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1.
J Comput Assist Tomogr ; 44(4): 479-484, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301409

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated rapid response plans to minimize risks of infection in the workforce while ensuring maintenance of essential functions of radiology departments. Plan adoption is, however, challenged by the need to coordinate with institutional efforts, a rapidly expanding number of patients, and the diversity of clinical and administrative functions in the department. Here, we describe the implementation of a response plan in an academic radiology department, challenges encountered, and tactics used to address these challenges.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Safety Management , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Texas/epidemiology
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25117, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262268

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To describe and advise on management protocols and infection-protection experience of the radiology department in makeshift hospitals in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak.Based on the literature review and the experience in the frontline, we retrospectively reviewed the configuration of the radiology department, human resource, personal protection, examination procedures for patients confirmed with COVID-19 in Wuhan fangcang shelter hospital.From February 11, 2020 to March 10, 2020, 2730 and 510 CT examinations were performed in the Hanjiang shelter hospital and Hanyang Sports School shelter hospital, respectively, including initial examinations and re-examinations. The maximum number of daily CT examinations reached 289. The CT scanned a patient approximately once every 13 mins.Fangcang shelter radiology department could be powerful components of both global and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , China/epidemiology , Clinical Protocols , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Administration, Hospital , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(6): 789-791, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174600

ABSTRACT

Radiology departments have been directly involved from the beginning of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emergency to provide imaging lung assessment of suspected and positive patients while ensuring the execution of other routine and emergency examinations for non-COVID-19 patients. To limit the risk of the infection spread, radiology departments should be reconfigured. We propose the example of the reorganization of the Radiology Department of our hospital, in the center of Milan, in Northern Italy, which consisted of the creation of 2 completely distinct pathways and distinct radiological machines for COVID-19 positive or suspected positive and for non-COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Disease Outbreaks , Disinfection/organization & administration , Humans , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 54(3): 349-358, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157513

ABSTRACT

The radiology department was categorized as a "high risk area" during the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 and is similarly considered a "high risk area" during the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The purpose of infection control is to isolate patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 from uninfected people by utilizing separate equipment, spaces, and healthcare workers. Infection control measures should be prioritized to prevent the nosocomial spread of infection. We established a COVID-19 infection control team in our radiology department. The team's responsibilities include triaging patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19, performing imaging and reporting, using dedicated equipment, disinfecting the equipment and the immediate environment, and staff scheduling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Personnel , Humans , Patient Care/methods , Patient Care Planning , Patient Safety , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Program Evaluation
5.
Clin Radiol ; 76(6): 443-446, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144570

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess, via a survey of UK radiological departments, if the COVID-19 pandemic led to a change in radiological reporting undertaken in a home environment with appropriate IT support. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All imaging departments in the UK were contacted and asked about the provision of home reporting and IT support before and after the first wave of the pandemic. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-seven of the 217 departments contacted replied, producing a response rate of 61%. There was a 147% increase in the provision of remote access viewing and reporting platforms during the pandemic. Although 578 consultants had access to a viewing platform pre-pandemic, this had increased to 1,431 during the course of the first wave. CONCLUSION: This survey represents work undertaken by UK NHS Trusts in co-ordinating and providing increased home-reporting facilities to UK radiologists during the first wave of this global pandemic. The impact of these facilities has been shown to allow more than just the provision of reporting of both elective and emergency imaging and provides additional flexibility in how UK radiologists can help support and provide services. This is a good start, but there are potential problems that now need to be overcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Teleworking , Health Care Surveys , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
Radiol Oncol ; 55(2): 121-129, 2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119525

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 infection is particularly aggressive in frail patients, as cancer patients. Therefore, the more suitable management of the oncological patient requires a multidisciplinary assessment, to identify which patients should be treated, as inpatients or outpatients, and which treatments can be procrastinated. CONCLUSIONS: The role of radiologist is crucial, and, all cancer patients who need an imaging evaluation will need to be studied, using the most appropriate imaging tools related to the clinical question and paying a special attention to preserve public health. Guidelines are necessary in the correct organization of a radiology unit to manage patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection, and whenever possible, a satellite radiography center with dedicated equipment should be used to decrease the transmission risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Protocols , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Incidental Findings , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
7.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(11): 1460-1468, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065254

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has greatly affected demand for imaging services, with marked reductions in demand for elective imaging and image-guided interventional procedures. To guide radiology planning and recovery from this unprecedented impact, three recovery models were developed to predict imaging volume over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic: (1) a long-term volume model with three scenarios based on prior disease outbreaks and other historical analogues, to aid in long-term planning when the pandemic was just beginning; (2) a short-term volume model based on the supply-demand approach, leveraging increasingly available COVID-19 data points to predict examination volume on a week-to-week basis; and (3) a next-wave model to estimate the impact from future COVID-19 surges. The authors present these models as techniques that can be used at any stage in an unpredictable pandemic timeline.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Workload , Boston/epidemiology , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Organizational , Pandemics , Planning Techniques , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Radiology ; 296(2): E26-E31, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043320

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic initially manifested in the United States in the greater Seattle area and has rapidly progressed across the nation in the past 2 months, with the United States having the highest number of cases in the world. Radiology departments play a critical role in policy and guideline development both for the department and for the institutions, specifically in planning diagnostic screening, triage, and management of patients. In addition, radiology workflows, volumes, and access must be optimized in preparation for the expected surges in the number of patients with COVID-19. In this article, the authors discuss the processes that have been implemented at the University of Washington in managing the COVID-19 pandemic as well in preparing for patient surges, which may provide important guidance for other radiology departments who are in the early stages of preparation and management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Policy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Disaster Planning , Hospitalization , Hospitals, University , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiology Department, Hospital/legislation & jurisprudence , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Washington
9.
Radiology ; 299(1): E187-E192, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007281

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has spread across the world since December 2019, infecting 100 million and killing millions. The impact on health care institutions during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has been considerable, with exhaustion of institutional and personal protective equipment resources during local outbreaks and crushing financial consequences for many institutions. Establishing adaptive principles of leadership is necessary during crises, fostering quick decision-making and workflow modifications, while a rapid review of data must determine necessary course corrections. This report describes concepts of crisis leadership teams that can help maximize their effectiveness during the current and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Leadership , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , North America , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
11.
Diagn Interv Radiol ; 27(2): 302-305, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963000

ABSTRACT

A new coronavirus outbreak called COVID-19 started in December 2019. In Turkey, the first case was reported on 10 March 2020. In this article, information will be given about the patient and staff management and organization that we have implemented in the Radiology Department of our hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. The rules we followed were: 1- Performing the examinations of COVID-19 patients and suspects with a CT device isolated from other patients; 2- Reducing the unnecessary workload in imaging modalities other than CT, emergency radiography, and emergency ultrasonography; 3- Directing and managing patients and their relatives in accordance with the mask and distancing rules; 4- Disinfecting the device with an appropriate disinfectant after each patient in order to prevent cross-contamination; 5- Protecting the entire technician team from infection by employing one week work, two weeks off shifts of fixed teams; 6- Ensuring adequate ventilation of the gantry room. Adhering to the above rules, no infection spread was reported from the Radiology department and especially the COVID-19 CT unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Personnel Management , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Humans
12.
Strahlenther Onkol ; 196(12): 1080-1085, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-928408

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The described work aimed to avoid cancellations of indispensable treatments by implementing active patient flow management practices and optimizing infrastructure utilization in the radiation oncology department of a large university hospital and regional COVID-19 treatment center close to the first German SARS-CoV­2 hotspot region Heinsberg in order to prevent nosocomial infections in patients and personnel during the pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study comprised year-to-date intervention analyses of in- and outpatient key procedures, machine occupancy, and no-show rates in calendar weeks 12 to 19 of 2019 and 2020 to evaluate effects of active patient flow management while monitoring nosocomial COVID-19 infections. RESULTS: Active patient flow management helped to maintain first-visit appointment compliance above 85.5%. A slight appointment reduction of 10.3% daily (p = 0.004) could still significantly increase downstream planning CT scheduling (p = 0.00001) and performance (p = 0.0001), resulting in an absolute 20.1% (p = 0.009) increment of CT performance while avoiding overbooking practices. Daily treatment start was significantly increased by an absolute value of 18.5% (p = 0.026). Hypofractionation and acceleration were significantly increased (p = 0.0043). Integrating strict testing guidelines, a distancing regimen for staff and patients, hygiene regulations, and precise appointment scheduling, no SARS-CoV­2 infection in 164 tested radiation oncology service inpatients was observed. CONCLUSION: In times of reduced medical infrastructure capacities and resources, controlling infrastructural time per patient as well as optimizing facility utilization and personnel workload during treatment evaluation, planning, and irradiation can help to improve appointment compliance and quality management. Avoiding recurrent and preventable exposure to healthcare infrastructure has potential health benefits and might avert cross infections during the pandemic. Active patient flow management in high-risk COVID-19 regions can help Radiation Oncologists to continue and initiate treatments safely, instead of cancelling and deferring indicated therapies.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics , Radiation Oncology/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Workflow , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Germany/epidemiology , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Neoplasms/surgery , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Radiosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Radiotherapy/statistics & numerical data , Triage/methods , Triage/standards
13.
Radiologia (Engl Ed) ; 63(1): 50-55, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-920491

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the consequent declaration of a state of alarm have required changes throughout the entire health system and diagnostic imaging departments are no exception. In our department, these circumstances led to an immediate restructuring of the working dynamics of our group of imaging technologists that had an important role in the front lines of the battle. To ensure that these new needs were met, the staff had to be trained and distributed into different areas and working groups; moreover, new protective measures and protocols had to be adopted in the working environment. We also defined different care circuits for patients with COVID-19 and those without COVID-19, incorporating new technologies, adapting existing resources to the new scenario, and creating a circuit for the rapid diagnosis of COVID-19. This paper also provides detailed recommendations for organizing radiology departments in the case of new outbreaks of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diagnostic Imaging , Professional Role , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Humans
14.
Einstein (Säo Paulo) ; 18: eGS5832, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-884193

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Radiology departments were forced to make significant changes in their routine during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, to prevent further transmission of the coronavirus and optimize medical care as well. In this article, we describe our Radiology Department's policies in a private hospital for coronavirus disease 2019 preparedness focusing on quality and safety for the patient submitted to imaging tests, the healthcare team involved in the exams, the requesting physician, and for other patients and hospital environment.


RESUMO Os departamentos de radiologia precisaram adotar mudanças significativas em sua rotina durante a pandemia da doença causada pelo novo coronavírus, a fim de reduzir sua transmissibilidade e otimizar os cuidados médicos. Neste artigo, descrevemos as políticas adotadas pelo Departamento de Radiologia de um hospital privado durante a pandemia, com foco em qualidade e segurança de paciente submetido a exames de imagem, equipe de assistência do departamento de imagem, médico solicitante, demais pacientes e ambiente hospitalar.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiology Department, Hospital/standards , Disease Outbreaks , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Latin America/epidemiology
15.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 214(6): 1206-1210, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE. This article shares the ground operational perspective of how a tertiary hospital radiology department in Singapore is responding to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic. This same department was also deeply impacted by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003. CONCLUSION. Though similar to SARS, the COVID-19 outbreak has several differences. We share how lessons from 2003 are applied and modified in our ongoing operational response to this evolving novel pathogen.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Epidemics , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/standards , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Humans , Singapore/epidemiology
16.
Br J Radiol ; 93(1114): 20200679, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740384

ABSTRACT

Italy has one of the highest COVID-19 clinical burdens in the world and Lombardy region accounts for more than half of the deaths of the country. Since COVID-19 is a novel disease, early impactful decisions are often based on experience of referral centres.We report the re-organisation which our institute (IEO, European Institute of Oncology), a cancer referral centre in Lombardy, went through to make our breast-imaging division pandemic-proof. Using personal-protective-equipment and innovative protocols, we provided essential breast-imaging procedures during COVID-19 pandemic without compromising cancer outcomes.The emergency management and infection-control-measures implemented in our division protected both the patients and the staff, making this experience useful for other radiology departments dealing with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cancer Care Facilities/standards , Clinical Protocols , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Radiology Department, Hospital/standards , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Eur Radiol ; 31(1): 468-474, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710138

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak poses a serious public health risk. To date, the disease has affected almost all countries in the world. The enormous scale of the outbreak and the relative lack of knowledge and information regarding a new virus, as well as the unpredictability of events, make it challenging for leadership teams to respond. This paper shares how we have reconfigured our radiology leadership team into a smaller disease outbreak task force (DOTF) to respond and coordinate all related efforts during this ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The DOTF format is modelled after the military with domain groups looking at manpower, intelligence, operations, and logistics matters on a daily basis so that timely decisions can be made and action plans executed promptly. In managing the DOTF, discipline, flexibility, and teamwork are key principles, and these are built upon a strong foundation of focus on infection prevention and control, and patient and staff safety as well as staff well-being. The DOTF has positioned us well to confront the many challenges to date. We believe it will also help us navigate the complex issues that will arise with future surges in cases and in formulating strategies to manage exit from the present and future lockdowns. KEY POINTS: • In a pandemic, regular and directed meetings by a smaller leadership core group are required, for prompt decision making and execution of action plans. • The military format, with domain groups to look at manpower, intelligence, operations, and logistics matters, is useful in managing a pandemic. • Discipline, flexibility, and teamwork with strong focus on infection prevention and control, and patient and staff safety as well as staff well-being are key principles for leadership teams managing a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Infection Control , Leadership , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Decision-Making , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel Administration, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology
20.
Curr Med Sci ; 40(4): 608-613, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696815

ABSTRACT

The corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging respiratory infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, which first occurred in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. These days, in China, chest CT is used for diagnosis of COVID-19, as an important complement to the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test. Because of contacting with a large number of suspected or probable cases closely during chest CT examination, radiographers are easily infected with COVID-19. This article included the rearrangement of CT examination room in fever clinic, the rearrangement of human resources in radiology department, and the drafting of new operating procedures for radiologists who carry out CT examination on COVID-19 patients. This article also introduced the emergency management procedures of the department of radiology during the outbreak, and the experience of infection prevention for the staff of the department of radiology.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disinfection/standards , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control Practitioners/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiologists/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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