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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 825408, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776025

ABSTRACT

Objective: During total knee arthroplasty (TKA), tourniquet may negatively impact post-operative functional recovery. This study aimed at investigating the effects of tourniquet on pain and return to function. Methods: Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library were comprehensively searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published up to February 15th, 2020. Search terms included; total knee arthroplasty, tourniquet, and randomized controlled trial. RCTs evaluating the efficacies of tourniquet during and after operation were selected. Two reviewers independently extracted the data. Effect estimates with 95% CIs were pooled using the random-effects model. Dichotomous data were calculated as relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Mean differences (MD) with 95% CI were used to measure the impact of consecutive results. Primary outcomes were the range of motion (ROM) and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores. Results: Thirty-three RCTs involving a total of 2,393 patients were included in this study. The mean age is 65.58 years old. Compared to no tourniquet group, the use of a tourniquet resulted in suppressed ROM on the 3rd post-operative day [MD, -4.67; (95% CI, -8.00 to -1.35)] and the 1st post-operative month [MD, -3.18; (95% CI, -5.92 to -0.44)]. Pain increased significantly when using tourniquets on the third day after surgery [MD, 0.39; (95% CI, -0.19 to 0.59)]. Moreover, tourniquets can reduce intra-operative blood loss [MD, -127.67; (95% CI, -186.83 to -68.50)], shorter operation time [MD, -3.73; (95% CI, -5.98 to -1.48)], lower transfusion rate [RR, 0.85; (95% CI, 0.73-1.00)], higher superficial wound infection rates RR, 2.43; [(5% CI, 1.04-5.67)] and higher all complication rates [RR, 1.98; (95% CI, 1.22-3.22)]. Conclusion: Moderate certainty evidence shows that the use of a tourniquet was associated with an increased risk of higher superficial wound infection rates and all complication rates. Therefore, the findings did not support the routine use of a tourniquet during TKA.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Pain, Postoperative , Tourniquets , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/methods , Humans , Pain, Postoperative/etiology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Range of Motion, Articular , Tourniquets/adverse effects
2.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 164(5): 1317-1328, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763360

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing created challenges for accessing and providing health services. Telemedicine enables prompt evaluation of patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury, even at a distance, without prejudice to the prognosis. The present study aimed to verify the validity of range of motion, muscle strength, sensitivity, and Tinel sign tele-assessment in adults with traumatic brachial plexus injury (TBPI). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of twenty-one men and women with TBPI admitted for treatment at a Rehabilitation Hospital Network was conducted. The participants were assessed for range of motion, muscle strength, sensitivity, and Tinel sign at two moments: in-person assessment (IPA) and tele-assessment (TA). RESULTS: The TA muscle strength tests presented significant and excellent correlations with the IPA (the intra-rater intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC ranged between 0.79 and 1.00 depending on the muscle tested). The agreement between the TA and IPA range of motion tests ranged from substantial to moderate (weighted kappa coefficient of 0.47-0.76 (p < 0.05) depending on the joint), and the kappa coefficient did not indicate a statistically significant agreement in the range of motion tests of supination, wrist flexors, shoulder flexors, and shoulder external rotators. The agreement between the IPA andTA sensitivity tests of all innervations ranged from substantial to almost perfect (weighted kappa coefficient 0.61-0.83, p < 0.05) except for the C5 innervation, where the kappa coefficient did not indicate a statistically significant agreement. The IPA versus TA Tinel sign test showed a moderate agreement (weighted kappa coefficient of 0.57, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated that muscle strength tele-assessment is valid in adults with TBPI and presented a strong agreement for many components of TA range of motion, sensitivity, and Tinel sign tests.


Subject(s)
Brachial Plexus Neuropathies , Brachial Plexus , COVID-19 , Adult , Brachial Plexus/injuries , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Muscle Strength , Pandemics , Range of Motion, Articular
3.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(6S): S350-S354, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748218

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020, there has been a marked rise in the use of telemedicine to evaluate patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of our study was to assess a novel stem with an embedded sensor that can remotely and objectively monitor a patient's mobility after TKA. METHODS: A single anatomically designed knee system was implanted in concert with an interconnected tibial stem extension containing 3D accelerometers, 3D gyroscopes, a power source, and a telemetry transmission capability in 3 cadaveric pelvis to toe specimens. The legs were moved by hand to preset tibial positions at full knee extension, midflexion, flexion, and back to midflexion and extension for a total of 16 trials across 6 knees. RESULTS: Sensor data were successfully transmitted with good quality of signal to an external base station. Good correlation to the range of motion of the tibia was found (mean error 0.1 degrees; root mean square error 3.8 degrees). The signal from the heel drop tests suggests the sensor could detect heel strike during activities of daily living in vivo and the potential for additional signal processing to analyze vibratory and motion patterns detected by the sensors. A frequency domain analysis of a properly cemented and poorly cemented implant during the heel drop test suggests a difference in accelerometer signal in these implant states. CONCLUSION: The results confirm signals generated from an embedded TKA sensor can transmit through bone and cement, providing accurate range of motion data and may be capable of detecting changes in prosthesis fixation remotely.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Knee Prosthesis , Activities of Daily Living , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Biomechanical Phenomena , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cadaver , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Knee Joint/surgery , Monitoring, Physiologic , Pandemics , Range of Motion, Articular , Tibia/surgery
4.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(6)2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742615

ABSTRACT

The interruption of rehabilitation activities caused by the COVID-19 lockdown has significant health negative consequences for the population with physical disabilities. Thus, measuring the range of motion (ROM) using remotely taken photographs, which are then sent to specialists for formal assessment, has been recommended. Currently, low-cost Kinect motion capture sensors with a natural user interface are the most feasible implementations for upper limb motion analysis. An active range of motion (AROM) measuring system based on a Kinect v2 sensor for upper limb motion analysis using Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scoring is described in this paper. Two test groups of children, each having eighteen participants, were analyzed in the experimental stage, where upper limbs' AROM and motor performance were assessed using FMA. Participants in the control group (mean age of 7.83 ± 2.54 years) had no cognitive impairment or upper limb musculoskeletal problems. The study test group comprised children aged 8.28 ± 2.32 years with spastic hemiparesis. A total of 30 samples of elbow flexion and 30 samples of shoulder abduction of both limbs for each participant were analyzed using the Kinect v2 sensor at 30 Hz. In both upper limbs, no significant differences (p < 0.05) in the measured angles and FMA assessments were observed between those obtained using the described Kinect v2-based system and those obtained directly using a universal goniometer. The measurement error achieved by the proposed system was less than ±1° compared to the specialist's measurements. According to the obtained results, the developed measuring system is a good alternative and an effective tool for FMA assessment of AROM and motor performance of upper limbs, while avoiding direct contact in both healthy children and children with spastic hemiparesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Hemiplegia , Humans , Range of Motion, Articular , Upper Extremity
5.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 44(2): 227-232, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712229

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Two most common variations of flexor pollicis longus include its accessory head and its connection with the flexor digitorum profundus of the index (Linburg-Comstock variation). In addition, while three-dimensional (3D) screening has widely been used in anatomical education, its use as reporting tool in anatomical research is still limited. The objective of this study is to report a previously unrecognized form of the accessory head of flexor pollicis longus, discuss the potential etiology of Linburg-Comstock variation, and pilot the 3D scanning of a large-scale anatomical structure. METHODS: An unusual tendon slip was discovered during a routine dissection in the anterior compartment of the right forearm of a 54-year-old male cadaver. A 3D scanner was used to capture the surface topography of the specimen and an interactive portable document format (PDF) was created. RESULTS: An anomalous tendon was found originating from the lateral aspect of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle. This variant tendon then inserted onto the medial surface of the flexor pollicis longus tendon before entering the carpal tunnel. The variation resembles a reverse form of Linburg-Comstock variation, because pulling this variant tendon resulted in simultaneous flexion of the interphalangeal joint of thumb. CONCLUSION: Surgeons should be aware of the reverse Linburg-Comstock variation, because it may not be detectable by the conventional provocative testing. Linburg-Comstock variation may be classified as an anatomical variant or a secondarily acquired condition depending on its type. Our demonstration of interactive 3D-PDF file highlights its potential use for delivering anatomical information in future cadaveric studies.


Subject(s)
Hand Deformities, Congenital , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Muscle, Skeletal , Range of Motion, Articular , Tendons/diagnostic imaging , Thumb
6.
J Shoulder Elbow Surg ; 31(1): 201-208, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428204

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Shoulder range-of-motion (ROM) assessment is vital for the follow-up evaluation of operated patients and for the outcome-based research studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of a remote on-screen application (app)-based method of shoulder ROM measurement through a telehealth medium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A consultant shoulder surgeon, a board-certified orthopedic resident, and a graduate medical doctor served as the examiners. The cohort consisted of 24 healthy volunteers and 16 symptomatic patients with expected shoulder ROM deficits. Shoulder ROM was first examined physically using a goniometer in the clinic and then over Zoom remote conferencing using the protractor extension app of the Chrome browser. RESULTS: Instrument validity was examined by comparing the goniometer method with the protractor app-based method of the expert shoulder consultant using Bland-Altman analysis. It showed only minor mean differences between the healthy volunteers and the patients in elevation (2.0° and 5.0°, respectively), abduction (2.0° and 3.0°, respectively), external rotation with the elbow adducted (1.9° and 0.2°, respectively), external rotation with the elbow abducted at 90° (0.4° and 4°, respectively), and internal rotation with elbow abducted at 90° (2.3° and 1.2°, respectively), with limits of agreement that were below the well-established minimal clinically important difference values. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values varied between 0.83 and 0.96 for the volunteers and between 0.90 and 0.98 for the patients, indicating excellent correlation between the 2 methods. The interobserver reliability between 2 examiners for the protractor app-based method as evaluated by ICC scores was excellent; it ranged between 0.86 and 0.98 for the volunteers and between 0.88 and 0.99 for the patients. Comparison of the protractor app-based method with the gold-standard goniometer method for the resident and the graduate doctor showed excellent ICC values. CONCLUSION: A protractor app-based method of measuring shoulder ROM over a telehealth medium is accurate and reliable compared with a clinical goniometer method. This validated method can be used during remote telehealth consultation with significant benefits of saving patients travel and time during the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic and even later.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Arthrometry, Articular , Humans , Range of Motion, Articular , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Shoulder
7.
Curr Sports Med Rep ; 20(5): 271-276, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322966

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In the spring of 2020, we faced a global pandemic that resulted in social distancing limitations not previously experienced, forcing practitioners to adapt exercise programming to a virtual model. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effectiveness of a virtual exercise oncology program in 491 participants undergoing antineoplastic therapy between March and June 2020. Each session was completed virtually with a certified exercise oncology trainer. Fitness and psychological parameters were measured preexercise and postexercise intervention. Overall, participants completed 4949 of 5892 prescribed exercise sessions. Patients saw increases in cardiovascular endurance (15.2%, P < 0.05), muscular endurance (18.2%, P < 0.05), flexibility (31.9%, P < 0.05), feelings of support (58.7%, P < 0.05), and quality of life (32.2%, P < 0.05), as well as decreases in loneliness (54%, P < 0.05) and fatigue (48.7%, P < 0.05). In light of our findings, we assert that virtual exercise training is a viable option in circumstances where in-person, individualized exercise training is not possible.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Exercise Therapy/methods , Internet-Based Intervention , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Checklist , Exercise Therapy/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Physical Endurance/physiology , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Social Support , Symptom Assessment , Treatment Outcome
8.
J Hand Surg Eur Vol ; 46(8): 818-824, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277887

ABSTRACT

We report the outcomes of delayed primary repair of flexor tendons in Zone 2 in 31 fingers and thumb (28 patients) averaging 15 days (range 4-37) after injury in 2020. The delay was longer than usual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The tendons were repaired with a 6-strand core suture (M-Tang method) or a double Tsuge suture and a peripheral suture. This was followed by an early, partial-range, active flexion exercise programme. Adhesions in four digits required tenolysis. These patients were not with longest delay. Outcomes of two improved after tenolysis. The other two patients declined further surgery. One finger flexor tendon ruptured in early active motion. This was re-repaired, and final outcome was good. Overall excellent and good results using the Tang criteria were in 27 out of 31 fingers and thumbs (87%). The time elapsed between the injury and surgery is not an important risk factor for a good outcome, rather it depends on proper surgical methods, the surgeon's experience and early mobilization, properly applied. Adhesions may occur, but they can be managed with tenolysis.Level of evidence: IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Finger Injuries , Tendon Injuries , Finger Injuries/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Range of Motion, Articular , SARS-CoV-2 , Suture Techniques , Tendon Injuries/surgery , Tendons/surgery
9.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 382, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This randomized controlled study compared standard supervised physiotherapy (SPT) with a self-developed, home-based, enhanced knee flexion exercise program involving a low stool (KFEH) in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Patients were recruited from July 2014 to December 2015 and randomly assigned to one of two groups: KFEH (n = 60) and SPT (n = 59). Outcomes (joint function) were evaluated according to the Knee Society Score (KSS), visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and range of motion (ROM) assessment at selected time points (preoperatively; 1 week; 1, 3, and 6 months; and 1 year after surgery). RESULTS: Pain and functional improvement were observed in both groups. Non-inferiority of KFEH was evident 12 months postoperatively; however, patients in the KFEH group exhibited better ROM at 1 month (P < 0.01). Absolute WOMAC and KSS scores were slightly better in the KFEH group, although the difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in VAS scores and complication rates between the two groups. Additionally, the home program would save patient time and decrease the economic burden associated with in-hospital SPT. CONCLUSION: Considering rehabilitation and economic efficiency as well as the COVID pandemic, a home-based enhanced knee flexion exercise program for TKA rehabilitation is recommended.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Exercise Therapy/methods , Osteoarthritis, Knee/rehabilitation , Physical Therapy Modalities , Self Care/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobility Limitation , Osteoarthritis, Knee/physiopathology , Osteoarthritis, Knee/surgery , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Safety , Treatment Outcome
10.
Muscle Nerve ; 64(3): 357-361, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261771

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION/AIM: This retrospective study aimed to quantify the changes in motor function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) due to the government-imposed travel restrictions associated with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: Twelve DMD patients were enrolled in this investigation (mean ± SD age: 9.8 ± 3.6 y). Their physical characteristics and motor function were evaluated approximately 3 mo before, immediately before, and approximately 3 mo after the travel restrictions were decreed. Statistical comparisons were performed of the changes in motor function before and after the travel restrictions. RESULTS: The change in range of motion (ROM) of ankle dorsiflexion was significantly decreased after the travel restrictions. Changes in body mass index and other motor function parameters were not significant. DISCUSSION: An apparent decrease in the amount of physical activity due to travel restrictions in response to COVID-19 negatively affected ankle dorsiflexion ROM but not other motor functions. A more sedentary lifestyle and lack of regular physical therapy services most likely contributed to this reduction. The use of remote rehabilitation tools with the involvement of physiotherapists may help mitigate such changes and prevent more severe physical decline.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Motor Skills/physiology , Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne/therapy , Physical Therapy Modalities , Travel , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Female , Humans , Male , Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne/diagnosis , Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne/physiopathology , Physical Therapy Modalities/trends , Range of Motion, Articular/physiology , Retrospective Studies , Travel/trends
11.
J Electromyogr Kinesiol ; 59: 102566, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260782

ABSTRACT

We aimed to investigate the impact of time on fine-wire (fw) electromyography (EMG) signal amplitude, and to determine whether any attenuation is confounded by task type. Twenty healthy participants were instrumented with fw and surface (s) EMG electrodes at the biceps brachii bilaterally. Participants held a weight statically with one arm and with the other arm either repeated the same task following a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) or repeated dynamic elbow flexion/extension contractions. Each task was repeated for 30 s every five minutes over two hours. EMG amplitude was smoothed and normalized to time = 0. Stable median power frequency of the s-EMG ruled out the confounding influence of fatigue. Repeated-measures ANCOVAs determined the effect of electrode type and time (covariate) on EMG amplitude and the confounding impact of task type. During the isometric protocol, fw-EMG amplitude reduced over time (p = 0.002), while s-EMG amplitude (p = 0.895) and MPF (p > 0.05) did not change. Fw-EMG amplitude attenuated faster during the dynamic than the isometric protocol (p = 0.008) and there was evidence that the MVC preceding the isometric protocol impacted the rate of decline (p = 0.001). We conclude that systematic signal attenuation of fw-EMG occurs over time and is more pronounced during dynamic tasks.


Subject(s)
Elbow Joint , Isometric Contraction , Electromyography , Humans , Muscle, Skeletal , Range of Motion, Articular
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(22): e26240, 2021 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258820

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: There have been a few reports on the early rehabilitation of patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), and none on the effectiveness and adverse events of early mobilization for mechanical ventilation patients (other than COVID-19) during deep sedation. This report indicates that sitting without adverse events is possible in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia during deep sedation with muscle relaxation. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 65-year-old man with a history of diabetes mellitus, lacunar infarction, and Parkinson's disease was admitted to a local hospital for pneumonia due to COVID-19. After admission, the patient was managed on a ventilator under deep sedation with muscle relaxants and sedatives. Twelve days after admission, the patient was transferred to our hospital due to his worsening respiratory status. DIAGNOSIS: Pneumonia due to COVID-19 was diagnosed using a polymerase chain reaction-dependent method. INTERVENTIONS: The day following transfer, a physical therapist started passive range of motion training and sitting. OUTCOMES: The period spanning his initial rehabilitation to muscle relaxant medication interruption was 9 days, and he underwent 7 rehabilitation sessions. The patient was unable to sit during only one of the 7 sessions due to pre-rehabilitation hypoxemia. In 5 of the 6 sitting sessions, PaO2/FiO2 transiently decreased but recovered by the time of subsequent blood sampling. The patient's PaCO2 decreased during all sessions. His blood pressure did not drastically decrease in any sitting session, except the first. Sputum excretion via sputum suction increased during sitting, and peak inspiratory pressure did not change. LESSONS: The patient eventually died of pneumonia due to COVID-19. However, sitting during deep sedation with muscle relaxants did not cause any serious adverse events nor did it appear to cause obvious negative respiratory effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Deep Sedation/methods , Early Ambulation/methods , Sitting Position , Aged , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives/administration & dosage , Hypnotics and Sedatives/adverse effects , Male , Neuromuscular Agents/administration & dosage , Neuromuscular Agents/adverse effects , Range of Motion, Articular , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(5)2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243695

ABSTRACT

A 68-year-old woman presented for left shoulder pain, decreased range of motion (ROM) and fever 7 days following COVID-19 vaccination. Investigations showed a tender left deltoid mass, decreased shoulder ROM and elevated inflammatory markers. MRI demonstrated a large glenohumeral effusion with synovitis, and arthrocentesis confirmed septic arthritis (SA). She required subtotal bursectomy. Intraoperative joint cultures grew Streptococcus gordonii She completed 6 weeks of antibiotics and is undergoing physical therapy for post-infectious adhesive capsulitis. SA is most commonly due to Staphylococcus aureus and ß-haemolytic streptococci, and rarely due to viridans group streptococci including S. gordonii To avoid inadvertent injection into the glenohumeral joint, vaccination should be performed posteriorly and inferiorly into the deltoid musculature. Progressive pain, fever or decreased passive ROM following vaccination should raise concern for SA. Given its rarity, however, concern for secondary SA should not affect the general population's consideration for vaccination.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Infectious , COVID-19 , Shoulder Joint , Aged , Arthritis, Infectious/etiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Range of Motion, Articular , SARS-CoV-2 , Shoulder Joint/diagnostic imaging , Shoulder Joint/surgery , Streptococcus gordonii , Vaccination/adverse effects
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(6): e24141, 2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101918

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global neo-coronary pneumonia epidemic has increased the workload of healthcare institutions in various countries and directly affected the physical and psychological recovery of the vast majority of patients requiring hospitalization in China. We anticipate that post-total knee arthroplasty kinesiophobia may have an impact on patients' postoperative pain scores, knee function, and ability to care for themselves in daily life. The purpose of this study is to conduct a micro-video intervention via WeChat to verify the impact of this method on the rapid recovery of patients with kinesiophobia after total knee arthroplasty during neo-coronary pneumonia. METHODS: Using convenience sampling method, 78 patients with kinesiophobia after artificial total knee arthroplasty who met the exclusion criteria were selected and randomly grouped, with the control group receiving routine off-line instruction and the intervention group receiving micro-video intervention, and the changes in the relevant indexes of the two groups of patients at different time points on postoperative day 1, 3 and 7 were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: There were no statistical differences in the scores of kinesiophobia, pain, knee flexion mobility (ROM) and ability to take care of daily life between the two groups on the first postoperative day (P > .05). On postoperative day 3 and 7, there were statistical differences in Tampa Scale for kinesiophobia, pain, activities of daily living scale score and ROM between the two groups (P < .01), and the first time of getting out of bed between the two groups (P < .05), and by repeated-measures ANOVA, there were statistically significant time points, groups and interaction effects of the outcome indicators between the 2 groups (P < .01), indicating that the intervention group reconstructed the patients' postoperative kinesiophobiaand hyperactivity. The level of pain awareness facilitates the patient's acquisition of the correct functional exercises to make them change their misbehavior. CONCLUSIONS: WeChat micro-video can reduce the fear of movement score and pain score in patients with kinesiophobia after unilateral total knee arthroplasty, shorten the first time out of bed, and improve their joint mobility and daily living ability. ETHICS: This study has passed the ethical review of the hospital where it was conducted and has been filed, Ethics Approval Number: 20181203-01.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Knee Joint/physiopathology , Knee Joint/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Pneumonia/virology , Postoperative Period , Prospective Studies , Range of Motion, Articular , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
16.
Am Fam Physician ; 103(3): 147-154, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050965

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine can provide patients with cost-effective, quality care. The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has highlighted the need for alternative methods of delivering health care. Family physicians can benefit from using a standardized approach to evaluate and diagnose musculoskeletal issues via telemedicine visits. Previsit planning establishes appropriate use of telemedicine and ensures that the patient and physician have functional telehealth equipment. Specific instructions to patients regarding ideal setting, camera angles, body positioning, and attire enhance virtual visits. Physicians can obtain a thorough history and perform a structured musculoskeletal examination via telemedicine. The use of common household items allows physicians to replicate in-person clinical examination maneuvers. Home care instructions and online rehabilitation resources are available for initial management. Patients should be scheduled for an in-person visit when the diagnosis or management plan is in question. Patients with a possible deformity or neurovascular compromise should be referred for urgent evaluation. Follow-up can be done virtually if the patient's condition is improving as expected. If the condition is worsening or not improving, the patient should have an in-office assessment, with consideration for referral to formal physical therapy or specialty services when appropriate.


Subject(s)
Musculoskeletal Diseases/diagnosis , Musculoskeletal Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Medical History Taking , Muscle Strength , Pandemics , Physical Examination/methods , Range of Motion, Articular
17.
Syst Rev ; 9(1): 264, 2020 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940036

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Flexor tendon injuries most commonly occur following a penetrating injury to the hand or wrist. These are challenging injuries and the standard treatment is surgical repair under general or regional anaesthesia. 'Wide-awake' surgery is an emerging technique in hand surgery where a conscious patient is operated on under local anaesthetic. The vasoconstrictive effect of adrenaline (epinephrine) creates a 'bloodless' operating field and a tourniquet is not required. The potential advantages include intra-operative testing of the repair; removal of the risks of general anaesthesia; reduced costs; no aerosol generation from intubation therefore reduced risk of COVID-19 spread to healthcare professionals. The aim of this study will be to systematically evaluate the evidence to determine if wide-awake surgery is superior to general/regional anaesthetic in adults who undergo flexor tendon repair. METHODS: We designed and registered a study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative and non-comparative studies. The primary outcome will be functional active range of motion. Secondary outcomes will be complications, resource use (operative time) and patient-reported outcome measures. A comprehensive literature search will be conducted (from 1946 to present) in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library. Grey literature will be identified through Open Grey, dissertation databases and clinical trials registers. All studies on wide-awake surgery for flexor tendon repair will be included. The comparator will be general or regional anaesthesia. No limitations will be imposed on peer review status or language of publication. Two investigators will independently screen all citations, full-text articles and abstract data. Potential conflicts will be resolved through discussion or referral to a third author when necessary. The study methodological quality (or bias) will be appraised using an appropriate tool. If feasible, we will conduct a random effects meta-analysis. DISCUSSION: This systematic review will summarise the best available evidence and definitively establish if function, complications, cost, or patient-reported outcomes are improved when flexor tendons are repaired using wide-awake technique. It will determine if this novel approach is superior to general or regional anaesthesia. This knowledge will help guide hand surgeons by continuing to improve outcomes from flexor tendon injuries. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42020182196.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Local , Anesthetics, Local , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hand/surgery , Infection Control , Tendon Injuries/surgery , Wakefulness , Adult , Anesthesia, Conduction , Anesthesia, General , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Epinephrine , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Orthopedic Procedures , Pandemics , Range of Motion, Articular , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Tendons/surgery , Tourniquets , Treatment Outcome
18.
Rev Paul Pediatr ; 39: e2020238, 2020.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934373

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report the physiotherapeutic management of two pediatric cases with COVID-19 admitted in a reference state hospital to treat the disease in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. CASES DESCRIPTION: Case 1, female, 10-month-old child, pre-existing chronic disease, hospitalized since birth, mechanical ventilation dependency via tracheotomy, progressed with hypoxemia, requiring oxygen therapy, and increased ventilator parameters, and a diagnosis of COVID-19 was confirmed. Airway clearance and pulmonary expansion maintenance therapies were performed. During hospitalization, the child acquired cephalic control, sitting without support, rolling, holding, and reaching objects. Recommendations were provided to a family member to maintain motor development milestones. Case 2, male, nine years old, previous psychiatric disease and obesity, showed worsening of the sensory state, requiring intensive care and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the diagnosis of SARS-Cov-2 infection. The physical therapy was performed to maintain airway clearance, pulmonary expansion, and early mobilization, showing ventilatory improvement during the intensive care hospitalization and successfully extubated after 17 days. The physical therapy evolved from passive to resistive exercises during the hospitalization, and the patient was able to walk without assistance at discharge, with the same previous functional status. COMMENTS: The COVID-19 showed different manifestations in both cases. Physical therapy treatment was essential to maintain and to recover the functional status of the patients. Future studies are needed to improve the understanding of disease course and its functional consequences to offer an efficient treatment to pediatric patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Patient-Centered Care/methods , Physical Therapy Modalities/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Brazil , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Range of Motion, Articular
19.
Musculoskeletal Care ; 19(2): 208-216, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-891896

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been increased usage of virtual telerehabilitation approach during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is crucial to establish reliability of conducting virtual assessments for musculoskeletal conditions. OBJECTIVES: This research determined the intra- and interrater reliability of measuring knee and wrist range of motion (ROM) assessed virtually and obtained face-to-face (F2F) using a goniometer (UG) for a student and an experienced examiner. METHOD: Knee and wrist joint ROM for 54 healthy participants was assessed virtually and F2F by a student examiner and an experienced physical therapist. Intra- (virtual vs. UG assessment) and inter-rater (virtual or UG assessment between examiners) reliabilities were examined for all ROM using Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICC values were considered good (>0.75) or excellent (>0.90). Bland and Altman plots determined the limits of agreement (LOA) in assessing joint ROM. RESULTS/FINDINGS: Student examiner had good reliability in virtually estimating knee extension (ICC = 0.79), wrist flexion (ICC = 0.82) and wrist extension (ICC = 0.78), whereas the experienced examiner had excellent reliability in virtually estimating all knee and wrist ROM (ICC > 0.90). The LOA in assessing knee and wrist ROM for the student examiner were wider indicating higher disagreement between virtual and UG-obtained ROM in some cases. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual estimation of knee and wrist ROM is a reliable technique, however experience level impacts the precision of measurement. It is suggested that the same examiner conducts all the ROM assessments throughout the clinical course of a patient receiving virtual interventions for knee or wrist pathologies.


Subject(s)
Arthrometry, Articular/instrumentation , Knee Joint/physiology , Range of Motion, Articular/physiology , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Wrist Joint/physiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
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