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1.
Antiviral Res ; 197: 105232, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588314

ABSTRACT

We report the in vitro antiviral activity of DZNep (3-Deazaneplanocin A; an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase) against SARS-CoV-2, besides demonstrating its protective efficacy against lethal infection of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV, a member of the Coronaviridae family). DZNep treatment resulted in reduced synthesis of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and proteins without affecting other steps of viral life cycle. We demonstrated that deposition of N6-methyl adenosine (m6A) in SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the infected cells recruits heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1), an RNA binding protein which serves as a m6A reader. DZNep inhibited the recruitment of hnRNPA1 at m6A-modified SARS-CoV-2 RNA which eventually suppressed the synthesis of the viral genome. In addition, m6A-marked RNA and hnRNPA1 interaction was also shown to regulate early translation to replication switch of SARS-CoV-2 genome. Furthermore, abrogation of methylation by DZNep also resulted in defective synthesis of the 5' cap of viral RNA, thereby resulting in its failure to interact with eIF4E (a cap-binding protein), eventually leading to a decreased synthesis of viral proteins. Most importantly, DZNep-resistant mutants could not be observed upon long-term sequential passage of SARS-CoV-2 in cell culture. In summary, we report the novel role of methylation in the life cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and propose that targeting the methylome using DZNep could be of significant therapeutic value against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine/pharmacology , Animals , Chick Embryo , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing , DNA Methylation/drug effects , DNA Methylation/physiology , Drug Resistance, Viral/drug effects , Genome, Viral/genetics , Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1/metabolism , Humans , Lethal Dose 50 , Mice , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA, Viral/drug effects , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Rabbits , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Vero Cells
2.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572668

ABSTRACT

Broad-spectrum antiviral therapies hold promise as a first-line defense against emerging viruses by blunting illness severity and spread until vaccines and virus-specific antivirals are developed. The nucleobase favipiravir, often discussed as a broad-spectrum inhibitor, was not effective in recent clinical trials involving patients infected with Ebola virus or SARS-CoV-2. A drawback of favipiravir use is its rapid clearance before conversion to its active nucleoside-5'-triphosphate form. In this work, we report a synergistic reduction of flavivirus (dengue, Zika), orthomyxovirus (influenza A), and coronavirus (HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV-2) replication when the nucleobases favipiravir or T-1105 were combined with the antimetabolite 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr). The 6MMPr/T-1105 combination increased the C-U and G-A mutation frequency compared to treatment with T-1105 or 6MMPr alone. A further analysis revealed that the 6MMPr/T-1105 co-treatment reduced cellular purine nucleotide triphosphate synthesis and increased conversion of the antiviral nucleobase to its nucleoside-5'-monophosphate, -diphosphate, and -triphosphate forms. The 6MMPr co-treatment specifically increased production of the active antiviral form of the nucleobases (but not corresponding nucleosides) while also reducing levels of competing cellular NTPs to produce the synergistic effect. This in-depth work establishes a foundation for development of small molecules as possible co-treatments with nucleobases like favipiravir in response to emerging RNA virus infections.


Subject(s)
Antimetabolites/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Amides/pharmacology , Animals , Cell Line , Drug Synergism , Guanosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Humans , Methylthioinosine/pharmacology , Mutation/drug effects , Phosphoribosyl Pyrophosphate/metabolism , Pyrazines/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/classification , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA, Viral/drug effects , RNA, Viral/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects
3.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an urgent need for new antivirals with powerful therapeutic potential and tolerable side effects. METHODS: Here, we tested the antiviral properties of interferons (IFNs), alone and with other drugs in vitro. RESULTS: While IFNs alone were insufficient to completely abolish replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), IFNα, in combination with remdesivir, EIDD-2801, camostat, cycloheximide, or convalescent serum, proved to be more effective. Transcriptome and metabolomic analyses revealed that the IFNα-remdesivir combination suppressed SARS-CoV-2-mediated changes in Calu-3 cells and lung organoids, although it altered the homeostasis of uninfected cells and organoids. We also demonstrated that IFNα combinations with sofosbuvir, telaprevir, NITD008, ribavirin, pimodivir, or lamivudine were effective against HCV, HEV, FLuAV, or HIV at lower concentrations, compared to monotherapies. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results indicated that IFNα can be combined with drugs that affect viral RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and processing to make synergistic combinations that can be attractive targets for further pre-clinical and clinical development against emerging and re-emerging viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Cell Line , Drug Synergism , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Metabolome/drug effects , Organoids , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Transcriptome/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Viruses/classification , Viruses/drug effects
4.
Cell Rep ; 37(4): 109882, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525720

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir (RDV), a nucleotide analog with broad-spectrum features, has exhibited effectiveness in COVID-19 treatment. However, the precise working mechanism of RDV when targeting the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) has not been fully elucidated. Here, we solve a 3.0-Å structure of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RdRP elongation complex (EC) and assess RDV intervention in polymerase elongation phase. Although RDV could induce an "i+3" delayed termination in meta-stable complexes, only pausing and subsequent elongation are observed in the EC. A comparative investigation using an enterovirus RdRP further confirms similar delayed intervention and demonstrates that steric hindrance of the RDV-characteristic 1'-cyano at the -4 position is responsible for the "i+3" intervention, although two representative Flaviviridae RdRPs do not exhibit similar behavior. A comparison of representative viral RdRP catalytic complex structures indicates that the product RNA backbone encounters highly conserved structural elements, highlighting the broad-spectrum intervention potential of 1'-modified nucleotide analogs in anti-RNA virus drug development.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Proteins/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/drug effects , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Virus Replication/drug effects
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518611

ABSTRACT

Inhaled nebulized interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-ß have been shown to be effective in the management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to construct a virus-free rapid detection system for high-throughput screening of IFN-like compounds that induce viral RNA degradation and suppress the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We prepared a SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA expression vector which contained the SARS-CoV-2 5'-UTR, the partial sequence of ORF1a, luciferase, nucleocapsid, ORF10, and 3'-UTR under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The expression vector was transfected into Calu-3 cells and treated with IFN-α and the IFNAR2 agonist CDM-3008 (RO8191) for 3 days. SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA degradation was subsequently evaluated based on luciferase levels. IFN-α and CDM-3008 suppressed SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 193 IU/mL and 2.54 µM, respectively. HeLa cells stably expressing SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA were prepared and treated with the IFN-α and pan-JAK inhibitor Pyridone 6 or siRNA-targeting ISG20. IFN-α activity was canceled with Pyridone 6. The knockdown of ISG20 partially canceled IFN-α activity. Collectively, we constructed a virus-free rapid detection system to measure SARS-CoV-2 RNA suppression. Our data suggest that the SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA was degraded by IFN-α-induced ISG20 exonuclease activity.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Genetic Vectors , HeLa Cells , Humans , Interferon-alpha/administration & dosage , Luciferases/genetics , Luciferases/metabolism , Naphthyridines/administration & dosage , Naphthyridines/pharmacology , Oxadiazoles/administration & dosage , Oxadiazoles/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Replicon
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488612

ABSTRACT

Inhaled nebulized interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-ß have been shown to be effective in the management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to construct a virus-free rapid detection system for high-throughput screening of IFN-like compounds that induce viral RNA degradation and suppress the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We prepared a SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA expression vector which contained the SARS-CoV-2 5'-UTR, the partial sequence of ORF1a, luciferase, nucleocapsid, ORF10, and 3'-UTR under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The expression vector was transfected into Calu-3 cells and treated with IFN-α and the IFNAR2 agonist CDM-3008 (RO8191) for 3 days. SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA degradation was subsequently evaluated based on luciferase levels. IFN-α and CDM-3008 suppressed SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 193 IU/mL and 2.54 µM, respectively. HeLa cells stably expressing SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA were prepared and treated with the IFN-α and pan-JAK inhibitor Pyridone 6 or siRNA-targeting ISG20. IFN-α activity was canceled with Pyridone 6. The knockdown of ISG20 partially canceled IFN-α activity. Collectively, we constructed a virus-free rapid detection system to measure SARS-CoV-2 RNA suppression. Our data suggest that the SARS-CoV-2 subreplicon RNA was degraded by IFN-α-induced ISG20 exonuclease activity.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Genetic Vectors , HeLa Cells , Humans , Interferon-alpha/administration & dosage , Luciferases/genetics , Luciferases/metabolism , Naphthyridines/administration & dosage , Naphthyridines/pharmacology , Oxadiazoles/administration & dosage , Oxadiazoles/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Replicon
8.
Viruses ; 13(5)2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244139

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is the causative agent of COVID-19, which is a global pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 is transmitted rapidly via contaminated surfaces and aerosols, emphasizing the importance of environmental disinfection to block the spread of virus. Ultraviolet C radiation and chemical compounds are effective for SARS-CoV-2 disinfection, but can only be applied in the absence of humans due to their toxicities. Therefore, development of disinfectants that can be applied in working spaces without evacuating people is needed. Here we showed that TiO2-mediated photocatalytic reaction inactivates SARS-CoV-2 in a time-dependent manner and decreases its infectivity by 99.9% after 20 min and 120 min of treatment in aerosol and liquid, respectively. The mechanistic effects of TiO2 photocatalyst on SARS-CoV-2 virion included decreased total observed virion count, increased virion size, and reduced particle surface spike structure, as determined by transmission electron microscopy. Damage to viral proteins and genome was further confirmed by western blotting and RT-qPCR, respectively. The multi-antiviral effects of TiO2-mediated photocatalytic reaction implies universal disinfection potential for different infectious agents. Notably, TiO2 has no adverse effects on human health, and therefore, TiO2-induced photocatalytic reaction is suitable for disinfection of SARS-CoV-2 and other emerging infectious disease-causing agents in human habitation.


Subject(s)
Disinfection/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Titanium/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Titanium/chemistry , Vero Cells
9.
Curr Opin Virol ; 49: 81-85, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225185

ABSTRACT

The nucleotide analogue prodrug remdesivir remains the only FDA-approved antiviral small molecule for the treatment of infection with SARS-CoV-2. Biochemical studies revealed that the active form of the drug targets the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and causes delayed chain-termination. Delayed chain-termination is incomplete, but the continuation of RNA synthesis enables a partial escape from viral proofreading. Remdesivir becomes embedded in the copy of the RNA genome that later serves as a template. Incorporation of an incoming nucleotide triphosphate is now inhibited by the modified template. Knowledge on the mechanism of action matters. Enzymatic inhibition links to antiviral effects in cell cultures, animal models and viral load reduction in patients, which provides the logical chain that is expected for a direct acting antiviral. Hence, remdesivir also serves as a benchmark in current drug development efforts that will hopefully lead to orally available treatments to the benefit of a broader population.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Humans , Prodrugs/pharmacology , Prodrugs/therapeutic use , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Substrate Specificity , Virus Replication/drug effects
10.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 97: 107702, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical characteristics and treatment of patients who tested positive for COVID-19 after recovery remained elusive. Effective antiviral therapy is important for tackling these patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of favipiravir for treating these patients. METHODS: This is a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial in SARS-CoV-2 RNA re-positive patients. Patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either favipiravir, in addition to standard care, or standard care alone. The primary outcome was time to achieve a consecutive twice (at intervals of more than 24 h) negative RT-PCR result for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in nasopharyngeal swab and sputum sample. RESULTS: Between March 27 and May 9, 2020, 55 patients underwent randomization; 36 were assigned to the favipiravir group and 19 were assigned to the control group. Favipiravir group had a significantly shorter time from start of study treatment to negative nasopharyngeal swab and sputum than control group (median 17 vs. 26 days); hazard ratio 2.1 (95% CI [1.1-4.0], p = 0.038). The proportion of virus shedding in favipiravir group was higher than control group (80.6% [29/36] vs. 52.6% [10/19], p = 0.030, respectively). C-reactive protein decreased significantly after treatment in the favipiravir group (p = 0.016). The adverse events were generally mild and self-limiting. CONCLUSION: Favipiravir was safe and superior to control in shortening the duration of viral shedding in SARS-CoV-2 RNA recurrent positive after discharge. However, a larger scale and randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial is required to confirm our conclusion.


Subject(s)
Amides/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Reinfection/drug therapy , Administration, Oral , Adult , Aged , Amides/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/blood , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Subsets/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Pyrazines/adverse effects , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Reinfection/blood , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Treatment Outcome
12.
Br J Nutr ; 125(6): 618-627, 2021 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139692

ABSTRACT

Se is a micronutrient essential for human health. Sub-optimal Se status is common, occurring in a significant proportion of the population across the world including parts of Europe and China. Human and animal studies have shown that Se status is a key determinant of the host response to viral infections. In this review, we address the question whether Se intake is a factor in determining the severity of response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Emphasis is placed on epidemiological and animal studies which suggest that Se affects host response to RNA viruses and on the molecular mechanisms by which Se and selenoproteins modulate the inter-linked redox homeostasis, stress response and inflammatory response. Together these studies indicate that Se status is an important factor in determining the host response to viral infections. Therefore, we conclude that Se status is likely to influence human response to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and that Se status is one (of several) risk factors which may impact on the outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection, particularly in populations where Se intake is sub-optimal or low. We suggest the use of appropriate markers to assess the Se status of COVID-19 patients and possible supplementation may be beneficial in limiting the severity of symptoms, especially in countries where Se status is regarded as sub-optimal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , RNA, Viral/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Selenium/pharmacology , Virus Diseases/physiopathology , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Micronutrients/pharmacology , Nutritional Status , Oxidation-Reduction/drug effects , Stress, Physiological/drug effects , Virus Diseases/virology
13.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(3)2021 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115425

ABSTRACT

Relative risk reduction and absolute risk reduction measures in the evaluation of clinical trial data are poorly understood by health professionals and the public. The absence of reported absolute risk reduction in COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials can lead to outcome reporting bias that affects the interpretation of vaccine efficacy. The present article uses clinical epidemiologic tools to critically appraise reports of efficacy in Pfzier/BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 mRNA vaccine clinical trials. Based on data reported by the manufacturer for Pfzier/BioNTech vaccine BNT162b2, this critical appraisal shows: relative risk reduction, 95.1%; 95% CI, 90.0% to 97.6%; p = 0.016; absolute risk reduction, 0.7%; 95% CI, 0.59% to 0.83%; p < 0.000. For the Moderna vaccine mRNA-1273, the appraisal shows: relative risk reduction, 94.1%; 95% CI, 89.1% to 96.8%; p = 0.004; absolute risk reduction, 1.1%; 95% CI, 0.97% to 1.32%; p < 0.000. Unreported absolute risk reduction measures of 0.7% and 1.1% for the Pfzier/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, respectively, are very much lower than the reported relative risk reduction measures. Reporting absolute risk reduction measures is essential to prevent outcome reporting bias in evaluation of COVID-19 vaccine efficacy.


Subject(s)
Bias , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Numbers Needed To Treat/statistics & numerical data , Humans , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Treatment Outcome
14.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 277: 113888, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1056890

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has formed a global pandemic since late 2019. Benefitting from the application experience of Chinese Medicine (CM) for influenza and SARS, CM has been used to save patients at the early stage of COVID-19 outbreak in China. AIM OF THE STUDY: In order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CM, and compare with Western Medicine (WM) for COVID-19, we conducted a retrospective case series study based on the patients in Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, Wuhan, China. METHODS: The inclusion and exclusion criteria of data extraction were set for this retrospective study. All patients who were admitted by the Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital between January 17th and February 25th 2020 were considered. In addition, patients enrolled met the severe defined by the guidelines released by the National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China. In these cases included in the study, CM or WM treatment was selected according to the wishes of the patients at the beginning of hospitalization. The patients in CM group were treated with Huashi Baidu granule (137 g po, bid) combined with the injections of Xiyanping (100 mg iv, bid), Xuebijing (100 ml iv, bid) and Shenmai (60 ml iv, qd) according to the syndrome of epidemic toxin blocking the lung in the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The WM group received antiviral therapy (including abidor capsule 0.2 g po, tid; Lopinavir-Ritonavir tablets, 500 mg po, bid), antibiotics (such as cefoperazone 2 g iv, bid; moxifloxacin hydrochloride tablets, 0.4 g po, qd) or corticosteroid therapy (such as methylprednisolone succinate sodium 40 mg iv, qd; prednisone, 30 mg po, qd). In addition, patients in both groups received routine supportive treatment, including oxygen inhalation, symptomatic therapy, and/or human intravenous immunoglobulin, and/or serum albumin, and treatment for underlying diseases. The clinical outcomes were evaluated based on changes related with clinical manifestations, computer tomography (CT) scan images, and laboratory examinations before and after the treatment. RESULTS: 55 severe COVID-19 patients, with 23 in CM group and 32 in WM group, were included for analyzed. There was no case of death, being transferred to ICU, or receiving invasive mechanical ventilation in two groups during hospitalization. The median time of SARS-CoV-2 RNA clearance in CM and WM group were 12 days and 15.5 days respectively, the ratio of nucleic acid negative conversion of CM group at different follow-up time points was significantly higher than that of WM group (HR: 2.281, P = 0.018). Further, the chest CT imaging showed more widely lung lesion opacity absorbed in the CM group. The high sensitivity C-reactive protein and serum ferritin decreased significantly in the CM group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in adverse events in terms of liver function and renal function between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Based on this retrospective analysis from Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, CM has better effects in SARS-CoV-2 RNA clearance, promoting lung lesion opacity absorbed and reducing inflammation in severe COVID-19 patients, which is effective and safe therapy for treating severe COVID-19 and reducing mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/adverse effects , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , China , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
15.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(3): 253-260, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Personal protective equipment (PPE) is a critical need during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Alternative sources of surgical masks, including 3-dimensionally (3D) printed approaches that may be reused, are urgently needed to prevent PPE shortages. Few data exist identifying decontamination strategies to inactivate viral pathogens and retain 3D-printing material integrity. OBJECTIVE: To test viral disinfection methods on 3D-printing materials. METHODS: The viricidal activity of common disinfectants (10% bleach, quaternary ammonium sanitizer, 3% hydrogen peroxide, or 70% isopropanol and exposure to heat (50°C, and 70°C) were tested on four 3D-printed materials used in the healthcare setting, including a surgical mask design developed by the Veterans' Health Administration. Inactivation was assessed for several clinically relevant RNA and DNA pathogenic viruses, including severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 and all viruses tested were completely inactivated by a single application of bleach, ammonium quaternary compounds, or hydrogen peroxide. Similarly, exposure to dry heat (70°C) for 30 minutes completely inactivated all viruses tested. In contrast, 70% isopropanol reduced viral titers significantly less well following a single application. Inactivation did not interfere with material integrity of the 3D-printed materials. CONCLUSIONS: Several standard decontamination approaches effectively disinfected 3D-printed materials. These approaches were effective in the inactivation SARS-CoV-2, its surrogates, and other clinically relevant viral pathogens. The decontamination of 3D-printed surgical mask materials may be useful during crisis situations in which surgical mask supplies are limited.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Disinfection/methods , Masks , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Inactivation , 2-Propanol , DNA, Viral/drug effects , Decontamination/methods , HIV-1/drug effects , Healthy Volunteers , Hot Temperature , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide , Personal Protective Equipment , Printing, Three-Dimensional , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Virus Diseases/prevention & control
16.
Stem Cell Rev Rep ; 17(1): 296-299, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009200

ABSTRACT

We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient, treated with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody for a B-cell lymphoma previously treated by autologous stem cell transplant. He suffered from chronic COVID19 and we monitored by plasma SARS-CoV-2 RNA by highly sensitive droplet-based digital PCR technology (ddPCR). Under tocilizumab therapy and despite a first clinical improvement biologically associated with decreasing inflammatory markers, a slight increase of SARS-CoV-2 RNAaemia quantified by ddPCR was highlighted, confirming the absence of viral efficacy of this treatment and predicting the subsequent observed deterioration. As expected, his complete recovery, finally achieved after COVID-19 convalescent plasmatherapy, strictly paralleled plasma SARS-CoV-2 RNA clearance. With these results, we confirmed the interest of SARS-CoV-2 RNAaemia monitoring by ddPCR in COVID-19 patients, particularly during treatment, and firstly showed that this new and specific biomarker could be helpful to select eligible patient for anti-IL6 receptors therapy considering the variable levels of efficacy recently observed with such therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , HIV Infections/blood , Lymphoma, B-Cell/drug therapy , RNA, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , HIV Infections/genetics , HIV Infections/therapy , HIV Infections/virology , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Humans , Lymphocytes/virology , Lymphoma, B-Cell/complications , Lymphoma, B-Cell/genetics , Lymphoma, B-Cell/virology , RNA, Viral/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Load/drug effects
17.
Drug Res (Stuttg) ; 71(3): 166-170, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919370

ABSTRACT

A recent outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel coronavirus designated as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) started in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019 and then spread rapidly all over the world. However, there are no specific antiviral therapies for COVID-19, using the agents which approved or in development for other viral infections is one of the potentially quickest ways to find treatment for this new viral infection. Favipiravir is an effective agent that acts as a nucleotide analog that selectively inhibits the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase or causes lethal mutagenesis upon incorporation into the virus RNA. In view of recent studies and discussion on favipiravir, in this mini review we aimed to summarize the clinical trials studying the efficacy and safety of favipiravir in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Pyrazines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Amides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Mutagenesis/drug effects , Pyrazines/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/drug effects , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Treatment Outcome
18.
Drug Res (Stuttg) ; 71(3): 138-148, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894442

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is presently been considered as 'molecule of hope' to curb the menace of COVID19. Non-availability of any USFDA approved drug has led to several attempt of drug-repurposing and development of new therapeutic molecules. However, Remdesivir has been found to be effective against a broad range of virus including SARS, MERS and COVID 19 through in-vitro studies. Several clinical research attempt are presently being conducted showing promising result yet not conclusive. This review summarized all such clinical trials to critically appraise the usage of Remdesivir against COVID 19 along with the publications related to the results of the clinical studies. The present regulatory aspect i. e. Emergency Use Authorization (EYA) and information of molecule and plausible mechanism is also dealt.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Drug Approval , Humans , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Treatment Outcome , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration
19.
Minerva Med ; 112(1): 144-152, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890934

ABSTRACT

The world is now entering its 9th month of combat against a pandemic of deadly pneumonia. Started out from China in December 2019, the disease has been declared as caused by infection with a so far unknown RNA Coronavirus of the respiratory family, then named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. In the absence of a vaccine, and with scientists still struggling for an effective therapy, COVID-19 (the SARS-dependent syndrome) carries up to now, a death toll of more than 590,000 (July 18,2020) undermining jobs and finance of contemporary society in all continents. Social distancing, the only measure hitherto shown to restrain virus spread, has been progressively loosened from May 2020 in some countries, leaving us in the fear of repeat attacks from the unchecked virus. We discuss the problem and propose to tentatively boost the antivirus cell machinery by using lab-made viral mimics to engage cell receptors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium/analogs & derivatives , Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Interferon Inducers/therapeutic use , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/etiology , Physical Distancing , Poly I-C/therapeutic use , Polylysine/analogs & derivatives , Polylysine/therapeutic use , Practice Guidelines as Topic , RNA, Double-Stranded/drug effects , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Secondary Prevention
20.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 16577, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-834912

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for COVID-19, resulting in the largest pandemic in over a hundred years. After examining the molecular structures and activities of hepatitis C viral inhibitors and comparing hepatitis C virus and coronavirus replication, we previously postulated that the FDA-approved hepatitis C drug EPCLUSA (Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir) might inhibit SARS-CoV-2. We subsequently demonstrated that Sofosbuvir triphosphate is incorporated by the relatively low fidelity SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps), serving as an immediate polymerase reaction terminator, but not by a host-like high fidelity DNA polymerase. Other investigators have since demonstrated the ability of Sofosbuvir to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in lung and brain cells; additionally, COVID-19 clinical trials with EPCLUSA and with Sofosbuvir plus Daclatasvir have been initiated in several countries. SARS-CoV-2 has an exonuclease-based proofreader to maintain the viral genome integrity. Any effective antiviral targeting the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp must display a certain level of resistance to this proofreading activity. We report here that Sofosbuvir terminated RNA resists removal by the exonuclease to a substantially higher extent than RNA terminated by Remdesivir, another drug being used as a COVID-19 therapeutic. These results offer a molecular basis supporting the current use of Sofosbuvir in combination with other drugs in COVID-19 clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Exonucleases/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Prodrugs/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Sofosbuvir/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Drug Discovery/methods , Drug Repositioning/methods , Hepacivirus/drug effects , Hepacivirus/enzymology , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Hepatitis C/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prodrugs/therapeutic use , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Sofosbuvir/chemistry , Sofosbuvir/therapeutic use , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
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