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1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24442, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577650

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic interventions targeting viral infections remain a significant challenge for both the medical and scientific communities. While specific antiviral agents have shown success as therapeutics, viral resistance inevitably develops, making many of these approaches ineffective. This inescapable obstacle warrants alternative approaches, such as the targeting of host cellular factors. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the major respiratory pathogen of infants and children worldwide, causes respiratory tract infection ranging from mild upper respiratory tract symptoms to severe life-threatening lower respiratory tract disease. Despite the fact that the molecular biology of the virus, which was originally discovered in 1956, is well described, there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment against RSV infection. Here, we demonstrate that targeting host factors, specifically, mTOR signaling, reduces RSV protein production and generation of infectious progeny virus. Further, we show that this approach can be generalizable as inhibition of mTOR kinases reduces coronavirus gene expression, mRNA transcription and protein production. Overall, defining virus replication-dependent host functions may be an effective means to combat viral infections, particularly in the absence of antiviral drugs.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , A549 Cells , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/genetics , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/metabolism , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/antagonists & inhibitors , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/genetics , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/pathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/drug effects , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
2.
Int Microbiol ; 24(1): 123-124, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573644

ABSTRACT

Until now, there is no current vaccine or treatment against SARS-CoV-2. There are previous successful RNAi studies performed on SARS-CoV. Therefore, similar line of investigation against SARS-CoV-2 could be successful.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , RNA Interference , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Genome, Viral , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21462, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500517

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). More than 143 million cases of COVID-19 have been reported to date, with the global death rate at 2.13%. Currently, there are no licensed therapeutics for controlling SARS-CoV-2 infection. The antiviral effects of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme that inhibits the inflammatory response and reduces oxidative stress, have been investigated in several viral infections. To confirm whether HO-1 suppresses SARS-CoV-2 infection, we assessed the antiviral activity of hemin, an effective and safe HO-1 inducer, in SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that treatment with hemin efficiently suppressed SARS-CoV-2 replication (selectivity index: 249.7012). Besides, the transient expression of HO-1 using an expression vector also suppressed the growth of the virus in cells. Free iron and biliverdin, which are metabolic byproducts of heme catalysis by HO-1, also suppressed the viral infection. Additionally, hemin indirectly increased the expression of interferon-stimulated proteins known to restrict SARS-CoV-2 replication. Overall, the findings suggested that HO-1, induced by hemin, effectively suppressed SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Therefore, HO-1 could be potential therapeutic candidate for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Heme Oxygenase-1/metabolism , Hemin/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Heme Oxygenase-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Heme Oxygenase-1/genetics , Hemin/chemistry , Hemin/pharmacology , Humans , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Up-Regulation/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
4.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 401, 2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486593

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the novel coronavirus causing severe respiratory illness (COVID-19). This virus was initially identified in Wuhan city, a populated area of the Hubei province in China, and still remains one of the major global health challenges. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of post-transcriptional gene silencing that plays a crucial role in innate viral defense mechanisms by inhibiting the virus replication as well as expression of various viral proteins. Dicer, Drosha, Ago2, and DGCR8 are essential components of the RNAi system, which is supposed to be dysregulated in COVID-19 patients. This study aimed to assess the expression level of the mentioned mRNAs in COVID-19patients compared to healthy individuals. RESULTS: Our findings demonstrated that the expression of Dicer, Drosha, and Ago2 was statistically altered in COVID-19 patients compared to healthy subjects. Ultimately, the RNA interference mechanism as a crucial antiviral defense system was suggested to be dysregulated in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , MicroRNAs , Humans , RNA Interference , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463841

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected almost 200 million people worldwide and led to approximately 4 million deaths as of August 2021. Despite successful vaccine development, treatment options are limited. A promising strategy to specifically target viral infections is to suppress viral replication through RNA interference (RNAi). Hence, we designed eight small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the highly conserved 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of SARS-CoV-2. The most promising candidate identified in initial reporter assays, termed siCoV6, targets the leader sequence of the virus, which is present in the genomic as well as in all subgenomic RNAs. In assays with infectious SARS-CoV-2, it reduced replication by two orders of magnitude and prevented the development of a cytopathic effect. Moreover, it retained its activity against the SARS-CoV-2 alpha variant and has perfect homology against all sequences of the delta variant that were analyzed by bioinformatic means. Interestingly, the siRNA was even highly active in virus replication assays with the SARS-CoV-1 family member. This work thus identified a very potent siRNA with a broad activity against various SARS-CoV viruses that represents a promising candidate for the development of new treatment options.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/therapy , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Virus Replication/drug effects , 5' Untranslated Regions/genetics , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , HeLa Cells , Humans , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/genetics
6.
Viruses ; 13(2)2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456346

ABSTRACT

Rubella virus (RuV) is the infectious agent of a series of birth defect diseases termed congenital rubella syndrome, which is a major public health concern all around the world. RNA interference (RNAi) is a crucial antiviral defense mechanism in eukaryotes, and numerous viruses have been found to encode viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) to evade antiviral RNAi response. However, there is little knowledge about whether and how RuV antagonizes RNAi. In this study, we identified that the RuV capsid protein is a potent VSR that can efficiently suppress shRNA- and siRNA-induced RNAi in mammalian cells. Moreover, the VSR activity of the RuV capsid is dependent on its dimerization and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding activity. In addition, ectopic expression of the RuV capsid can effectively rescue the replication defect of a VSR-deficient virus or replicon, implying that the RuV capsid can act as a VSR in the context of viral infection. Together, our findings uncover that RuV encodes a VSR to evade antiviral RNAi response, which expands our understanding of RuV-host interaction and sheds light on the potential therapeutic target against RuV.


Subject(s)
Capsid Proteins/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , RNA Interference , Rubella virus/pathogenicity , Animals , Capsid , Capsid Proteins/genetics , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , RNA, Double-Stranded , RNA, Small Interfering , Rubella virus/genetics , Vero Cells , Virion , Virus Replication
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19161, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440480

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is associated with fatal pulmonary fibrosis. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can be developed to induce RNA interference against SARS-CoV-2, and their susceptible target sites can be inferred by Argonaute crosslinking immunoprecipitation sequencing (AGO CLIP). Here, by reanalysing AGO CLIP data in RNA viruses, we delineated putative AGO binding in the conserved non-structural protein 12 (nsp12) region encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) in SARS-CoV-2. We utilised the inferred AGO binding to optimise the local RNA folding parameter to calculate target accessibility and predict all potent siRNA target sites in the SARS-CoV-2 genome, avoiding sequence variants. siRNAs loaded onto AGO also repressed seed (positions 2-8)-matched transcripts by acting as microRNAs (miRNAs). To utilise this, we further screened 13 potential siRNAs whose seed sequences were matched to known antifibrotic miRNAs and confirmed their miRNA-like activity. A miR-27-mimicking siRNA designed to target the nsp12 region (27/RdRP) was validated to silence a synthesised nsp12 RNA mimic in lung cell lines and function as an antifibrotic miR-27 in regulating target transcriptomes related to TGF-ß signalling. siRNA sequences with an antifibrotic miRNA-like activity that could synergistically treat COVID-19 are available online ( http://clip.korea.ac.kr/covid19 ).


Subject(s)
Argonaute Proteins/genetics , COVID-19/prevention & control , MicroRNAs/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , A549 Cells , Argonaute Proteins/metabolism , Base Sequence , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , HeLa Cells , Humans , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA-Seq/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
8.
Vopr Virusol ; 66(4): 241-251, 2021 09 16.
Article in English, Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1431289

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has killed more than 4 million people to date and is the most significant global health problem. The first recorded case of COVID-19 had been noted in Wuhan, China in December 2019, and already on March 11, 2020, World Health Organization declared a pandemic due to the rapid spread of this infection. In addition to the damage to the respiratory system, SARS-CoV-2 is capable of causing severe complications that can affect almost all organ systems. Due to the insufficient effectiveness of the COVID-19 therapy, there is an urgent need to develop effective specific medicines. Among the known approaches to the creation of antiviral drugs, a very promising direction is the development of drugs whose action is mediated by the mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi). A small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecule suppresses the expression of a target gene in this regulatory pathway. The phenomenon of RNAi makes it possible to quickly create a whole series of highly effective antiviral drugs, if the matrix RNA (mRNA) sequence of the target viral protein is known. This review examines the possibility of clinical application of siRNAs aimed at suppressing reproduction of the SARS-CoV-2, taking into account the experience of similar studies using SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV infection models. It is important to remember that the effectiveness of siRNA molecules targeting viral genes may decrease due to the formation of viral resistance. In this regard, the design of siRNAs targeting the cellular factors necessary for the reproduction of SARS-CoV-2 deserves special attention.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
9.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(9): 1333-1335, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401314

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has mutually illuminated our collective knowledge and knowledge gaps, particularly in antiviral defense and therapeutic strategies. A recent study in Science (Poirier et al., 2021) uncovers an ancient antiviral mechanism that mammals utilize to suppress viruses, including SARS-CoV-2 and Zika virus, that could have broad implications for therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Argonaute Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Interferons/immunology , RNA Interference/physiology , Ribonuclease III/metabolism , Zika Virus Infection/prevention & control , Animals , Cell Line , HEK293 Cells , Humans , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Replication , Zika Virus/genetics , Zika Virus/immunology
10.
Science ; 373(6551): 231-236, 2021 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304152

ABSTRACT

In mammals, early resistance to viruses relies on interferons, which protect differentiated cells but not stem cells from viral replication. Many other organisms rely instead on RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by a specialized Dicer protein that cleaves viral double-stranded RNA. Whether RNAi also contributes to mammalian antiviral immunity remains controversial. We identified an isoform of Dicer, named antiviral Dicer (aviD), that protects tissue stem cells from RNA viruses-including Zika virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-by dicing viral double-stranded RNA to orchestrate antiviral RNAi. Our work sheds light on the molecular regulation of antiviral RNAi in mammalian innate immunity, in which different cell-intrinsic antiviral pathways can be tailored to the differentiation status of cells.


Subject(s)
DEAD-box RNA Helicases/genetics , DEAD-box RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA Viruses/physiology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Ribonuclease III/genetics , Ribonuclease III/metabolism , Stem Cells/enzymology , Stem Cells/virology , Alternative Splicing , Animals , Brain/enzymology , Brain/virology , Cell Line , DEAD-box RNA Helicases/chemistry , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Isoenzymes/chemistry , Isoenzymes/genetics , Isoenzymes/metabolism , Mice , Organoids/enzymology , Organoids/virology , RNA Virus Infections/enzymology , RNA Virus Infections/immunology , RNA Virus Infections/virology , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA Viruses/immunology , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Ribonuclease III/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication , Zika Virus/genetics , Zika Virus/immunology , Zika Virus/physiology , Zika Virus Infection/enzymology , Zika Virus Infection/immunology , Zika Virus Infection/virology
11.
Malar J ; 20(1): 284, 2021 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286028

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (PfSPZ) can be administered as a highly protective vaccine conferring the highest protection seen to date. Sanaria® PfSPZ vaccines are produced using aseptically reared Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. The bionomics of sporogonic development of P. falciparum in A. stephensi to fully mature salivary gland PfSPZ is thought to be modulated by several components of the mosquito innate immune system. In order to increase salivary gland PfSPZ infections in A. stephensi and thereby increase vaccine production efficiency, a gene knock down approach was used to investigate the activity of the immune deficiency (IMD) signaling pathway downstream effector leucine-rich repeat immune molecule 1 (LRIM1), an antagonist to Plasmodium development. METHODS: Expression of LRIM1 in A. stephensi was reduced following injection of double stranded (ds) RNA into mosquitoes. By combining the Gal4/UAS bipartite system with in vivo expression of short hairpin (sh) RNA coding for LRIM1 reduced expression of LRIM1 was targeted in the midgut, fat body, and salivary glands. RT-qPCR was used to demonstrate fold-changes in gene expression in three transgenic crosses and the effects on P. falciparum infections determined in mosquitoes showing the greatest reduction in LRIM1 expression. RESULTS: LRIM1 expression could be reduced, but not completely silenced, by expression of LRIM1 dsRNA. Infections of P. falciparum oocysts and PfSPZ were consistently and significantly higher in transgenic mosquitoes than wild type controls, with increases in PfSPZ ranging from 2.5- to tenfold. CONCLUSIONS: Plasmodium falciparum infections in A. stephensi can be increased following reduced expression of LRIM1. These data provide the springboard for more precise knockout of LRIM1 for the eventual incorporation of immune-compromised A. stephensi into manufacturing of Sanaria's PfSPZ products.


Subject(s)
Anopheles/parasitology , Insect Proteins/genetics , Plasmodium falciparum/physiology , RNA Interference , Animals , Anopheles/genetics , Female , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Insect Proteins/metabolism , Salivary Glands/parasitology , Sporozoites/physiology
12.
Cells ; 10(6)2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264419

ABSTRACT

In late 2019, the betacoronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was identified as the viral agent responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Coronaviruses Spike proteins are responsible for their ability to interact with host membrane receptors and different proteins have been identified as SARS-CoV-2 interactors, among which Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), and Basigin2/EMMPRIN/CD147 (CD147). CD147 plays an important role in human immunodeficiency virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections. In particular, SARS-CoV recognizes the CD147 receptor expressed on the surface of host cells by its nucleocapsid protein binding to cyclophilin A (CyPA), a ligand for CD147. However, the involvement of CD147 in SARS-CoV-2 infection is still debated. Interference with both the function (blocking antibody) and the expression (knock down) of CD147 showed that this receptor partakes in SARS-CoV-2 infection and provided additional clues on the underlying mechanism: CD147 binding to CyPA does not play a role; CD147 regulates ACE2 levels and both receptors are affected by virus infection. Altogether, these findings suggest that CD147 is involved in SARS-CoV-2 tropism and represents a possible therapeutic target to challenge COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Basigin/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Basigin/antagonists & inhibitors , Basigin/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Hep G2 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy , RNA Interference/physiology , RNA, Small Interfering/pharmacology , RNA, Small Interfering/therapeutic use , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Vero Cells , Viral Tropism/physiology
13.
Blood ; 138(4): 344-349, 2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255893

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with the hypercoagulable state. Tissue factor (TF) is the primary cellular initiator of coagulation. Most of the TF expressed on cell surfaces remains cryptic. Sphingomyelin (SM) is responsible for maintaining TF in the encrypted state, and hydrolysis of SM by acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) increases TF activity. ASMase was shown to play a role in virus infection biology. In the present study, we investigated the role of ASMase in SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced TF procoagulant activity. Infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein pseudovirus (SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV) markedly increased TF procoagulant activity at the cell surface and released TF+ extracellular vesicles. The pseudovirus infection did not increase either TF protein expression or phosphatidylserine externalization. SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV infection induced the translocation of ASMase to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, which led to the hydrolysis of SM in the membrane. Pharmacologic inhibitors or genetic silencing of ASMase attenuated SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV-induced increased TF activity. Inhibition of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2, attenuated SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV-induced increased TF activity. Overall, our data suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection activates the coagulation by decrypting TF through activation of ASMase. Our data suggest that the US Food and Drug Administration-approved functional inhibitors of ASMase may help treat hypercoagulability in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Macrophages/virology , Membrane Proteins/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thromboplastin/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , COVID-19/complications , Cell-Derived Microparticles , Enzyme Activation , Humans , Hydrolysis , Macrophages/enzymology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Plasmids , Protein Transport , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , Receptors, Virus/physiology , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase/antagonists & inhibitors , Sphingomyelins/physiology , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/enzymology
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10271, 2021 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228271

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has currently become the biggest challenge in the world. There is still no specific medicine for COVID-19, which leaves a critical gap for the identification of new drug candidates for the disease. Recent studies have reported that the small-molecule enoxacin exerts an antiviral activity by enhancing the RNAi pathway. The aim of this study is to analyze if enoxacin can exert anti-SARS-CoV-2 effects. We exploit multiple computational tools and databases to examine (i) whether the RNAi mechanism, as the target pathway of enoxacin, could act on the SARS-CoV-2 genome, and (ii) microRNAs induced by enoxacin might directly silence viral components as well as the host cell proteins mediating the viral entry and replication. We find that the RNA genome of SARS-CoV-2 might be a suitable substrate for DICER activity. We also highlight several enoxacin-enhanced microRNAs which could target SARS-CoV-2 components, pro-inflammatory cytokines, host cell components facilitating viral replication, and transcription factors enriched in lung stem cells, thereby promoting their differentiation and lung regeneration. Finally, our analyses identify several enoxacin-targeted regulatory modules that were critically associated with exacerbation of the SARS-CoV-2 infection. Overall, our analysis suggests that enoxacin could be a promising candidate for COVID-19 treatment through enhancing the RNAi pathway.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Enoxacin/pharmacology , RNA Interference/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , COVID-19/genetics , Computer Simulation , Drug Discovery , Gene Regulatory Networks/drug effects , Genomics , Humans , MicroRNAs/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
15.
Comput Biol Chem ; 92: 107486, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226281

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a single-stranded RNA (+) virus first identified in China and then became an ongoing global outbreak. In most cases, it is fatal in humans due to respiratory malfunction. Extensive researches are going to find an effective therapeutic technique for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals. In this study, we attempted to design a siRNA molecule to silence the most suitable nucleocapsid(N) gene of SARS-CoV-2, which play a major role during viral pathogenesis, replication, encapsidation and RNA packaging. At first, 270 complete N gene sequences of different strains in Bangladesh of these viruses were retrieved from the NCBI database. Different computational methods were used to design siRNA molecules. A siRNA molecule was built against these strains using the SiDirect 2.0 server. Using Mfold and the OligoCalc server, the siRNA molecule was tested for its secondary structure and GC material. The Clustal Omega tool was employed to evaluate any off-target harmony of the planned siRNA molecule. Herein, we proposed a duplex siRNA molecule that does not fit any off-target sequences for the gene silencing of SARS-CoV-2. To treat SARS-CoV-2 infections, currently, any effective therapy is not available. Our engineered siRNA molecule could give an alternative therapeutic approach against various sequenced SARS-CoV-2 strains in Bangladesh.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/chemistry , RNA, Small Interfering/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Humans , Models, Chemical
16.
Nat Methods ; 18(5): 499-506, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220210

ABSTRACT

Competitive coevolution between microbes and viruses has led to the diversification of CRISPR-Cas defense systems against infectious agents. By analyzing metagenomic terabase datasets, we identified two compact families (775 to 803 amino acids (aa)) of CRISPR-Cas ribonucleases from hypersaline samples, named Cas13X and Cas13Y. We engineered Cas13X.1 (775 aa) for RNA interference experiments in mammalian cell lines. We found Cas13X.1 could tolerate single-nucleotide mismatches in RNA recognition, facilitating prophylactic RNA virus inhibition. Moreover, a minimal RNA base editor, composed of engineered deaminase (385 aa) and truncated Cas13X.1 (445 aa), exhibited robust editing efficiency and high specificity to induce RNA base conversions. Our results suggest that there exist untapped bacterial defense systems in natural microbes that can function efficiently in mammalian cells, and thus potentially are useful for RNA-editing-based research.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Cas Systems , RNA Editing , RNA, Bacterial , Animals , Bacterial Proteins , Cell Line , Cloning, Molecular , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Dogs , Humans , Mice , RNA Interference
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 8849, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202232

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) rapidly transformed into a global pandemic, for which a demand for developing antivirals capable of targeting the SARS-CoV-2 RNA genome and blocking the activity of its genes has emerged. In this work, we presented a database of SARS-CoV-2 targets for small interference RNA (siRNA) based approaches, aiming to speed the design process by providing a broad set of possible targets and siRNA sequences. The siRNAs sequences are characterized and evaluated by more than 170 features, including thermodynamic information, base context, target genes and alignment information of sequences against the human genome, and diverse SARS-CoV-2 strains, to assess possible bindings to off-target sequences. This dataset is available as a set of four tables, available in a spreadsheet and CSV (Comma-Separated Values) formats, each one corresponding to sequences of 18, 19, 20, and 21 nucleotides length, aiming to meet the diversity of technology and expertise among laboratories around the world. A metadata table (Supplementary Table S1), which describes each feature, is also provided in the aforementioned formats. We hope that this database helps to speed up the development of new target antivirals for SARS-CoV-2, contributing to a possible strategy for a faster and effective response to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Databases, Genetic , Humans , RNA Interference
18.
Appl Biochem Biotechnol ; 193(6): 1744-1756, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171414

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, taking place globally, occurs as a result of the SARS-CoV-2 viral infection which has caused death of innumerable numbers of people and is responsible for a massive drop in the global economy. Millions of people are infected, and the death rate is also quite high in different countries. So, there is an urgent requirement of the invention of some effective and efficient drugs that can be effective against this deadly viral infection. The invention of new drugs and vaccine has become a matter of utmost importance to stop the mayhem of coronavirus pandemic. In the middle of such a deadly pandemic, the necessity of development of a vaccine is of high importance in this context. Among all the popular methods of vaccine development, the mRNA vaccines turned out to be the one of the most versatile vaccine with quick responses. However, in this review, we have explained all the possible types of vaccines available including DNA vaccines, RNA vaccines, and live and attenuated vaccines. Their effectiveness, importance, and application of the vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus have been discussed. Research is also being conducted in the field of gene silencing, and one of the best possible ways to combat the virus at the molecular level is by applying RNAi technology. The modified siRNA molecules can be used to silence the gene expression of the virus. A summarization of the virus's behavior, characteristics, and the methods by which RNAi technology can be administered to control the virus is depicted in this study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , RNA Interference , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
19.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 99, 2021 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169963

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pneumonia has been associated with severe acute hypoxia, sepsis-like states, thrombosis and chronic sequelae including persisting hypoxia and fibrosis. The molecular hypoxia response pathway has been associated with such pathologies and our recent observations on anti-hypoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of whole aqueous extract of Adhatoda Vasica (AV) prompted us to explore its effects on relevant preclinical mouse models. METHODS: In this study, we tested the effect of whole aqueous extract of AV, in murine models of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis, Cecum Ligation and Puncture (CLP) induced sepsis, and siRNA induced hypoxia-thrombosis phenotype. The effect on lung of AV treated naïve mice was also studied at transcriptome level. We also determined if the extract may have any effect on SARS-CoV2 replication. RESULTS: Oral administration AV extract attenuates increased airway inflammation, levels of transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1), IL-6, HIF-1α and improves the overall survival rates of mice in the models of pulmonary fibrosis and sepsis and rescues the siRNA induced inflammation and associated blood coagulation phenotypes in mice. We observed downregulation of hypoxia, inflammation, TGF-ß1, and angiogenesis genes and upregulation of adaptive immunity-related genes in the lung transcriptome. AV treatment also reduced the viral load in Vero cells infected with SARS-CoV2. CONCLUSION: Our results provide a scientific rationale for this ayurvedic herbal medicine in ameliorating the hypoxia-hyperinflammation features and highlights the repurposing potential of AV in COVID-19-like conditions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Justicia , Lung/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Sepsis/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Bleomycin , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cecum/microbiology , Cecum/surgery , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Hypoxia/genetics , Hypoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Justicia/chemistry , Ligation , Lung/metabolism , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Pneumonia/genetics , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/microbiology , Transcriptome
20.
Int J Hyperthermia ; 38(1): 202-212, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120965

ABSTRACT

Increased transmissibility of the pandemic severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been noted to occur at lower ambient temperatures. This is seemingly related to a better replication of most respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, at lower-than-core body temperatures (i.e., 33 °C vs 37 °C). Also, intrinsic characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 make it a heat-susceptible pathogen. Thermotherapy has successfully been used to combat viral infections in plants which could otherwise result in great economic losses; 90% of viruses causing infections in plants are positive-sense single-stranded ribonucleic acid (+ssRNA) viruses, a characteristic shared by SARS-CoV-2. Thus, it is possible to envision the use of heat-based interventions (thermotherapy or mild-temperature hyperthermia) in patients with COVID-19 for which moderate cycles (every 8-12 h) of mild-temperature hyperthermia (1-2 h) have been proposed. However, there are potential safety and mechanistic concerns which could limit the use of thermotherapy only to patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 to prevent disease progression rather than to treat patients who have already progressed to severe-to-critical COVID-19. Here, we review the characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 which make it a heat-susceptible virus, potential host mechanisms which could be enhanced at higher temperatures to aid viral clearance, and how thermotherapy could be investigated as a modality of treatment in patients with COVID-19 while taking into consideration potential risks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hyperthermia, Induced , Animals , Body Temperature , COVID-19/virology , Genes, Viral , Humans , Hyperthermia/immunology , Plants/virology , RNA Interference , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
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