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1.
Minerva Gastroenterol (Torino) ; 67(2): 190-195, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535066

ABSTRACT

When looking for new antiviral compounds aimed to counteract the COVID-19, a disease caused by the recently identified novel Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), the knowledge of the main viral proteins is fundamental. The major druggable targets of SARS-CoV-2 include 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro), papain-like protease (PLpro), RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and spike (S) protein. Molecular docking studies have highlighted that quercetin, a natural polyphenol belonging to the flavonol class, inhibits 3CLpro, PLpro and S proteins. Biophysical technics have then very recently confirmed that quercetin is reasonably a potent inhibitor of 3CLpro. The likely antiviral properties of quercetin are anyway challenged by its very poor oral bioavailability profile and any attempt to overcome this limit should be welcome. A phospholipid delivery form of quercetin (Quercetin Phytosome®) has been recently tested in humans to evaluate a possible improvement in oral bioavailability. After hydrolysis of the conjugated form (mainly glucuronide) of quercetin found in human plasma, the pharmacokinetics results have demonstrated an increased bioavailability rate by about 20-fold for total quercetin. It has been also observed that the presence of specific glucuronidase could yield free systemic quercetin in human body. Taking also into considerations its anti-inflammatory and thrombin-inhibitory actions, a bioavailable form of quercetin, like Quercetin Phytosome®, should be considered a possible candidate to clinically face COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation
2.
Molecules ; 26(19)2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438675

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is caused by SARS-CoV-2 and is leading to the worst health crisis of this century. It emerged in China during late 2019 and rapidly spread all over the world, producing a broad spectrum of clinical disease severity, ranging from asymptomatic infection to death (4.3 million victims so far). Consequently, the scientific research is devoted to investigating the mechanisms of COVID-19 pathogenesis to both identify specific therapeutic drugs and develop vaccines. Although immunological mechanisms driving COVID-19 pathogenesis are still largely unknown, new understanding has emerged about the innate and adaptive immune responses elicited in SARS-CoV-2 infection, which are mainly focused on the dysregulated inflammatory response in severe COVID-19. Polyphenols are naturally occurring products with immunomodulatory activity, playing a relevant role in reducing inflammation and preventing the onset of serious chronic diseases. Mainly based on data collected before the appearance of SARS-CoV-2, polyphenols have been recently suggested as promising agents to fight COVID-19, and some clinical trials have already been approved with polyphenols to treat COVID-19. The aim of this review is to analyze and discuss the in vitro and in vivo research on the immunomodulatory activity of quercetin as a research model of polyphenols, focusing on research that addresses issues related to the dysregulated immune response in severe COVID-19. From this analysis, it emerges that although encouraging data are present, they are still insufficient to recommend polyphenols as potential immunomodulatory agents against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Polyphenols/therapeutic use , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/chemistry , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Polyphenols/chemistry , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Quercetin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
3.
Nature ; 599(7884): 283-289, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404888

ABSTRACT

Derailed cytokine and immune cell networks account for the organ damage and the clinical severity of COVID-19 (refs. 1-4). Here we show that SARS-CoV-2, like other viruses, evokes cellular senescence as a primary stress response in infected cells. Virus-induced senescence (VIS) is indistinguishable from other forms of cellular senescence and is accompanied by a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which comprises pro-inflammatory cytokines, extracellular-matrix-active factors and pro-coagulatory mediators5-7. Patients with COVID-19 displayed markers of senescence in their airway mucosa in situ and increased serum levels of SASP factors. In vitro assays demonstrated macrophage activation with SASP-reminiscent secretion, complement lysis and SASP-amplifying secondary senescence of endothelial cells, which mirrored hallmark features of COVID-19 such as macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, endothelial damage and widespread thrombosis in affected lung tissue1,8,9. Moreover, supernatant from VIS cells, including SARS-CoV-2-induced senescence, induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and activation of platelets and the clotting cascade. Senolytics such as navitoclax and a combination of dasatinib plus quercetin selectively eliminated VIS cells, mitigated COVID-19-reminiscent lung disease and reduced inflammation in SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters and mice. Our findings mark VIS as a pathogenic trigger of COVID-19-related cytokine escalation and organ damage, and suggest that senolytic targeting of virus-infected cells is a treatment option against SARS-CoV-2 and perhaps other viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aniline Compounds/pharmacology , Aniline Compounds/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Dasatinib/pharmacology , Dasatinib/therapeutic use , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/metabolism
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(17)2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379978

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) is one of the molecular targets for drug design. Effective vaccines have been identified as a long-term solution but the rate at which they are being administered is slow in several countries, and mutations of SARS-CoV-2 could render them less effective. Moreover, remdesivir seems to work only with some types of COVID-19 patients. Hence, the continuous investigation of new treatments for this disease is pivotal. This study investigated the inhibitory role of natural products against SARS-CoV-2 Mpro as repurposable agents in the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Through in silico approach, selected flavonoids were docked into the active site of Mpro. The free energies of the ligands complexed with Mpro were computationally estimated using the molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) method. In addition, the inhibition process of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro with these ligands was simulated at 100 ns in order to uncover the dynamic behavior and complex stability. The docking results showed that the selected flavonoids exhibited good poses in the binding domain of Mpro. The amino acid residues involved in the binding of the selected ligands correlated well with the residues involved with the mechanism-based inhibitor (N3) and the docking score of Quercetin-3-O-Neohesperidoside (-16.8 Kcal/mol) ranked efficiently with this inhibitor (-16.5 Kcal/mol). In addition, single-structure MM/GBSA rescoring method showed that Quercetin-3-O-Neohesperidoside (-87.60 Kcal/mol) is more energetically favored than N3 (-80.88 Kcal/mol) and other ligands (Myricetin 3-Rutinoside (-87.50 Kcal/mol), Quercetin 3-Rhamnoside (-80.17 Kcal/mol), Rutin (-58.98 Kcal/mol), and Myricitrin (-49.22 Kcal/mol). The molecular dynamics simulation (MDs) pinpointed the stability of these complexes over the course of 100 ns with reduced RMSD and RMSF. Based on the docking results and energy calculation, together with the RMSD of 1.98 ± 0.19 Å and RMSF of 1.00 ± 0.51 Å, Quercetin-3-O-Neohesperidoside is a better inhibitor of Mpro compared to N3 and other selected ligands and can be repurposed as a drug candidate for the treatment of COVID-19. In addition, this study demonstrated that in silico docking, free energy calculations, and MDs, respectively, are applicable to estimating the interaction, energetics, and dynamic behavior of molecular targets by natural products and can be used to direct the development of novel target function modulators.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Binding Sites , Biological Products/chemistry , Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Drug Design , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Quercetin/chemistry , Quercetin/metabolism , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry
5.
J Evid Based Integr Med ; 26: 2515690X211026193, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298011

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES AND SETTING.: As the lethal COVID-19 pandemic enters its second year, the need for effective modalities of alleviation remains urgent. This includes modalities that can readily be used by the public to reduce disease spread and severity. Such preventive measures and early-stage treatments may temper the immediacy of demand for advanced anti-COVID measures (drugs, antibodies, vaccines) and help relieve strain also on other health system resources. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS.: We present results of a clinical study with a multi-component OTC "core formulation" regimen used in a multiply exposed adult population. Analysis of clinical outcome data from our sample of over 100 subjects - comprised of roughly equal sized regimen-compliant (test) and non-compliant (control) groups meeting equivalent inclusion criteria - demonstrates a strong statistical significance in favor of use of the core formulations. RESULTS.: While both groups were moderate in size, the difference between them in outcomes over the 20-week study period was large and stark: Just under 4% of the compliant test group presented flu-like symptoms, but none of the test group was COVID-positive; whereas 20% of the non-compliant control group presented flu-like symptoms, three-quarters of whom (15% overall of the control group) were COVID-positive. CONCLUSIONS.: Offering a low cost, readily implemented anti-viral approach, the study regimen may serve, at the least, as a stopgap modality and, perhaps, as a useful tool in combatting the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Dietary Supplements , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Cinchona , Female , Humans , Ionophores/therapeutic use , Lysine/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Nonprescription Drugs , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Zinc/therapeutic use
6.
Minerva Gastroenterol (Torino) ; 67(2): 190-195, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278860

ABSTRACT

When looking for new antiviral compounds aimed to counteract the COVID-19, a disease caused by the recently identified novel Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), the knowledge of the main viral proteins is fundamental. The major druggable targets of SARS-CoV-2 include 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro), papain-like protease (PLpro), RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and spike (S) protein. Molecular docking studies have highlighted that quercetin, a natural polyphenol belonging to the flavonol class, inhibits 3CLpro, PLpro and S proteins. Biophysical technics have then very recently confirmed that quercetin is reasonably a potent inhibitor of 3CLpro. The likely antiviral properties of quercetin are anyway challenged by its very poor oral bioavailability profile and any attempt to overcome this limit should be welcome. A phospholipid delivery form of quercetin (Quercetin Phytosome®) has been recently tested in humans to evaluate a possible improvement in oral bioavailability. After hydrolysis of the conjugated form (mainly glucuronide) of quercetin found in human plasma, the pharmacokinetics results have demonstrated an increased bioavailability rate by about 20-fold for total quercetin. It has been also observed that the presence of specific glucuronidase could yield free systemic quercetin in human body. Taking also into considerations its anti-inflammatory and thrombin-inhibitory actions, a bioavailable form of quercetin, like Quercetin Phytosome®, should be considered a possible candidate to clinically face COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation
7.
Expert Rev Respir Med ; 15(6): 805-821, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187906

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Viral respiratory tract infections (RTIs) have been recognized as a global public health burden. Despite current theories about their effectiveness, the true benefits of dietary supplements on the prevention and treatment of viral RTIs remain elusive, due to contradictory reports. Hence, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of dietary supplements on the prevention and treatment of viral RTIs.Areas covered: We systematically searched databases of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar through 4 March 2020, to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of consuming selected dietary supplements on the prevention or treatment of viral RTIs.Expert opinion: Thirty-nine randomized controlled trials (n = 16,797 participants) were eligible and included. Namely, vitamin D supplementation appeared to improve viral RTIs across cohorts particulate in those with vitamin D deficiency. Among the evaluated dietary supplements, specific lactobacillus strains were used most commonly with selected prebiotics that showed potentially positive effects on the prevention and treatment of viral RTIs. Further, ginseng extract supplementation may effectively prevent viral RTIs as adjuvant therapy. However, longitudinal research is required to confirm these observations and address the optimal dose, duration, and safety of dietary supplements being publicly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Dietary Supplements , Respiratory Tract Infections , Virus Diseases , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dietary Supplements/classification , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Humans , Lactobacillus/physiology , Panax/chemistry , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/therapy , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/diet therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , beta-Glucans/therapeutic use
8.
Science ; 373(6552)2021 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262378

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the pronounced vulnerability of the elderly and chronically ill to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced morbidity and mortality. Cellular senescence contributes to inflammation, multiple chronic diseases, and age-related dysfunction, but effects on responses to viral infection are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that senescent cells (SnCs) become hyper-inflammatory in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including SARS-CoV-2 spike protein-1, increasing expression of viral entry proteins and reducing antiviral gene expression in non-SnCs through a paracrine mechanism. Old mice acutely infected with pathogens that included a SARS-CoV-2-related mouse ß-coronavirus experienced increased senescence and inflammation, with nearly 100% mortality. Targeting SnCs by using senolytic drugs before or after pathogen exposure significantly reduced mortality, cellular senescence, and inflammatory markers and increased antiviral antibodies. Thus, reducing the SnC burden in diseased or aged individuals should enhance resilience and reduce mortality after viral infection, including that of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Aging , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Flavonols/therapeutic use , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Dasatinib/pharmacology , Dasatinib/therapeutic use , Female , Flavonols/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Murine hepatitis virus/immunology , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Receptors, Coronavirus/genetics , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
9.
J Nutr Biochem ; 97: 108787, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253236

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of mysterious pneumonia at the end of 2019 is associated with widespread research interest worldwide. The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) targets multiple organs through inflammatory, immune, and redox mechanisms, and no effective drug for its prophylaxis or treatment has been identified until now. The use of dietary bioactive compounds, such as phenolic compounds (PC), has emerged as a putative nutritional or therapeutic adjunct approach for COVID-19. In the present study, scientific data on the mechanisms underlying the bioactivity of PC and their usefulness in COVID-19 mitigation are reviewed. In addition, antioxidant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory effects of dietary PC are studied. Moreover, the implications of digestion on the putative benefits of dietary PC against COVID-19 are presented by addressing the bioavailability and biotransformation of PC by the gut microbiota. Lastly, safety issues and possible drug interactions of PC and their implications in COVID-19 therapeutics are discussed.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Dietary Supplements , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Phenols/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacokinetics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacokinetics , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Availability , Curcumin/pharmacokinetics , Curcumin/pharmacology , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Dietary Supplements/analysis , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/drug effects , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacokinetics , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Phenols/pharmacokinetics , Phenols/pharmacology , Quercetin/pharmacokinetics , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Resveratrol/pharmacokinetics , Resveratrol/pharmacology , Resveratrol/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
10.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(6)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246687

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical consequences of SARS-CoV-2 and DENGUE virus co-infection are not promising. However, their treatment options are currently unavailable. Current studies have shown that quercetin is both resistant to COVID-19 and DENGUE; this study aimed to evaluate the possible functional roles and underlying mechanisms of action of quercetin as a potential molecular candidate against COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. METHODS: We used a series of bioinformatics analyses to understand and characterize the biological functions, pharmacological targets and therapeutic mechanisms of quercetin in COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. RESULTS: We revealed the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 and DENGUE, including pathological mechanisms, key inflammatory pathways and possible methods of intervention, 60 overlapping targets related to the co-infection and the drug were identified, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) was constructed and TNFα, CCL-2 and CXCL8 could become potential drug targets. Furthermore, we disclosed the signaling pathways, biological functions and upstream pathway activity of quercetin in COVID-19 and DENGUE. The analysis indicated that quercetin could inhibit cytokines release, alleviate excessive immune responses and eliminate inflammation, through NF-κB, IL-17 and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to reveal quercetin as a pharmacological drug for COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection remain a potential threat to the world's public health system. Therefore, we need innovative thinking to provide admissible evidence for quercetin as a potential molecule drug for the treatment of COVID-19 and DENGUE, but the findings have not been verified in actual patients, so further clinical drug trials are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dengue Virus/chemistry , Dengue/drug therapy , Quercetin/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CCL2/chemistry , Chemokine CCL2/drug effects , Chemokine CCL2/genetics , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/genetics , Coinfection/virology , Dengue/complications , Dengue/genetics , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/drug effects , Humans , Interleukin-17/genetics , Interleukin-8/chemistry , Interleukin-8/drug effects , Interleukin-8/genetics , NF-kappa B/drug effects , NF-kappa B/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps/drug effects , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/chemistry , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
11.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0246265, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117479

ABSTRACT

Medicinal uses and applications of metals and their complexes are of increasing clinical and commercial importance. The ligation behavior of quercetin (Q), which is a flavonoid, and its Zn (II) (Q/Zn) complex were studied and characterized based on elemental analysis, molar conductance, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, electronic spectra, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), thermogravimetric analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). FTIR spectral data revealed that Q acts as a bidentate ligand (chelating ligand) through carbonyl C(4) = O oxygen and phenolic C(3)-OH oxygen in conjugation with Zn. Electronic, FTIR, and 1H-NMR spectral data revealed that the Q/Zn complex has a distorted octahedral geometry, with the following chemical formula: [Zn(Q)(NO3)(H2O)2].5H2O. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) injection. A total of 70 male albino rats were divided into seven groups: control, diabetic untreated group and diabetic groups treated with either MSCs and/or Q and/or Q/Zn or their combination. Serum insulin, glucose, C-peptide, glycosylated hemoglobin, lipid profile, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant levels were determined. Pancreatic and lung histology and TEM for pancreatic tissues in addition to gene expression of both SOD and CAT in pulmonary tissues were evaluated. MSCs in combination with Q/Zn therapy exhibited potent protective effects against STZ induced hyperglycemia and suppressed oxidative stress, genotoxicity, glycometabolic disturbances, and structural alterations. Engrafted MSCs were found inside pancreatic tissue at the end of the experiment. In conclusion, Q/Zn with MSC therapy produced a synergistic effect against oxidative stress and genotoxicity and can be considered potential ameliorative therapy against diabetes with pulmonary dysfunction, which may benefit against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Zinc/therapeutic use , Animals , Blood Glucose/analysis , Blood Glucose/metabolism , C-Peptide/blood , C-Peptide/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Coordination Complexes/chemistry , Coordination Complexes/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/pathology , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/metabolism , Hyperglycemia/pathology , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/chemistry , Insulin/blood , Insulin/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Rats , Zinc/chemistry
12.
Biomolecules ; 11(1)2020 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067683

ABSTRACT

The medical burden caused by respiratory manifestations of influenza virus (IV) outbreak as an infectious respiratory disease is so great that governments in both developed and developing countries have allocated significant national budget toward the development of strategies for prevention, control, and treatment of this infection, which is seemingly common and treatable, but can be deadly. Frequent mutations in its genome structure often result in resistance to standard medications. Thus, new generations of treatments are critical to combat this ever-evolving infection. Plant materials and active compounds have been tested for many years, including, more recently, active compounds like flavonoids. Quercetin is a compound belonging to the flavonols class and has shown therapeutic effects against influenza virus. The focus of this review includes viral pathogenesis as well as the application of quercetin and its derivatives as a complementary therapy in controlling influenza and its related symptoms based on the targets. We also touch on the potential of this class of compounds for treatment of SARS-COV-2, the cause of new pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Influenza A virus/metabolism , Influenza, Human , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/metabolism
13.
J Evid Based Integr Med ; 25: 2515690X20932523, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979748

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), which causes COVID-19, is a betacoronavirus closely related to the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The recent COVID-19 outbreak created an urgent need for treatment. To expedite the development of such treatment, pharmaceutical companies and government agencies are currently testing several existing drugs for their effect on the virus. Gene-Eden-VIR and Novirin are natural, broad-spectrum, antiviral treatments proven to be safe and effective in several clinical studies. In this article, we present evidence indicating that the 5 Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin ingredients have anti-betacoronavirus, and specifically, anti-SARS-CoV effects. We consider this evidence as a first indication of the anti-coronavirus effects of Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin. Next, we are planning to conduct a clinical study with users of the treatments to test the effects of Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin on individuals at risk and those infected with the virus.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Selenium/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Drug Combinations , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Molecules ; 25(23)2020 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966360

ABSTRACT

The inflammatory mediator and oxidant agent storm caused by the SARS-CoV-2 infection has been strongly associated with the failure of vital organs observed in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the death of thousands of infected people around the world. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common renal disorder characterized by a sudden and sustained decrease in renal function with a critical influence on poor prognosis and lethal clinical outcomes of various etiologies, including some viral infection diseases. It is known that oxidative stress and inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis and development of AKI. Quercetin is a natural substance that has multiple pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory action, and is used as a dietary supplement. There is evidence of the anti-coronavirus activities of this compound, including against the target SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro. The ability to inhibit coronavirus and its inflammatory processes is strongly desired in a new drug for the treatment of COVID-19. Therefore, in this review, the dual effect of quercetin is discussed from a mechanistic perspective in relation to AKI kidney injury and its nephroprotective potential to SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Quercetin/pharmacology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Morbidity , Protective Agents/pharmacology , Protective Agents/therapeutic use , Quercetin/therapeutic use
15.
Biofactors ; 46(6): 927-933, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966303

ABSTRACT

Recent articles report elevated markers of coagulation, endothelial injury, and microthromboses in lungs from deceased COVID-19 patients. However, there has been no discussion of what may induce intravascular coagulation. Platelets are critical in the formation of thrombi and their most potent trigger is platelet activating factor (PAF), first characterized by Demopoulos and colleagues in 1979. PAF is produced by cells involved in host defense and its biological actions bear similarities with COVID-19 disease manifestations. PAF can also stimulate perivascular mast cell activation, leading to inflammation implicated in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Mast cells are plentiful in the lungs and are a rich source of PAF and of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-6, which may contribute to COVID-19 and especially SARS. The histamine-1 receptor antagonist rupatadine was developed to have anti-PAF activity, and also inhibits activation of human mast cells in response to PAF. Rupatadine could be repurposed for COVID-19 prophylaxis alone or together with other PAF-inhibitors of natural origin such as the flavonoids quercetin and luteolin, which have antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-PAF actions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cyproheptadine/analogs & derivatives , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/prevention & control , Platelet Activating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cyproheptadine/therapeutic use , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/pathology , Mast Cells/virology , Platelet Activating Factor/genetics , Platelet Activating Factor/metabolism , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
16.
Curr Mol Med ; 21(5): 385-391, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-789058

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an emerging disease that is a major threat to the global community. The main challenge in this disease is the lack of proper or proven medication. The drugs used to treat this disease are only for symptomatic treatment. Studies of other coronaviruses, such as SARS and MERS, suggest that quercetin has sufficient potential to treat COVID-19. Previous studies have shown that quercetin reduces the entry of the virus into the cell by blocking the ACE2 receptor, as well as reducing the level of interleukin-6 in SARS and MERS patients. Therefore, the aim of this review was to scrutinize the potential of quercetin as a drug in the treatment of COVID-19 from a molecular perspective.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Quercetin/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Quercetin/biosynthesis , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Virus Internalization/drug effects
17.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(16): 8585-8591, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745634

ABSTRACT

Some surface proteins of the newly identified severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can bind to the hemoglobin molecule of an erythrocyte, which leads to the destruction of the structure of the heme and the release of harmful iron ions to the bloodstream. The degradation of hemoglobin results in the impairment of oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, and the accumulation of free iron enhances the production of reactive oxygen species. Both events can lead to the development of oxidative stress. In this case, oxidative damage to the lungs leads then to the injuries of all other tissues and organs. The use of uridine, which preserves the structure of pulmonary alveoli and the air-blood barrier of the lungs in the course of experimental severe hypoxia, and dihydroquercetin, an effective free radical scavenger, is promising for the treatment of COVID-19. These drugs can also be used for the recovery of the body after the severe disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Oxidative Stress , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Erythrocytes/cytology , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Erythrocytes/virology , Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology , Free Radical Scavengers/therapeutic use , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Alveoli/drug effects , Pulmonary Alveoli/physiology , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Uridine/pharmacology , Uridine/therapeutic use
18.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1451, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-637661

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) represents an emergent global threat which is straining worldwide healthcare capacity. As of May 27th, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has resulted in more than 340,000 deaths worldwide, with 100,000 deaths in the US alone. It is imperative to study and develop pharmacological treatments suitable for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. Ascorbic acid is a crucial vitamin necessary for the correct functioning of the immune system. It plays a role in stress response and has shown promising results when administered to the critically ill. Quercetin is a well-known flavonoid whose antiviral properties have been investigated in numerous studies. There is evidence that vitamin C and quercetin co-administration exerts a synergistic antiviral action due to overlapping antiviral and immunomodulatory properties and the capacity of ascorbate to recycle quercetin, increasing its efficacy. Safe, cheap interventions which have a sound biological rationale should be prioritized for experimental use in the current context of a global health pandemic. We present the current evidence for the use of vitamin C and quercetin both for prophylaxis in high-risk populations and for the treatment of COVID-19 patients as an adjunct to promising pharmacological agents such as Remdesivir or convalescent plasma.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Mice , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Quercetin/adverse effects , Quercetin/chemistry , Quercetin/pharmacokinetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication/drug effects
20.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(8): 6511-6517, 2020 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-30425

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, also known as SARS-CoV-2, is a new emerging zoonotic corona virus of the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and the MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) family. COVID-19 originated in China and spread world-wide, resulting in the pandemic of 2020. For some reason, COVID-19 shows a considerably higher mortality rate in patients with advanced chronological age. This begs the question as to whether there is a functional association between COVID-19 infection and the process of chronological aging. Two host receptors have been proposed for COVID-19. One is CD26 and the other is ACE-2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2). Interestingly, both CD26 and the angiotensin system show associations with senescence. Similarly, two proposed therapeutics for the treatment of COVID-19 infection are Azithromycin and Quercetin, both drugs with significant senolytic activity. Also, Chloroquine-related compounds inhibit the induction of the well-known senescence marker, Beta-galactosidase. Other anti-aging drugs should also be considered, such as Rapamycin and Doxycycline, as they behave as inhibitors of protein synthesis, blocking both SASP and viral replication. Therefore, we wish to speculate that the fight against COVID-19 disease should involve testing the hypothesis that senolytics and other anti-aging drugs may have a prominent role in preventing the transmission of the virus, as well as aid in its treatment. Thus, we propose that new clinical trials may be warranted, as several senolytic and anti-aging therapeutics are existing FDA-approved drugs, with excellent safety profiles, and would be readily available for drug repurposing efforts. As Azithromycin and Doxycycline are both commonly used antibiotics that inhibit viral replication and IL-6 production, we may want to consider this general class of antibiotics that functionally inhibits cellular protein synthesis as a side-effect, for the treatment and prevention of COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Aging/drug effects , Antiviral Agents , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/pharmacology , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
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