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1.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 398, 2022 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793948

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based assistance tools have the potential to improve the quality of healthcare when adopted by providers. This work attempts to elicit preferences and willingness to pay for these tools among German radiologists. The goal was to generate insights for tool providers and policymakers regarding the development and funding of ideally designed and priced tools. Ultimately, healthcare systems can only benefit from quality enhancing AI when provider adoption is considered. METHODS: Since there is no established market for AI-based assistance tools in radiology yet, a discrete choice experiment was conducted. Respondents from the two major German professional radiology associations chose between hypothetical tools composed of five attributes and a no-choice option. The attributes included: provider, application, quality impact, time savings and price. A conditional logit model was estimated identifying preferences for attribute levels, the no-choice option, and significant subject-related interaction effects. RESULTS: 114 respondents were included for analysis of which 46% were already using an AI-based assistance tool. Average adoption probability for an AI-based tool was 81% (95% CI 77.1% - 84.4%). Radiologists preferred a tool that assists in routine diagnostics performing at above-radiologist-level quality and saves 50% in diagnostics time at a price-point of €3 per study. The provider is not a significant factor in the decisions. Time savings were considered more important than quality improvements (i.e., detecting more anomalies). CONCLUSIONS: Radiologists are overall willing to invest in AI-based assistance tools. Development, funding, and research regarding these tools should, however, consider providers' preferences for features of immediate everyday and economic relevance like time savings to optimize adoption.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Radiology , Humans , Income , Quality Improvement , Radiologists
2.
Pediatr Radiol ; 52(4): 613-615, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787803

ABSTRACT

The field of radiology has benefited greatly from the technological boom that has brought greater precision, efficiency and utilization amid an exponential growth in medical science. The downside is that the same technology that has allowed the field to grow is contributing to an erosion of interpersonal communication and connection with patients and referring physicians. Remote reading has displaced us from the communal reading room, where much interaction and teaching used to take place. The "invisible" radiologist must transcend these barriers in order to preserve and strengthen the role of radiology in medical care. With modest adaptation, radiologists can regain their identity as consultants, where they have the greatest chance to show their value and thwart the drive toward commoditization.


Subject(s)
Radiology , Referral and Consultation , Communication , Humans , Radiography , Radiologists , Radiology/education
3.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0265873, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775449

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus pandemic has not only created massive public health issues, it has also produced excessive psychological disorders in healthcare professionals, including radiology staff. The aim of this study is to assess the risk perception and mental health of radiology staff in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. The researcher asked radiology staff to complete an online Google Forms questionnaire, between June 10, 2020 and June 17, 2020, which contained demographic data and self-designed questions related to anxiety, insomnia, depressive symptoms, and mental health services during the pandemic. A total of 168 radiology staff participated in the study. The results indicated that 53.05% and 57.14% of the participants were experiencing mild to severe symptoms of anxiety and depression, respectively. Moreover, 47.02% of the participants were experiencing insomnia symptoms. Among all the participants, only 16.61% had received psychological materials from their hospital during the pandemic, while 22.02% had accessed online psychological assistance techniques. The health of roughly one-third (30.95%) of the participants was worse than it had been before the pandemic. COVID-19 is a source of mental health disorders for healthcare professionals, particularly radiology staff. The findings of this study indicate that more than 70% of radiology staff in Saudi Arabia are concerned about insufficient protective measures and the risk of infection. In addition, a large percentage of them have experienced mental health disorders, such as anxiety, insomnia, and depression. Regular mental healthcare services are required to decrease the negative impact of the pandemic and enhance the overall mental health of the radiology staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Internet , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
4.
Clin Imaging ; 85: 120-122, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763643
5.
Clin Imaging ; 85: 55-59, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763639

ABSTRACT

Common misconceptions about radiology and radiation oncology exist and may dissuade women from pursuing these specialties. The American Association for Women in Radiology (AAWR) Medical Student Outreach Subcommittee began a multi-year social media campaign aimed at addressing these myths. Here, we outline several myths presented in this social media campaign and provide a combination of literature review and experts' opinions to deconstruct and dispel them.


Subject(s)
Radiation Oncology , Radiology , Female , Humans , Radiography , United States
6.
Ann Afr Med ; 21(1): 71-76, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753750

ABSTRACT

Context: COVID-19 came suddenly, bringing to the fore the challenges inherent in the health system. In a developing country, such as Nigeria, which already had myriad problems with funds and equipment in the health sector. Aims: This study aims to examine the challenges encountered by the staff in Radiology facilities and how they combated the challenges. Settings and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study of radiology facilities in Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: Radiologists from nine government and four private facilities who attended to COVID-19 patients were asked to fill questionnaires on challenges faced and their coping strategies. Responses were sent through E-mail. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from the responses were analyzed using Microsoft excel for Mac 2011 and presented as figures and tables. Results: Majority of the government 7 (77.8%) and private facilities 4 (100%) had no equipment dedicated only to COVID-19 patients. Seven (77.8%) government facilities complained of inadequate staff, poor availability of personal protective equipment (PPEs) 8 (88.9%), and lack of technology for remote viewing 7 (77.8%). Fear of cross-infection was a challenge in one of the facilities 1 (11.1%). Coping strategies adopted include ensuring less traffic in the department by discouraging walk-in patients and canceling non-emergent cases, booking suspected/confirmed cases for lighter times, using old film for face shields and cloth for facemasks, staff education on COVID-19 and preventive measures, and sending reports to physicians through E-mail. Conclusions: There were a lot of challenges during the COVID-19 crisis, with government hospitals experiencing more challenges than private facilities. The challenges included among others inadequate staff strength and lack of technology for remote viewing. Some were overcome using education and by production of facemasks/shields production using recycled materials.


Résumé Le contexte: COVID-19 came suddenly, bringing to the fore the challenges inherent in the health system. Dans un pays en développement, comme Le Nigeria, qui avait déjà une myriade de problèmes de fonds et d'équipements dans le secteur de la santé. Objectifs : Cette étude vise à examiner les défis rencontrés par le personnel des établissements de radiologie et comment ils ont relevé les défis. Paramètres et conception: une section descriptive étude des installations de radiologie au Nigeria. Sujets et méthodes: Radiologues de neuf établissements publics et de quatre établissements privés qui ont participé aux patients COVID-19 ont été invités à remplir des questionnaires sur les défis rencontrés et leurs stratégies d'adaptation. Les réponses ont été envoyées par courrier électronique. Analyse statistique utilisée: Les données des réponses ont été analysées à l'aide de Microsoft Excel pour Mac 2011 et présentées sous forme de figures et de tableaux. Résultats: La majorité des établissements publics 7 (77,8 %) et privés 4 (100 %) ne disposaient d'aucun équipement dédié uniquement aux patients COVID-19. Sept (77,8 %) établissements publics se sont plaints d'un personnel inadéquat, d'une faible disponibilité des équipements de protection individuelle (EPI) 8 (88,9 %), et le manque de technologie pour la visualisation à distance 7 (77,8 %). La peur d'une infection croisée était un défi dans l'un des établissements 1 (11,1 %). Faire faceles stratégies adoptées comprennent la réduction de la circulation dans le service en décourageant les patients sans rendez-vous et en annulant les cas non urgents, en réservant les cas suspects/confirmés pour des périodes plus légères, en utilisant un vieux film pour les écrans faciaux et un tissu pour les masques faciaux, la formation du personnel sur COVID-19 et mesures préventives et l'envoi de rapports aux médecins par courrier électronique. Conclusions: Il y a eu beaucoup de défis pendant la COVID-19 crise, les hôpitaux publics étant confrontés à plus de défis que les établissements privés. Les défis comprenaient entre autres l'insuffisance la force du personnel et le manque de technologie pour la visualisation à distance. Certains ont été surmontés grâce à l'éducation et à la production de masques faciaux/boucliers utilisant des matériaux recyclés. Mots-clés: défis, les stratégies d'adaptation, COVID-19, Nigeria.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nigeria/epidemiology
7.
Acad Radiol ; 29(5): 771-778, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1750930

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed radiology recruitment into a virtual affair and placed an even stronger emphasis on the importance of departmental websites. In this study, we evaluate residency websites in detailing the response to COVID-19 as well as initiatives which help describe the resident experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Program websites for diagnostic radiology residencies listed in the 2022 Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) program list were evaluated for 31 criteria related to departmental response to COVID-19, online outreach, and resident wellness. RESULTS: Of 184 programs, 182 had functioning websites for review. One program was excluded from analysis as the website was almost entirely video-based. In response to COVID-19, ≤1% described resident redeployment, vaccination information, departmental response to ABR Core Exam changes, or regular administration updates. Six (3.3%) described revised read-out protocols, four (2.2%) mentioned supplementary non-clinical education, and 14 (7.7%) indicated changes to educational conferences. The majority of websites (122, 67.4%) offered an informational or tour video, while 44 (24.3%) described expectations for virtual interviewing, and 20 (11.0%) had virtual "open-houses." Departmental social media, primarily Twitter, was linked for 60 (33.1%) programs. A total of 134 (74.0%) websites described community highlights. More than a quarter mentioned meal stipends (72, 39.8%), paid sick time (54, 29.8%) and healthcare resources (57, 31.5%). Although social activities were described by 44 (24.3%) programs, some specifically indicating changes to COVID-19, formal resident mentoring (25, 13.8%) and wellness committees (28, 15.5%) were less common. These criteria were found more commonly at the largest third of residency programs (chi square, p < 0.00625). CONCLUSION: Programs rarely described work flow changes to COVID-19, and websites could improve in virtual outreach. Compared with prior literature, departmental websites have improved in describing wellness initiatives and related measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education
8.
Radiol Med ; 127(4): 426-432, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739407

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To support the wellbeing of both patients and their families, our aim was to investigate the satisfaction of non-COVID in- and out-patients regarding safety measures implemented at our radiology unit of a transplant institute against COVID infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a five-month period, adult patients' feedback was obtained by a questionnaire on the fear of contracting COVID-19 during a radiology examination, the perceived delay in treatment, and the following safety measures implemented: modified schedules to limit the number of patients in the waiting area and to maximize social distancing; assistance by staff when visitors were not admitted; cleaning and disinfection of machines; mask wearing and hand hygiene of staff; and staff advice on hand hygiene and infection control precautions. RESULTS: Over a five-month period, our preliminary results (387 patients) showed general patient satisfaction (99.1%) with safety measures applied at our radiology unit. Patients were satisfied with distancing and assistance by staff (100%), cleaning and disinfection (91%), mask wearing and hand hygiene of the staff (97%), and staff advice (94%). There was some criticism of the perceived delay in treatment (7.3%) and in the scheduling of the waiting list (5.4%), with 5.4% fearing contracting the virus. Patients' awareness of safety measures and confidence in the hospital preparedness policy was perceived by all interviewers, and 100% appreciated being questioned. CONCLUSION: The feedback given by the non-COVID patient helps to measure the quality in health care, to improve the quality service, and to protect and satisfy more vulnerable patients, also during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(1 Pt B): 207-212, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1720149

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This article seeks to better understand how radiology residency programs leverage their social media presences during the 2020 National Residency Match Program (NRMP) application cycle to engage with students and promote diversity, equity, and inclusion to prospective residency applicants. METHODS: We used publicly available information to determine how broad a presence radiology programs have across specific platforms (Twitter [Twitter, Inc, San Francisco, California], Facebook [Facebook, Inc, Menlo Park, California], Instagram [Facebook, Inc], and website pages) as well as what strategies these programs use to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion. RESULTS: During the 2020 NRMP application cycle, radiology residency programs substantially increased their social media presence across the platforms we examined. We determined that 29.3% (39 of 133), 58.9% (43 of 73), and 29.55% (13 of 44) of programs used Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, respectively; these accounts were established after an April 1, 2020, advisory statement from the NRMP. Program size and university affiliation were correlated with the degree of social media presence. Those programs using social media to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion used a broad but similar approach across programs and platforms. CONCLUSION: The events of 2020 expedited the growth of social media among radiology residency programs, which subsequently ushered in a new medium for conversations about representation in medicine. However, the effectiveness of this medium to promote meaningful expansion of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of radiology remains to be seen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Social Media , Humans , Prospective Studies
10.
Clin Imaging ; 83: 191, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1717719

Subject(s)
Radiology , Humans , Radiography
11.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 53(1): 159-166, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703589

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This paper describes our experience in setting up a dedicated imaging facility within a temporary fever tentage in an acute tertiary hospital in Singapore during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We review the effectiveness of the setup and its role from the radiological perspective in detail. METHODS: The dedicated imaging facility within the temporary fever tentage was equipped with a computer-on-wheels (COWs) to access patients' medical records and a portable x-ray machine to allow for a smooth workflow. Radiation dose measurements were acquired around the imaging facility using phantoms and dosimeters to ensure radiation safety. RESULTS: Due to its rapid nature and availability as a screening tool, chest x-ray (CXR) is the most widely used imaging modality during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our dedicated fever tent setup minimizes possible in-hospital transmission between both patients and staff and provides a more streamlined workflow to tackle the high workload. It allowed us to reduce the time required for each radiograph, providing timely imaging services and radiological reports for expedient clinical screening. DISCUSSION: The close collaboration between Radiology and Emergency Departments in setting up the fever tentage is a crucial tool in managing the COVID-19 pandemic. The fever tentage imaging facility is a highly effective tool, providing the means to handle the increased patient load in a streamlined and safe manner during a pandemic. CONCLUSION: This paper provides insights and guidelines in setting up a dedicated imaging service within the fever tent for future infectious disease outbreak contingency plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(2 Pt B): 319-320, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697577
13.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(4): 567-575, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676786

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose was to create and analyze a competency-based model of educating medical students in a radiology clerkship that can be used to guide curricular reform. METHODS: During the 2019 to 2020 academic year, 326 fourth-year medical students were enrolled in a 2-week required clerkship. An online testing platform, ExamSoft (Dallas, Texas), was used to test pre- and postinstruction knowledge on "must see" diagnoses, as outlined in the National Medical Student Curriculum in Radiology. Assessment analysis was used to compare the frequency with which the correct diagnosis was identified on the pretest to that on the posttest. At the end of the academic year, in addition to statistical analysis, categorical analysis was used to classify the degree of this change to uncover topics that students found most challenging. RESULTS: For 23 of the 27 topics (85%), there was a significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy after instruction in the test curriculum. Categorical analysis further demonstrated that the clerkship had a high impact in teaching 13 of the 27 topics (48%), had a lower impact for 6 topics (22%), and identified the remaining 8 topics (30%) as gaps in teaching and learning. CONCLUSIONS: For medical students, our instructional program significantly increased competency for most critical radiologic diagnoses. Categorical analysis adds value beyond statistical analysis and allows dynamic tailoring of teaching to address gaps in student learning.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Radiology , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Radiology/education , Texas
14.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 59(243): 1196-1203, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636853

ABSTRACT

Diagnostic radiology plays a crucial role in children. The pediatric population has been less studied than the adult population since the initial period of the COVID-19 pandemic to date. Realizing the potential utility of structured reporting, different guidelines and international consensus statements regarding COVID-19 in the pediatric population have been released in recent times. Different clinical and radiological manifestations in children have been evolving in this period of uncertainty and are different from the adult population in certain aspects. Apart from the involvement of lungs, a multisystemic inflammatory syndrome in children or pediatric multi systemic inflammatory syndrome is unique in children. Therefore, awareness of the recent consensus, structural uniform reporting and multi-organ involving patterns in COVID-19 can guide radiologists for a better understanding of this complex novel disease leading to early diagnosis and timely treatment of affected children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Adult , Child , Consensus , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(3): 415-422, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637460

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiology imaging volumes at distinct time periods throughout the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic as a function of regional COVID-19 hospitalizations. METHODS: Radiology imaging volumes and statewide COVID-19 hospitalizations were collected, and four 28-day time periods throughout the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 were analyzed: pre-COVID-19 in January, the "first wave" of COVID-19 hospitalizations in April, the "recovery" time period in the summer of 2020 with a relative nadir of COVID-19 hospitalizations, and the "third wave" of COVID-19 hospitalizations in November. Imaging studies were categorized as inpatient, outpatient, or emergency department on the basis of patient location at the time of acquisition. A Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare daily imaging volumes during each discrete 28-day time period. RESULTS: Imaging volumes overall during the first wave of COVID-19 infections were 55% (11,098/20,011; P < .001) of pre-COVID-19 imaging volumes. Overall imaging volumes returned during the recovery time period to 99% (19,915/20,011; P = .725), and third-wave imaging volumes compared with the pre-COVID-19 period were significantly lower in the emergency department at 88.8% (7,951/8,955; P < .001), significantly higher for outpatients at 115.7% (8,818/7,621; P = .008), not significantly different for inpatients at 106% (3,650/3,435; P = .053), and overall unchanged when aggregated together at 102% (20,419/20,011; P = .629). CONCLUSIONS: Medical imaging rebounded after the first wave of COVID-19 hospitalizations, with relative stability of utilization over the ensuing phases of the pandemic. As widespread COVID-19 vaccination continues to occur, future surges in COVID-19 hospitalizations will likely have a negligible impact on imaging utilization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Korean J Radiol ; 23(1): 6-9, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622565
18.
Acad Radiol ; 29(5): 779-785, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611554

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Virtual residency interviews have become crucial in maintaining CDC-recommended precautionary measures throughout the ongoing COVID-era. However, scant literature exists regarding the direct impact the pandemic has had on the radiology program selection process, including preferred modalities of residency interviews and social media utilization. This survey aimed to understand how radiology programs adapted to changes in the 2020-2021 virtual application cycle. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 32-question survey was distributed to 194 residency programs between July and August of 2021. Data were analyzed primarily by using descriptive statistics and Paired Student's T-testing. RESULTS: A total of 31 programs completed the survey, yielding a response rate of 16%. When queried about the perceived success of virtual interviews during the 2020-2021 application cycle, 21 programs (68%) said the new interview format was very successful. Twenty-seven of the programs (87%) believed they were able to adequately gauge applicants through virtual interviews. However, when surveyed about personal preferences for interviews, the responses were more evenly distributed between virtual (11/31, 35%) and in-person (14/31, 45%). Pre-COVID, the top three criteria programs used to rank candidates were USMLE Step 1 score (20/31, 65%), letters of recommendation (17/31, 55%), and MSPE (12/31, 39%). Within the virtual, COVID-19 era, these criteria remained statistically unchanged (p = 0.22): USMLE Step 1 score (21/31, 68%), letters of recommendation (17/31, 55%), and MSPE (14/31, 45%). About half of programs who had not previously utilized social media (12 of 23, 52%) created accounts, mostly via Twitter or Instagram. CONCLUSION: The primary findings indicate that programs perceived success with virtually interviewing and ranking applicants, the criteria to rank applicants remain unchanged despite the virtual environment, and programs' social media utilization increased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Social Media , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Pediatr Radiol ; 52(1): 1-2, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603078
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