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3.
Antiviral Res ; 198: 105254, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654045

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a newly emerged infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The rapid global emergence of SARS-CoV-2 highlights the importance and urgency for potential drugs to control the pandemic. The functional importance of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in the viral life cycle, combined with structural conservation and absence of closely related homologs in humans, makes it an attractive target for designing antiviral drugs. Nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) are still the most promising broad-spectrum class of viral RdRp inhibitors. In this study, using our previously developed cell-based SARS-CoV-2 RdRp report system, we screened 134 compounds in the Selleckchemicals NAs library. Four candidate compounds, Fludarabine Phosphate, Fludarabine, 6-Thio-20-Deoxyguanosine (6-Thio-dG), and 5-Iodotubercidin, exhibit remarkable potency in inhibiting SARS-CoV-2 RdRp. Among these four compounds, 5-Iodotubercidin exhibited the strongest inhibition upon SARS-CoV-2 RdRp, and was resistant to viral exoribonuclease activity, thus presenting the best antiviral activity against coronavirus from a different genus. Further study showed that the RdRp inhibitory activity of 5-Iodotubercidin is closely related to its capacity to inhibit adenosine kinase (ADK).


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tubercidin/analogs & derivatives , Cell Line , Deoxyguanosine/analogs & derivatives , Deoxyguanosine/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thionucleosides/pharmacology , Tubercidin/pharmacology , Vidarabine/analogs & derivatives , Vidarabine/pharmacology , Vidarabine Phosphate/analogs & derivatives , Vidarabine Phosphate/pharmacology
4.
Virology ; 567: 1-14, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1628759

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein comprises two RNA-binding domains connected by a central spacer, which contains a serine- and arginine-rich (SR) region. The SR region engages the largest subunit of the viral replicase-transcriptase, nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3), in an interaction that is essential for efficient initiation of infection by genomic RNA. We carried out an extensive genetic analysis of the SR region of the N protein of mouse hepatitis virus in order to more precisely define its role in RNA synthesis. We further examined the N-nsp3 interaction through construction of nsp3 mutants and by creation of an interspecies N protein chimera. Our results indicate a role for the central spacer as an interaction hub of the N molecule that is partially regulated by phosphorylation. These findings are discussed in relation to the recent discovery that nsp3 forms a molecular pore in the double-membrane vesicles that sequester the coronavirus replicase-transcriptase.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Intracellular Membranes/metabolism , Viral Replicase Complex Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Motifs , Animals , Cell Line , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Mice , Murine hepatitis virus , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Viral Replicase Complex Proteins/chemistry , Viral Replicase Complex Proteins/genetics , Viral Replication Compartments/metabolism
5.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(3): 1484-1500, 2022 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1624985

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus is the causal agent of the current global pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 belongs to an order, Nidovirales, with very large RNA genomes. It is proposed that the fidelity of coronavirus (CoV) genome replication is aided by an RNA nuclease complex, comprising the non-structural proteins 14 and 10 (nsp14-nsp10), an attractive target for antiviral inhibition. Our results validate reports that the SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-nsp10 complex has RNase activity. Detailed functional characterization reveals nsp14-nsp10 is a versatile nuclease capable of digesting a wide variety of RNA structures, including those with a blocked 3'-terminus. Consistent with a role in maintaining viral genome integrity during replication, we find that nsp14-nsp10 activity is enhanced by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex (RdRp) consisting of nsp12-nsp7-nsp8 (nsp12-7-8) and demonstrate that this stimulation is mediated by nsp8. We propose that the role of nsp14-nsp10 in maintaining replication fidelity goes beyond classical proofreading by purging the nascent replicating RNA strand of a range of potentially replication-terminating aberrations. Using our developed assays, we identify drug and drug-like molecules that inhibit nsp14-nsp10, including the known SARS-CoV-2 major protease (Mpro) inhibitor ebselen and the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir, revealing the potential for multifunctional inhibitors in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Genome, Viral/genetics , Genomic Instability , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Exoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Genomic Instability/drug effects , Genomic Instability/genetics , HIV Integrase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Isoindoles/pharmacology , Multienzyme Complexes/antagonists & inhibitors , Multienzyme Complexes/metabolism , Organoselenium Compounds/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Raltegravir Potassium/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/genetics
6.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580424

ABSTRACT

Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a gammacoronavirus, is an economically important virus to the poultry industry, as well as a significant welfare issue for chickens. As for all positive strand RNA viruses, IBV infection causes rearrangements of the host cell intracellular membranes to form replication organelles. Replication organelle formation is a highly conserved and vital step in the viral life cycle. Here, we investigate the localization of viral RNA synthesis and the link with replication organelles in host cells. We have shown that sites of viral RNA synthesis and virus-related dsRNA are associated with one another and, significantly, that they are located within a membrane-bound compartment within the cell. We have also shown that some viral RNA produced early in infection remains within these membranes throughout infection, while a proportion is trafficked to the cytoplasm. Importantly, we demonstrate conservation across all four coronavirus genera, including SARS-CoV-2. Understanding more about the replication of these viruses is imperative in order to effectively find ways to control them.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/metabolism , Intracellular Membranes/metabolism , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Animals , Cell Line , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/growth & development , Cytoplasm/metabolism , Humans , Infectious bronchitis virus/growth & development , Infectious bronchitis virus/metabolism , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , Viral Replication Compartments/metabolism
7.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an urgent need for new antivirals with powerful therapeutic potential and tolerable side effects. METHODS: Here, we tested the antiviral properties of interferons (IFNs), alone and with other drugs in vitro. RESULTS: While IFNs alone were insufficient to completely abolish replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), IFNα, in combination with remdesivir, EIDD-2801, camostat, cycloheximide, or convalescent serum, proved to be more effective. Transcriptome and metabolomic analyses revealed that the IFNα-remdesivir combination suppressed SARS-CoV-2-mediated changes in Calu-3 cells and lung organoids, although it altered the homeostasis of uninfected cells and organoids. We also demonstrated that IFNα combinations with sofosbuvir, telaprevir, NITD008, ribavirin, pimodivir, or lamivudine were effective against HCV, HEV, FLuAV, or HIV at lower concentrations, compared to monotherapies. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results indicated that IFNα can be combined with drugs that affect viral RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and processing to make synergistic combinations that can be attractive targets for further pre-clinical and clinical development against emerging and re-emerging viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Cell Line , Drug Synergism , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Metabolome/drug effects , Organoids , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Transcriptome/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Viruses/classification , Viruses/drug effects
8.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(22): 13019-13030, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546008

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a positive-sense RNA virus responsible for the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which continues to cause significant morbidity, mortality and economic strain. SARS-CoV-2 can cause severe respiratory disease and death in humans, highlighting the need for effective antiviral therapies. The RNA synthesis machinery of SARS-CoV-2 is an ideal drug target and consists of non-structural protein 12 (nsp12), which is directly responsible for RNA synthesis, and numerous co-factors involved in RNA proofreading and 5' capping of viral RNAs. The formation of the 5' 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap structure is known to require a guanylyltransferase (GTase) as well as a 5' triphosphatase and methyltransferases; however, the mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 RNA capping remains poorly understood. Here we find that SARS-CoV-2 nsp12 is involved in viral RNA capping as a GTase, carrying out the addition of a GTP nucleotide to the 5' end of viral RNA via a 5' to 5' triphosphate linkage. We further show that the nsp12 NiRAN (nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyltransferase) domain performs this reaction, and can be inhibited by remdesivir triphosphate, the active form of the antiviral drug remdesivir. These findings improve understanding of coronavirus RNA synthesis and highlight a new target for novel or repurposed antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Nucleotidyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Adenosine Triphosphate/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Genome, Viral/genetics , Guanosine/analogs & derivatives , Guanosine/metabolism , Humans , Nucleotidyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Caps/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccinia virus/enzymology , Vaccinia virus/metabolism
9.
Antiviral Res ; 196: 105209, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520691

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Despite intensive and global efforts to discover and develop novel antiviral therapies, only Remdesivir has been approved as a treatment for COVID-19. Therefore, effective antiviral therapeutics are still urgently needed to combat and halt the pandemic. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of SARS-CoV-2 demonstrates high potential as a reliable target for the development of antivirals. We previously developed a cell-based assay to assess the efficiency of compounds that target SARS-CoV-2 RdRp, as well as their tolerance to viral exoribonuclease-mediated proof-reading. In our previous study, we discovered that 2-((1H-indol-3-yl)thio)-N-phenyl-acetamides specifically targets the RdRp of both respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus. Thus, we hypothesize that 2-((1H-indol-3-yl)thio)-N-phenyl-acetamides may also have the ability to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication by targeting its RdRp activity. In this research, we test a compound library containing 103 of 2-((1H-indol-3-yl)thio)-N-phenyl-acetamides against SARS-CoV-2 RdRp, using our cell-based assay. Among these compounds, the top five candidates strongly inhibit SARS-CoV-2 RdRp activity while exhibiting low cytotoxicity and resistance to viral exoribonuclease. Compound 6-72-2a is the most promising candidate with the lowest EC50 value of 1.41 µM and highest selectivity index (CC50/EC50) (above 70.92). Furthermore, our data suggests that 4-46b and 6-72-2a also inhibit the replication of HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 virus in a dose-dependent manner. Compounds 4-46b and 6-72-2a exhibit EC50 values of 1.13 µM and 0.94 µM, respectively, on HCoV-OC43 viral replication. However, higher concentrations of these compounds are needed to effectively block HCoV-NL63 replication. Together, our findings successfully identified 4-46b and 6-72-2a as promising inhibitors against SARS-CoV-2 RdRp.


Subject(s)
Acetamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Delivery Systems , Humans , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Proteins/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
10.
Cell Rep ; 37(8): 110049, 2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509642

ABSTRACT

Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate in close association with rearranged intracellular membranes. For hepatitis C virus (HCV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), these rearrangements comprise endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived double membrane vesicles (DMVs) serving as RNA replication sites. Cellular factors involved in DMV biogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we show that despite structural similarity of viral DMVs with autophagosomes, conventional macroautophagy is dispensable for HCV and SARS-CoV-2 replication. However, both viruses exploit factors involved in autophagosome formation, most notably class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). As revealed with a biosensor, PI3K is activated in cells infected with either virus to produce phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) while kinase complex inhibition or depletion profoundly reduces replication and viral DMV formation. The PI3P-binding protein DFCP1, recruited to omegasomes in early steps of autophagosome formation, participates in replication and DMV formation of both viruses. These results indicate that phylogenetically unrelated HCV and SARS-CoV-2 exploit similar components of the autophagy machinery to create their replication organelles.


Subject(s)
Autophagy/physiology , Hepacivirus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Replication Compartments/metabolism , Autophagosomes/metabolism , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Humans , Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates/metabolism , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
11.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488496

ABSTRACT

Human coronavirus (HCoV) similar to other viruses rely on host cell machinery for both replication and to spread. The p97/VCP ATPase is associated with diverse pathways that may favor HCoV replication. In this study, we assessed the role of p97 and associated host responses in human lung cell line H1299 after HCoV-229E or HCoV-OC43 infection. Inhibition of p97 function by small molecule inhibitors shows antiviral activity, particularly at early stages of the virus life cycle, during virus uncoating and viral RNA replication. Importantly, p97 activity inhibition protects human cells against HCoV-induced cytopathic effects. The p97 knockdown also inhibits viral production in infected cells. Unbiased quantitative proteomics analyses reveal that HCoV-OC43 infection resulted in proteome changes enriched in cellular senescence and DNA repair during virus replication. Further analysis of protein changes between infected cells with control and p97 shRNA identifies cell cycle pathways for both HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43 infection. Together, our data indicate a role for the essential host protein p97 in supporting HCoV replication, suggesting that p97 is a therapeutic target to treat HCoV infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Valosin Containing Protein/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cell Line , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Proteome/drug effects , Proteome/metabolism , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Valosin Containing Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Valosin Containing Protein/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Uncoating/drug effects
12.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0131221, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443363

ABSTRACT

The large (L) polymerase proteins of most nonsegmented, negative-stranded (NNS) RNA viruses have conserved methyltransferase motifs, (G)-G-G-D and K-D-K-E, which are important for the stabilization and translation of mRNA. However, the function of the (G)-G-G-D and K-D-K-E motifs in the NNS RNA virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV) remains unclear. We observed G-G-D and K-D-K-E motifs in all NDV genotypes. By using the infection cloning system of NDV rSG10 strain, recombinant NDVs with a single amino acid mutated to alanine in one motif (G-G-D or K-D-K-E) were rescued. The intracerebral pathogenicity index and mean death time assay results revealed that the G-G-D motif and K-D-K-E motif attenuate the virulence of NDV to various degrees. The replication, transcription, and translation levels of the K-D-K-E motif-mutant strains were significantly higher than those of wild-type virus owing to their altered regulation of the affinity between nucleocapsid protein and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E. When the infection dose was changed from a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10 to an MOI of 0.01, the cell-to-cell spread abilities of G-G-D- and K-D-K-E-mutant strains were reduced, according to plaque assay and dynamic indirect immunofluorescence assay results. Finally, we found that NDV strains with G-G-D or K-D-K-E motif mutations had less pathogenicity in 3-week-old specific-pathogen-free chickens than wild-type NDV. Therefore, these methyltransferase motifs can affect virulence by regulating the translation and cell-to-cell spread abilities of NDV. This work provides a feasible approach for generating vaccine candidates for viruses with methyltransferase motifs. IMPORTANCE Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an important pathogen that is widespread globally. Research on its pathogenic mechanism is an important means of improving prevention and control efforts. Our study found that a deficiency in its methyltransferase motifs (G-G-D and K-D-K-E motifs) can attenuate NDV and revealed the molecular mechanism by which these motifs affect pathogenicity, which provides a new direction for the development of NDV vaccines. In addition to the (G)-G-G-D and K-D-K-E motifs of many nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses, similar motifs have been found in dengue virus, Zika virus, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This suggests that such motifs may be present in more viruses. Our finding also provides a molecular basis for the discovery and functional study of (G)-G-G-D and K-D-K-E motifs of other viruses.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Motifs/genetics , Methyltransferases/genetics , Newcastle Disease/transmission , Newcastle disease virus/growth & development , Newcastle disease virus/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics , Animals , Cell Line , Chickens , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Genome, Viral/genetics , Newcastle disease virus/pathogenicity , Poultry Diseases/transmission , Poultry Diseases/virology , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Vero Cells , Virulence/genetics , Virus Replication/genetics
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17748, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412634

ABSTRACT

Based on WHO reports the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus is currently widespread all over the world. So far > 162 million cases have been confirmed, including > 3 million deaths. Because of the pandemic still spreading across the globe the accomplishment of computational methods to find new potential mechanisms of virus inhibitions is necessary. According to the fact that C60 fullerene (a sphere-shaped molecule consisting of carbon) has shown inhibitory activity against various protein targets, here the analysis of the potential binding mechanism between SARS-CoV-2 proteins 3CLpro and RdRp with C60 fullerene was done; it has resulted in one and two possible binding mechanisms, respectively. In the case of 3CLpro, C60 fullerene interacts in the catalytic binding pocket. And for RdRp in the first model C60 fullerene blocks RNA synthesis pore and in the second one it prevents binding with Nsp8 co-factor (without this complex formation, RdRp can't perform its initial functions). Then the molecular dynamics simulation confirmed the stability of created complexes. The obtained results might be a basis for other computational studies of 3CLPro and RdRp potential inhibition ways as well as the potential usage of C60 fullerene in the fight against COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Fullerenes/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/ultrastructure , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/ultrastructure , Crystallography, X-Ray , Fullerenes/chemistry , Fullerenes/therapeutic use , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors/chemistry , Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors/pharmacology , Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17748, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397901

ABSTRACT

Based on WHO reports the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus is currently widespread all over the world. So far > 162 million cases have been confirmed, including > 3 million deaths. Because of the pandemic still spreading across the globe the accomplishment of computational methods to find new potential mechanisms of virus inhibitions is necessary. According to the fact that C60 fullerene (a sphere-shaped molecule consisting of carbon) has shown inhibitory activity against various protein targets, here the analysis of the potential binding mechanism between SARS-CoV-2 proteins 3CLpro and RdRp with C60 fullerene was done; it has resulted in one and two possible binding mechanisms, respectively. In the case of 3CLpro, C60 fullerene interacts in the catalytic binding pocket. And for RdRp in the first model C60 fullerene blocks RNA synthesis pore and in the second one it prevents binding with Nsp8 co-factor (without this complex formation, RdRp can't perform its initial functions). Then the molecular dynamics simulation confirmed the stability of created complexes. The obtained results might be a basis for other computational studies of 3CLPro and RdRp potential inhibition ways as well as the potential usage of C60 fullerene in the fight against COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Fullerenes/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/ultrastructure , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/ultrastructure , Crystallography, X-Ray , Fullerenes/chemistry , Fullerenes/therapeutic use , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors/chemistry , Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors/pharmacology , Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure
16.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 557, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387494

ABSTRACT

Dengue virus (DENV) is spread from human to human through the bite of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito and leads to about 100 million clinical infections yearly. Treatment options and vaccine availability for DENV are limited. Defective interfering particles (DIPs) are considered a promising antiviral approach but infectious virus contamination has limited their development. Here, a DENV-derived DIP production cell line was developed that continuously produced DENV-free DIPs. The DIPs contained and could deliver to cells a DENV serotype 2 subgenomic defective-interfering RNA, which was originally discovered in DENV infected patients. The DIPs released into cell culture supernatant were purified and could potently inhibit replication of all DENV serotypes in cells. Antiviral therapeutics are limited for many viral infection. The DIP system described could be re-purposed to make antiviral DIPs for many other RNA viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, yellow fever, West Nile and Zika viruses.


Subject(s)
Defective Viruses , Dengue Vaccines/therapeutic use , Dengue Virus/growth & development , Dengue/prevention & control , Virus Replication , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Defective Viruses/genetics , Defective Viruses/metabolism , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/genetics , Dengue Virus/metabolism , Genes, Reporter , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Luminescent Proteins/biosynthesis , Luminescent Proteins/genetics , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Vero Cells , Viral Load
17.
Enzymes ; 49: 1-37, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370416

ABSTRACT

The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has spurred research in the biology of the nidovirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Much focus has been on the viral RNA synthesis machinery due to its fundamental role in viral propagation. The central and essential enzyme of the RNA synthesis process, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), functions in conjunction with a coterie of viral-encoded enzymes that mediate crucial nucleic acid transactions. Some of these enzymes share common features with other RNA viruses, while others play roles unique to nidoviruses or CoVs. The RdRps are proven targets for viral pathogens, and many of the other nucleic acid processing enzymes are promising targets. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of RNA synthesis in CoVs. By reflecting on these studies, we hope to emphasize the remaining gaps in our knowledge. The recent onslaught of structural information related to SARS-CoV-2 RNA synthesis, in combination with previous structural, genetic and biochemical studies, have vastly improved our understanding of how CoVs replicate and process their genomic RNA. Structural biology not only provides a blueprint for understanding the function of the enzymes and cofactors in molecular detail, but also provides a basis for drug design and optimization. The concerted efforts of researchers around the world, in combination with the renewed urgency toward understanding this deadly family of viruses, may eventually yield new and improved antivirals that provide relief to the current global devastation.


Subject(s)
RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics
18.
Curr Opin Virol ; 50: 159-170, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363948

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiologic agent that causes Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, is a newly emerging respiratory RNA virus with exceptional transmissibility and pathogenicity. Numerous COVID-19 related studies have been fast-tracked, with the ultimate goal to end the pandemic. Here we review the major stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection cycle in cells, with specific emphasis on essential host factors. Insights into the cell biology of SARS-CoV-2 infection have accelerated the development of host-directed therapeutics, as shown by dozens of clinical trials evaluating COVID-19 treatments using host-targeting compounds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cathepsin L/physiology , Humans , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Assembly , Virus Internalization
19.
Cell Rep ; 36(9): 109650, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363915

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses have evolved elaborate multisubunit machines to replicate and transcribe their genomes. Central to these machines are the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunit (nsp12) and its intimately associated cofactors (nsp7 and nsp8). We use a high-throughput magnetic-tweezers approach to develop a mechanochemical description of this core polymerase. The core polymerase exists in at least three catalytically distinct conformations, one being kinetically consistent with incorporation of incorrect nucleotides. We provide evidence that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) uses a thermal ratchet instead of a power stroke to transition from the pre- to post-translocated state. Ultra-stable magnetic tweezers enable the direct observation of coronavirus polymerase deep and long-lived backtracking that is strongly stimulated by secondary structures in the template. The framework we present here elucidates one of the most important structure-dynamics-function relationships in human health today and will form the grounds for understanding the regulation of this complex.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/physiology , Nucleotides/metabolism , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Models, Molecular , Molecular Conformation , Nucleotides/chemistry , RNA, Viral/chemistry , Single Molecule Imaging , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/physiology
20.
Science ; 373(6559): 1142-1146, 2021 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329031

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease (ExoN), residing in the nonstructural protein (nsp) 10­nsp14 complex, boosts replication fidelity by proofreading RNA synthesis and is critical for the virus life cycle. ExoN also recognizes and excises nucleotide analog inhibitors incorporated into the nascent RNA, undermining the effectiveness of nucleotide analog­based antivirals. Here we present cryo­electron microscopy structures of both wild-type and mutant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nsp10-nsp14 in complex with an RNA substrate bearing a 3'-end mismatch at resolutions ranging from 2.5 to 3.9 angstroms. The structures reveal the molecular determinants of ExoN substrate specificity and offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of mismatch correction during coronavirus RNA synthesis. Our findings provide guidance for rational design of improved anticoronavirus therapies.


Subject(s)
DNA Mismatch Repair , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Drug Design , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Humans , Protein Domains , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Substrate Specificity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/genetics
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