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1.
STAR Protoc ; 3(1): 101067, 2022 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595326

ABSTRACT

N 6 -methylation of adenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal mRNA modification and is an important post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for methylated RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeRIP-Seq) to detect and quantify m6A modifications in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA. The protocol is optimized for low viral RNA levels and is readily adaptable for other applications. For complete details on the use and execution of this protocol, please refer to Li et al. (2021).


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Immunoprecipitation/methods , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Adenosine/analysis , Adenosine/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Caco-2 Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Genetic Techniques , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Methylation , RNA/chemistry , RNA/genetics , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells
2.
Talanta ; 239: 122974, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466916

ABSTRACT

Direct RNA detection is critical for providing the RNA insights into gene expression profiling, noncoding RNAs, RNA-associated diseases and pathogens, without reverse transcription. However, classical RNA analysis usually requires RT-PCR, which can cause bias amplification and quantitation errors. To address this challenge, herein we report a microfluidic RNA chip (the microchip prototype) for direct RNA detection, which is primarily based on RNA extension and labeling with DNA polymerase. This detection strategy is of high specificity (discriminating against single-nucleotide differences), rapidity, accuracy, nuclease resistance, and reusability. Further, we have successfully detected disease-associated RNAs in clinical samples, demonstrating its great potentials in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Microfluidic Analytical Techniques , RNA , Microfluidics , Nucleotides , Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis , RNA/genetics
3.
Phys Chem Chem Phys ; 23(40): 22957-22971, 2021 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462045

ABSTRACT

The identification of chemical compounds able to bind specific sites of the human/viral proteins involved in the SARS-CoV-2 infection cycle is a prerequisite to design effective antiviral drugs. Here we conduct a molecular dynamics study with the aim to assess the interactions of ivermectin, an antiparasitic drug with broad-spectrum antiviral activity, with the human Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2), the viral 3CLpro and PLpro proteases, and the viral SARS Unique Domain (SUD). The drug/target interactions have been characterized in silico by describing the nature of the non-covalent interactions found and by measuring the extent of their time duration along the MD simulation. Results reveal that the ACE2 protein and the ACE2/RBD aggregates form the most persistent interactions with ivermectin, while the binding with the remaining viral proteins is more limited and unspecific.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Ivermectin/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , G-Quadruplexes , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , Ivermectin/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Life Sci Alliance ; 4(12)2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449494

ABSTRACT

The continued resurgence of the COVID-19 pandemic with multiple variants underlines the need for diagnostics that are adaptable to the virus. We have developed toehold RNA-based sensors across the SARS-CoV-2 genome for direct and ultrasensitive detection of the virus and its prominent variants. Here, isothermal amplification of a fragment of SARS-CoV-2 RNA coupled with activation of our biosensors leads to a conformational switch in the sensor. This leads to translation of a reporter protein, for example, LacZ or nano-lantern that is easily detected using color/luminescence. By optimizing RNA amplification and biosensor design, we have generated a highly sensitive diagnostic assay that is capable of detecting as low as 100 copies of viral RNA with development of bright color. This is easily visualized by the human eye and quantifiable using spectrophotometry. Finally, this PHAsed NASBA-Translation Optical Method (PHANTOM) using our engineered RNA biosensors efficiently detects viral RNA in patient samples. This work presents a powerful and universally accessible strategy for detecting COVID-19 and variants. This strategy is adaptable to further viral evolution and brings RNA bioengineering center-stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Luminescence , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , RNA/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
6.
BMC Bioinformatics ; 22(1): 428, 2021 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405916

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: RNA regulates a variety of biological functions by interacting with other molecules. The ligand often binds in the RNA pocket to trigger structural changes or functions. Thus, it is essential to explore and visualize the RNA pocket to elucidate the structural and recognition mechanism for the RNA-ligand complex formation. RESULTS: In this work, we developed one user-friendly bioinformatics tool, RPocket. This database provides geometrical size, centroid, shape, secondary structure element for RNA pocket, RNA-ligand interaction information, and functional sites. We extracted 240 RNA pockets from 94 non-redundant RNA-ligand complex structures. We developed RPDescriptor to calculate the pocket geometrical property quantitatively. The geometrical information was then subjected to RNA-ligand binding analysis by incorporating the sequence, secondary structure, and geometrical combinations. This new approach takes advantage of both the atom-level precision of the structure and the nucleotide-level tertiary interactions. The results show that the higher-level topological pattern indeed improves the tertiary structure prediction. We also proposed a potential mechanism for RNA-ligand complex formation. The electrostatic interactions are responsible for long-range recognition, while the Van der Waals and hydrophobic contacts for short-range binding and optimization. These interaction pairs can be considered as distance constraints to guide complex structural modeling and drug design. CONCLUSION: RPocket database would facilitate RNA-ligand engineering to regulate the complex formation for biological or medical applications. RPocket is available at http://zhaoserver.com.cn/RPocket/RPocket.html .


Subject(s)
Computational Biology , RNA , Binding Sites , Ligands , Protein Structure, Secondary , RNA/genetics
7.
Biochemistry ; 60(24): 1869-1875, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387102

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is an antiviral drug initially designed against the Ebola virus. The results obtained with it both in biochemical studies in vitro and in cell line assays in vivo were very promising, but it proved to be ineffective in clinical trials. Remdesivir exhibited far better efficacy when repurposed against SARS-CoV-2. The chemistry that accounts for this difference is the subject of this study. Here, we examine the hypothesis that remdesivir monophosphate (RMP)-containing RNA functions as a template at the polymerase site for the second run of RNA synthesis, and as mRNA at the decoding center for protein synthesis. Our hypothesis is supported by the observation that RMP can be incorporated into RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of both viruses, although some of the incorporated RMPs are subsequently removed by exoribonucleases. Furthermore, our hypothesis is consistent with the fact that RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 selects RMP for incorporation over AMP by 3-fold in vitro, and that RMP-added RNA can be rapidly extended, even though primer extension is often paused when the added RMP is translocated at the i + 3 position (with i the nascent base pair at an initial insertion site of RMP) or when the concentrations of the subsequent nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) are below their physiological concentrations. These observations have led to the hypothesis that remdesivir might be a delayed chain terminator. However, that hypothesis is challenged under physiological concentrations of NTPs by the observation that approximately three-quarters of RNA products efficiently overrun the pause.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Ebolavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/genetics , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Base Pairing , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism
9.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5152, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376195

ABSTRACT

The immunological features that distinguish COVID-19-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) from other causes of ARDS are incompletely understood. Here, we report the results of comparative lower respiratory tract transcriptional profiling of tracheal aspirate from 52 critically ill patients with ARDS from COVID-19 or from other etiologies, as well as controls without ARDS. In contrast to a "cytokine storm," we observe reduced proinflammatory gene expression in COVID-19 ARDS when compared to ARDS due to other causes. COVID-19 ARDS is characterized by a dysregulated host response with increased PTEN signaling and elevated expression of genes with non-canonical roles in inflammation and immunity. In silico analysis of gene expression identifies several candidate drugs that may modulate gene expression in COVID-19 ARDS, including dexamethasone and granulocyte colony stimulating factor. Compared to ARDS due to other types of viral pneumonia, COVID-19 is characterized by impaired interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. The relationship between SARS-CoV-2 viral load and expression of ISGs is decoupled in patients with COVID-19 ARDS when compared to patients with mild COVID-19. In summary, assessment of host gene expression in the lower airways of patients reveals distinct immunological features of COVID-19 ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , RNA/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Trachea/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Analysis, RNA
10.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5113, 2021 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373413

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a major threat to global health. Here, we investigate the RNA structure and RNA-RNA interactions of wildtype (WT) and a mutant (Δ382) SARS-CoV-2 in cells using Illumina and Nanopore platforms. We identify twelve potentially functional structural elements within the SARS-CoV-2 genome, observe that subgenomic RNAs can form different structures, and that WT and Δ382 virus genomes fold differently. Proximity ligation sequencing identify hundreds of RNA-RNA interactions within the virus genome and between the virus and host RNAs. SARS-CoV-2 genome binds strongly to mitochondrial and small nucleolar RNAs and is extensively 2'-O-methylated. 2'-O-methylation sites are enriched in viral untranslated regions, associated with increased virus pair-wise interactions, and are decreased in host mRNAs upon virus infection, suggesting that the virus sequesters methylation machinery from host RNAs towards its genome. These studies deepen our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenicity and provide a platform for targeted therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , DNA Methylation , Genome, Viral , Humans , Nucleic Acid Conformation , RNA/chemistry , RNA/genetics , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255690, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344158

ABSTRACT

Saliva is an attractive specimen type for asymptomatic surveillance of COVID-19 in large populations due to its ease of collection and its demonstrated utility for detecting RNA from SARS-CoV-2. Multiple saliva-based viral detection protocols use a direct-to-RT-qPCR approach that eliminates nucleic acid extraction but can reduce viral RNA detection sensitivity. To improve test sensitivity while maintaining speed, we developed a robotic nucleic acid extraction method for detecting SARS-CoV-2 RNA in saliva samples with high throughput. Using this assay, the Free Asymptomatic Saliva Testing (IGI FAST) research study on the UC Berkeley campus conducted 11,971 tests on supervised self-collected saliva samples and identified rare positive specimens containing SARS-CoV-2 RNA during a time of low infection prevalence. In an attempt to increase testing capacity, we further adapted our robotic extraction assay to process pooled saliva samples. We also benchmarked our assay against nasopharyngeal swab specimens and found saliva methods require further optimization to match this gold standard. Finally, we designed and validated a RT-qPCR test suitable for saliva self-collection. These results establish a robotic extraction-based procedure for rapid PCR-based saliva testing that is suitable for samples from both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Mass Screening/methods , RNA/genetics , RNA/isolation & purification , RNA, Viral/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Robotics/methods , Saliva/chemistry , Specimen Handling/methods
12.
Bull World Health Organ ; 99(7): 486-495, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305609

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine transmission and evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in shipboard quarantine of the Diamond Princess cruise ship. Methods: We obtained the full SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences of 28 samples from the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data database. The samples were collected between 10 and 25 February 2020 and came for individuals who had been tested for SARS-CoV-2 during the quarantine on the cruise ship. These samples were later sequenced in either Japan or the United States of America. We analysed evolution dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 using computational tools of phylogenetics, natural selection pressure and genetic linkage. Findings: The SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in the cruise most likely originated from either a single person infected with a virus variant identical to the WIV04 isolates, or simultaneously with another primary case infected with a virus containing the 11083G > T mutation. We identified a total of 24 new viral mutations across 64.2% (18/28) of samples, and the virus evolved into at least five subgroups. Increased positive selection of SARS-CoV-2 were statistically significant during the quarantine (Tajima's D: -2.03, P < 0.01; Fu and Li's D: -2.66, P < 0.01; and Zeng's E: -2.37, P < 0.01). Linkage disequilibrium analysis confirmed that ribonucleic acid (RNA) recombination with the11083G > T mutation also contributed to the increase of mutations among the viral progeny. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the 11083G > T mutation of SARS-CoV-2 spread during shipboard quarantine and arose through de novo RNA recombination under positive selection pressure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Disease Outbreaks , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Mutation/genetics , Phylogeny , Quarantine , RNA/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Ships
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(19)2020 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299431

ABSTRACT

CRISPR/Cas technologies have advanced dramatically in recent years. Many different systems with new properties have been characterized and a plethora of hybrid CRISPR/Cas systems able to modify the epigenome, regulate transcription, and correct mutations in DNA and RNA have been devised. However, practical application of CRISPR/Cas systems is severely limited by the lack of effective delivery tools. In this review, recent advances in developing vehicles for the delivery of CRISPR/Cas in the form of ribonucleoprotein complexes are outlined. Most importantly, we emphasize the use of extracellular vesicles (EVs) for CRISPR/Cas delivery and describe their unique properties: biocompatibility, safety, capacity for rational design, and ability to cross biological barriers. Available molecular tools that enable loading of desired protein and/or RNA cargo into the vesicles in a controllable manner and shape the surface of EVs for targeted delivery into specific tissues (e.g., using targeting ligands, peptides, or nanobodies) are discussed. Opportunities for both endogenous (intracellular production of CRISPR/Cas) and exogenous (post-production) loading of EVs are presented.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/genetics , Gene Editing/trends , Gene Transfer Techniques , RNA/genetics , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Humans , Mutation/genetics
14.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 189: 114424, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269238

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global pandemic. Three viral proteins, the spike protein (S) for attachment of virus to host cells, 3-chymotrypsin-like cysteine protease (Mpro) for digestion of viral polyproteins to functional proteins, and RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase (RdRp) for RNA synthesis are the most critical proteins for virus infection and replication, rendering them the most important drug targets for both antibody and chemical drugs. Due to its low-fidelity polymerase, the virus is subject to frequent mutations. To date, the sequence data from tens of thousands of virus isolates have revealed hundreds of mutations. Although most mutations have a minimum consequence, a small number of non-synonymous mutations may alter the virulence and antigenicity of the mutants. To evaluate the effects of viral mutations on drug safety and efficacy, we reviewed the biochemical features of the three main proteins and their potentials as drug targets, and analyzed the mutation profiles and their impacts on RNA therapeutics. We believe that monitoring and predicting mutation-introduced protein conformational changes in the three key viral proteins and evaluating their binding affinities and enzymatic activities with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated drugs by using computational modeling and machine learning processes can provide valuable information for the consideration of drug efficacy and drug safety for drug developers and drug reviewers. Finally, we propose an interactive database for drug developers and reviewers to use in evaluating the safety and efficacy of U.S. FDA regulated drugs with regard to viral mutations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , Mutation/genetics , RNA/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Approval/methods , Drug Development/methods , Drug Development/trends , Humans , RNA/metabolism , RNA/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
15.
Biochemistry ; 60(24): 1869-1875, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263454

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is an antiviral drug initially designed against the Ebola virus. The results obtained with it both in biochemical studies in vitro and in cell line assays in vivo were very promising, but it proved to be ineffective in clinical trials. Remdesivir exhibited far better efficacy when repurposed against SARS-CoV-2. The chemistry that accounts for this difference is the subject of this study. Here, we examine the hypothesis that remdesivir monophosphate (RMP)-containing RNA functions as a template at the polymerase site for the second run of RNA synthesis, and as mRNA at the decoding center for protein synthesis. Our hypothesis is supported by the observation that RMP can be incorporated into RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of both viruses, although some of the incorporated RMPs are subsequently removed by exoribonucleases. Furthermore, our hypothesis is consistent with the fact that RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 selects RMP for incorporation over AMP by 3-fold in vitro, and that RMP-added RNA can be rapidly extended, even though primer extension is often paused when the added RMP is translocated at the i + 3 position (with i the nascent base pair at an initial insertion site of RMP) or when the concentrations of the subsequent nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) are below their physiological concentrations. These observations have led to the hypothesis that remdesivir might be a delayed chain terminator. However, that hypothesis is challenged under physiological concentrations of NTPs by the observation that approximately three-quarters of RNA products efficiently overrun the pause.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Ebolavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/genetics , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Base Pairing , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism
16.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl ; 60(33): 18144-18151, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206743

ABSTRACT

The untranslated regions (UTRs) of viral genomes contain a variety of conserved yet dynamic structures crucial for viral replication, providing drug targets for the development of broad spectrum anti-virals. We combine in vitro RNA analysis with molecular dynamics simulations to build the first 3D models of the structure and dynamics of key regions of the 5' UTR of the SARS-CoV-2 genome. Furthermore, we determine the binding of metallo-supramolecular helicates (cylinders) to this RNA structure. These nano-size agents are uniquely able to thread through RNA junctions and we identify their binding to a 3-base bulge and the central cross 4-way junction located in stem loop 5. Finally, we show these RNA-binding cylinders suppress SARS-CoV-2 replication, highlighting their potential as novel anti-viral agents.


Subject(s)
5' Untranslated Regions , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Macromolecular Substances/pharmacology , RNA/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coordination Complexes/chemistry , Coordination Complexes/metabolism , Coordination Complexes/pharmacology , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Macromolecular Substances/chemistry , Macromolecular Substances/metabolism , Metals, Heavy/chemistry , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Vero Cells
17.
Science ; 372(6545): 941-948, 2021 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205995

ABSTRACT

CRISPR-Cas systems recognize foreign genetic material using CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs). In type II systems, a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) hybridizes to crRNAs to drive their processing and utilization by Cas9. While analyzing Cas9-RNA complexes from Campylobacter jejuni, we discovered tracrRNA hybridizing to cellular RNAs, leading to formation of "noncanonical" crRNAs capable of guiding DNA targeting by Cas9. Our discovery inspired the engineering of reprogrammed tracrRNAs that link the presence of any RNA of interest to DNA targeting with different Cas9 orthologs. This capability became the basis for a multiplexable diagnostic platform termed LEOPARD (leveraging engineered tracrRNAs and on-target DNAs for parallel RNA detection). LEOPARD allowed simultaneous detection of RNAs from different viruses in one test and distinguished severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its D614G (Asp614→Gly) variant with single-base resolution in patient samples.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Associated Protein 9/metabolism , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , RNA, Guide/genetics , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA/analysis , RNA/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Base Sequence , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Campylobacter jejuni , Humans , Nucleic Acid Hybridization , RNA, Bacterial/genetics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
18.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 476, 2021 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193604

ABSTRACT

CRISPR-based nucleic-acid detection is an emerging technology for molecular diagnostics. However, these methods generally require several hours and could cause amplification errors, due to the pre-amplification of target nucleic acids to enhance the detection sensitivity. Here, we developed a platform that allows "CRISPR-based amplification-free digital RNA detection (SATORI)", by combining CRISPR-Cas13-based RNA detection and microchamber-array technologies. SATORI detected single-stranded RNA targets with maximal sensitivity of ~10 fM in <5 min, with high specificity. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of multiple different guide RNAs enhanced the sensitivity, thereby enabling the detection of the SARS-CoV-2 N-gene RNA at ~5 fM levels. Therefore, we hope SATORI will serve as a powerful class of accurate and rapid diagnostics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Humans , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sensitivity and Specificity
19.
Mediators Inflamm ; 2021: 6635925, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175215

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was initially identified in China and currently worldwide dispersed, resulting in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Notably, COVID-19 is characterized by systemic inflammation. However, the potential mechanisms of the "cytokine storm" of COVID-19 are still limited. In this study, fourteen peripheral blood samples from COVID-19 patients (n = 10) and healthy donors (n = 4) were collected to perform the whole-transcriptome sequencing. Lung tissues of COVID-19 patients (70%) presenting with ground-glass opacity. Also, the leukocytes and lymphocytes were significantly decreased in COVID-19 compared with the control group (p < 0.05). In total, 25,482 differentially expressed messenger RNAs (DE mRNA), 23 differentially expressed microRNAs (DE miRNA), and 410 differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (DE lncRNAs) were identified in the COVID-19 samples compared to the healthy controls. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that the upregulated DE mRNAs were mainly involved in antigen processing and presentation of endogenous antigen, positive regulation of T cell mediated cytotoxicity, and positive regulation of gamma-delta T cell activation. The downregulated DE mRNAs were mainly concentrated in the glycogen biosynthetic process. We also established the protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of up/downregulated DE mRNAs and identified 4 modules. Functional enrichment analyses indicated that these module targets were associated with positive regulation of cytokine production, cytokine-mediated signaling pathway, leukocyte differentiation, and migration. A total of 6 hub genes were selected in the PPI module networks including AKT1, TNFRSF1B, FCGR2A, CXCL8, STAT3, and TLR2. Moreover, a competing endogenous RNA network showed the interactions between lncRNAs, mRNAs, and miRNAs. Our results highlight the potential pathogenesis of excessive cytokine production such as MSTRG.119845.30/hsa-miR-20a-5p/TNFRSF1B, MSTRG.119845.30/hsa-miR-29b-2-5p/FCGR2A, and MSTRG.106112.2/hsa-miR-6501-5p/STAT3 axis, which may also play an important role in the development of ground-glass opacity in COVID-19 patients. This study gives new insights into inflammation regulatory mechanisms of coding and noncoding RNAs in COVID-19, which may provide novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic avenues for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , RNA/blood , RNA/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/genetics , Female , Gene Expression , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Male , MicroRNAs/blood , MicroRNAs/genetics , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/blood , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , RNA, Messenger/blood , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Signal Transduction , Whole Exome Sequencing , Young Adult
20.
Cardiovasc Res ; 117(8): 1823-1840, 2021 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174897

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been as unprecedented as unexpected, affecting more than 105 million people worldwide as of 8 February 2020 and causing more than 2.3 million deaths according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Not only affecting the lungs but also provoking acute respiratory distress, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is able to infect multiple cell types including cardiac and vascular cells. Hence a significant proportion of infected patients develop cardiac events, such as arrhythmias and heart failure. Patients with cardiovascular comorbidities are at highest risk of cardiac death. To face the pandemic and limit its burden, health authorities have launched several fast-track calls for research projects aiming to develop rapid strategies to combat the disease, as well as longer-term projects to prepare for the future. Biomarkers have the possibility to aid in clinical decision-making and tailoring healthcare in order to improve patient quality of life. The biomarker potential of circulating RNAs has been recognized in several disease conditions, including cardiovascular disease. RNA biomarkers may be useful in the current COVID-19 situation. The discovery, validation, and marketing of novel biomarkers, including RNA biomarkers, require multi-centre studies by large and interdisciplinary collaborative networks, involving both the academia and the industry. Here, members of the EU-CardioRNA COST Action CA17129 summarize the current knowledge about the strain that COVID-19 places on the cardiovascular system and discuss how RNA biomarkers can aid to limit this burden. They present the benefits and challenges of the discovery of novel RNA biomarkers, the need for networking efforts, and the added value of artificial intelligence to achieve reliable advances.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence/economics , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , RNA/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular System/virology , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
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