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1.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374307

ABSTRACT

The year 2020 will be carved in the history books-with the proliferation of COVID-19 over the globe and with frontline health workers and basic scientists worldwide diligently fighting to alleviate life-threatening symptoms and curb the spread of the disease. Behind the shocking prevalence of death are countless families who lost loved ones. To these families and to humanity as a whole, the tallies are not irrelevant digits, but a motivation to develop effective strategies to save lives. However, at the onset of the pandemic, not many therapeutic choices were available besides supportive oxygen, anti-inflammatory dexamethasone, and antiviral remdesivir. Low-dose radiation (LDR), at a much lower dosage than applied in cancer treatment, re-emerged after a 75-year silence in its use in unresolved pneumonia, as a scientific interest with surprising effects in soothing the cytokine storm and other symptoms in severe COVID-19 patients. Here, we review the epidemiology, symptoms, immunological alterations, mutations, pharmaceuticals, and vaccine development of COVID-19, summarizing the history of X-ray irradiation in non-COVID diseases (especially pneumonia) and the currently registered clinical trials that apply LDR in treating COVID-19 patients. We discuss concerns, advantages, and disadvantages of LDR treatment and potential avenues that may provide empirical evidence supporting its potential use in defending against the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , X-Ray Therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , Radiation, Ionizing , Radiotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
Respir Med ; 186: 106531, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300990

ABSTRACT

The covid-19 pandemic has been affecting many countries across the world and lost precious lives. Most patients suffer from respiratory disease which progresses to the severe acute respiratory syndrome, termed as SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. A systemic inflammatory response occurs in SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia severely ill patients, The inflammation process if uncontrolled has a detrimental effect, and the release of cytokines play an important role leading to lung fibrosis. Radiation therapy used in low doses has an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effect. Its low cost, wider availability, and decreased risk of acute side effects can reduce the burden on the health care system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/radiotherapy , Radiotherapy/methods , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/radiotherapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Progression , Humans , Inflammation , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Macrophages , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/radiotherapy , Radiotherapy Dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/etiology , Severity of Illness Index
3.
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol ; 147(9): 2621-2624, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293373

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Performing low-dose radiation therapy (LDRT) is a new approach to treat pneumonia resulting from COVID-19 disease. This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of LDRT in treating COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Medline was searched for "low-dose" and "radiation therapy" and "COVID-19" and "pneumonia" and "inflammation", to retrieve papers that published on low-dose radiation therapy to improve mortality of COVID-19 patients. Only clinical investigations that included original and case report papers were selected for this paper. RESULTS: The completed clinical trials that have performed LDRT to treat COVID-19 showed that the effectiveness of LDRT in treating COVID-19 was up to 90%. CONCLUSION: The vast majority of primary and secondary outcomes of clinical trial investigations regarding LDRT in treating COVID-19 found that LDRT can be considered a feasible treatment to improve mortality of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Radiotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , COVID-19/radiotherapy , COVID-19/virology , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survival Rate
4.
Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi ; 24(6): 377-383, 2021 Jun 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241299

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had a serious impact on global health. COVID-19 vaccines may be one of the most effective measure to end the pandemic. High infection risk and higher serious incident and mortality rates have been shown in cancer patients with COVID-19. Therefore, cancer patients should be the priority group for COVID-19 prevention. Until now, data of COVID-19 vaccination for cancer patients is lacking. We review the interim data of safety and immune-efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination in cancer patients based on the latest studies. Due to the complicated immune systems of cancer patients caused by the malignancy and anticancer treatments, we proposed preliminary specific COVID-19 vaccination recommendations for cancer patients with different anticancer treatments and at different stages of the disease. Preventing COVID-19 with vaccinations for cancer patients is crucial, and we call for more large-scale clinical trials and real-world studies, for further COVID-19 vaccination recommendations development.
.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vaccination/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , Pandemics , Radiotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods
5.
Nuklearmedizin ; 60(3): 210-215, 2021 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169437

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic imposed an unimaginable challenge to the healthcare systems worldwide. This online survey captured the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nuclear medicine services in Germany comparing 2020 to 2019. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A web-based questionnaire was developed to record the 2020 numbers of nuclear medicine procedures and, in particular, the change compared with 2019. The changes in nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy were queried, as well as the extent to which "Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2" recommendations provided by the DGN were implemented. RESULTS: 91 complete responses were recorded and evaluated. This corresponds to about 20 % of all German nuclear medicine facilities. Nuclear medicine diagnostic tests showed a decrease in scintigraphies for thyroid (15.9 %), bone (8.8 %), lung (7.6 %), sentinel lymph nodes (5.5 %), and myocardium (1.4 %) with small increases in PET/CT examinations (1.2 %) compared with 2019. Among nuclear medicine therapies, reductions were highest for benign indications (benign thyroid 13.3 %, RSO 7.7 %), while changes from 2019 were less pronounced for malignant indications (PRRT: + 2.2 %, PSMA: + 7.4 %, SIRT: -5.9 %, and RJT for thyroid carcinoma -2.4 %). The DGN recommendations for action were fully or partially applied in 90 %. CONCLUSIONS: The initial significant reduction in nuclear medicine procedures in the first three weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic did not continue, but there was no compensation of the previously not performed services. The decrease in diagnostics and therapy procedures of benign diseases was particularly severe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Germany , Humans , Radiography/methods , Radiography/statistics & numerical data , Radionuclide Imaging/methods , Radionuclide Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Radiotherapy/methods , Radiotherapy/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Strahlenther Onkol ; 197(5): 429-437, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064440

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, healthcare systems have focused their efforts into finding a treatment to avoid the fatal outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome due to coronavirus­2 (SARS-CoV-2). Benefits and risks of systemic treatments remain unclear, with multiple clinical trials still ongoing. Radiotherapy could play a role in reducing the inflammatory response in the lungs and relieve life-threatening symptoms. METHODS: We designed a prospective study of Ultra-Low Doses of Therapy with Radiation Applied to COVID-19 (ULTRA-COVID) for patients who suffer pneumonia, are not candidates for invasive mechanical ventilation and show no improvement with medical therapy. RESULTS: We present the preliminary results of two patients diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia treated with ULTRA-COVID. After one radiotherapy session, significant clinical response and a good radiological response was observed in both cases, resulting in both patients being discharged from hospital in less than 2 weeks after radiation treatment. CONCLUSION: Preliminary clinical and radiological results suggest a potential benefit of treating COVID-19 pneumonia with ULTRA-COVID. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04394182.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/radiotherapy , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Preliminary Data , Prospective Studies , Radiotherapy/methods , Radiotherapy Dosage , Treatment Outcome
8.
In Vivo ; 35(1): 649-652, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011858

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: The study aimed to evaluate practice changes in the time period of the early wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective single institution study. We defined palliative radiotherapy (PRT) initiated before Saturday, March 14th as pre-COVID and PRT initiated later as during-COVID (through June 30th). RESULTS: National COVID-19 recommendations led to a significant decrease in PRT with 10 or more fractions, while re-irradiation and radiotherapy during the final 30 days of life were equally common before and after these recommendations had been issued in March 2020. CONCLUSION: Rapid adoption of modified PRT regimens was feasible. However, the challenge of overtreatment in the final phase of the disease, due to inaccurate survival prediction, persisted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Palliative Care/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology/methods , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/classification , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiotherapy/methods , Radiotherapy/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Time Factors
10.
Dig Liver Dis ; 53(3): 306-308, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987476

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has major impact of healthcare systems, including cancer care pathways. The aim of this work is to discuss in a multidisciplinary approach the therapeutic and/or strategies adaptations for patients treated for a digestive cancer during the European second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A collaborative work was performed by several French societies to answer how to preserve digestive cancer care with no loss of chance during the second wave of COVID-19. In this context, all recommendations are graded as expert's agreement according to level evidence found in literature until October 2020 and the experience of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: As far as possible, no therapeutic modification should be carried out. If necessary, therapeutic adjustments may be considered if they do not constitute a loss of chance for patients. Considering the level of evidence all therapeutic modifications need to be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board meeting and with patient consent. By contrast to first wave cancer prevention, cancer screening, supportive care and clinical trials should be continued. CONCLUSION: Recommendations proposed could limit cancer excess mortality due to the COVID-19 pandemic but should be adapted according to the situation in each hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Digestive System Neoplasms/therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Biomedical Research , Digestive System Neoplasms/diagnosis , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/methods , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , France , Humans , Radiotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(23): 12480-12489, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995004

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 disease is one of the biggest public health challenges in Italy and global healthcare facilities, including radiotherapy departments, faced an unprecedented emergency. Cancer patients are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection because of their immunosuppressive state caused by both tumor itself and anticancer therapy adopted. In this setting, the radiation therapy clinical decision-making process has been partly reconsidered; thus, to reduce treatment duration and minimize infection risk during a pandemic, hypofractionated regimens have been revised. Moreover, telemedicine shows its helpfulness in the radiotherapy field, and patients get the supportive care they need minimizing their access to hospitals. This review aims to point out the importance of hypofractionated RT and telemedicine in cancer patient management in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Radiation Dose Hypofractionation , Radiation Oncology/methods , Radiotherapy/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Bone Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Bone Neoplasms/secondary , Brachytherapy/methods , Brain Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Brain Neoplasms/secondary , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Clinical Decision-Making , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prostatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Radiosurgery/methods , Radiotherapy, Conformal/methods , Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment
12.
Tumori ; 107(6): 498-503, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983620

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During 2020, medical clinical activities were dramatically modified by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emergency. We aim to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on radiotherapy (RT) practice in a hub cancer center. METHODS: Retrospective data collection of patients with suspected COVID-19 infection, identified by pathognomonic symptoms feedback at triage realized at the entrance to RT division. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of oncologic disease, COVID-19-related symptoms, and signed written informed consent. RESULTS: Between 1 March and 30 June 2020, 1,006 patients accessed our RT division for RT simulation or treatment. Forty-four patients matched inclusion criteria (4.4% of all patients): 29 women and 15 men. Seventeen patients had metastatic disease. Twenty-one patients reported fever, 6 presented dyspnea, 4 complained of ageusia and anosmia, and 3 developed conjunctivitis. Thirty-six patients underwent nasal swab, with 7 positive results. From our cohort, 4 cases of pneumonia were diagnosed with computed tomography scan imaging: 3 were related to COVID-19 infection, while the fourth was evaluated as an RT adverse event. From the entire series, 4 patients died: 3 during hospitalization in intensive care unit of complications of COVID-19 and 1 of other causes neither COVID-19 nor cancer-related. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer hub allows for safe RT practice continuation while minimizing the spread of contagion in this frail patient population. A challenge for the future will be to understand pandemic consequences in cancer natural history and manage its clinical impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Radiation Oncology/standards , Radiotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Disease Management , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/virology , Retrospective Studies
13.
Radiol Med ; 126(2): 343-347, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-834039

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective of the paper was to assess real-life experience in the management of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients during the COVID-19 pandemic in radiotherapy departments and to evaluate the variability in terms of adherence to American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) recommendations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In May 2020, an anonymous 30-question online survey, comparing acute phase of outbreak and pre-COVID-19 period, was conducted. Two sections exploited changes in general management of HNC patients and different HNC primary tumors, addressing specific statements from ASTRO ESTRO consensus statement as well. RESULTS: Eighty-eight questionnaires were included in the demographic/clinical workflow analysis, and 64 were analyzed for treatment management. Forty-eight percent of radiotherapy departments became part of oncologic hubs. First consultations reduced, and patients were addressed to other centers in 33.8 and 18.3% of cases, respectively. Telematic consultations were used in 50% of follow-up visits and 73.9% of multidisciplinary tumor board discussions. There were no practical changes in the management of patients affected by different primitive HNCs. Hypofractionation was not favored over conventional schedules. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to pre-COVID era, the clinical workflow was highly re-organized, whereas there were no consistent changes in RT indications and schedules.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics , Radiation Oncology/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Europe/epidemiology , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/drug therapy , Health Care Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Induction Chemotherapy , Italy/epidemiology , Radiotherapy/methods , Radiotherapy/statistics & numerical data , Radiotherapy Dosage , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Societies, Medical , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Workflow
14.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(6): 2931-2937, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-812588

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the last months, Italy faced a COVID-19 emergency and implemented preventive measures in order to protect patients and healthcare providers from a disease outbreak. The pandemic control strategies impacted patient experience directly. Questionnaires evaluating patients reported measures (PREMs) may assess critical issues and represent a helpful tool to measure the patient perception of healthcare service. Our aim was to prospectively assess patient satisfaction about doctor-patient interaction in a high-volume radiation therapy and oncology center during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Cancer patients receiving either systemic and/or radiation treatment underwent a survey. Two validated questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30, FACIT-TS-G version 1) and 14 specific questions evaluating patients' perception of COVID-19 measures were administered. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-five patients admitted to our department from 1-30 April 2020 completed the questionnaires. The majority (66.4%) of patients were women and the most common disease was breast cancer (40%). The average Global Health Status (GHS) of EORTC QLQ-C30 was 61.67. Emotional functioning, social, and cognitive domains obtained scores of 75.48, 80.13, and 84.67, respectively. FACIT-TS-G results revealed 120 patients rated the treatments effective and 108 patients thought the side effects were the same as expected or better. Most (89.6%) rated their treatment good, very good, or excellent. Concerning COVID-19-related questions, patients reported overall very good level of information. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the introduction of strict COVID-19 control measures, there was a high level of cancer outpatient satisfaction. The satisfaction levels may influence compliance, continuity of treatments, and patient-doctor communication, impacting the quality of clinical care in the next phases of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life/psychology , Radiotherapy/methods , Aged , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(4): 512-517, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739921

ABSTRACT

Clinical placement experience is an important component of medical radiation science (MRS) education, equipping students to safely transition into complex healthcare environments. This commentary draws on evidence from the literature that reports challenges allied health students face in clinical environments. As several factors are implicated that could result in a higher prevalence of psychological distress and mental ill-health in MRS students, there is a need to re-emphasize the importance of developing strategies to support students in clinical education. A key recommendation is to identify associated risk factors early as they can impact on the quality of education and in severe cases be detrimental to students' psychological well-being. This requires an understanding of the full extent and nature of the challenges through partnered approaches between professional organisations, clinical departments, academics and students. Developing evidence-based strategies for improving students' well-being in clinical environments is also essential.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Occupations/education , Allied Health Personnel/education , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Radiography/psychology , Radiotherapy/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Humans , Radiography/methods , Radiotherapy/methods
17.
Med Oncol ; 37(10): 85, 2020 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716386

ABSTRACT

Management of patients with head and neck cancers (HNCs) is challenging for the Radiation Oncologist, especially in the COVID-19 era. The Italian Society of Radiotherapy and Clinical Oncology (AIRO) identified the need of practice recommendations on logistic issues, treatment delivery and healthcare personnel's protection in a time of limited resources. A panel of 15 national experts on HNCs completed a modified Delphi process. A five-point Likert scale was used; the chosen cut-offs for strong agreement and agreement were 75% and 66%, respectively. Items were organized into two sections: (1) general recommendations (10 items) and (2) special recommendations (45 items), detailing a set of procedures to be applied to all specific phases of the Radiation Oncology workflow. The distribution of facilities across the country was as follows: 47% Northern, 33% Central and 20% Southern regions. There was agreement or strong agreement across the majority (93%) of proposed items including treatment strategies, use of personal protection devices, set-up modifications and follow-up re-scheduling. Guaranteeing treatment delivery for HNC patients is well-recognized in Radiation Oncology. Our recommendations provide a flexible tool for management both in the pandemic and post-pandemic phase of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Medical Oncology/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiotherapy/methods , Radiotherapy/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical/standards
18.
J Med Radiat Sci ; 67(3): 243-248, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-610405

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has rapidly impacted all of our lives following its escalation to pandemic status on 11 March 2020. Government guidelines and restrictions implemented to mitigate the risk of COVID-19 community transmission have forced radiation therapy departments to promptly adjust to the significant impact on our ability to deliver best clinical care. The inherent nature of our tri-partied professions relies heavily on multidisciplinary teamwork and patient-clinician interactions. Teamwork and patient interaction are critical to the role of a radiation therapist. The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre's (Peter Mac) radiation therapy services during the preliminary stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in minimising risk to patients, staff and our clinical service. Four critical areas were identified in developing risk mitigation strategies across our service: (a) Workforce planning, (b) Workforce communication, (c) Patient safety and wellbeing, and (d) Staff safety and wellbeing. Each of these initiatives had a focus on continuum of clinical care, whilst minimising risk of cross infection for our radiation therapy workforce and patients alike. Initiatives included, but were not limited to, establishing COVID-Eclipse clinical protocols, remote access to local applications, implementation of Microsoft Teams, personal protective equipment (PPE) guidelines and virtual 'Division of Radiation Oncology' briefing/updates. The COVID-19 pandemic has dictated change in conventional radiation therapy practice. It is hoped that by sharing our experiences, the radiation therapy profession will continue to learn, adapt and navigate this period together, to ensure optimal outcomes for ourselves and our patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Health Planning , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Radiotherapy/methods , Risk Management/methods , Australia , COVID-19 , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disaster Planning , Health Communication , Health Personnel/education , Health Planning/methods , Humans , Patient Care Team , Personal Protective Equipment , Safety
19.
In Vivo ; 34(3 Suppl): 1675-1680, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-542896

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is now a global pandemic. It is unclear to radiotherapy practitioners how to carry out radiotherapy during the epidemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: After the outbreak of COVID-19, our Institute established measures for the prevention and control of COVID-19, and continues to treat patients according to these measures. The Radiotherapy Department has been divided into a clean zone and a semi-contaminated zone, and corresponding personal protective equipment is used in these zones. The temperature of patients and their escorts, and history of fever are assessed daily. Special procedures are performed during radiotherapy setup and intracavitary brachytherapy. RESULTS: Over a period of 2 months, 655 patients were treated in the Department. Sixteen patients with fever were identified and no patient undergoing radiotherapy or medical staff have been infected with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Our protective measures were found to be effective and can be used as a reference in places where COVID-19 situations are not markedly serious.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiotherapy/methods , Adult , Beijing , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Containment of Biohazards/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disinfection , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Fever/etiology , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Protective Devices , Symptom Assessment , Thermometry
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