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1.
Rofo ; 193(8): 937-946, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139768

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: As a cross-section discipline within the hospital infrastructure, radiological departments might be able to provide important information regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare. The goal of this study was to quantify changes in medical care during the first wave of the pandemic using radiological examinations as a comprehensive surrogate marker and to determine potential future workload. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all radiological examinations during the first wave of the pandemic was performed. The number of examinations was compared to time-matched control periods. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of radiological examinations attributed to various medical specialties was conducted and postponed examinations were extrapolated to calculate additional workload in the near future. RESULTS: A total of 596,760 examinations were analyzed. Overall case volumes decreased by an average of 41 % during the shutdown compared to the control period. The most affected radiological modalities were sonography (-54 %), X-ray (-47 %) followed by MRI (-42 %). The most affected medical specialty was trauma and orthopedics (-60 % case volume) followed by general surgery (-49 %). Examination numbers increased during the post-shutdown period leading to a predicted additional workload of up to 22 %. CONCLUSION: This study shows a marked decrease in radiological examinations in total and among several core medical specialties, indicating a significant reduction in medical care during the first COVID-19 shutdown. KEY POINTS: · Number of radiological examinations decreased by 41 % during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.. · Several core medical specialties were heavily affected with a reduction of case volumes up to 60 %.. · When extrapolating postponed examinations to the near future, the overall workload for radiological departments might increase up to 22 %.. CITATION FORMAT: · Fleckenstein FN, Maleitzke T, Böning G et al. Decreased Medical Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Comprehensive Analysis of Radiological Examinations. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2021; 193: 937 - 946.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Radiography , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology , Workload , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Orthopedics , Radiography/trends , Radiology/trends , Retrospective Studies
2.
J Korean Med Sci ; 35(40): e368, 2020 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-881337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has escalated to be a global threat to public health. Analysis of the use of radiology resources may render us insight regarding the public health behavior during pandemic. We measured the influence COVID-19 had on the use of radiology resources in terms of the number of examinations performed, and turnaround time for portable radiography. METHODS: This study was conducted at a tertiary hospital located in area where the prevalence of COVID-19 infection was low (0.01%). We compared the number of radiology examinations 1) before pandemic (in 2019) vs. during peak of pandemic (January to March 2020), and 2) before pandemic vs. after the peak of pandemic (April to June 2020) via t-tests. We repeated similar analyses for subgroups as follows: gender, age, department (outpatient, inpatient, emergency, screening), body parts, and modality. We also performed a survey of radiologic technologists regarding the turnaround time and rate-limiting step of portable radiography for patients with and without suspicion or confirmation of COVID-19. RESULTS: Although not statistically significant, the daily number of examinations during the peak of pandemic decreased by 9 percentage points (2,638 vs. 2,413; difference [95% CI], -225 [-489, 38]; P = 0.094). The percentage change was especially notable for children, emergency, and screening department (25, 19, and 44 percentage points, respectively). After the peak of the pandemic, the number of examinations increased back to near the pre-pandemic level (2,638 vs. 2,588; -50 [-317, 218]; P = 0.71). The turnaround time for portable radiography tended to be longer for patients with suspicion or confirmation of COVID-19, with donning personal protective equipment being the major rate-limiting step. CONCLUSION: The number of examinations decreased during the pandemic, reflecting the tendency of the public to refrain from seeking medical care even in a community of low infection risk. Nevertheless, burden of healthcare providers may not have decreased as much, considering longer turnaround time required for COVID-19 related examinations.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Radiology/statistics & numerical data , Radiology/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Tertiary Care Centers , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
3.
Radiographics ; 40(5): 1309-1317, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737819

ABSTRACT

The recent shutting down of in-person events owing to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has elevated the popularity of web-based conferencing. This development provides an opportunity for educators to test their teaching skills on what, for many, is a new platform. Many of the basic elements of what constitutes an effective presentation are the same regardless of whether they are delivered in person or online. However, there are advantages and disadvantages of each mode of presentation, and understanding how to best leverage the features of an online platform will lead to a better educational experience for the presenter and audience. The effectiveness of any presentation is dependent on the ability of the speaker to communicate with the audience. This is accomplished by including as much audience participation as possible. Many of the techniques used to encourage audience participation in person can be adapted for use in online presentations (eg, the use of features such as chat, hand raising, polling, and question-and-answer sessions). In any type of presentation, both the quality of the content and the oral delivery are important. The author reviews the common elements of an effective presentation and how they can be optimized for online platforms. ©RSNA, 2020.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Radiology/methods , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Data Display , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Marketing , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/trends
4.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(9): 1086-1095, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in significant loss of radiologic volume as a result of shelter-at-home mandates and delay of non-time-sensitive imaging studies to preserve capacity for the pandemic. We analyze the volume-related impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on six academic medical systems (AMSs), three in high COVID-19 surge (high-surge) and three in low COVID-19 surge (low-surge) regions, and a large national private practice coalition. We sought to assess adaptations, risks of actions, and lessons learned. METHODS: Percent change of 2020 volume per week was compared with the corresponding 2019 volume calculated for each of the 14 imaging modalities and overall total, outpatient, emergency, and inpatient studies in high-surge AMSs and low-surge AMSs and the practice coalition. RESULTS: Steep examination volume drops occurred during week 11, with slow recovery starting week 17. The lowest total AMS volume drop was 40% compared with the same period the previous year, and the largest was 70%. The greatest decreases were seen with screening mammography and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans, and the smallest decreases were seen with PET/CT, x-ray, and interventional radiology. Inpatient volume was least impacted compared with outpatient or emergency imaging. CONCLUSION: Large percentage drops in volume were seen from weeks 11 through 17, were seen with screening studies, and were larger for the high-surge AMSs than for the low-surge AMSs. The lowest drops in volume were seen with modalities in which delays in imaging had greater perceived adverse consequences.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diagnostic Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/statistics & numerical data , Radiology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Incidence , Learning , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiology/trends , Risk Assessment , United States
5.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(3): 361-363, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-643217

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has redefined the diagnostic imaging that is being practiced. It is important to consider how COVID-19 will reshape the practice in the post-COVID era. The "new normal" should reflect what has been learned from COVID-19 and preparedness for the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Diagnostic Imaging/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Radiology/trends , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Diagn Interv Radiol ; 26(4): 323-332, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-154916

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has recently become a worldwide outbreak with several millions of people infected and more than 160.000 deaths. A fast and accurate diagnosis in this outbreak is critical to isolate and treat patients. Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of the patients. Among various imaging modalities, chest CT has received attention with its higher sensitivity and specificity rates. Shortcomings of the real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction test, including inappropriate sample collection and analysis methods, initial false negative results, and limited availability has led to widespread use of chest CT in the diagnostic algorithm. This review summarizes the role of radiology in COVID-19 pneumonia, diagnostic accuracy of imaging, and chest CT findings of the disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Radiology/standards , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , Algorithms , Artificial Intelligence , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Outbreaks , False Negative Reactions , Female , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Radiography/standards , Radiology/trends , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling/statistics & numerical data
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