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1.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580424

ABSTRACT

Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a gammacoronavirus, is an economically important virus to the poultry industry, as well as a significant welfare issue for chickens. As for all positive strand RNA viruses, IBV infection causes rearrangements of the host cell intracellular membranes to form replication organelles. Replication organelle formation is a highly conserved and vital step in the viral life cycle. Here, we investigate the localization of viral RNA synthesis and the link with replication organelles in host cells. We have shown that sites of viral RNA synthesis and virus-related dsRNA are associated with one another and, significantly, that they are located within a membrane-bound compartment within the cell. We have also shown that some viral RNA produced early in infection remains within these membranes throughout infection, while a proportion is trafficked to the cytoplasm. Importantly, we demonstrate conservation across all four coronavirus genera, including SARS-CoV-2. Understanding more about the replication of these viruses is imperative in order to effectively find ways to control them.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/metabolism , Intracellular Membranes/metabolism , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Animals , Cell Line , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/growth & development , Cytoplasm/metabolism , Humans , Infectious bronchitis virus/growth & development , Infectious bronchitis virus/metabolism , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , Viral Replication Compartments/metabolism
2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6668, 2021 11 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526076

ABSTRACT

Our innate immune responses to viral RNA are vital defenses. Long cytosolic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is recognized by MDA5. The ATPase activity of MDA5 contributes to its dsRNA binding selectivity. Mutations that reduce RNA selectivity can cause autoinflammatory disease. Here, we show how the disease-associated MDA5 variant M854K perturbs MDA5-dsRNA recognition. M854K MDA5 constitutively activates interferon signaling in the absence of exogenous RNA. M854K MDA5 lacks ATPase activity and binds more stably to synthetic Alu:Alu dsRNA. CryoEM structures of MDA5-dsRNA filaments at different stages of ATP hydrolysis show that the K854 sidechain forms polar bonds that constrain the conformation of MDA5 subdomains, disrupting key steps in the ATPase cycle- RNA footprint expansion and helical twist modulation. The M854K mutation inhibits ATP-dependent RNA proofreading via an allosteric mechanism, allowing MDA5 to form signaling complexes on endogenous RNAs. This work provides insights on how MDA5 recognizes dsRNA in health and disease.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , Mutation, Missense , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Adenosine Triphosphatases/genetics , Adenosine Triphosphatases/metabolism , Adenosine Triphosphatases/ultrastructure , Cryoelectron Microscopy , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Inflammation/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/chemistry , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Models, Molecular , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , RNA, Double-Stranded/chemistry , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics
3.
J Virol ; 95(12)2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501541

ABSTRACT

Long disregarded as junk DNA or genomic dark matter, endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) have turned out to represent important components of the antiviral immune response. These remnants of once-infectious retroviruses not only regulate cellular immune activation, but may even directly target invading viral pathogens. In this Gem, we summarize mechanisms by which retroviral fossils protect us from viral infections. One focus will be on recent advances in the role of ERVs as regulators of antiviral gene expression.


Subject(s)
Endogenous Retroviruses/physiology , Retroelements , Virus Diseases/immunology , Animals , Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics , Enhancer Elements, Genetic , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Promoter Regions, Genetic , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Receptors, Pattern Recognition/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virion/metabolism , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology
4.
Science ; 374(6567): eabj3624, 2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440797

ABSTRACT

Inherited genetic factors can influence the severity of COVID-19, but the molecular explanation underpinning a genetic association is often unclear. Intracellular antiviral defenses can inhibit the replication of viruses and reduce disease severity. To better understand the antiviral defenses relevant to COVID-19, we used interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression screening to reveal that 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), through ribonuclease L, potently inhibits severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We show that a common splice-acceptor single-nucleotide polymorphism (Rs10774671) governs whether patients express prenylated OAS1 isoforms that are membrane-associated and sense-specific regions of SARS-CoV-2 RNAs or if they only express cytosolic, nonprenylated OAS1 that does not efficiently detect SARS-CoV-2. In hospitalized patients, expression of prenylated OAS1 was associated with protection from severe COVID-19, suggesting that this antiviral defense is a major component of a protective antiviral response.


Subject(s)
2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , 5' Untranslated Regions , A549 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Chiroptera/genetics , Chiroptera/virology , Coronaviridae/enzymology , Coronaviridae/genetics , Coronaviridae/physiology , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Interferons/immunology , Isoenzymes/genetics , Isoenzymes/metabolism , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/genetics , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/metabolism , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Protein Prenylation , RNA, Double-Stranded/chemistry , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retroelements , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Replication
5.
J Biol Chem ; 297(4): 101218, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433454

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 replication-transcription complex is an assembly of nonstructural viral proteins that collectively act to reproduce the viral genome and generate mRNA transcripts. While the structures of the individual proteins involved are known, how they assemble into a functioning superstructure is not. Applying molecular modeling tools, including protein-protein docking, to the available structures of nsp7-nsp16 and the nucleocapsid, we have constructed an atomistic model of how these proteins associate. Our principal finding is that the complex is hexameric, centered on nsp15. The nsp15 hexamer is capped on two faces by trimers of nsp14/nsp16/(nsp10)2, which then recruit six nsp12/nsp7/(nsp8)2 polymerase subunits to the complex. To this, six subunits of nsp13 are arranged around the superstructure, but not evenly distributed. Polymerase subunits that coordinate dimers of nsp13 are capable of binding the nucleocapsid, which positions the 5'-UTR TRS-L RNA over the polymerase active site, a state distinguishing transcription from replication. Analysis of the viral RNA path through the complex indicates the dsRNA that exits the polymerase passes over the nsp14 exonuclease and nsp15 endonuclease sites before being unwound by a convergence of zinc fingers from nsp10 and nsp14. The template strand is then directed away from the complex, while the nascent strand is directed to the sites responsible for mRNA capping. The model presents a cohesive picture of the multiple functions of the coronavirus replication-transcription complex and addresses fundamental questions related to proofreading, template switching, mRNA capping, and the role of the endonuclease.


Subject(s)
Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Dimerization , Endoribonucleases/chemistry , Endoribonucleases/genetics , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Structure, Quaternary , RNA, Double-Stranded/chemistry , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transcription, Genetic , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication
6.
Science ; 373(6551): 231-236, 2021 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304152

ABSTRACT

In mammals, early resistance to viruses relies on interferons, which protect differentiated cells but not stem cells from viral replication. Many other organisms rely instead on RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by a specialized Dicer protein that cleaves viral double-stranded RNA. Whether RNAi also contributes to mammalian antiviral immunity remains controversial. We identified an isoform of Dicer, named antiviral Dicer (aviD), that protects tissue stem cells from RNA viruses-including Zika virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-by dicing viral double-stranded RNA to orchestrate antiviral RNAi. Our work sheds light on the molecular regulation of antiviral RNAi in mammalian innate immunity, in which different cell-intrinsic antiviral pathways can be tailored to the differentiation status of cells.


Subject(s)
DEAD-box RNA Helicases/genetics , DEAD-box RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA Viruses/physiology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Ribonuclease III/genetics , Ribonuclease III/metabolism , Stem Cells/enzymology , Stem Cells/virology , Alternative Splicing , Animals , Brain/enzymology , Brain/virology , Cell Line , DEAD-box RNA Helicases/chemistry , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Isoenzymes/chemistry , Isoenzymes/genetics , Isoenzymes/metabolism , Mice , Organoids/enzymology , Organoids/virology , RNA Virus Infections/enzymology , RNA Virus Infections/immunology , RNA Virus Infections/virology , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA Viruses/immunology , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Ribonuclease III/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication , Zika Virus/genetics , Zika Virus/immunology , Zika Virus/physiology , Zika Virus Infection/enzymology , Zika Virus Infection/immunology , Zika Virus Infection/virology
7.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(16)2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165017

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are adept at evading host antiviral pathways induced by viral double-stranded RNA, including interferon (IFN) signaling, oligoadenylate synthetase-ribonuclease L (OAS-RNase L), and protein kinase R (PKR). While dysregulated or inadequate IFN responses have been associated with severe coronavirus infection, the extent to which the recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 activates or antagonizes these pathways is relatively unknown. We found that SARS-CoV-2 infects patient-derived nasal epithelial cells, present at the initial site of infection; induced pluripotent stem cell-derived alveolar type 2 cells (iAT2), the major cell type infected in the lung; and cardiomyocytes (iCM), consistent with cardiovascular consequences of COVID-19 disease. Robust activation of IFN or OAS-RNase L is not observed in these cell types, whereas PKR activation is evident in iAT2 and iCM. In SARS-CoV-2-infected Calu-3 and A549ACE2 lung-derived cell lines, IFN induction remains relatively weak; however, activation of OAS-RNase L and PKR is observed. This is in contrast to Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, which effectively inhibits IFN signaling and OAS-RNase L and PKR pathways, but is similar to mutant MERS-CoV lacking innate immune antagonists. Remarkably, OAS-RNase L and PKR are activated in MAVS knockout A549ACE2 cells, demonstrating that SARS-CoV-2 can induce these host antiviral pathways despite minimal IFN production. Moreover, increased replication and cytopathic effect in RNASEL knockout A549ACE2 cells implicates OAS-RNase L in restricting SARS-CoV-2. Finally, while SARS-CoV-2 fails to antagonize these host defense pathways, which contrasts with other coronaviruses, the IFN signaling response is generally weak. These host-virus interactions may contribute to the unique pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Immunity, Innate , Lung/pathology , Myocytes, Cardiac/immunology , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , A549 Cells , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Nose/virology , Virus Replication , eIF-2 Kinase
8.
Clin Immunol ; 226: 108699, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101151

ABSTRACT

RNA editing is a fundamental biological process with 2 major forms, namely adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I, recognized as A-to-G) and cytosine-to-uracil (C-to-U) deamination, mediated by ADAR and APOBEC enzyme families, respectively. A-to-I RNA editing has been shown to directly affect the genome/transcriptome of RNA viruses with significant repercussions for viral protein synthesis, proliferation and infectivity, while it also affects recognition of double-stranded RNAs by cytosolic receptors controlling the host innate immune response. Recent evidence suggests that RNA editing may be present in SARS-CoV-2 genome/transcriptome. The majority of mapped mutations in SARS-CoV-2 genome are A-to-G/U-to-C(opposite strand) and C-to-U/G-to-A(opposite strand) substitutions comprising potential ADAR-/APOBEC-mediated deamination events. A single nucleotide substitution can have dramatic effects on SARS-CoV-2 infectivity as shown by the D614G(A-to-G) substitution in the spike protein. Future studies utilizing serial sampling from patients with COVID-19 are warranted to delineate whether RNA editing affects viral replication and/or the host immune response to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
APOBEC Deaminases/metabolism , Adenosine Deaminase/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , RNA Editing , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , APOBEC Deaminases/genetics , Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mutation , RNA Viruses/pathogenicity , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
9.
Cell Rep ; 34(2): 108628, 2021 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1036973

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have profiled the innate immune signatures in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and suggest that cellular responses to viral challenge may affect disease severity. Yet the molecular events that underlie cellular recognition and response to SARS-CoV-2 infection remain to be elucidated. Here, we find that SARS-CoV-2 replication induces a delayed interferon (IFN) response in lung epithelial cells. By screening 16 putative sensors involved in sensing of RNA virus infection, we found that MDA5 and LGP2 primarily regulate IFN induction in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Further analyses revealed that viral intermediates specifically activate the IFN response through MDA5-mediated sensing. Additionally, we find that IRF3, IRF5, and NF-κB/p65 are the key transcription factors regulating the IFN response during SARS-CoV-2 infection. In summary, these findings provide critical insights into the molecular basis of the innate immune recognition and signaling response to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Interferon Regulatory Factors/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factors/metabolism , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Signal Transduction , Transcription Factor RelA/metabolism , Virus Replication
11.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 4481, 2020 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-7753

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein 13 (SCV nsP13), a superfamily 1 helicase, plays a central role in viral RNA replication through the unwinding of duplex RNA and DNA with a 5' single-stranded tail in a 5' to 3' direction. Despite its putative role in viral RNA replication, nsP13 readily unwinds duplex DNA by cooperative translocation. Herein, nsP13 exhibited different characteristics in duplex RNA unwinding than that in duplex DNA. nsP13 showed very poor processivity on duplex RNA compared with that on duplex DNA. More importantly, nsP13 inefficiently unwinds duplex RNA by increasing the 5'-ss tail length. As the concentration of nsP13 increased, the amount of unwound duplex DNA increased and that of unwound duplex RNA decreased. The accumulation of duplex RNA/nsP13 complexes increased as the concentration of nsP13 increased. An increased ATP concentration in the unwinding of duplex RNA relieved the decrease in duplex RNA unwinding. Thus, nsP13 has a strong affinity for duplex RNA as a substrate for the unwinding reaction, which requires increased ATPs to processively unwind duplex RNA. Our results suggest that duplex RNA is a preferred substrate for the helicase activity of nsP13 than duplex DNA at high ATP concentrations.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Methyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS Virus/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , DNA/metabolism , DNA Helicases/metabolism , DNA, Single-Stranded/metabolism , DNA, Viral/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Hydrolysis , Kinetics , Protein Binding , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Substrate Specificity , Virus Replication/physiology
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