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1.
Br J Radiol ; 94(1127): 20210632, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430510

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe adult respiratory distress syndrome Coronavirus-2) and its most severe clinical syndrome, COVID-19, has dramatically impacted service delivery in many radiology departments. Radiology (primarily chest radiography and CT) has played a pivotal role in managing the pandemic in countries with well-developed healthcare systems, enabling early diagnosis, triage of patients likely to require intensive care and detection of arterial and venous thrombosis complicating the disease. We review the lessons learned during the early response to the pandemic, placing these in the wider context of the responsibility radiology departments have to mitigate the impact of hospital-acquired infection on clinical care and staff wellbeing. The potential long-term implications for design and delivery of radiology services are considered. The need to achieve effective social distancing and ensure continuity of service during the pandemic has brought about a step change in the implementation of virtual clinical team working, off-site radiology reporting and postgraduate education in radiology. The potential consequences of these developments for the nature of radiological practice and the education of current and future radiologists are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology/education , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
3.
J Comput Assist Tomogr ; 44(4): 479-484, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301409

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated rapid response plans to minimize risks of infection in the workforce while ensuring maintenance of essential functions of radiology departments. Plan adoption is, however, challenged by the need to coordinate with institutional efforts, a rapidly expanding number of patients, and the diversity of clinical and administrative functions in the department. Here, we describe the implementation of a response plan in an academic radiology department, challenges encountered, and tactics used to address these challenges.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Safety Management , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Texas/epidemiology
4.
Radiol Med ; 126(10): 1258-1272, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290023

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Chest imaging modalities play a key role for the management of patient with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Unfortunately, there is no consensus on the optimal chest imaging approach in the evaluation of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, and radiology departments tend to use different approaches. Thus, the main objective of this survey was to assess how chest imaging modalities have been used during the different phases of the first COVID-19 wave in Italy, and which diagnostic technique and reporting system would have been preferred based on the experience gained during the pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The questionnaire of the survey consisted of 26 questions. The link to participate in the survey was sent to all members of the Italian Society of Medical and Interventional Radiology (SIRM). RESULTS: The survey gathered responses from 716 SIRM members. The most notable result was that the most used and preferred chest imaging modality to assess/exclude/monitor COVID-19 pneumonia during the different phases of the first COVID-19 wave was computed tomography (51.8% to 77.1% of participants). Additionally, while the narrative report was the most used reporting system (55.6% of respondents), one-third of participants would have preferred to utilize structured reporting systems. CONCLUSION: This survey shows that the participants' responses did not properly align with the imaging guidelines for managing COVID-19 that have been made by several scientific, including SIRM. Therefore, there is a need for continuing education to keep radiologists up to date and aware of the advantages and limitations of the chest imaging modalities and reporting systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Health Care Surveys , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Radiologists/statistics & numerical data , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ultrasonography , COVID-19/epidemiology , Consensus , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiography, Thoracic , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology, Interventional , Sensitivity and Specificity , Societies, Medical , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , Ultrasonography/statistics & numerical data
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25117, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262268

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To describe and advise on management protocols and infection-protection experience of the radiology department in makeshift hospitals in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak.Based on the literature review and the experience in the frontline, we retrospectively reviewed the configuration of the radiology department, human resource, personal protection, examination procedures for patients confirmed with COVID-19 in Wuhan fangcang shelter hospital.From February 11, 2020 to March 10, 2020, 2730 and 510 CT examinations were performed in the Hanjiang shelter hospital and Hanyang Sports School shelter hospital, respectively, including initial examinations and re-examinations. The maximum number of daily CT examinations reached 289. The CT scanned a patient approximately once every 13 mins.Fangcang shelter radiology department could be powerful components of both global and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , China/epidemiology , Clinical Protocols , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Administration, Hospital , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
7.
Radiography (Lond) ; 27(4): 1064-1072, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225375

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is a plethora of literature that has described the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of healthcare staff worldwide. Our aim was to investigate the physical and mental demands of mobile x-ray imaging on radiographers during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, within a local NHS Trust. METHODS: A total of 16 participants from 1 NHS Trust took part within this study. Both quantitative and qualitative data was obtained through an online survey. Statistical data was obtained via the Trust Radiology Information System (RIS). Data was gathered for the thirteen weeks from 23rd March to 21st June 2020 (the first wave); direct comparison was made to the same period in 2019. RESULTS: Three key themes emerged from the data. These include mental health challenges/work morale in Radiology, demand of mobile imaging and departmental and Trust-wide mental health support. Results indicate a high demand in mobile imaging which has made a significant difference in the working life of some radiographers. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected the mental health of a proportion of radiographers at this Trust. Results indicate high workload and demand in mobile imaging has made a significant difference to the working life of radiographers, specifically the ones who were relatively newly qualified. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Two key interventions are proposed from this study. The first one is to provide and promote mental health support within radiology departments. The second is to encourage dual working on mobile x-ray examinations to help manage the emotional and physical burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology Department, Hospital , Humans , Mental Health , Morale , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(7): 1027-1037, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207037

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 and the publicly documented deaths of countless Black individuals have highlighted the need to confront systemic racism, address racial/ethnic disparities, and improve diversity and inclusion in radiology. Several radiology departments have begun to create diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) committees to systematically address DEI issues in radiology. However, there are few articles that provide departments with guidance on how to create DEI committees to comprehensively address DEI issues in radiology. The purpose of this review is to provide readers with a framework and practical tips for creating a comprehensive, institutionally aligned radiology DEI committee. METHODS: The authors describe key components of the strategic planning process and lessons learned in the creation of a radiology DEI committee, on the basis of the experience of an integrated, academic northeastern radiology department. RESULTS: A hospital-based strategic planning process defining the DEI vision, mission, goals, and strategies was used to inform the formation of the radiology department DEI committee. The radiology department performed gap analyses by conducting internal and external research. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analyses were performed on the basis of consultations with institutional and other departmental DEI leaders as well as DEI leaders from other academic medical centers. This framework served as the basis for the creation of the radiology departmental DEI committee, including a steering committee and four task forces (education, research, patient experience, and workforce development), each charged with addressing specific institutional goals and strategies. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides academic radiology departments with a blueprint to create a comprehensive, institutionally aligned radiology DEI committee.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology , Academic Medical Centers , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(6): 789-791, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174600

ABSTRACT

Radiology departments have been directly involved from the beginning of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emergency to provide imaging lung assessment of suspected and positive patients while ensuring the execution of other routine and emergency examinations for non-COVID-19 patients. To limit the risk of the infection spread, radiology departments should be reconfigured. We propose the example of the reorganization of the Radiology Department of our hospital, in the center of Milan, in Northern Italy, which consisted of the creation of 2 completely distinct pathways and distinct radiological machines for COVID-19 positive or suspected positive and for non-COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Disease Outbreaks , Disinfection/organization & administration , Humans , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 54(3): 349-358, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157513

ABSTRACT

The radiology department was categorized as a "high risk area" during the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 and is similarly considered a "high risk area" during the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The purpose of infection control is to isolate patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 from uninfected people by utilizing separate equipment, spaces, and healthcare workers. Infection control measures should be prioritized to prevent the nosocomial spread of infection. We established a COVID-19 infection control team in our radiology department. The team's responsibilities include triaging patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19, performing imaging and reporting, using dedicated equipment, disinfecting the equipment and the immediate environment, and staff scheduling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Personnel , Humans , Patient Care/methods , Patient Care Planning , Patient Safety , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Program Evaluation
11.
Clin Radiol ; 76(6): 443-446, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144570

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess, via a survey of UK radiological departments, if the COVID-19 pandemic led to a change in radiological reporting undertaken in a home environment with appropriate IT support. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All imaging departments in the UK were contacted and asked about the provision of home reporting and IT support before and after the first wave of the pandemic. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-seven of the 217 departments contacted replied, producing a response rate of 61%. There was a 147% increase in the provision of remote access viewing and reporting platforms during the pandemic. Although 578 consultants had access to a viewing platform pre-pandemic, this had increased to 1,431 during the course of the first wave. CONCLUSION: This survey represents work undertaken by UK NHS Trusts in co-ordinating and providing increased home-reporting facilities to UK radiologists during the first wave of this global pandemic. The impact of these facilities has been shown to allow more than just the provision of reporting of both elective and emergency imaging and provides additional flexibility in how UK radiologists can help support and provide services. This is a good start, but there are potential problems that now need to be overcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Teleworking , Health Care Surveys , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
Rofo ; 193(8): 937-946, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139768

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: As a cross-section discipline within the hospital infrastructure, radiological departments might be able to provide important information regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare. The goal of this study was to quantify changes in medical care during the first wave of the pandemic using radiological examinations as a comprehensive surrogate marker and to determine potential future workload. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all radiological examinations during the first wave of the pandemic was performed. The number of examinations was compared to time-matched control periods. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of radiological examinations attributed to various medical specialties was conducted and postponed examinations were extrapolated to calculate additional workload in the near future. RESULTS: A total of 596,760 examinations were analyzed. Overall case volumes decreased by an average of 41 % during the shutdown compared to the control period. The most affected radiological modalities were sonography (-54 %), X-ray (-47 %) followed by MRI (-42 %). The most affected medical specialty was trauma and orthopedics (-60 % case volume) followed by general surgery (-49 %). Examination numbers increased during the post-shutdown period leading to a predicted additional workload of up to 22 %. CONCLUSION: This study shows a marked decrease in radiological examinations in total and among several core medical specialties, indicating a significant reduction in medical care during the first COVID-19 shutdown. KEY POINTS: · Number of radiological examinations decreased by 41 % during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.. · Several core medical specialties were heavily affected with a reduction of case volumes up to 60 %.. · When extrapolating postponed examinations to the near future, the overall workload for radiological departments might increase up to 22 %.. CITATION FORMAT: · Fleckenstein FN, Maleitzke T, Böning G et al. Decreased Medical Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Comprehensive Analysis of Radiological Examinations. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2021; 193: 937 - 946.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Radiography , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology , Workload , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Orthopedics , Radiography/trends , Radiology/trends , Retrospective Studies
13.
Med Sci (Basel) ; 9(1)2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136521

ABSTRACT

Due to the contagious nature of the COVID-19 virus, healthcare workers are at a great risk of infection. Since medical imaging plays a significant part in the healthcare system and is often used in the diagnosis of potential COVID-19 patients, the radiology personnel are at a very high risk of becoming infected. PURPOSE: This study aims to assess the enforcement of infection control guidelines for patients with COVID-19 during medical imaging procedures and raise awareness of infection control in different hospitals in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A total of 128 responses were collected from four hospitals across Saudi Arabia using a new structured questionnaire, which was created for health workers by the WHO specifically for this purpose. Data were collected during the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2020. RESULTS: Most participants correctly followed the guidelines of the WHO and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on infection control in the X-ray and general radiology departments. Guideline awareness was higher among magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerised tomography (CT) radiographers, which reduced the risk of future infections. Out of the total respondents, 98.4% stated that they had received formal training in hand hygiene. Only 40.6% of participants, however, knew that respiratory droplets are the primary mode of transmission of the virus from person to person. CONCLUSION: The knowledge of healthcare professionals in the radiology department regarding infection control needs to be continually assessed. A focus on educational interventions on infection control is required in order to maintain well-informed medical staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Radiology Department, Hospital , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Female , Hand Hygiene , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Saudi Arabia , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Rofo ; 193(5): 537-543, 2021 05.
Article in English, German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127197

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The recent COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an increasing overload of the medical system. Healthcare workers (HCW) in radiology departments are exposed to a high infection risk similar to HCWs in the ICU or dedicated COVID wards. The goal of our paper is to evaluate the prevalence of IgG antibody against SARS-CoV-2 among radiology HCWs in two different hospitals and regions in Germany with a low and high COVID-19 prevalence and to compare it to the prevalence in other clinical personnel. Additionally, we assessed the number of radiological procedures performed in patients with a positive PCR test (C+) followed by a short review of the risk for nosocomial infections of radiology HCWs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the first COVID-19 wave between March and July 2020, we evaluated a region with one of the highest COVID-19 rates (776-1570/100 000) in Germany (Hospital A). Additionally, we assessed Hospital B in a region with a low prevalence (65/100 000). We tested the serum prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies among the whole staff with a subgroup analysis for radiology in both hospitals. We calculated the total number of different radiological procedures performed in C+ patients. RESULTS: In Hospital A 594 PCR-proven C+ patients were treated resulting in 2723 radiological procedures. 24 % (n = 6) of the radiology technicians and 13.35 (n = 2) of radiologists had a positive IgG test. The rates were similar to positive rates in HCWs in COVID-19 wards and ICUs within the hospital. The most frequently performed procedures in C+ patients were chest X-rays (3.17/patient) and CT examinations (1.15/patient). In Hospital B 50 C+ patients were treated, resulting in 64 radiological procedures. None of the HCWs tested IgG positive. The most frequently performed examinations were also chest X-rays (1.04/patient) and CT (0.2/patient). CONCLUSION: HCWs in radiology have a high occupational infection risk similar to that of HCWs in ICUs and dedicated COVID wards. KEY POINTS: · The risk of acquiring COVID-19 increases with the amount of contact with infected individuals.. · The occupational risk of a SARS-CoV-2 infection for radiology staff is similar to that of nurses and physicians in COVID wards.. · Hygiene concepts and medical resources have to be adapted for further COVID outbreaks.. · Reporting of an occupational disease can be considered in the case of seropositive staff.. CITATION FORMAT: · Finkenzeller T, Lenhart S, Reinwald M et al. Risk to Radiology Staff for Occupational COVID-19 Infection in a High-Risk and a Low-Risk Region in Germany: Lessons from the "First Wave". Fortschr Röntgenstr 2021; 193: 537 - 543.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/etiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Radiologists , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Germany , Humans , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Risk
15.
Radiol Oncol ; 55(2): 121-129, 2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119525

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 infection is particularly aggressive in frail patients, as cancer patients. Therefore, the more suitable management of the oncological patient requires a multidisciplinary assessment, to identify which patients should be treated, as inpatients or outpatients, and which treatments can be procrastinated. CONCLUSIONS: The role of radiologist is crucial, and, all cancer patients who need an imaging evaluation will need to be studied, using the most appropriate imaging tools related to the clinical question and paying a special attention to preserve public health. Guidelines are necessary in the correct organization of a radiology unit to manage patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection, and whenever possible, a satellite radiography center with dedicated equipment should be used to decrease the transmission risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Protocols , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Incidental Findings , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
16.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 65(2): 139-145, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085304

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to study anxiety and burnout among Division of Radiological Sciences (RADSC) staff during the COVID-19 pandemic and identify potential risk and protective factors. These outcomes were compared with non-RADSC staff. METHODS: A cross-sectional online study was conducted between 12 March and 20 July 2020 in the largest public tertiary hospital receiving COVID-19 cases. Burnout and anxiety were assessed with the Physician Work-Life Scale and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Scale, respectively. Workplace factors were examined as potential risk and protective factors using multivariable ordinary least squares regression analyses, adjusting for pertinent demographic characteristics. RESULTS: RADSC staff (n = 180) and non-RADSC staff (n = 1458) demonstrated moderate-to-severe anxiety rates of 6.7 and 13.2 % and burnout rates of 17.8 and 23.9 %, respectively. RADSC staff reported significantly lower anxiety (mean ± SD: 4.0 ± 3.7 vs 4.9 ± 4.5; P-value < 0.05), burnout (mean ± SD: 1.9 ± 0.7 vs 2.1 ± 0.8; P-value < 0.01), increased teamwork (82.2% vs 74.1%; P-value < 0.05) and fewer night shifts (36.7% vs 41.1%; P-value < 0.01). Among RADSC staff, higher job dedication was associated with lower anxiety (b (95% CI) = -0.28 (-0.45, -0.11)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = -0.07 (-0.11,-0.04)), while longer than usual working hours was associated with increased anxiety (b (95% CI) = 1.42 (0.36, 2.45)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = 0.28 (0.09, 0.48)). CONCLUSIONS: A proportion of RADSC staff reported significant burnout and anxiety, although less compared to the larger hospital cohort. Measures to prevent longer than usual work hours and increase feelings of enthusiasm and pride in one's job may further reduce the prevalence of anxiety problems and burnout in radiology departments.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Radiology Department, Hospital , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
17.
Eur Radiol ; 31(2): 601-604, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064468

ABSTRACT

Teleradiology solutions are playing an essential role during the COVID-19 outbreak. Activity at radiology departments must be maintained and adapted to this new situation beyond teleradiology. Teleworking should be extended to the rest of non-medical radiology department areas. A comprehensive perspective based on our own experience during the COVID-19 outbreak has been performed highlighting the value of teleworking for almost all areas implied in the workflow of radiology departments beyond radiologists. Personal and technical requirements for successfully adapting to this new scenario are discussed including the opportunities that this unprecedent situation is bringing for reorganizing workflow and developing new projects. KEY POINTS: • Teleradiology solutions are playing an essential role during the COVID-19 outbreak. • Teleworking should be extended to the rest of non-medical radiology department areas whenever possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology Department, Hospital , Teleworking , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Radiography , SARS-CoV-2 , Teleradiology , Workflow
18.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(11): 1460-1468, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065254

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has greatly affected demand for imaging services, with marked reductions in demand for elective imaging and image-guided interventional procedures. To guide radiology planning and recovery from this unprecedented impact, three recovery models were developed to predict imaging volume over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic: (1) a long-term volume model with three scenarios based on prior disease outbreaks and other historical analogues, to aid in long-term planning when the pandemic was just beginning; (2) a short-term volume model based on the supply-demand approach, leveraging increasingly available COVID-19 data points to predict examination volume on a week-to-week basis; and (3) a next-wave model to estimate the impact from future COVID-19 surges. The authors present these models as techniques that can be used at any stage in an unpredictable pandemic timeline.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Workload , Boston/epidemiology , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Organizational , Pandemics , Planning Techniques , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Acta Biomed ; 91(4): e2020166, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On March 9th, 2020, the Italian government decided to go into lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which led to changes in the workflow of radiological examinations. AIMS: Aim of the study is to illustrate how the workload and outcome of radiological exams changed in a community hospital during the pandemic. METHODS AND MATERIAL: The exams performed in the radiology department from March 9th to March 29th, 2020 were retrospectively reviewed and compared to the exams conducted during the same time-period in 2019. Only exams coming from the emergency department (ED) were included. Two radiologists defined the cases as positive or negative findings, based on independent blind readings of the imaging studies. Categorical measurements are presented as frequency and percentages, and p-values are calculated using the Chi-squared test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant reduction in the amount of exams performed in 2020: there were 143 (93|65% male, 60.7±21.5 years) patients who underwent radiological examinations from the ED vs. 485 (255|53% male, 51.2±24.8 years) in 2019. Furthermore, the total number of ED exams dropped from 699 (2019) to 215 (2020). However, the percentage of patients with a positive result was significantly higher in 2020 (69|48%) compared to 2019 (151|31%) (p<.001). The reduction of emergency radiological examinations might be a result of the movement restrictions enforced during the lockdown, and possible fear of the hospital as a contagious place. This translated to a relative increase of positive cases as only patients with very serious conditions were accessing the ED.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Radiography/statistics & numerical data , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies
20.
Radiology ; 296(2): E26-E31, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043320

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic initially manifested in the United States in the greater Seattle area and has rapidly progressed across the nation in the past 2 months, with the United States having the highest number of cases in the world. Radiology departments play a critical role in policy and guideline development both for the department and for the institutions, specifically in planning diagnostic screening, triage, and management of patients. In addition, radiology workflows, volumes, and access must be optimized in preparation for the expected surges in the number of patients with COVID-19. In this article, the authors discuss the processes that have been implemented at the University of Washington in managing the COVID-19 pandemic as well in preparing for patient surges, which may provide important guidance for other radiology departments who are in the early stages of preparation and management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Policy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Disaster Planning , Hospitalization , Hospitals, University , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiology Department, Hospital/legislation & jurisprudence , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Washington
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