Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 79
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470891

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, represents a new pathogen from the family of Coronaviridae that caused a global pandemic of COVID-19 disease. In the absence of effective antiviral drugs, research of novel therapeutic targets such as SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) becomes essential. This viral protein is without a human counterpart and thus represents a unique prospective drug target. However, in vitro biological evaluation testing on RdRp remains difficult and is not widely available. Therefore, we prepared a database of commercial small-molecule compounds and performed an in silico high-throughput virtual screening on the active site of the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp using ensemble docking. We identified a novel thioether-amide or guanidine-linker class of potential RdRp inhibitors and calculated favorable binding free energies of representative hits by molecular dynamics simulations coupled with Linear Interaction Energy calculations. This innovative procedure maximized the respective phase-space sampling and yielded non-covalent inhibitors representing small optimizable molecules that are synthetically readily accessible, commercially available as well as suitable for further biological evaluation and mode of action studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Databases, Chemical , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Guanidine/chemistry , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Structure-Activity Relationship , Sulfides/chemistry , Thermodynamics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470887

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected >235 million people and killed over 4.8 million individuals worldwide. Although vaccines have been developed for prophylactic management, there are no clinically proven antivirals to treat the viral infection. Continuous efforts are being made all over the world to develop effective drugs but these are being delayed by periodic outbreak of mutated SARS-CoV-2 and a lack of knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying viral pathogenesis and post-infection complications. In this regard, the involvement of Annexin A2 (AnxA2), a lipid-raft related phospholipid-binding protein, in SARS-CoV-2 attachment, internalization, and replication has been discussed. In addition to the evidence from published literature, we have performed in silico docking of viral spike glycoprotein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase with human AnxA2 to find the molecular interactions. Overall, this review provides the molecular insights into a potential role of AnxA2 in the SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and post-infection complications, especially thrombosis, cytokine storm, and insulin resistance.


Subject(s)
Annexin A2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Annexin A2/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , Virus Internalization
3.
Virology ; 564: 33-38, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447220

ABSTRACT

Endemic seasonal coronaviruses cause morbidity and mortality in a subset of patients, but no specific treatment is available. Molnupiravir is a promising pipeline antiviral drug for treating SARS-CoV-2 infection potentially by targeting RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). This study aims to evaluate the potential of repurposing molnupiravir for treating seasonal human coronavirus (HCoV) infections. Molecular docking revealed that the active form of molnupiravir, ß-D-N4-hydroxycytidine (NHC), has similar binding affinity to RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-229E. In cell culture models, treatment of molnupiravir effectively inhibited viral replication and production of infectious viruses of the three seasonal coronaviruses. A time-of-drug-addition experiment indicates the specificity of molnupiravir in inhibiting viral components. Furthermore, combining molnupiravir with the protease inhibitor GC376 resulted in enhanced antiviral activity. Our findings highlight that the great potential of repurposing molnupiravir for treating seasonal coronavirus infected patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Hydroxylamines/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Common Cold/drug therapy , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus NL63, Human/physiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Cytidine/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Binding/drug effects , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Seasons , Sulfonic Acids/pharmacology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/genetics
4.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 999, 2021 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371605

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 uses an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) to replicate and transcribe its genome. Previous structures of the RdRp revealed a monomeric enzyme composed of the catalytic subunit nsp12, two copies of subunit nsp8, and one copy of subunit nsp7. Here we report an alternative, dimeric form of the enzyme and resolve its structure at 5.5 Å resolution. In this structure, the two RdRps contain only one copy of nsp8 each and dimerize via their nsp7 subunits to adopt an antiparallel arrangement. We speculate that the RdRp dimer facilitates template switching during production of sub-genomic RNAs.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Dimerization , Humans , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16307, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354117

ABSTRACT

Structure-based drug design targeting the SARS-CoV-2 virus has been greatly facilitated by available virus-related protein structures. However, there is an urgent need for effective, safe small-molecule drugs to control the spread of the virus and variants. While many efforts are devoted to searching for compounds that selectively target individual proteins, we investigated the potential interactions between eight proteins related to SARS-CoV-2 and more than 600 compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine which has proven effective at treating the viral infection. Our original ensemble docking and cooperative docking approaches, followed by a total of over 16-micorsecond molecular simulations, have identified at least 9 compounds that may generally bind to key SARS-CoV-2 proteins. Further, we found evidence that some of these compounds can simultaneously bind to the same target, potentially leading to cooperative inhibition to SARS-CoV-2 proteins like the Spike protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These results not only present a useful computational methodology to systematically assess the anti-viral potential of small molecules, but also point out a new avenue to seek cooperative compounds toward cocktail therapeutics to target more SARS-CoV-2-related proteins.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Cats , Computational Biology , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/metabolism , Flavonoids/metabolism , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship
6.
Nat Struct Mol Biol ; 28(9): 740-746, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354110

ABSTRACT

Molnupiravir is an orally available antiviral drug candidate currently in phase III trials for the treatment of patients with COVID-19. Molnupiravir increases the frequency of viral RNA mutations and impairs SARS-CoV-2 replication in animal models and in humans. Here, we establish the molecular mechanisms underlying molnupiravir-induced RNA mutagenesis by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Biochemical assays show that the RdRp uses the active form of molnupiravir, ß-D-N4-hydroxycytidine (NHC) triphosphate, as a substrate instead of cytidine triphosphate or uridine triphosphate. When the RdRp uses the resulting RNA as a template, NHC directs incorporation of either G or A, leading to mutated RNA products. Structural analysis of RdRp-RNA complexes that contain mutagenesis products shows that NHC can form stable base pairs with either G or A in the RdRp active center, explaining how the polymerase escapes proofreading and synthesizes mutated RNA. This two-step mutagenesis mechanism probably applies to various viral polymerases and can explain the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of molnupiravir.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Hydroxylamines/metabolism , Mutagenesis/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Base Sequence , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cytidine/chemistry , Cytidine/metabolism , Cytidine/pharmacology , Humans , Hydroxylamines/chemistry , Hydroxylamines/pharmacology , Models, Molecular , Molecular Structure , Mutagenesis/drug effects , Mutation/drug effects , Mutation/genetics , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Conformation , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/genetics
7.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(15): 8822-8835, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343703

ABSTRACT

The catalytic subunit of SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) contains two active sites that catalyze nucleotidyl-monophosphate transfer (NMPylation). Mechanistic studies and drug discovery have focused on RNA synthesis by the highly conserved RdRp. The second active site, which resides in a Nidovirus RdRp-Associated Nucleotidyl transferase (NiRAN) domain, is poorly characterized, but both catalytic reactions are essential for viral replication. One study showed that NiRAN transfers NMP to the first residue of RNA-binding protein nsp9; another reported a structure of nsp9 containing two additional N-terminal residues bound to the NiRAN active site but observed NMP transfer to RNA instead. We show that SARS-CoV-2 RdRp NMPylates the native but not the extended nsp9. Substitutions of the invariant NiRAN residues abolish NMPylation, whereas substitution of a catalytic RdRp Asp residue does not. NMPylation can utilize diverse nucleotide triphosphates, including remdesivir triphosphate, is reversible in the presence of pyrophosphate, and is inhibited by nucleotide analogs and bisphosphonates, suggesting a path for rational design of NiRAN inhibitors. We reconcile these and existing findings using a new model in which nsp9 remodels both active sites to alternately support initiation of RNA synthesis by RdRp or subsequent capping of the product RNA by the NiRAN domain.


Subject(s)
Nidovirales/enzymology , Nucleotides/metabolism , Protein Domains , RNA-Binding Proteins/chemistry , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Catalytic Domain , Coenzymes/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Diphosphates/pharmacology , Diphosphonates/pharmacology , Guanosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Manganese , Models, Molecular , Nidovirales/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Uridine Triphosphate/metabolism
8.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253364, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315884

ABSTRACT

Of the 16 non-structural proteins (Nsps) encoded by SARS CoV-2, Nsp3 is the largest and plays important roles in the viral life cycle. Being a large, multidomain, transmembrane protein, Nsp3 has been the most challenging Nsp to characterize. Encoded within Nsp3 is the papain-like protease domain (PLpro) that cleaves not only the viral polypeptide but also K48-linked polyubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier, ISG15, from host cell proteins. We here compare the interactors of PLpro and Nsp3 and find a largely overlapping interactome. Intriguingly, we find that near full length Nsp3 is a more active protease compared to the minimal catalytic domain of PLpro. Using a MALDI-TOF based assay, we screen 1971 approved clinical compounds and identify five compounds that inhibit PLpro with IC50s in the low micromolar range but showed cross reactivity with other human deubiquitinases and had no significant antiviral activity in cellular SARS-CoV-2 infection assays. We therefore looked for alternative methods to block PLpro activity and engineered competitive nanobodies that bind to PLpro at the substrate binding site with nanomolar affinity thus inhibiting the enzyme. Our work highlights the importance of studying Nsp3 and provides tools and valuable insights to investigate Nsp3 biology during the viral infection cycle.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Single-Chain Antibodies/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , A549 Cells , Antigen-Antibody Complex , Humans , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/immunology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Single-Chain Antibodies/immunology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/immunology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
9.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 98: 107831, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313172

ABSTRACT

Explicit hindrance and blockade of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of SARS-CoV-2 is considered one of the most promising and efficient approaches for developing highly potent remedies for COVID-19. However, almost all of the reported viral RdRp inhibitors (either repurposed or new antiviral drugs) lack specific selectivity against the novel coronaviral RdRp and still at a beginning phase of advancement. Herein, I discovered and introduce a new pyrazine derivative, (E)-N-(4-cyanobenzylidene)-6-fluoro-3-hydroxypyrazine-2-carboxamide (cyanorona-20), as the first potent SARS-CoV-2 RdRp inhibitor with very high selectivity (209- and 45-fold more potent than favipiravir and remdesivir, respectively). This promising selective specific anti-COVID-19 compound is also deemed to be the first distinctive derivative of favipiravir. Cyanorona-20, the unprecedented nucleoside/nucleotide analog, was designed, synthesized, characterized, computationally studied, and biologically evaluated for its anti-COVID-19 actions (through a precise in vitro anti-COVID-19 assay). The results of the biological assay displayed that cyanorona-20 surprisingly exhibited very high and largely significant anti-COVID-19 activities (anti-SARS-CoV-2 EC50 = 0.45 µM), and, in addition, it could be also a very promising guide and lead compound for the design and synthesis of new anti-SARS-CoV-2 and anti-COVID-19 agents through structural modifications and further computational studies. Further appraisal for the improvement of cyanorona-20 medication is a prerequisite requirement in the coming days. In a word, the ascent of the second member (cyanorona-20 "Corona Antidote") of the novel and promising class of anti-COVID-19 pyrazine derivatives would drastically make a medical uprising in the pharmacotherapeutic treatment regimens and protocols of the recently-emerged SARS-CoV-2 infection and its accompanying COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Computer-Aided Design , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Molecular Targeted Therapy , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Structure-Activity Relationship
10.
Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids ; 40(8): 790-797, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310863

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a pandemic of the coronavirus disease in 2019. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) plays an essential role in RNA replication and transcription in SARS-CoV-2. In this study, we focused on the RNA template component of viral RdRp structure and analyzed human microRNAs (miRNAs) targeting specific sequences in this RNA. By examining miRNA databases and using an in vitro RNA-RNA interaction assay, we observed hsa-miR-15b-5p interacting with the RNA component of viral RdRp. Our findings provide evidence that hsa-miR15b-5p may suppresses viral infection and proliferation by targeting the RNA template component of SARS-CoV-2 RdRp.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , MicroRNAs/physiology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Genetic , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcription, Genetic
11.
Molecules ; 26(12)2021 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282543

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused tremendous economic loss and serious health problems worldwide. In this study, we investigated 14 natural compounds isolated from Amphimedon sp. via a molecular docking study, to examine their ability to act as anti-COVID-19 agents. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic properties of the most promising compounds were studied. The docking study showed that virtually screened compounds were effective against the new coronavirus via dual inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 RdRp and the 3CL main protease. In particular, nakinadine B (1), 20-hepacosenoic acid (11) and amphimedoside C (12) were the most promising compounds, as they demonstrated good interactions with the pockets of both enzymes. Based on the analysis of the molecular docking results, compounds 1 and 12 were selected for molecular dynamics simulation studies. Our results showed Amphimedon sp. to be a rich source for anti-COVID-19 metabolites.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/chemistry , Biological Products/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Porifera/chemistry , Porifera/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Amino Sugars/chemistry , Amino Sugars/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Binding Sites , Biological Products/isolation & purification , Biological Products/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computational Biology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Humans , Ligands , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/chemistry , Pyridines/pharmacology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
12.
Virus Res ; 302: 198484, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272769

ABSTRACT

Novel corona virus SARS-CoV-2, causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has become a global health challenge particularly for developing countries like Pakistan where overcrowded cities, inadequate sanitation, little health awareness and poor socioeconomic conditions exist. The SARS-CoV-2 has been known to spread primarily through direct contact and respiratory droplets. However, detection of SARS-CoV-2 in stool and sewage have raised the possibility of fecal-oral mode of transmission. Currently, quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) is the only method being used for SARS-CoV-2 detection, which requires expensive instrumentation, dedicated laboratory setup, highly skilled staff, and several hours to report results. Considering the high transmissibility and rapid spread, a robust, sensitive, specific and cheaper assay for rapid SARS-CoV-2 detection is highly needed. Herein, we report a novel colorimetric RT-LAMP assay for naked-eye detection of SARS-COV-2 in clinical as well as sewage samples. Our SARS-CoV-2 RdRp-based LAMP assay could successfully detect the virus RNA in 26/28 (93%) of RT-PCR positive COVID-19 clinical samples with 100% specificity (n = 7) within 20 min. We also tested the effect of various additives on the performance of LAMP assay and found that addition of 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (BSA) could increase the sensitivity of assay up to 101 copies of target sequence. Moreover, we also successfully applied this assay to detect SARS-CoV-2 in sewage waters collected from those areas of Lahore, a city of Punjab province of Pakistan, declared as virus hotspots by local government. Our optimized LAMP assay could provide a sensitive first tier strategy for SARS-CoV-2 screening and can potentially help diagnostic laboratories in better handling of high sample turnout during pandemic situation. By providing rapid naked-eye SARS-CoV-2 detection in sewage samples, this assay may support pandemic readiness and emergency response to any possible virus outbreaks in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sewage/virology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Colorimetry , Feces/virology , Humans , Mass Screening , Pakistan/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(19)2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254144

ABSTRACT

Backtracking, the reverse motion of the transcriptase enzyme on the nucleic acid template, is a universal regulatory feature of transcription in cellular organisms but its role in viruses is not established. Here we present evidence that backtracking extends into the viral realm, where backtracking by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) may aid viral transcription and replication. Structures of SARS-CoV-2 RdRp bound to the essential nsp13 helicase and RNA suggested the helicase facilitates backtracking. We use cryo-electron microscopy, RNA-protein cross-linking, and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations to characterize SARS-CoV-2 RdRp backtracking. The results establish that the single-stranded 3' segment of the product RNA generated by backtracking extrudes through the RdRp nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) entry tunnel, that a mismatched nucleotide at the product RNA 3' end frays and enters the NTP entry tunnel to initiate backtracking, and that nsp13 stimulates RdRp backtracking. Backtracking may aid proofreading, a crucial process for SARS-CoV-2 resistance against antivirals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Cryoelectron Microscopy/methods , DNA Helicases/metabolism , Genome, Viral , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
14.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251368, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242246

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is challenging healthcare preparedness, world economies, and livelihoods. The infection and death rates associated with this pandemic are strikingly variable in different countries. To elucidate this discrepancy, we analyzed 2431 early spread SARS-CoV-2 sequences from GISAID. We estimated continental-wise admixture proportions, assessed haplotype block estimation, and tested for the presence or absence of strains' recombination. Herein, we identified 1010 unique missense mutations and seven different SARS-CoV-2 clusters. In samples from Asia, a small haplotype block was identified, whereas samples from Europe and North America harbored large and different haplotype blocks with nonsynonymous variants. Variant frequency and linkage disequilibrium varied among continents, especially in North America. Recombination between different strains was only observed in North American and European sequences. In addition, we structurally modelled the two most common mutations, Spike_D614G and Nsp12_P314L, which suggested that these linked mutations may enhance viral entry and replication, respectively. Overall, we propose that genomic recombination between different strains may contribute to SARS-CoV-2 virulence and COVID-19 severity and may present additional challenges for current treatment regimens and countermeasures. Furthermore, our study provides a possible explanation for the substantial second wave of COVID-19 presented with higher infection and death rates in many countries.


Subject(s)
Recombination, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virulence/physiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Genetic , Genetic Variation , Haplotypes , Humans , Linkage Disequilibrium , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Mutation, Missense , Principal Component Analysis , Protein Structure, Tertiary , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
15.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251801, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226905

ABSTRACT

Drug repurposing studies targeting inhibition of RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have exhibited the potential effect of small molecules. In the present work a detailed interaction study between the phytochemicals from Indian medicinal plants and the RdRP of SARS-CoV-2 has been performed. The top four phytochemicals obtained through molecular docking were, swertiapuniside, cordifolide A, sitoindoside IX, and amarogentin belonging to Swertia chirayita, Tinospora cordifolia and Withania somnifera. These ligands bound to the RdRP were further studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The principal component analysis of these systems showed significant conformational changes in the finger and thumb subdomain of the RdRP. Hydrogen bonding, salt-bridge and water mediated interactions supported by MM-GBSA free energy of binding revealed strong binding of cordifolide A and sitoindoside IX to RdRP. The ligand-interacting residues belonged to either of the seven conserved motifs of the RdRP. These residues were polar and charged amino acids, namely, ARG 553, ARG 555, ASP 618, ASP 760, ASP 761, GLU 811, and SER 814. The glycosidic moieties of the phytochemicals were observed to form favourable interactions with these residues. Hence, these phytochemicals may hold the potential to act as RdRP inhibitors owing to their stability in binding to the druggable site.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biological Products/chemistry , Biological Products/pharmacology , Drug Discovery , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phytochemicals/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
16.
J Med Virol ; 93(1): 300-310, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206791

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), named coronavirus disease 2019, has infected more than 8.9 million people worldwide. This calls for urgent effective therapeutic measures. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity in viral transcription and replication has been recognized as an attractive target to design novel antiviral strategies. Although SARS-CoV-2 shares less genetic similarity with SARS-CoV (~79%) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (~50%), the respective RdRps of the three coronaviruses are highly conserved, suggesting that RdRp is a good broad-spectrum antiviral target for coronaviruses. In this review, we discuss the antiviral potential of RdRp inhibitors (mainly nucleoside analogs) with an aim to provide a comprehensive account of drug discovery on SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Nucleosides/pharmacology , Nucleosides/therapeutic use , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
17.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(17): 19816-19824, 2021 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199255

ABSTRACT

The detection of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is crucial for preventing and controlling infectious diseases and disease treatment. In this work, a Au@Ti3C2@PEI-Ru(dcbpy)32+ nanocomposite-based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor was rationally designed, which realized sensitive detection of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene of SARS-CoV-2. In addition, a DNA walker was also used to excise the hairpin DNAs under the action of Nb.BbvCI endonuclease. Furthermore, model DNA-Ag nanoclusters (model DNA-AgNCs) were used to quench the initial ECL signal. As a result, the ECL biosensor was used to sensitively detect the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp gene with a detection range of 1 fM to 100 pM and a limit of detection of 0.21 fM. It was indicated that the ECL biosensor had a great application potential for clinical medical detection. Furthermore, the DNA walker amplification also played a reliable candidate strategy for other detection methods.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques/methods , Nanocomposites/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , DNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(19)2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196910

ABSTRACT

Backtracking, the reverse motion of the transcriptase enzyme on the nucleic acid template, is a universal regulatory feature of transcription in cellular organisms but its role in viruses is not established. Here we present evidence that backtracking extends into the viral realm, where backtracking by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) may aid viral transcription and replication. Structures of SARS-CoV-2 RdRp bound to the essential nsp13 helicase and RNA suggested the helicase facilitates backtracking. We use cryo-electron microscopy, RNA-protein cross-linking, and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations to characterize SARS-CoV-2 RdRp backtracking. The results establish that the single-stranded 3' segment of the product RNA generated by backtracking extrudes through the RdRp nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) entry tunnel, that a mismatched nucleotide at the product RNA 3' end frays and enters the NTP entry tunnel to initiate backtracking, and that nsp13 stimulates RdRp backtracking. Backtracking may aid proofreading, a crucial process for SARS-CoV-2 resistance against antivirals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Cryoelectron Microscopy/methods , DNA Helicases/metabolism , Genome, Viral , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
19.
EMBO J ; 40(11): e102277, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194823

ABSTRACT

The ongoing outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) demonstrates the continuous threat of emerging coronaviruses (CoVs) to public health. SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV share an otherwise non-conserved part of non-structural protein 3 (Nsp3), therefore named as "SARS-unique domain" (SUD). We previously found a yeast-2-hybrid screen interaction of the SARS-CoV SUD with human poly(A)-binding protein (PABP)-interacting protein 1 (Paip1), a stimulator of protein translation. Here, we validate SARS-CoV SUD:Paip1 interaction by size-exclusion chromatography, split-yellow fluorescent protein, and co-immunoprecipitation assays, and confirm such interaction also between the corresponding domain of SARS-CoV-2 and Paip1. The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of SARS-CoV SUD ("macrodomain II", Mac2) in complex with the middle domain of Paip1, determined by X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering, provides insights into the structural determinants of the complex formation. In cellulo, SUD enhances synthesis of viral but not host proteins via binding to Paip1 in pBAC-SARS-CoV replicon-transfected cells. We propose a possible mechanism for stimulation of viral translation by the SUD of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Peptide Initiation Factors/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Bacterial Proteins , Chromatography, Gel , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Crystallography, X-Ray , Genes, Reporter , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoprecipitation , Luminescent Proteins , Models, Molecular , Peptide Initiation Factors/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Biosynthesis , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains , Protein Interaction Mapping , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits/metabolism , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Scattering, Small Angle , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , X-Ray Diffraction
20.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 138: 111544, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163406

ABSTRACT

The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and 3C-like protease (3CLpro) from SARS-CoV-2 play crucial roles in the viral life cycle and are considered the most promising targets for drug discovery against SARS-CoV-2. In this study, FDA-approved drugs were screened to identify the probable anti-RdRp and 3CLpro inhibitors by molecular docking approach. The number of ligands selected from the PubChem database of NCBI for screening was 1760. Ligands were energy minimized using Open Babel. The RdRp and 3CLpro protein sequences were retrieved from the NCBI database. For Homology Modeling predictions, we used the Swiss model server. Their structure was then energetically minimized using SPDB viewer software and visualized in the CHIMERA UCSF software. Molecular dockings were performed using AutoDock Vina, and candidate drugs were selected based on binding affinity (∆G). Hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions between ligands and proteins were visualized using Ligplot and the Discovery Studio Visualizer v3.0 software. Our results showed 58 drugs against RdRp, which had binding energy of - 8.5 or less, and 69 drugs to inhibit the 3CLpro enzyme with a binding energy of - 8.1 or less. Six drugs based on binding energy and number of hydrogen bonds were chosen for the next step of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate drug-protein interactions (including Nilotinib, Imatinib and dihydroergotamine for 3clpro and Lapatinib, Dexasone and Relategravir for RdRp). Except for Lapatinib, other drugs-complexes were stable during MD simulation. Raltegravir, an anti-HIV drug, was observed to be the best compound against RdRp based on docking binding energy (-9.5 kcal/mole) and MD results. According to the MD results and binding energy, dihydroergotamine is a suitable candidate for 3clpro inhibition (-9.6 kcal/mol). These drugs were classified into several categories, including antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, cardiovascular, anticoagulant, BPH and impotence, antipsychotic, antimigraine, anticancer, and so on. The common prescription-indications for some of these medication categories appeared somewhat in line with manifestations of COVID-19. We hope that they can be beneficial for patients with certain specific symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection, but they can also probably inhibit viral enzymes. We recommend further experimental evaluations in vitro and in vivo on these FDA-approved drugs to assess their potential antiviral effect on SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Repositioning , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Dihydroergotamine/therapeutic use , Drug Approval , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Raltegravir Potassium/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...