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1.
Clin Mol Hepatol ; 27(4): 564-574, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456286

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: In July 2017, the Emprint™ next-generation microwave ablation system using thermosphere technology (Covidien, Boulder, CO, USA) was approved for use in Japan. This system can produce a predictable spherical ablation zone at higher temperatures than radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether this new microwave thermosphere ablation (MTA) could safely improve outcome compared to RFA, which is the standard of care for small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: This retrospective study analyzed 513 patients with 630 HCCs (≤3 cm) who were performed by percutaneous RFA (174 patients, 214 HCCs) or MTA (339 patients, 416 HCCs) between January 2016 and March 2020. RESULTS: Median ablation time was significantly shorter for MTA (240 seconds) than for RFA (721 seconds; P<0.001). A significant difference in 3-year local tumor progression rate was evident between the RFA group (22%) and MTA group (8%; P<0.001). Multivariable analysis revealed ablation procedure and tumor diameter as independent factors contributing to local tumor progression (MTA; P<0.001; hazard ratio, 0.565; 95% confidence interval, 0.437-0.731). In patients with primary HCC, a significant difference in overall survival was evident (RFA vs. MTA, 3-year, 77% vs. 95%, P=0.029). Ablation procedure and Child-Pugh score were independent factors contributing to survival. The total complication rate was significantly lower for MTA (8%) than for RFA (14%, P<0.05), particularly for bile duct injury (3% vs. 9%, respectively; P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Next-generation MTA for small HCC could provide safer, more curative treatment in a shorter ablation time than RFA.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Catheter Ablation , Liver Neoplasms , Radiofrequency Ablation , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/surgery , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Microwaves , Radiofrequency Ablation/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
3.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248589, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456066

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess efficacy and safety of imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Osteoid Osteoma (OO) in both typical and atypical sites. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 2014 and March 2019, 102 consecutive percutaneous RFA were performed and retrospectively reviewed. The procedures were performed using a RFA bipolar ablation system (Covidien, exposed tip of 0.7-1cm), under Computed Tomography (CT) guidance or using a navigation system (Masmec) under CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) guidance. Patients were followed up over 24 months. Clinical success and recurrences were considered on the base of established criteria. In patients with clinical failure and/or imaging evidence of relapse, retreatment was considered. RESULTS: Administered power per-procedure was ≤8 W (mean temperature, 90°C). The pre-procedure average value of visual analog scale (VAS) was 8.33+/-0.91. Primary and secondary success rate 96.08% (98/102) and100% (102/102), respectively. No major complication was described. Technical success was proved in every patient by CT scan acquisition after needle positioning. Relapse and tumour location were significantly correlated (p-value = 0.0165). The mean dose-length product was 751.55 mGycm2. Advanced bone healing was noted in 68 lesions after 1y-follow up and in 86 lesions after 2y-follow up. CONCLUSION: Imaging-guided percutaneous RFA is a highly effective technique for OO, both in typical and atypical sites. CT or CBCT guidance, navigation systems and operator experience grant the technical success, which is the most crucial parameter affecting outcome.


Subject(s)
Bone Neoplasms/therapy , Cancer Pain/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Osteoma, Osteoid/therapy , Radiofrequency Ablation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Bone Neoplasms/complications , Bone Neoplasms/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/etiology , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Osteoma, Osteoid/complications , Osteoma, Osteoid/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Radiofrequency Ablation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
4.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 32(1): 33-38, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine effect of body mass index (BMI) on safety and cancer-related outcomes of thermal ablation for renal cell carcinoma (RRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated 427 patients (287 men and 140 women; mean [SD] age, 72 [12] y) who were treated with thermal ablation for RCC between October 2006 and December 2017. Patients were stratified by BMI into 3 categories: normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥ 30 kg/m2). Of 427 patients, 71 (16%) were normal weight, 157 (37%) were overweight, and 199 (47%) were obese. Complication rates, local recurrence, and residual disease were compared in the 3 cohorts. RESULTS: No differences in technical success between normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were identified (P = .72). Primary technique efficacy rates for normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were 91%, 94%, and 93% (P = .71). There was no significant difference in RCC specific-free survival, disease-free survival, and metastasis-free survival between obese, overweight, and normal-weight groups (P = .72, P = .43, P = .99). Complication rates between the 3 cohorts were similar (normal weight 4%, overweight 2%, obese 3%; P = .71). CONCLUSIONS: CT-guided renal ablation is safe, feasible, and effective regardless of BMI.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Cryosurgery , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Microwaves/therapeutic use , Obesity/diagnosis , Radiofrequency Ablation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/secondary , Cryosurgery/adverse effects , Cryosurgery/mortality , Disease Progression , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Microwaves/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Obesity/mortality , Patient Safety , Radiofrequency Ablation/adverse effects , Radiofrequency Ablation/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
5.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 164(6): 1186-1192, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455831

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze patients' return to normal activity, pain scores, narcotic use, and adverse events after undergoing tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy with monopolar electrocautery or radiofrequency ablation. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized double-blinded clinical trial based on prospective parallel design. SETTING: Academic medical center and tertiary children's hospital between March 2018 and July 2019. METHODS: Inclusion criteria included patients aged ≥3 years with surgical indication of recurrent tonsillitis or airway obstruction/sleep-disordered breathing. Patients were randomly assigned to monopolar electrocautery or radiofrequency ablation. Patients were blinded to treatment assignment. Survey questions answered via text or email were collected daily until postoperative day 15. The primary outcome was the patient's return to normal activity. Secondary outcomes included daily pain score, total amount of postoperative narcotic use, and adverse events. RESULTS: Of the 236 patients who met inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned to radiofrequency ablation or monopolar electrocautery, 230 completed the study (radiofrequency ablation, n = 112; monopolar electrocautery, n = 118). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in the number of days for return to normal activity (P = .89), daily pain scores over 15 postoperative days (P = .46), postoperative narcotic use (P = .61), or return to hospital for any reason (P = .60), including bleeding as an adverse event (P = .13). CONCLUSIONS: As one of the largest randomized controlled trials examining instrumentation in tonsillectomy, our data do not show a difference between monopolar electrocautery and radiofrequency ablation with regard to return to normal activity, daily pain scores, total postoperative narcotic use, or adverse events.


Subject(s)
Adenoidectomy/methods , Electrocoagulation , Radiofrequency Ablation , Tonsillectomy/methods , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
6.
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg ; 60(1): 108-117, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454123

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Post-procedure limb compression, hitherto routine following open varicose vein surgery, has been extended to endovenous procedures. However, no robust evidence exists to support this practice. Most of the previous studies have focused on the ideal duration of compression. This study evaluates the clinical and patient reported outcomes with and without post-procedure leg compression following radiofrequency ablation (RFA). METHODS: This single centre, prospective, non-inferiority randomised controlled trial recruited adult patients, into two groups (A: RFA with compression stocking for two weeks, B: RFA alone). The primary outcome was ultrasound determined target vein obliteration at 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included a Quality of Life (QoL) score [Aberdeen Varicose Vein Severity Score (AVSS) and Revised Venous Clinical Severity Score (RVCSS)], patient satisfaction, pain score, and complications. RESULTS: In total, 100 consecutive patients were recruited (A: 51; B: 49) classified as clinical class C2-C6 of the Clinical-Etiological-Anatomical-Pathophysiological (CEAP) classification. At 12 weeks the occlusion rate of the target vein was similar in both groups at 98% (n = 47) and 98% (n = 45), respectively (p = 1.0). There was no statistically significant difference in mean AVSS 6 vs. 5.0 (mean difference -1, 95% CI -2 - 3, p = .57) and mean RVCSS 3 vs. 4 (mean difference 1, 95% CI -1 - 2, p = .46) scores at 12 weeks. Comparable patient satisfaction scores were observed (p = .72) and pain score 2.0 vs. 2.0 (p = .92) were achieved in both groups. Two patients in each group developed deep vein thrombosis at two weeks follow up (p = 1.0 for above the knee and p = 1.0 for below the knee). CONCLUSION: The clinical and patient reported outcomes following RFA without compression are no worse than with compression. This trial supports the conclusion that the widely practised use of compression after RFA adds no clinical benefit for the patients. However, a much larger study, preferably a multicentre trial, may be required to confirm this conclusion.


Subject(s)
Compression Bandages , Radiofrequency Ablation , Varicose Veins/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Care/methods , Radiofrequency Ablation/methods , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
7.
Lasers Surg Med ; 53(1): 115-118, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060012

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic requires us all to re-evaluate aesthetic practices to ensure optimal patient safety during elective procedures. Specifically, energy-based devices and lasers require special consideration, as they may emit plume which has been shown to contain tissue debris and aerosolized biological materials. Prior studies have shown transmission of viruses and bacteria via plume (i.e., HIV and papillomavirus). The purpose of this study was to evaluate plume characteristics of the Er:YAG resurfacing laser (Sciton; Palo Alto, CA) and compare it to the Morpheus8 fractional radiofrequency device (InMode; Lake Forest, CA). METHODS: Five patients who underwent aesthetic resurfacing and/or skin tightening of the face and neck were treated with the Er:YAG (Sciton Joule, Palo Alto, CA) and/or fractional radiofrequency (Morpheus8, Lake Forest, CA) between April 1 and May 11, 2020. Data collected included patient demographics, past medical history, treatment parameters, adverse events, particle counter data, as well as high magnification video equiptment. Patients were evaluated during treatment with a calibrated particle meter (PCE; Jupiter, FL). The particle meter was used at a consistent focal distance (6-12 inches) to sample the surrounding environment during treatment at 2.83 L/min to a counting efficiency of 50% at 0.3 µm and 100% at >0.45 µm. Recordings were obtained with and without a smoke evacuator. RESULTS: Of our cohort (n = 5), average age was 58 years old (STD ±7.2). Average Fitzpatrick type was between 2 and 3. Two patients received Er:YAG fractional resurfacing in addition to fractional radiofrequency during the same treatment session. Two patients had fractional radiofrequency only, and one patient had laser treatment with the Er:YAG only. There were no adverse events recorded. The particle counter demonstrated ambient baseline particles/second (pps) at 8 (STD ±6). During fractional radiofrequency treatment at 1-mm depth, the mean recording was 8 pps (STD ±8). At the more superficial depth of 0.5 mm, recordings showed 10 pps (STD ±6). The Er:YAG laser resurfacing laser had mean readings of 44 pps (STD ±11). When the particle sizes were broken down by size, the fractional radiofrequency device had overall smaller particle sizes with a count of 251 for 0.3 µm (STD ±147) compared with Er:YAG laser with a count of 112 for 0.3 µm (STD ±84). The fractional radiofrequency did not appear to emit particles >5 µm throughout the treatment, however, the Er:YAG laser consistently recorded majority of particles in the range of 5-10 µm. The addition of the smoke evacuator demonstrated a 50% reduction in both particles per second recorded as well as all particle sizes. CONCLUSION: Re-evaluation of the plume effect from aesthetic devices has become important during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further studies are required to characterize viability of COVID-19 viability and transmissibility in plume specimens. Based on this pilot study, we recommend that devices that generate little to no plume such as fractional radiofrequency devices be used in Phase I reopening of practice while devices that generate a visible plume such as Er:YAG laser resurfacing devices be avoided and only used with appropriate personal protective equipment in addition to a smoke evacuator in Phase IV reopening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Cosmetic Techniques/instrumentation , Laser Therapy/instrumentation , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Radiofrequency Ablation/instrumentation , Skin Aging/radiation effects , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Face , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neck , Particle Size , Pilot Projects , Risk Assessment
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