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Rofo ; 193(5): 537-543, 2021 05.
Article in English, German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127197

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The recent COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an increasing overload of the medical system. Healthcare workers (HCW) in radiology departments are exposed to a high infection risk similar to HCWs in the ICU or dedicated COVID wards. The goal of our paper is to evaluate the prevalence of IgG antibody against SARS-CoV-2 among radiology HCWs in two different hospitals and regions in Germany with a low and high COVID-19 prevalence and to compare it to the prevalence in other clinical personnel. Additionally, we assessed the number of radiological procedures performed in patients with a positive PCR test (C+) followed by a short review of the risk for nosocomial infections of radiology HCWs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the first COVID-19 wave between March and July 2020, we evaluated a region with one of the highest COVID-19 rates (776-1570/100 000) in Germany (Hospital A). Additionally, we assessed Hospital B in a region with a low prevalence (65/100 000). We tested the serum prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies among the whole staff with a subgroup analysis for radiology in both hospitals. We calculated the total number of different radiological procedures performed in C+ patients. RESULTS: In Hospital A 594 PCR-proven C+ patients were treated resulting in 2723 radiological procedures. 24 % (n = 6) of the radiology technicians and 13.35 (n = 2) of radiologists had a positive IgG test. The rates were similar to positive rates in HCWs in COVID-19 wards and ICUs within the hospital. The most frequently performed procedures in C+ patients were chest X-rays (3.17/patient) and CT examinations (1.15/patient). In Hospital B 50 C+ patients were treated, resulting in 64 radiological procedures. None of the HCWs tested IgG positive. The most frequently performed examinations were also chest X-rays (1.04/patient) and CT (0.2/patient). CONCLUSION: HCWs in radiology have a high occupational infection risk similar to that of HCWs in ICUs and dedicated COVID wards. KEY POINTS: · The risk of acquiring COVID-19 increases with the amount of contact with infected individuals.. · The occupational risk of a SARS-CoV-2 infection for radiology staff is similar to that of nurses and physicians in COVID wards.. · Hygiene concepts and medical resources have to be adapted for further COVID outbreaks.. · Reporting of an occupational disease can be considered in the case of seropositive staff.. CITATION FORMAT: · Finkenzeller T, Lenhart S, Reinwald M et al. Risk to Radiology Staff for Occupational COVID-19 Infection in a High-Risk and a Low-Risk Region in Germany: Lessons from the "First Wave". Fortschr Röntgenstr 2021; 193: 537 - 543.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/etiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Radiologists , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Germany , Humans , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Risk
3.
Acta Biomed ; 91(4): e2020166, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On March 9th, 2020, the Italian government decided to go into lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which led to changes in the workflow of radiological examinations. AIMS: Aim of the study is to illustrate how the workload and outcome of radiological exams changed in a community hospital during the pandemic. METHODS AND MATERIAL: The exams performed in the radiology department from March 9th to March 29th, 2020 were retrospectively reviewed and compared to the exams conducted during the same time-period in 2019. Only exams coming from the emergency department (ED) were included. Two radiologists defined the cases as positive or negative findings, based on independent blind readings of the imaging studies. Categorical measurements are presented as frequency and percentages, and p-values are calculated using the Chi-squared test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant reduction in the amount of exams performed in 2020: there were 143 (93|65% male, 60.7±21.5 years) patients who underwent radiological examinations from the ED vs. 485 (255|53% male, 51.2±24.8 years) in 2019. Furthermore, the total number of ED exams dropped from 699 (2019) to 215 (2020). However, the percentage of patients with a positive result was significantly higher in 2020 (69|48%) compared to 2019 (151|31%) (p<.001). The reduction of emergency radiological examinations might be a result of the movement restrictions enforced during the lockdown, and possible fear of the hospital as a contagious place. This translated to a relative increase of positive cases as only patients with very serious conditions were accessing the ED.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Radiography/statistics & numerical data , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies
4.
Radiology ; 296(2): E26-E31, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043320

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic initially manifested in the United States in the greater Seattle area and has rapidly progressed across the nation in the past 2 months, with the United States having the highest number of cases in the world. Radiology departments play a critical role in policy and guideline development both for the department and for the institutions, specifically in planning diagnostic screening, triage, and management of patients. In addition, radiology workflows, volumes, and access must be optimized in preparation for the expected surges in the number of patients with COVID-19. In this article, the authors discuss the processes that have been implemented at the University of Washington in managing the COVID-19 pandemic as well in preparing for patient surges, which may provide important guidance for other radiology departments who are in the early stages of preparation and management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Policy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Disaster Planning , Hospitalization , Hospitals, University , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiology Department, Hospital/legislation & jurisprudence , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Washington
5.
Future Oncol ; 16(35): 2917-2922, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-958163

ABSTRACT

Aim: To describe the activity in the 'breast unit' at the department of radiology during the COVID-19 lockdown in a university hospital treating COVID-19 patients in a Middle-Eastern developing country. Materials: This was a retrospective study conducted from March 9 until 11 May 2020, in the breast unit at the department of radiology of a central university hospital in a Middle-Eastern developing country. Data were collected from 205 patients visiting the breast unit during the lockdown period and compared with the activity in the same period in the previous year. Results: Reduction of the breast unit activity was estimated at 73%. In addition, 153 mammograms, 205 ultrasounds, and 16 breast MRIs were done. Indications for mammogram were screening (41.5%), follow-up (22%), clinical symptoms (20%) and breast cancer surveillance (16.5%). MRI was performed mostly for preoperative surgical management. The rate of positive biopsies was 41%. All staff members and patients have accommodated to new adjustments. Conclusion: Activity in the breast unit dropped during the lockdown period. Staff should continue to seek their own and their patient's safety without diminishing the quality of healthcare.


Subject(s)
Biopsy/statistics & numerical data , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Mammography/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Quality of Health Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
6.
Arch Iran Med ; 23(11): 787-793, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chest computed tomography (CT) scan has been used widely to diagnose COVID-19 in Iran. OBJECTIVES: To trace the footsteps of COVID-19 in Iran by exploring the trend in using chest CT scans and its economic impact on radiology departments. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the number of imaging examinations from 33 tertiary radiology departments in 9 large cities of Iran was collected from September 23, 2019 to March 20, 2020 (Months 1 to 6) and the corresponding months in 2018-2019. RESULTS: A 50.2% increase was noted in the chest CT scan utilization in 2019-2020 compared to 2018-2019. This increase was +15%, +15%, +27%, +2%, +1% in Months 1-5 of 2019-2020, respectively. In Month 6 of 2019-2020, a 251% increase in the acquisition of chest CT scans was observed compared to the Month 6 of 2018-2019. Following negative balance of revenue from Month 1 to 5 with respect to the inflation rate, the total income in Month 6 was further 1.5% less than the same Month in 2018-19. CONCLUSION: The observed peak in chest CT utilization in Month 3 prior to the surge in Month 6 could be explained by the seasonal influenza. However, unawareness about an emerging viral disease, i.e. COVID-19, might have underutilized chest CT in Months 4 and 5 before the official announcement in Month 6. The unbalanced increase in the workload of radiology departments in the shortage of cardiothoracic radiologists with the simultaneous decrease in income initiated a vicious cycle that worsened the economic repercussions of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Radiology Department, Hospital/economics , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Iran , Pandemics/economics , Radiologists/supply & distribution , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Strahlenther Onkol ; 196(12): 1080-1085, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-928408

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The described work aimed to avoid cancellations of indispensable treatments by implementing active patient flow management practices and optimizing infrastructure utilization in the radiation oncology department of a large university hospital and regional COVID-19 treatment center close to the first German SARS-CoV­2 hotspot region Heinsberg in order to prevent nosocomial infections in patients and personnel during the pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study comprised year-to-date intervention analyses of in- and outpatient key procedures, machine occupancy, and no-show rates in calendar weeks 12 to 19 of 2019 and 2020 to evaluate effects of active patient flow management while monitoring nosocomial COVID-19 infections. RESULTS: Active patient flow management helped to maintain first-visit appointment compliance above 85.5%. A slight appointment reduction of 10.3% daily (p = 0.004) could still significantly increase downstream planning CT scheduling (p = 0.00001) and performance (p = 0.0001), resulting in an absolute 20.1% (p = 0.009) increment of CT performance while avoiding overbooking practices. Daily treatment start was significantly increased by an absolute value of 18.5% (p = 0.026). Hypofractionation and acceleration were significantly increased (p = 0.0043). Integrating strict testing guidelines, a distancing regimen for staff and patients, hygiene regulations, and precise appointment scheduling, no SARS-CoV­2 infection in 164 tested radiation oncology service inpatients was observed. CONCLUSION: In times of reduced medical infrastructure capacities and resources, controlling infrastructural time per patient as well as optimizing facility utilization and personnel workload during treatment evaluation, planning, and irradiation can help to improve appointment compliance and quality management. Avoiding recurrent and preventable exposure to healthcare infrastructure has potential health benefits and might avert cross infections during the pandemic. Active patient flow management in high-risk COVID-19 regions can help Radiation Oncologists to continue and initiate treatments safely, instead of cancelling and deferring indicated therapies.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics , Radiation Oncology/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Workflow , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Germany/epidemiology , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Neoplasms/surgery , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Radiosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Radiotherapy/statistics & numerical data , Triage/methods , Triage/standards
8.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(3 Pt A): 380-387, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917326

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the effect of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on CT volumes in the United States during and after the first wave of the pandemic. METHODS: CT volumes from 2,398 US radiology practices participating in the ACR Dose Index Registry from January 1, 2020, to September 30, 2020, were analyzed. Data were compared to projected CT volumes using 2019 normative data and analyzed with respect to time since government orders, population-normalized positive COVID-19 tests, and attributed deaths. Data were stratified by state population density, unemployment status, and race. RESULTS: There were 16,198,830 CT examinations (2,398 practices). Volume nadir occurred an average of 32 days after each state-of-emergency declaration and 12 days after each stay-at-home order. At nadir, the projected volume loss was 38,043 CTs per day (of 71,626 CTs per day; 53% reduction). Over the entire study period, there were 3,689,874 fewer CT examinations performed than predicted (of 18,947,969; 19% reduction). There was less reduction in states with smaller population density (15% [169,378 of 1,142,247; quartile 1] versus 21% [1,894,152 of 9,140,689; quartile 4]) and less reduction in states with a lower insured unemployed proportion (13% [279,331 of 2,071,251; quartile 1] versus 23% [1,753,521 of 7,496,443; quartile 4]). By September 30, CT volume had returned to 84% (59,856 of 71,321) of predicted; recovery of CT volume occurred as positive COVID-19 tests rose and deaths were in decline. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 substantially reduced US CT volume, reflecting delayed and deferred care, especially in states with greater unemployment. Partial volume recovery occurred despite rising positive COVID-19 tests.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
9.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(10): 1289-1298, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634323

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a significant impact on imaging utilization across practice settings. The purpose of this study was to quantify the change in the composition of inpatient imaging volumes for modality types and Current Procedural Terminology-coded groups during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective study of inpatient imaging volumes in a large health care system was performed, analyzing weekly imaging volumes by modality types (radiography, CT, MRI, ultrasound, interventional radiology, nuclear medicine) in years 2020 and 2019. The data set was split to compare pre-COVID-19 (weeks 1-9) and post-COVID-19 (weeks 10-16) periods. Further subanalyses compared early post-COVID-19 (weeks 10-13) and late post-COVID-19 (weeks 14-16) periods. Statistical comparisons were performed using χ2 and independent-samples t tests. RESULTS: Compared with 2019, total inpatient imaging volume in 2020 post-COVID-19, early and late post-COVID-19 periods, declined by 13.6% (from 78,902 to 68,168), 16.6% (from 45,221 to 37,732), and 9.6% (from 33,681 to 30,436), respectively. By week 16, inpatient imaging volume rebounded and was only down 4.2% (from 11,003 to 10,546). However, a statistically significant shift (P < .0001) in the 2020 composition mix was observed largely comprised of radiography (74.3%), followed by CT (12.7%), ultrasound (8%), MRI (2.4%), interventional radiology (2.3%), and nuclear medicine (0.4%). Although the vast majority of imaging studies declined, few Current Procedural Terminology-coded groups showed increased trends in imaging volumes in the late post-COVID-19 period, including CT angiography chest, radiography chest, and ultrasound venous duplex. DISCUSSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, we observed a decrease in inpatient imaging volumes accompanied by a shift away from cross-sectional imaging toward radiography. These findings could have significant implications in planning for a potential resurgence.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Diagnostic Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/methods , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Computed Tomography Angiography/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Angiography/methods , Magnetic Resonance Angiography/statistics & numerical data , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Reference Values , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , United States
10.
Radiol Med ; 125(6): 600-603, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-266609

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 pandemic represents a troubling health emergency but also a main challenge for the clinical governance of the system. Discontinuation of radiation treatments is not desirable and potentially life-threatening. On the other hand, accesses to hospital expose cancer patients to an increased risk of COVID-19 infection. We report our extended protocol, draft to manage clinical activities in our radiotherapy department, by minimizing contagion risks. METHODS: We used telephonic screening to assess the need for patient admission. A telephonic triage was performed to identify the presence of COVID-19 infection risk factors or symptoms. New treatments were stratified according to priority codes. A reserved entrance to radiotherapy department was assured for patients and staff. Surgical disposable mask was required for patients and caregivers. The activities were distributed during the whole workday, avoiding overlap to reduce aggregation. RESULTS: From 1st February 2020 to 31 March 2020, we reported an increase in the number of first medical examinations and treatments, compared to the same period of the previous year. Outpatients first medical examinations have been spread over the 12 working hours. No COVID-19 cases were detected. CONCLUSION: During COVID-19 pandemic, we introduced procedures that allowed us to ensure the continuity in oncological cares, with limited risks of infection for patients and staff.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Radiology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Triage
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