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1.
Clin Imaging ; 88: 66-77, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850865

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: In response to COVID-19, our institution implemented three virtual readout systems: a commercial HIPAA compliant web-based video conferencing platform used for screen-sharing (Starleaf), an interactive control sharing system integrated into PACS allowing simultaneous multi-user mouse control over images (Collaborate), and the telephone. Our aim was to assess overall satisfaction with and perceived effectiveness of these virtual readout methods to optimize best practices for the future. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An IRB-exempt survey was electronically distributed to 64 trainees and 76 attendings at one tertiary-care institution via Survey Monkey. Questions focused on overall satisfaction, perceived effectiveness, technical difficulties, and continued future use of the three virtual readout strategies. Answers were collected with Likert scales, tick boxes, and open-ended questions. RESULTS: 32/64 trainees (50%) and 32/76 attendings (42%) completed the survey. Trainees and attendings were more satisfied with screen sharing (Starleaf) and perceived it more effective than control sharing (Collaborate) or the telephone (p < 0.0001). Respondents experienced more technical difficulties with control sharing versus screen sharing (p = 0.0004) with a negative correlation between level of technical difficulties and satisfaction with screen sharing (r = -0.50, p < 0.0001) and control sharing (r = -0.38, p = 0.0006). Trainees and faculty supported a combination of in-person and virtual readouts in the future (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Platforms mirroring in-person readouts, such as Starleaf, are preferred by both trainees and attendings over non-screen sharing platforms such as the telephone. However, technical stability determines satisfaction between similar platforms. Both trainees and attendings support incorporation of virtual readout methods in combination with traditional in-person readouts in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Animals , Humans , Mice , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Radiography , Radiology/education
2.
Pediatr Radiol ; 52(4): 613-615, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787803

ABSTRACT

The field of radiology has benefited greatly from the technological boom that has brought greater precision, efficiency and utilization amid an exponential growth in medical science. The downside is that the same technology that has allowed the field to grow is contributing to an erosion of interpersonal communication and connection with patients and referring physicians. Remote reading has displaced us from the communal reading room, where much interaction and teaching used to take place. The "invisible" radiologist must transcend these barriers in order to preserve and strengthen the role of radiology in medical care. With modest adaptation, radiologists can regain their identity as consultants, where they have the greatest chance to show their value and thwart the drive toward commoditization.


Subject(s)
Radiology , Referral and Consultation , Communication , Humans , Radiography , Radiologists , Radiology/education
3.
Acad Radiol ; 29(5): 771-778, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1750930

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed radiology recruitment into a virtual affair and placed an even stronger emphasis on the importance of departmental websites. In this study, we evaluate residency websites in detailing the response to COVID-19 as well as initiatives which help describe the resident experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Program websites for diagnostic radiology residencies listed in the 2022 Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) program list were evaluated for 31 criteria related to departmental response to COVID-19, online outreach, and resident wellness. RESULTS: Of 184 programs, 182 had functioning websites for review. One program was excluded from analysis as the website was almost entirely video-based. In response to COVID-19, ≤1% described resident redeployment, vaccination information, departmental response to ABR Core Exam changes, or regular administration updates. Six (3.3%) described revised read-out protocols, four (2.2%) mentioned supplementary non-clinical education, and 14 (7.7%) indicated changes to educational conferences. The majority of websites (122, 67.4%) offered an informational or tour video, while 44 (24.3%) described expectations for virtual interviewing, and 20 (11.0%) had virtual "open-houses." Departmental social media, primarily Twitter, was linked for 60 (33.1%) programs. A total of 134 (74.0%) websites described community highlights. More than a quarter mentioned meal stipends (72, 39.8%), paid sick time (54, 29.8%) and healthcare resources (57, 31.5%). Although social activities were described by 44 (24.3%) programs, some specifically indicating changes to COVID-19, formal resident mentoring (25, 13.8%) and wellness committees (28, 15.5%) were less common. These criteria were found more commonly at the largest third of residency programs (chi square, p < 0.00625). CONCLUSION: Programs rarely described work flow changes to COVID-19, and websites could improve in virtual outreach. Compared with prior literature, departmental websites have improved in describing wellness initiatives and related measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education
4.
J Digit Imaging ; 35(3): 723-731, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700822

ABSTRACT

There is consistent demand for clinical exposure from students interested in radiology; however, the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in fewer available options and limited student access to radiology departments. Additionally, there is increased demand for radiologists to manage more complex quantification in reports on patients enrolled in clinical trials. We present an online educational curriculum that addresses both of these gaps by virtually immersing students (radiology preprocessors, or RPs) into radiologists' workflows where they identify and measure target lesions in advance of radiologists, streamlining report quantification. RPs switched to remote work at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in our National Institutes of Health (NIH). We accommodated them by transitioning our curriculum on cross-sectional anatomy and advanced PACS tools to a publicly available online curriculum. We describe collaborations between multiple academic research centers and industry through contributions of academic content to this curriculum. Further, we describe how we objectively assess educational effectiveness with cross-sectional anatomical quizzes and decreasing RP miss rates as they gain experience. Our RP curriculum generated significant interest evidenced by a dozen academic and research institutes providing online presentations including radiology modality basics and quantification in clinical trials. We report a decrease in RP miss rate percentage, including one virtual RP over a period of 1 year. Results reflect training effectiveness through decreased discrepancies with radiologist reports and improved tumor identification over time. We present our RP curriculum and multicenter experience as a pilot experience in a clinical trial research setting. Students are able to obtain useful clinical radiology experience in a virtual learning environment by immersing themselves into a clinical radiologist's workflow. At the same time, they help radiologists improve patient care with more valuable quantitative reports, previously shown to improve radiologist efficiency. Students identify and measure lesions in clinical trials before radiologists, and then review their reports for self-evaluation based on included measurements from the radiologists. We consider our virtual approach as a supplement to student education while providing a model for how artificial intelligence will improve patient care with more consistent quantification while improving radiologist efficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Artificial Intelligence , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education , Students , Workflow
5.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(4): 567-575, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676786

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose was to create and analyze a competency-based model of educating medical students in a radiology clerkship that can be used to guide curricular reform. METHODS: During the 2019 to 2020 academic year, 326 fourth-year medical students were enrolled in a 2-week required clerkship. An online testing platform, ExamSoft (Dallas, Texas), was used to test pre- and postinstruction knowledge on "must see" diagnoses, as outlined in the National Medical Student Curriculum in Radiology. Assessment analysis was used to compare the frequency with which the correct diagnosis was identified on the pretest to that on the posttest. At the end of the academic year, in addition to statistical analysis, categorical analysis was used to classify the degree of this change to uncover topics that students found most challenging. RESULTS: For 23 of the 27 topics (85%), there was a significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy after instruction in the test curriculum. Categorical analysis further demonstrated that the clerkship had a high impact in teaching 13 of the 27 topics (48%), had a lower impact for 6 topics (22%), and identified the remaining 8 topics (30%) as gaps in teaching and learning. CONCLUSIONS: For medical students, our instructional program significantly increased competency for most critical radiologic diagnoses. Categorical analysis adds value beyond statistical analysis and allows dynamic tailoring of teaching to address gaps in student learning.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Radiology , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Radiology/education , Texas
6.
Acad Radiol ; 29 Suppl 5: S76-S81, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620430

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus pandemic upended in-person radiology education and led to a transition to virtual platforms. We needed a new method to monitor lecture attendance, previously relying on a physical badge system. Our goal was to develop and implement a virtual conference attendance system that is user-friendly, automated, useable in any virtual conference environment, and accurate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We developed a web-based platform to serve as a virtual conference attendance tracking and evaluation platform. Daily, the application synchronizes with our lecture calendar to identify scheduled conferences and generates a unique attendance link for each event. The link is automatically posted in the conference chat and attendees must be logged in by the time it is posted to click the link, prompting single sign-on authentication. We integrated the system with resident schedules to excuse residents when appropriate. Real-time attendance reports are accessible in a user-friendly dashboard with a 5-star lecture review and comment system. We surveyed residents on satisfaction with the application after 1-year of use. RESULTS: Over the 2020-2021 academic year, we registered 376 conferences with 5,040 virtual swipes from 65 users. Once set up, virtual swipes take seconds to perform with minimal disruption to the conference. Average satisfaction for the platform was rated as 4.69 on a scale of 1 to 5. All respondents agreed or strongly agreed that use of the platform should be continued for future years, with 85% strongly agreeing. CONCLUSION: We developed an online platform for radiology conference attendance logging and evaluation, designed for virtual conferences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Acad Radiol ; 29(4): 576-583, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530540

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused a dramatic shift in radiology resident education. Primarily, physical distancing prompted a general transition to virtual learning. Common changes made by radiology residency programs included virtual rounds and readouts, the use of simulation technology, and case-based learning which utilized pedagogical approaches such as the flipped classroom for teaching residents. Virtual learning appears to be a suitable alternative to traditional, in-person learning, and may have a place post-pandemic as part of a blended curriculum with in-person and virtual components. The extent of disruption to radiology resident education varied based on the local impact of COVID-19 and the prevalence of redeployment, as did residents' mental health and wellbeing. Accessibility of mental health resources for residents was highlighted as an issue that programs need to address during these difficult times. Moreover, the pandemic resulted in unavoidable reductions in procedural exposure which programs mitigated through the use of simulation technologies and virtual learning resources. Professional development activities such as mentorship and career planning were also dramatically impacted by the pandemic and remains a challenge that programs need to consider moving forward post-pandemic. The purpose of this review is to outline the changes made to radiology resident education as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and suggest what changes may be worthwhile to continue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 51(2): 146-151, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500823

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Remote workstations were rapidly deployed in our academic radiology practice in late March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although well-received by faculty, there were concerns for the impact on resident education. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Surveys of the radiology trainees and faculty were conducted online seven- and thirteen-months following workstation deployment as a part of a quality improvement project to assess the impact on radiology education and faculty wellness, as well as assess the desired trajectory of remote work in an academic setting. RESULTS: The majority of trainees (52%) reported the implementation had negatively impacted resident education, greatest among lower level residents (p < .001). This perception did not change despite interventions and perceived improvement in teleconferencing. Greater than 75% of radiologists with remote workstations reported improved wellness and lower stress levels compared to the onsite radiologists. The majority of all respondents voted to continue or expand remote work following the COVID-19 pandemic in both surveys. CONCLUSIONS: Onsite teaching is important for the education of residents, particularly for lower-level residents. However, the adoption of a hybrid model in an academic setting may prove beneficial for faculty wellness and recruitment of the next generation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Faculty , Faculty, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 51(3): 296-300, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488042

ABSTRACT

Visiting Professorships (VPs) have significant benefits for both the guest lecturer and host institution. Such opportunities increase knowledge dissemination, research collaboration, opportunities for junior faculty members, and educational material that shores up perceived weaknesses in the host institution's training program. While VPs provide these benefits, such invitations are often costly due to travel and accommodation expenses, which can be challenging for host institutions. The COVID-19 pandemic - with the forced social and work distancing - has mandated that radiologists rethink how they interact and collaborate within their department and also within the larger medical and radiology communities. Virtual platforms have become critical for communication and education, and in this altered academic environment have provided an opportunity for us to redesign how VPs are designed. The virtual VP removes many of the cost and time burdens associated with travel and even enables greater communication where it might not have been economically or time-feasible. We present a virtual Microsoft Teams (Redmond, WA) based platform for facilitating VPs in all subspecialties and for all ranks called the Radiology Lecture Exchange.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Emerg Radiol ; 28(6): 1083-1086, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439725

ABSTRACT

For more than 1 year, COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every aspect of our lives. This paper reviews the major challenges that the radiology community faced over the past year and the impact the pandemic had on the radiology practice, radiologist-in-training education, and radiology research. The lessons learned from COVID-19 pandemic can help the radiology community to be prepared for future outbreaks and new pandemics, preserve good habits, enhance cancer screening programs, and adapt to the changes in radiology education and scientific meetings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Br J Radiol ; 94(1127): 20210632, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430510

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe adult respiratory distress syndrome Coronavirus-2) and its most severe clinical syndrome, COVID-19, has dramatically impacted service delivery in many radiology departments. Radiology (primarily chest radiography and CT) has played a pivotal role in managing the pandemic in countries with well-developed healthcare systems, enabling early diagnosis, triage of patients likely to require intensive care and detection of arterial and venous thrombosis complicating the disease. We review the lessons learned during the early response to the pandemic, placing these in the wider context of the responsibility radiology departments have to mitigate the impact of hospital-acquired infection on clinical care and staff wellbeing. The potential long-term implications for design and delivery of radiology services are considered. The need to achieve effective social distancing and ensure continuity of service during the pandemic has brought about a step change in the implementation of virtual clinical team working, off-site radiology reporting and postgraduate education in radiology. The potential consequences of these developments for the nature of radiological practice and the education of current and future radiologists are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology/education , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Acad Radiol ; 28(11): 1582-1585, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404697

ABSTRACT

The fifth Association of University Radiologists (AUR) Academic Radiology and Leaders Roundtable took place the day after the conclusion of the AUR annual meeting in May 2021 and involved leaders in academic radiology departments across the United States, and industry from companies who provide quintessential services to radiology departments. The open-ended discussion identified the key challenges facing the practice and business of radiology as we jointly move forward after the COVID-19 pandemic. Particular attention was paid to the identification of viable solutions that radiology departments should embrace to sustain clinical productivity, innovation, and well-being, and the ways that industry could contribute significantly to that endeavor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Humans , Pandemics , Radiologists , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Universities
17.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 217(3): 765-766, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311347

ABSTRACT

Social distancing concerns arising from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic have led to the emergence of virtual readouts in radiology training programs. Given the myriad benefits of virtual readouts, radiology departments should continue using virtual readouts in at least a hybrid format, even after social distancing restrictions become relaxed. This article highlights the challenges and opportunities associated with virtual readouts and provides guidance and strategies for their long-term implementation by training programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Radiology/methods , Telemedicine , Humans , Internship and Residency , Radiology/education
18.
Radiographics ; 41(4): E109-E116, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290456

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 global pandemic has presented new challenges to radiology educators and their learners. As a specialty that is accustomed to adapting to continual technologic innovation, as well as one with the capacity for remote work, radiology is uniquely positioned to meet these challenges by taking advantage of online remote educational strategies. This represents an opportunity to not only leverage new methods and technologies but also reexamine the most effective way to implement established ones. The authors review the benefits of taking a purposeful goal-oriented approach to these challenges, provide a corresponding qreview of the general categories of resources that are currently available, and explore educational strategies by using broad categories of software solutions. An invited commentary by Awan is available online. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2021.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Radiology/education , Audiovisual Aids , Education, Medical/methods , Humans , Teaching
19.
Clin Radiol ; 76(11): 854-860, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275247

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess trainee perceptions of the Radiology-Integrated Training Initiative (R-ITI)) e-learning modules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A mixed methodology approach was used, with triangulation between a thematic analysis of eight semi-structured interviews from radiology trainees and trainers, and a contextual analysis of 60 free-text feedback comments and module ratings from trainees after completion of R-ITI modules. RESULTS: Three broad themes emerged: "learning the subject matter", "learning the role," and "e-learning preferences". Superficial learning techniques were prevalent when "learning the subject matter" during early training, with e-learning resources providing a good pedagogical fit for this learning. Much of what was considered "learning the role" of the radiologist was learned at the workplace. This included topics with inherent subjectivity, which were difficult to convey with e-learning. Trainees' "e-learning preferences" favoured modules that incorporated many imaging cases with layer annotation, clinical relevance, and self-assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The ease of reproducing imaging studies using the R-ITI platform represents a huge potential for e-learning. Content tailored to the learning needs of the trainee, the appropriateness of the subject matter for an online platform, and the design of the e-learning modules are important considerations. Radiology training also involves important tacit learning and discussions around subjective topics, which are difficult to capture on this platform.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Radiology/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom
20.
Clin Radiol ; 76(9): 634-639, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275246
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