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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753501

ABSTRACT

Evidence-based intervention and policy strategies to address the recent surge of race-motivated hate crimes and other forms of racism against Asian Americans are essential; however, such efforts have been impeded by a lack of empirical knowledge, e.g., about racism, specifically aimed at the Asian American population. Our qualitative descriptive study sought to fill this gap by using a data-mining approach to examine the contents of tweets having the hashtag #StopAsianHate. We collected tweets during a two-week time frame starting on 20 May 2021, when President Joe Biden signed the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act. Screening of the 31,665 tweets collected revealed that a total of 904 tweets were eligible for thematic analysis. Our analysis revealed five themes: "Asian hate is not new", "Address the harm of racism", "Get involved in #StopAsianHate", "Appreciate the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community's culture, history, and contributions" and "Increase the visibility of the AAPI community." Lessons learned from our findings can serve as a foundation for evidence-based strategies to address racism against Asian Americans both locally and globally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Racism , Social Media , Asian Americans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hate , Humans , Racism/prevention & control
2.
Pediatr Ann ; 51(3): e95-e106, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744849

ABSTRACT

Police shootings of unarmed Black men, women, and children at the intersection of disparities in the setting of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic have resulted in a long overdue national awakening regarding race and racism in society. This article defines some of the key terms, providing a foundation to help promote equity in pediatric practice. Although no single article can result in full competency regarding such complex issues, it is meant to provide a foundation for pediatricians on a journey to deepen their knowledge and understanding toward a path to action. [Pediatr Ann. 2022;51(3):e95-e106.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Racism , African Americans , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Police , Racism/prevention & control
4.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(2): 158-162, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686121

ABSTRACT

One large Massachusetts health system has ambitious plans for how it can become an antiracist institution.


Subject(s)
Racism , Humans , Massachusetts , Racism/prevention & control
5.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(2): 311-312, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686120
7.
Environ Health Perspect ; 129(5): 55002, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism during 2020 have forced a conversation across many segments of our society, including the environmental health sciences (EHS) research community. We have seen the proliferation of statements of solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and commitments to fight racism and health inequities from academia, nonprofit organizations, governmental agencies, and private corporations. Actions must now arise from these promises. As public health and EHS scientists, we must examine the systems that produce and perpetuate inequities in exposure to environmental pollutants and associated health effects. OBJECTIVES: We outline five recommendations the EHS research community can implement to confront racism and move our science forward for eliminating racial inequities in environmental health. DISCUSSION: Race is best considered a political label that promotes inequality. Thus, we should be wary of equating race with biology. Further, EHS researchers should seriously consider racism as a plausible explanation of racial disparities in health and consider structural racism as a factor in environmental health risk/impact assessments, as well as multiple explanations for racial differences in environmental exposures and health outcomes. Last, the EHS research community should develop metrics to measure racism and a set of guidelines on the use and interpretation of race and ethnicity within the environmental sciences. Numerous guidelines exist in other disciplines that can serve as models. By taking action on each of these recommendations, we can make significant progress toward eliminating racial disparities. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP8186.


Subject(s)
Environmental Health , Racism , COVID-19/ethnology , Environmental Health/organization & administration , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Racism/prevention & control
12.
Tech Hand Up Extrem Surg ; 24(3): 107, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434522
15.
Nursing ; 51(9): 40-43, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393340

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The US healthcare system is plagued with inequities that disproportionately impact people of color and other marginalized communities. This article discusses some of the key reasons behind these historic and current health disparities, identifies key terms, and discusses strategies for nurses who are interested in allying with efforts to tackle inequity and racism in American healthcare.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Nurses/psychology , Racism/prevention & control , COVID-19/ethnology , Health Status Disparities , Humans , United States/epidemiology
16.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(4): 311-323, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381061

ABSTRACT

The promotion of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in nursing is a topic of renewed importance, given the civil unrest following the death of George Floyd and identified disparities in health and health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite its progress, the nursing profession continues to struggle with recruiting and retaining a workforce that represents the cultural diversity of the patient population. The authors completed a review of the literature on DEI in nursing and found a scarcity of studies, and that a limitation exists due to the strength of the evidence examined. This article aims to provide a review of the literature on DEI in nursing, outcomes and strategies associated with organizational DEI efforts, and knowledge on how the American Nurses Credentialing Center Pathway to Excellence® Designation Program framework supports DEI initiatives. The authors further provided recommendations for nurse leaders and a checklist of proposed questions for assessing commitment, culture, and structural empowerment initiatives toward a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive organization.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Health Equity , Leadership , Nursing/standards , Social Inclusion , COVID-19/epidemiology , Empowerment , Humans , Organizational Culture , Pandemics , Racism/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Workforce/organization & administration
17.
Acad Med ; 97(1): 41-47, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381046

ABSTRACT

With an increasing awareness of the disparate impact of COVID-19 on historically marginalized populations and acts of violence on Black communities in 2020, academic health centers across the United States have been prioritizing antiracism strategies. Often, medical students and residents have been educated in the concepts of equity and antiracism and are ready to tackle these issues in practice. However, faculty are not prepared to respond to or integrate antiracism topics into the curriculum. Leaders in faculty affairs, education, diversity, and other departments are seeking tools, frameworks, expertise, and programs that are best suited to meet this imminent faculty development need. In response to these demands for guidance, the authors came together to explore best practices, common competencies, and frameworks related to antiracism education. The focus of their work was preparing faculty to foster antiracist learning environments at traditionally predominantly White medical schools. In this Scholarly Perspective, the authors describe their collaborative work to define racism and antiracism education; propose a framework for antiracism education for faculty development; and outline key elements to successfully build faculty capacity in providing antiracism education. The proposed framework highlights the interplay between individual learning and growth and the systemic and institutional changes needed to advance antiracist policies and practices. The key elements of the framework include building foundational awareness, expanding foundational knowledge on antiracism, embedding antiracism education into practice, and dismantling oppressive structures and measuring progress. The authors list considerations for program planning and provide examples of current work from their institutions. The proposed strategies aim to support all faculty and enable them to learn, work, and educate others in an antiracist learning environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Racism , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Humans , Racism/prevention & control , Schools, Medical , United States
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