Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther ; 22(5): 549-559, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806096

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a variable entity, encompassing bulky primary tumors, nodal involvement, or both. Multidisciplinary evaluation is essential to discuss multiple treatment options, to outline optimal management, and to examine the main debated topics and critical issues not addressed by current trials and guidelines that influence daily clinical practice. AREAS COVERED: From March to 5 May 2021 ,meetings were scheduled in a webinar format titled 'Radio Talk' due to the COVID-19 pandemic; the faculty was composed of 6 radiation oncologists from 6 different Institutions of Italy, all of them were the referring radiation oncologist for lung cancer treatment at their respective departments and were or had been members of AIRO (Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) Thoracic Oncology Study Group. The topics covered included: pulmonary toxicity, cardiac toxicity, radiotherapy dose, fractionation and volumes, unfit/elderly patients, multidisciplinary management. EXPERT OPINION: The debate was focused on the unmet needs triggered by case reports, personal experiences and questions; the answers were often not univocal; however, the exchange of opinion and the contribution of different centers confirmed the role of multidisciplinary management and the necessity that the most critical issues should be investigated in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Aged , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Radiation Oncologists
2.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 18(1): 214-219, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776463

ABSTRACT

Background: Cancer care hospitals are taking measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Doctors and health-care workers might be suffering from burnout. Measures taken to reduce overcrowding in hospitals might be making access to essential cancer care difficult. The study aims to understand changes in practice, levels of burnout, and other psychological aspects in radiation oncologists working in a regional cancer center during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Data were collected through online Google Forms. The participants who were included in the study were doctors working in the department of radiation oncology. A 25min survey consisting of multiplechoice questions related to the changes at work during COVID19, and standardized questionnaires assessing fear of Covid 19 and burnout. The Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI) was used in this study to assess burnout. The Fear of COVID-19 Scale was used to assess fear induced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Results and Conclusion: Out of 71 professionals who participated in this study, most of them belonged to the category of residents (84.5%) and the rest were consultants (15.5%). Rescheduling of the patients' radiation treatment to convenient time slots to avoid overcrowding, preferring hypofractionated radiotherapy, and the use of telephonic consultations to prioritize outpatient appointments were the most commonly used measures. The results have shown that 62% of the doctors have experienced symptoms of exhaustion and disengagement, indicating a presence of burnout. However, aspects related to fear of COVID have been revealed to be less prevalent among the participants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics , Radiation Oncologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Radiol Med ; 127(2): 220-224, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626353

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the emotional state and organizational well-being of healthcare workers in radiation oncology departments, during the COVID pandemic. METHODS: A survey was carried out with three questionnaires: Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R); Italian ANAC questionnaire; and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Comparisons between groups were done by Student's t test. RESULTS: Seventy-eight questionnaires for 26 workers were analyzed. Thirty-three percent of the sample obtained an IES-R high score, such as post-traumatic syndrome. In terms of organizational well-being, younger age and lower working seniority were statistically significant for higher score of ANAC items (p < 0.5). Regarding MBI, 0, 27 and 50% high scores of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were reported, respectively. Low working seniority and male sex were correlated with high score of personal accomplishment (p:0.05; p:0.03). CONCLUSION: Intervention to promote mental health well-being should be implemented in radiation oncology department.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Radiation Oncologists/psychology , Radiation Oncology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 65(3): 374-383, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205930

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic demanded a rapid response within Radiation Oncology services to minimise the risk of infection to patients and workforce. This study aimed to assess whether the operational changes put in place to reduce infection risks were effective in engaging and supporting staff. METHODS: Our service's response saw staff and patients split into morning or afternoon shifts without overlap. Changes included extended clinic hours, modified treatment regimens, expanded online/electronic communication and remote working. Staff were invited to respond to an electronic questionnaire in September 2020, just after the peak of the second COVID-19 wave in Victoria. Responses captured demographic data, parental status, profession, happiness levels, fear of COVID-19 and e-communication efficacy. RESULTS: A 57% response rate was achieved. 69% of respondents were female; 40% were aged 45+ and 35% had school-aged children. Staff aged 45+ showed a significantly greater fear of COVID-19 than younger staff. 36% of respondents reported feeling nervous or anxious watching news reports about COVID-19. 92% of staff were happy with their work arrangements; staff with children were happier than staff without children with their shifts. Online chat/channels were reported as the preferred e-communication method between colleagues. CONCLUSION: Staff provided predominantly positive feedback to the changes made in response to the pandemic, reporting high levels of happiness and willingness to continue with the changes implemented during COVID-19. The strategies adopted worked well and the overall high levels of staff satisfaction will allow our service to quickly pivot should further surges, or another pandemic, arise.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Radiation Oncologists/psychology , Radiation Oncologists/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Victoria
7.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther ; 21(3): 251-255, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963084

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Oncologists have an arduous task of weighing the urgency of treating cancer patients against risk for COVID-19 exposure, especially in low resource countries, where there is shortage of radiation equipment, personnel as well as resources to deal with the crisis. Strategic planning to control the spread of infection is critical in this susceptible patient population as well as healthcare workers involved in radiation delivery.Areas covered: We reviewed all the available literature and present feasible strategies for sustainable and continued care of cancer patients amidst this pandemic.Expert opinion: Further research is warranted to maintain and improve survival outcomes for cancer patients in spite of necessary restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Brachytherapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Developing Countries , Humans , Patient Education as Topic , Physical Distancing , Radiation Oncologists
8.
J Med Radiat Sci ; 67(4): 356-359, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866090

ABSTRACT

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic caused swift change in society, affecting both personal and professional lives. In radiation therapy (RT), professional and social interactions are highly important to maintaining team culture and effective patient care. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is also an integral part of maintaining professional and personal competence and growth for healthcare professionals. This article examines the rationale for and methods of swiftly adapting a robust CPD program and training calendar to an online offering for radiation therapists (RTs) at the Princess Alexandra Hospital Radiation Oncology Department, Brisbane, Australia. Reasons for the change, how it was achieved quickly, and the opportunity to build resilience in the staff group are discussed. Successes and challenges of achieving meaningful change in a short timeframe are described, ensuring RTs maintained access to both CPD and social support during the crisis. Initial feedback suggested a positive response from RTs, but the situation remains dynamic and will need to be monitored and adapted as the pandemic continues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Continuing/standards , Radiation Oncologists/education , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Interaction , Staff Development/methods , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Focus Groups , Humans
11.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys ; 108(2): 421-429, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739869

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Telemedicine was rapidly implemented for initial consultations and radiation treatment planning in the wake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In this study, we explore utilization of and physician perspectives on this approach in an attempt to identify patient populations that may benefit most from virtual care. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This is a mixed-methods study with a convergent design. Approximately 6 to 8 weeks after implementation of telemedicine, all radiation oncologists in a single academic radiation oncology department were invited to participate in either semistructured interviews with embedded survey questions or a concurrently administered survey only. Rapid qualitative analysis was used to identify common themes, and quantitative data was assessed using descriptive statistics and univariable analyses. RESULTS: At the apex of the pandemic, 92% of radiation oncology visits were conducted via telemedicine. In total, 51 of 61 radiation oncologists participated in the study (response rate 84%). Most (71%) reported no difference in ability to treat cancer appropriately via telemedicine, which was more common among specialized physicians (P = .01) but not those with higher visit volume or years of experience. Over half (55%) perceived no difference or even improvement in overall visit quality with telemedicine. Virtual visits were deemed acceptable for a median of 70% to 96% of patients, which varied by disease site. Need for physical examination, and availability of an acceptable proxy, factored into telemedicine acceptability. Most (88%) found telemedicine better than expected, but opinions were split on how telemedicine would affect physician burnout. Almost all (96%) foresaw a role for telemedicine beyond the pandemic and would opt for a median of 50% (interquartile range 20%-66%) of visits conducted via telemedicine. CONCLUSIONS: Among radiation oncologists in an academic setting, telemedicine was perceived to be highly appropriate and acceptable for most patients. Future studies should focus on identifying the 5% to 30% of patients whose care may be optimized with in-person visits, and if there is alignment with patient preferences.


Subject(s)
Perception , Radiation Oncologists/psychology , Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted , Referral and Consultation , Telemedicine , Attitude to Computers , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 16(3): 638-640, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689099

ABSTRACT

Covid19 has become a major public health problem in India and the rest of the world. The dramatic rise in the incidence of COVID 19 cases has severely challenged our healthcare system and forced us to work with limited infrastructure, resources, and workforce. However, even in this time of adversity, we as oncologists cannot neglect the seriousness of cancer care and the utmost attention it requires for the timely management of our patients. Hence, the Association of Radiation Oncologists of India has come up with an advisory for radiation therapy keeping in mind such aspects.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiation Oncologists , COVID-19 , Humans , India , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Biomed Res Int ; 2020: 4892382, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-582357

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and COVID-19 diffusion have recently become an international public health emergency. Cancer patients, as a frail population, are particularly exposed to the risk related to infections. The clinical decision-making process and the organizational workflow of radiotherapy department should be revised in the light of the critical situation. We herein provide practical suggestions derived from the available literature and discussed during an online session held within the e-learning educational program of the European School of Oncology on March 31st 2020.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiation Oncologists , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Radiation Oncology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 64(3): 414-421, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72130

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The global COVID-19 pandemic forced the cancellation of the TROG 2020 face to face Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM). It was instead delivered as a live virtual meeting with 6 days of planning. Here, we report the participants' experience of this live virtual meeting. METHOD: Participants were invited to complete custom-developed, pre- and post-meeting surveys to assess their expectations of and satisfaction with the live virtual format. Speakers and moderators were also invited to complete a custom-developed satisfaction survey. The working parties of TROG (head/neck/skin, genitourinary, breast and lung) were also sampled. RESULTS: In total, 188/273 (69%) registered participants logged in to the live virtual meeting. The online engagement for each of the oral sessions ranged from 53 to 66%. There were 102 and 57 responders to the online pre- and post-meeting surveys, respectively. The majority of pre-meeting responders indicated a significant level of employer support to attend the virtual meeting. Post-meeting satisfaction exceeded pre-meeting expectations ('very much' and 'quite a bit'; 86% vs. 54%; P < 0.0001). The majority indicated they would be 'quite a bit' or 'very much' interested in future live virtual meetings. CONCLUSION: The TROG 2020 ASM was conducted as a live virtual meeting. Participant satisfaction and future interest in a live virtual meeting was high, indicating this is a viable platform for other CCTG's faced with the decision to deliver virtual content at times of global public health threats.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic/organization & administration , Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Internet , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiation Oncologists/psychology , Radiation Oncology , Societies, Medical , Adult , Aged , Australia , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Zealand , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , User-Computer Interface , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL