types of tests (PCR and lateral flow antigen tests (LFA)) to identify the cost-effective testing policies that minimize the expected infecting days post-exposure considering different levels of testing capacity. This analysis suggests that even a limited number of tests can be effective at reducing secondary infection risk: two LFA tests (with optimal timing) avert infectiousness at a level that is comparable to 14-day quarantine with 80-90% adherence, or equivalently, 7-9 day quarantine with full adherence (depending on the sensitivity of the LFA test). Adding a third test (PCR or LFA) reaches the efficiency of a 14-day quarantine with 90-100% adherence. These results are robust to the exposure dates of the contact, test sensitivity of LFA and alternative models of viral load evolution, which suggests that simple testing rules can be effective for improving contact tracing in settings where strict quarantine adherence is difficult to implement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Contact Tracing/methods , Quarantine , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Models, Statistical , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Quarantine/methods , Time Factors
6.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(SI-1): 3207-3214, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726148

ABSTRACT

Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) are actions apart from getting vaccinated and medications, in order to promote deceleration of the spread of illness among people and communities during pandemic. In this article, we aim to examine NPIs applied in Turkey and worldwide due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some of the NPIs such as isolation, quarantine, and contact tracing were maintained with updates of the Ministry of Health guidelines in Turkey. Some NPIs including travel and partial or full curfew mobilization restrictions were set in accordance with the various periods by the number of cases. Periods of restrictions at autumn 2021 to summer 2022 are national partial curfews, national extended curfews, local decision-making phase, revised local decision-making phase, partial lockdown, full lockdown and gradual normalization. Mitigation and suppression have been implemented in Turkey with restrictions of varying severity throughout the course of the epidemic. It is seen that the restrictions implemented in Turkey contributed to the flattening of the epidemic curve. Even some countries mainly applied the suppression method, and others applied the mitigation method, in general, it is seen that similar methods were applied with different weights. Examples of different countries demonstrated that NPIs are effective for flattening epidemic curve. NPI have been the main instrument for a year and a half from the beginning of the epidemic to mid-2021 in Turkey as well as worldwide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Contact Tracing/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Public Health , Quarantine/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
7.
Diabet Med ; 39(2): e14782, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648138
10.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2015, 2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671628

ABSTRACT

Older children with online schooling requirements, unsurprisingly, were reported to have increased screen time during the first COVID-19 lockdown in many countries. Here, we ask whether younger children with no similar online schooling requirements also had increased screen time during lockdown. We examined children's screen time during the first COVID-19 lockdown in a large cohort (n = 2209) of 8-to-36-month-olds sampled from 15 labs across 12 countries. Caregivers reported that toddlers with no online schooling requirements were exposed to more screen time during lockdown than before lockdown. While this was exacerbated for countries with longer lockdowns, there was no evidence that the increase in screen time during lockdown was associated with socio-demographic variables, such as child age and socio-economic status (SES). However, screen time during lockdown was negatively associated with SES and positively associated with child age, caregiver screen time, and attitudes towards children's screen time. The results highlight the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on young children's screen time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Screen Time , Age Factors , COVID-19/virology , Caregivers , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Parents
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(47): e27948, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605804

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: South Korean studies on coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) treatment have described the use of community treatment centers (CTCs), which combine elements of the home and hospital, to isolate and treat mild COVID-19 patients. While the number of South Koreans diagnosed with COVID-19 cases has varied greatly by season, the number of confirmed cases in foreign nationals has shown no seasonality, with an average of around 25 to 30 per day. For foreign patients, accommodation arrangements and travel routes may be difficult; they may also have difficulty accessing medical care, so require careful management.We discuss our experience in operating and managing a CTC for foreign COVID-19 patients arriving in South Korea with mild symptoms. We also propose guidelines for efficient use of resources with respect to treating these patients in CTCs.We present the clinical findings of patients treated at the CTC between 7 October and 22 November 2020, and make some recommendations. We quarantined and treated foreign patients with mild symptoms of COVID-19 at the Ansan CTC. Discharge is determined based on clinical symptoms rather than polymerase chain reaction results. Medical and administrative staff use building A, while building B is used for isolating patients. Medical rounds are in the form of twice-daily video calls. Three kinds of foods with medication are served according to the patient's country of origin.In total, 315 patients were admitted to the Ansan CTC between 7 October and 22 November 2020; 145 of them were discharged from the CTC and 26 were transferred to other hospitals.To utilize medical resources efficiently during the pandemic, it is desirable to reserve CTCs exclusively for foreign patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Health Centers/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation/methods , Patient Transfer , Telemedicine/methods , Humans , Quarantine/methods , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 61(1): 22-25, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607391

ABSTRACT

To combat the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), significant measures were enacted including school and business closures, social distancing, and facial coverings. We hypothesized that this would have an impact on all respiratory infections in children. Using nasopharyngeal panel test results of children in the emergency department, we evaluated cross-sectional data from February to May in both 2019 and 2020. Respiratory panel testing included 11 common respiratory viruses and bacteria. After the restrictions were enacted, we observed a large drop in the number and percentage positive of all common respiratory viral infections in 2020 compared with the same time in 2019. When analyzing data from children <2 years old, a similar decrease was seen. Restrictions enacted to prevent the spread of COVID-19 were associated with a significant decrease in respiratory viral infections in children of all ages. This association could guide future public health recommendations and guidelines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Quarantine/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies
14.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261424, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599330

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak has caused two waves and spread to more than 90% of Canada's provinces since it was first reported more than a year ago. During the COVID-19 epidemic, Canadian provinces have implemented many Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs). However, the spread of the COVID-19 epidemic continues due to the complex dynamics of human mobility. We develop a meta-population network model to study the transmission dynamics of COVID-19. The model takes into account the heterogeneity of mitigation strategies in different provinces of Canada, such as the timing of implementing NPIs, the human mobility in retail and recreation, grocery and pharmacy, parks, transit stations, workplaces, and residences due to work and recreation. To determine which activity is most closely related to the dynamics of COVID-19, we use the cross-correlation analysis to find that the positive correlation is the highest between the mobility data of parks and the weekly number of confirmed COVID-19 from February 15 to December 13, 2020. The average effective reproduction numbers in nine Canadian provinces are all greater than one during the time period, and NPIs have little impact on the dynamics of COVID-19 epidemics in Ontario and Saskatchewan. After November 20, 2020, the average infection probability in Alberta became the highest since the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in Canada. We also observe that human activities around residences do not contribute much to the spread of the COVID-19 epidemic. The simulation results indicate that social distancing and constricting human mobility is effective in mitigating COVID-19 transmission in Canada. Our findings can provide guidance for public health authorities in projecting the effectiveness of future NPIs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Epidemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel/statistics & numerical data , Basic Reproduction Number/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Models, Statistical , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/methods
15.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(5152): 1778-1781, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596398

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in school closures and reduction of in-person learning (1). In August 2021, the Lake County Health Department (LCHD) in Illinois introduced a Test to Stay (TTS) strategy, whereby unvaccinated students, teachers, and staff members with certain school-related COVID-19 exposures could remain in school and participate in school-related extracurricular activities. Eligibility to participate in TTS required the following conditions to be met: 1) the exposure occurred while both the person with COVID-19 (index patient) and the close contact were masked; 2) the close contact remained asymptomatic, practiced consistent mask wearing, and maintained physical distancing; and 3) the close contact underwent testing for SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 after exposure to the index patient. LCHD permitted kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) schools in Lake County to implement TTS; 90 schools, representing 31 school districts in Lake County, implemented TTS during August 9-October 29, 2021. During the implementation period, 258 COVID-19 cases were reported. Among 1,035 students and staff members enrolled in TTS, the secondary attack risk (number of close contacts who received a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result within 14 days after exposure to an index patient, divided by total number of close contacts) was 1.5% (16 of 1,035). Among the 16 secondary cases identified, all were in students, and none appeared to transmit SARS-CoV-2 to other school-based contacts. However, nine tertiary cases were identified among household contacts of the 16 secondary cases, and four of the nine were fully vaccinated. Assuming a maximum of 8 missed school days for every 10-day quarantine period, up to 8,152 in-person learning days were saved among TTS participants. Implementation of TTS with other concurrent prevention strategies, including masking and physical distancing, limited further spread of SARS-CoV-2 within K-12 schools and allowed students to safely sustain in-person learning. Although vaccination remains the leading public health recommendation to protect against COVID-19 for those aged ≥5 years, schools might consider TTS as an option for allowing close contacts who are not fully vaccinated to remain in the classroom as an alternative to home quarantine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , Schools , Students , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Environmental Exposure , Humans , Illinois/epidemiology , Masks
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(5152): 1773-1777, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593939

ABSTRACT

On July 12, 2021, the California Department of Public Health updated COVID-19 school guidance, allowing a Test to Stay (TTS) strategy to increase access to in-person learning* (1). The TTS strategy enabled unvaccinated students, exposed in school to a person infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19), to remain in school while under quarantine, if both the infected person and the exposed person wore masks correctly and consistently throughout the exposure. To stay in school during the quarantine period, the exposed student must remain asymptomatic, wear a mask at school, and undergo twice weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2. To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of TTS on transmission (2-4). This study evaluated a TTS strategy implemented by Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LAC DPH). During September 20-October 31, 2021, among 78 school districts, one half permitted TTS; in total, 432 (21%) of 2,067 schools adopted TTS. TTS schools did not experience increases in COVID-19 incidence among students after TTS implementation, and in 20 identified outbreaks in TTS schools,† no tertiary transmission was identified. The ratio of student COVID-19 incidence in TTS districts to that in non-TTS districts was similar before and after TTS adoption (rate ratio = 0.5). Non-TTS schools lost an estimated 92,455 in-person school days during September 20-October 31 while students were in quarantine, compared with no lost days among quarantined students in TTS schools. Non-TTS schools cited resource-related reasons for not adopting TTS; 75% of these schools were in LAC's most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Preliminary data from LAC suggest that a school-based TTS strategy does not increase school transmission of SARS-CoV-2, and might greatly reduce loss of in-person school days; however, TTS might have barriers to implementation and require resources that are not available for some schools. Continued efforts to simplify school quarantine strategies might help to ensure that all students have access to safe in-person education. Although vaccination remains the leading public health recommendation to protect against COVID-19 for persons aged ≥5 years, schools might consider TTS as an option for allowing students with a school exposure who are not fully vaccinated to remain in the classroom as an alternative to home quarantine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , Schools , Students , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Environmental Exposure , Humans , Los Angeles/epidemiology , Masks
17.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0242777, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574841

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has spread across the world since the beginning of 2020. Many regions have experienced its effects. The state of South Carolina in the USA has seen cases since early March 2020 and a primary peak in early April 2020. A lockdown was imposed on April 6th but lifting of restrictions started on April 24th. The daily case and death data as reported by NCHS (deaths) via the New York Times GitHUB repository have been analyzed and approaches to modeling of the data are presented. Prediction is also considered and the role of asymptomatic transmission is assessed as a latent unobserved effect. Two different time periods are examined and one step prediction is provided. The results suggest that both socio-economic disadvantage, asymptomatic transmission and spatial confounding are important ingredients in any model pertaining to county level case dynamics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Bayes Theorem , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , South Carolina/epidemiology
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(19)2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569333

ABSTRACT

Regional quarantine policies, in which a portion of a population surrounding infections is locked down, are an important tool to contain disease. However, jurisdictional governments-such as cities, counties, states, and countries-act with minimal coordination across borders. We show that a regional quarantine policy's effectiveness depends on whether 1) the network of interactions satisfies a growth balance condition, 2) infections have a short delay in detection, and 3) the government has control over and knowledge of the necessary parts of the network (no leakage of behaviors). As these conditions generally fail to be satisfied, especially when interactions cross borders, we show that substantial improvements are possible if governments are outward looking and proactive: triggering quarantines in reaction to neighbors' infection rates, in some cases even before infections are detected internally. We also show that even a few lax governments-those that wait for nontrivial internal infection rates before quarantining-impose substantial costs on the whole system. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding contagion across policy borders and offer a starting point in designing proactive policies for decentralized jurisdictions.


Subject(s)
Disease , Policy , Quarantine , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , SARS-CoV-2
20.
CMAJ ; 193(24): E921-E930, 2021 06 14.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551317

ABSTRACT

CONTEXTE: Les interventions non pharmacologiques demeurent le principal moyen de maîtriser le coronavirus du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère 2 (SRAS-CoV-2) d'ici à ce que la couverture vaccinale soit suffisante pour donner lieu à une immunité collective. Nous avons utilisé des données de mobilité anonymisées de téléphones intelligents afin de quantifier le niveau de mobilité requis pour maîtriser le SRAS-CoV-2 (c.-à-d., seuil de mobilité), et la différence par rapport au niveau de mobilité observé (c.-à-d., écart de mobilité). MÉTHODES: Nous avons procédé à une analyse de séries chronologiques sur l'incidence hebdomadaire du SRAS-CoV-2 au Canada entre le 15 mars 2020 et le 6 mars 2021. Le paramètre mesuré était le taux de croissance hebdomadaire, défini comme le rapport entre les cas d'une semaine donnée et ceux de la semaine précédente. Nous avons mesuré les effets du temps moyen passé hors domicile au cours des 3 semaines précédentes à l'aide d'un modèle de régression log-normal, en tenant compte de la province, de la semaine et de la température moyenne. Nous avons calculé le seuil de mobilité et l'écart de mobilité pour le SRAS-CoV-2. RÉSULTATS: Au cours des 51 semaines de l'étude, en tout, 888 751 personnes ont contracté le SRAS-CoV-2. Chaque augmentation de 10 % de l'écart de mobilité a été associée à une augmentation de 25 % du taux de croissance des cas hebdomadaires de SRAS-CoV-2 (rapport 1,25, intervalle de confiance à 95 % 1,20­1,29). Comparativement à la mobilité prépandémique de référence de 100 %, le seuil de mobilité a été plus élevé au cours de l'été (69 %, écart interquartile [EI] 67 %­70 %), et a chuté à 54 % pendant l'hiver 2021 (EI 52 %­55 %); un écart de mobilité a été observé au Canada entre juillet 2020 et la dernière semaine de décembre 2020. INTERPRÉTATION: La mobilité permet de prédire avec fiabilité et constance la croissance des cas hebdomadaires et il faut maintenir des niveaux faibles de mobilité pour maîtriser le SRAS-CoV-2 jusqu'à la fin du printemps 2021. Les données de mobilité anonymisées des téléphones intelligents peuvent servir à guider le relâchement ou le resserrement des mesures de distanciation physique provinciales et régionales.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Geographic Mapping , Mobile Applications/standards , Patient Identification Systems/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Patient Identification Systems/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/standards , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Regression Analysis , Time Factors
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