Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 46
Filter
1.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598389

ABSTRACT

Both in utero exposure to maternal immune activation and cannabis use during adolescence have been associated with increased risk for the development of schizophrenia; however, whether these exposures exert synergistic effects on brain function is not known. In the present study, mild maternal immune activation (MIA) was elicited in mice with prenatal exposure to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), and ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was provided throughout adolescence in cereal (3 mg/kg/day for 5 days). Neither THC nor MIA pretreatments altered activity in assays used to characterize hyperdopaminergic states in adulthood: amphetamine hyperlocomotion and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex. Adolescent THC treatment elicited deficits in spatial memory and enhanced spatial reversal learning in adult female mice in the Morris water maze, while exposure to MIA elicited female-specific deficits in fear extinction learning in adulthood. There were no effects in these assays in adult males, nor were there interactions between THC and MIA in adult females. While doses of poly(I:C) and THC were sufficient to elicit behavioral effects, particularly relating to cognitive performance in females, there was no evidence that adolescent THC exposure synergized with the risk imposed by MIA to worsen behavioral outcomes in adult mice of either sex.


Subject(s)
Aging/physiology , Behavior, Animal/drug effects , Dronabinol/pharmacology , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/immunology , Amphetamine , Animals , Conditioning, Classical , Extinction, Psychological/drug effects , Fear/drug effects , Female , Locomotion/drug effects , Male , Maze Learning/physiology , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pregnancy , Prepulse Inhibition/drug effects , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Reflex, Startle/drug effects , Swimming
2.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259732, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518359

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) are bioactive particles that evoke beneficial responses in recipient cells. We identified a role for MSC-EV in immune modulation and cellular salvage in a model of SARS-CoV-2 induced acute lung injury (ALI) using pulmonary epithelial cells and exposure to cytokines or the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD). Whereas RBD or cytokine exposure caused a pro-inflammatory cellular environment and injurious signaling, impairing alveolar-capillary barrier function, and inducing cell death, MSC-EVs reduced inflammation and reestablished target cell health. Importantly, MSC-EV treatment increased active ACE2 surface protein compared to RBD injury, identifying a previously unknown role for MSC-EV treatment in COVID-19 signaling and pathogenesis. The beneficial effect of MSC-EV treatment was confirmed in an LPS-induced rat model of ALI wherein MSC-EVs reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and respiratory dysfunction associated with disease. MSC-EV administration was dose-responsive, demonstrating a large effective dose range for clinical translation. These data provide direct evidence of an MSC-EV-mediated improvement in ALI and contribute new insights into the therapeutic potential of MSC-EVs in COVID-19 or similar pathologies of respiratory distress.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/complications , Acute Lung Injury/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Extracellular Vesicles/ultrastructure , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Models, Biological , Pneumonia/pathology , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction , THP-1 Cells
3.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(2): 375-384, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent clinical studies report that women with a history of AKI have an increased incidence of maternal and fetal adverse outcomes during pregnancy, despite fully recovering renal function prior to conception. The mechanisms contributing to such adverse outcomes in pregnancy after AKI are not yet understood. METHODS: To develop a rodent model to investigate fetal and maternal outcomes in female animals with a history of AKI, we used ischemia-reperfusion injury as an experimental model of AKI in female Sprague Dawley rats. The 12-week-old animals underwent warm bilateral ischemia-reperfusion surgery involving clamping of both renal arteries for 45 minutes or sham surgery (control). Rats were allowed to recover for 1 month prior to mating. Recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury was confirmed by measurements of plasma creatinine and urinary protein excretion. We assessed maternal and fetal outcomes during late pregnancy on gestational day 20. RESULTS: After recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury, compared with healthy sham-surgery controls, dams exhibited pregnancy-induced renal insufficiency with increases in plasma creatinine and urea, along with increased urinary protein excretion. Additionally, recovered ischemia-reperfusion dams experienced worse fetal outcomes compared with controls, with intrauterine growth restriction leading to higher rates of fetal demise and smaller pups. CONCLUSIONS: In this rat model, despite biochemical resolution of ischemia-reperfusion injury, subsequent pregnancy resulted in maternal renal insufficiency and significant impairments in fetal growth. This mirrors findings in recent reports in the clinical population, indicating that this model may be a useful tool to further explore the alterations in kidney function after AKI in women.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Pregnancy Complications/etiology , Reperfusion Injury/etiology , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Kidney Function Tests , Ligation , Pregnancy , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Renal Artery/surgery
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480798

ABSTRACT

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a severe condition characterized by the systemic formation of microthrombi complicated with bleeding tendency and organ dysfunction. In the last years, it represents one of the most frequent consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The pathogenesis of DIC is complex, with cross-talk between the coagulant and inflammatory pathways. The objective of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory action of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DIC model in rats. Experimental DIC was induced by continual infusion of LPS (30 mg/kg) for 4 h through the tail vein. Um-PEA (30 mg/kg) was given orally 30 min before and 1 h after the start of intravenous infusion of LPS. Results showed that um-PEA reduced alteration of coagulation markers, as well as proinflammatory cytokine release in plasma and lung samples, induced by LPS infusion. Furthermore, um-PEA also has the effect of preventing the formation of fibrin deposition and lung damage. Moreover, um-PEA was able to reduce the number of mast cells (MCs) and the release of its serine proteases, which are also necessary for SARS-CoV-2 infection. These results suggest that um-PEA could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach in the management of DIC and in clinical implications associated to coagulopathy and lung dysfunction, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Ethanolamines/therapeutic use , Palmitic Acids/therapeutic use , Sepsis/complications , Amides/chemistry , Amides/pharmacology , Animals , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Ethanolamines/chemistry , Ethanolamines/pharmacology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mast Cells/cytology , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Palmitic Acids/chemistry , Palmitic Acids/pharmacology , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Prothrombin Time , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/pathology , Serine Proteases/metabolism
5.
Surg Obes Relat Dis ; 16(12): 1910-1918, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery is well established as a treatment for obesity and associated complications. This procedure improves metabolic homeostasis through changes in energy expenditure. We hypothesized that sleeve gastrectomy (SG) improves metabolic homeostasis by modulating energy expenditure and enhancing thermogenesis through increasing the expression level of meteorin-like protein (METRNL) and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5/Irisin) through uncoupling proteins 1/2/3 (UCP1, UCP2, and UCP3). OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of SG on the levels of proteins involved in thermogenesis process. SETTING: Laboratory rats at Kuwait University. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 4 to 5 weeks, were divided into 2 groups, control (n = 11) and diet-induced obesity (DIO) (n = 22). The control group was fed regular rat chow ad libitum, whereas the DIO group was fed cafeteria diet "high-fat/carbohydrate diet" ad libitum. At 21 weeks, rats in the DIO group that weighed 20% more than the control group animals underwent surgery. These rats were randomly subdivided into Sham and SG operation groups. Gene expression was evaluated, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were employed to assess the changes in gene and protein levels in tissue and circulation. RESULTS: The protein expression data revealed an increase in METRNL levels in the muscles and white adipose tissue of SG animals. METRNL level in circulation in SG animals was reduced compared with control and Sham rats. The level of Irisin increased in the muscle of SG animals compared with the control and Sham group animals; however, a decrease in Irisin level was observed in the white adipose tissue and brown adipose tissue of SG animals compared with controls. Gene expression analysis revealed decreased METRNL levels in muscle tissues in the SG group compared with the control group animals. Increased expression of FNDC5 (Irisin), UCP2, and UCP3 in the muscle tissue of SG animals was also observed. Furthermore, the levels of UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, and METRNL in the brown adipose tissue of SG animals were upregulated. No significant alteration in the gene expression of Irisin was observed in brown adipose tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Sleeve gastrectomy induces weight loss through complex mechanisms that may include browning of fat.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue, Brown , Obesity , Adipose Tissue/metabolism , Animals , Diet , Fibronectins/genetics , Fibronectins/metabolism , Gastrectomy , Kuwait , Male , Mitochondrial Uncoupling Proteins , Muscles/metabolism , Obesity/genetics , Obesity/surgery , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
6.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity increases the severity of SARS-CoV-2 outcomes. Thus, this study tested whether obesogenic and ketogenic diets distinctly affect SARS-CoV-2 entry proteins and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in rat pulmonary and cardiac tissues. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either standard chow (SC), a high-fat sucrose-enriched diet (HFS), or a ketogenic diet (KD) for 16 weeks. Afterwards, levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2), RAS components, and inflammatory genes were measured in the lungs and hearts of these animals. RESULTS: In the lungs, HFS elevated ACE2 and TMPRSS2 levels relative to SC diet, whereas the KD lowered the levels of these proteins and the gene expressions of toll-like receptor 4 and interleukin-6 receptor relative to HFS. The diets did not alter ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in the heart, although ACE2 was more abundant in heart than lung tissues. CONCLUSION: Diet-induced obesity increased the levels of viral entry proteins in the lungs, providing a mechanism whereby SARS-CoV-2 infectivity can be enhanced in obese individuals. Conversely, by maintaining low levels of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and by exerting an anti-inflammatory effect, the KD can potentially attenuate the severity of infection and migration of SARS-CoV-2 to other ACE2-expressing tissues.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects , Diet, Ketogenic/methods , Lung/metabolism , Myocardium/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Male , Obesity/complications , Obesity/metabolism , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization
7.
Toxicol Pathol ; 49(7): 1255-1268, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398800

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a rapidly spreading disease, posing a huge hazard to global health. The plasmid vaccine pTK1A-TPA-SpikeA (named COVID-eVax) encodes the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 S protein receptor-binding domain, developed for intramuscular injection followed by electroporation (EP). The aim of this study was to assess the systemic toxicity and local tolerance of COVID-eVax delivered intramuscularly followed by EP in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The animals were killed 2 days and 4 weeks after the last injection (30-day and 57-day, respectively). No mortality was observed, and no signs of toxicity were evident, including injection site reactions. A lasting and specific immune response was observed in all treated animals, confirming the relevance of the rat as a toxicological model for this vaccine. Histopathological evaluation revealed muscle fiber necrosis associated with subchronic inflammation at the injection sites (at the 30-day time point), with a clear trend for recovery at the 57-day time point, which is expected following EP, and considered a desirable effect to mount the immune response against the target antigen. In conclusion, the intramuscular EP-assisted DNA vaccine, COVID-eVax showed an excellent safety profile in SD rats under these experimental conditions and supports its further development for use in humans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines, DNA , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Vaccines , Electroporation , Humans , Plasmids , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, DNA/toxicity
8.
J Neuroimmunol ; 358: 577654, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386080

ABSTRACT

Increasing evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, is associated with increased risk of developing neurological or psychiatric conditions such as depression, anxiety or dementia. While the precise mechanism underlying this association is unknown, aberrant activation of toll-like receptor (TLR)3, a viral recognizing pattern recognition receptor, may play a key role. Synthetic cannabinoids and enhancing cannabinoid tone via inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been demonstrated to modulate TLR3-induced neuroimmune responses and associated sickness behaviour. However, the role of individual FAAH substrates, and the receptor mechanisms mediating these effects, are unknown. The present study examined the effects of intracerebral or systemic administration of the FAAH substrates N-oleoylethanolamide (OEA), N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) or the anandamide (AEA) analogue meth-AEA on hyperthermia and hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression following administration of the TLR3 agonist, and viral mimetic, poly I:C. The data demonstrate that meth-AEA does not alter TLR3-induced hyperthermia or hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression. In comparison, OEA and PEA attenuated the TLR3-induced hyperthermia, although only OEA attenuated the expression of hyperthermia-related genes (IL-1ß, iNOS, COX2 and m-PGES) in the hypothalamus. OEA, but not PEA, attenuated TLR3-induced increases in the expression of all IRF- and NFκB-related genes examined in the hypothalamus, but not in the spleen. Antagonism of PPARα prevented the OEA-induced attenuation of IRF- and NFκB-related genes in the hypothalamus following TLR3 activation but did not significantly alter temperature. PPARα agonism did not alter TLR3-induced hyperthermia or hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression. These data indicate that OEA may be the primary FAAH substrate that modulates TLR3-induced neuroinflammation and hyperthermia, effects partially mediated by PPARα.


Subject(s)
Ethanolamines/pharmacology , Hyperthermia, Induced/methods , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , PPAR alpha/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 3/administration & dosage , Amidohydrolases/pharmacology , Animals , Female , Gene Expression , PPAR alpha/agonists , PPAR alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Poly I-C/toxicity , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
9.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8112783, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378089

ABSTRACT

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to participate in regulating many biological processes, including immune response to influenza A virus (IAV). However, the association between lncRNA expression profiles and influenza infection susceptibility has not been well elucidated. Here, we analyzed the expression profiles of lncRNAs, miRNAs, and mRNAs among IAV-infected adult rat (IAR), normal adult rat (AR), IAV-infected junior rat (IJR), and normal junior rat (JR) by RNA sequencing. Compared with differently expressed lncRNAs (DElncRNAs) between AR and IAR, 24 specific DElncRNAs were found between IJR and JR. Then, based on the fold changes and P value, the top 5 DElncRNAs, including 3 upregulated and 2 downregulated lncRNAs, were chosen to establish a ceRNA network for further disclosing their regulatory mechanisms. To visualize the differentially expressed genes in the ceRNA network, GO and KEGG pathway analysis was performed to further explore their roles in influenza infection of junior rats. The results showed that the downregulated DElncRNA-target genes were mostly enriched in the IL-17 signaling pathway. It indicated that the downregulated lncRNAs conferred the susceptibility of junior rats to IAV via mediating the IL-17 signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , MicroRNAs/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Susceptibility , Gene Expression Profiling , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Interleukin-17/genetics , Interleukin-17/immunology , MicroRNAs/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , RNA, Long Noncoding/immunology , RNA, Messenger/immunology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
10.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255976, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365424

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiac injury associated with cytokine release frequently occurs in SARS-CoV-2 mediated coronavirus disease (COVID19) and mortality is particularly high in these patients. The mechanistic role of the COVID19 associated cytokine-storm for the concomitant cardiac dysfunction and associated arrhythmias is unclear. Moreover, the role of anti-inflammatory therapy to mitigate cardiac dysfunction remains elusive. AIMS AND METHODS: We investigated the effects of COVID19-associated inflammatory response on cardiac cellular function as well as its cardiac arrhythmogenic potential in rat and induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). In addition, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of the IL-1ß antagonist Canakinumab using state of the art in-vitro confocal and ratiometric high-throughput microscopy. RESULTS: Isolated rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were exposed to control or COVID19 serum from intensive care unit (ICU) patients with severe ARDS and impaired cardiac function (LVEF 41±5%; 1/3 of patients on veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; CK 154±43 U/l). Rat cardiomyocytes showed an early increase of myofilament sensitivity, a decrease of Ca2+ transient amplitudes and altered baseline [Ca2+] upon exposure to patient serum. In addition, we used iPS-CM to explore the long-term effect of patient serum on cardiac electrical and mechanical function. In iPS-CM, spontaneous Ca2+ release events were more likely to occur upon incubation with COVID19 serum and nuclear as well as cytosolic Ca2+ release were altered. Co-incubation with Canakinumab had no effect on pro-arrhythmogenic Ca2+ release or Ca2+ signaling during excitation-contraction coupling, nor significantly influenced cellular automaticity. CONCLUSION: Serum derived from COVID19 patients exerts acute cardio-depressant and chronic pro-arrhythmogenic effects in rat and iPS-derived cardiomyocytes. Canakinumab had no beneficial effect on cellular Ca2+ signaling during excitation-contraction coupling. The presented method utilizing iPS-CM and in-vitro Ca2+ imaging might serve as a novel tool for precision medicine. It allows to investigate cytokine related cardiac dysfunction and pharmacological approaches useful therein.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , COVID-19 , Calcium Signaling/drug effects , Myocytes, Cardiac , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Animals , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/metabolism , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Calcium/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Female , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/drug therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/etiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/metabolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/pathology
11.
Bioorg Chem ; 115: 105196, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322004

ABSTRACT

So far, there is still no specific drug against COVID-19. Taking compound 1 with anti-EBOV activity as the lead, fifty-four 12N-substituted aloperine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for the anti-SARS-CoV-2 activities using pseudotyped virus model. Among them, 8a exhibited the most potential effects against both pseudotyped and authentic SARS-CoV-2, as well as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, indicating a broad-spectrum anti-coronavirus profile. The mechanism study disclosed that 8a might block a late stage of viral entry, mainly via inhibiting host cathepsin B activity rather than directly targeting cathepsin B protein. Also, 8a could significantly reduce the release of multiple inflammatory cytokines in a time- and dose-dependent manner, such as IL-6, IL-1ß, IL-8 and MCP-1, the major contributors to cytokine storm. Therefore, 8a is a promising agent with the advantages of broad-spectrum anti-coronavirus and anti-cytokine effects, thus worthy of further investigation.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Piperidines/pharmacology , Quinolizidines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Cathepsin B/antagonists & inhibitors , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cytokines/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Male , Mice , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Structure , Piperidines/chemical synthesis , Piperidines/pharmacokinetics , Piperidines/toxicity , Quinolizidines/chemical synthesis , Quinolizidines/pharmacokinetics , Quinolizidines/toxicity , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vero Cells
12.
Anal Bioanal Chem ; 413(23): 5811-5820, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321733

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is a nucleotide analog prodrug that has received much attention since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2019. GS-441524 (Nuc) is the active metabolite of remdesivir and plays a pivotal role in the clinical treatment of COVID-19. Here, a robust HPLC-MS/MS method was developed to determine Nuc concentrations in rat plasma samples after a one-step protein precipitation process. Chromatographic separation was accomplished on Waters XBrige C18 column (50 × 2.1 mm, 3.5 µm) under gradient elution conditions. Multiple reaction monitoring transitions in electrospray positive ion mode were m/z 292.2 → 163.2 for Nuc and 237.1 → 194.1 for the internal standard (carbamazepine). The quantitative analysis method was fully validated in line with the United States Food and Drug Administration guidelines. The linearity, accuracy and precision, matrix effect, recovery, and stability results met the requirements of the guidelines. Uncertainty of measurement and incurred sample reanalysis were analyzed to further ensure the robustness and reproducibility of the method. This optimized method was successfully applied in a rat pharmacokinetics study of remdesivir (intravenously administration, 5 mg kg-1). The method can act as a basis for further pharmacokinetic and clinical efficacy investigations in patients with COVID-19. Graphical abstract.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/blood , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods , Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods , Adenosine/blood , Adenosine/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine/standards , Adenosine Monophosphate/blood , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/standards , Alanine/blood , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/standards , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/standards , Limit of Detection , Male , Quality Control , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Reference Standards , Reproducibility of Results
13.
J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci ; 1179: 122862, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313204

ABSTRACT

Niclosamide, which is an anti-tapeworm drug, was developed in 1958. However, recent studies have demonstrated the antiviral effects of niclosamide against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19. In this study, we developed and validated a quantitative analysis method for the determination of niclosamide in rat and dog plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and used this method for pharmacokinetic studies. Biological samples were prepared using the protein precipitation method with acetonitrile. Ibuprofen was used as an internal standard. The mobile phase used to quantify niclosamide in rat or dog plasma consisted of 10 mM ammonium formate in distilled water-acetonitrile (30:70, v/v) or 5 mM ammonium acetate-methanol (30:70, v/v). An XDB-phenyl column (5 µm, 2.1 × 50 mm) and a Kinetex® C18 column (5 µm, 2.1 × 500 mm) were used as reverse-phase liquid chromatography columns for rat and dog plasma analyses, respectively. Niclosamide and ibuprofen were detected under multiple reaction monitoring conditions using the electrospray ionization interface running in the negative ionization mode. Niclosamide presented linearity in the concentration ranges of 1-3000 ng/mL (r = 0.9967) and 1-1000 ng/mL (r = 0.9941) in rat and dog plasma, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision values were < 7.40% and < 6.35%, respectively, for rat plasma, and < 3.95% and < 4.01%, respectively, for dog plasma. The intra- and inter-day accuracy values were < 4.59% and < 6.63%, respectively, for rat plasma, and < 12.1% and < 10.9%, respectively, for dog plasma. In addition, the recoveries of niclosamide ranged between 87.8 and 99.6% and 102-104% for rat and dog plasma, respectively. Niclosamide was stable during storage under various conditions (three freeze-thaw cycles, 6 h at room temperature, long-term, and processed samples). A reliable LC-MS/MS method for niclosamide detection was successfully used to perform pharmacokinetic studies in rats and dogs. Niclosamide presented dose-independent pharmacokinetics in the dose range of 0.3-3 mg/kg after intravenous administration, and drug exposure in rats and dogs after oral administration was very low. Additionally, niclosamide presented high plasma protein binding (>99.8%) and low metabolic stability. These results can be helpful for further developing and understanding the pharmacokinetic characteristics of niclosamide to expand its clinical use.


Subject(s)
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods , Niclosamide/blood , Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods , Animals , Dogs , Humans , Male , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
14.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295894

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a key entry point of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus known to induce Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We have recently outlined a concept to reduce ACE2 expression by the administration of glycyrrhizin, a component of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract, via its inhibitory activity on 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2) and resulting activation of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). We hypothesized that in organs such as the ileum, which co-express 11betaHSD2, MR and ACE2, the expression of ACE2 would be suppressed. We studied organ tissues from an experiment originally designed to address the effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract on stress response. Male Sprague Dawley rats were left undisturbed or exposed to chronic mild stress for five weeks. For the last two weeks, animals continued with a placebo diet or received a diet containing extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra root at a dose of 150 mg/kg of body weight/day. Quantitative PCR measurements showed a significant decrease in gene expression of ACE2 in the small intestine of rats fed with diet containing Glycyrrhiza glabra extract. This effect was independent of the stress condition and failed to be observed in non-target tissues, namely the heart and the brain cortex. In the small intestine we also confirmed the reduction of ACE2 at the protein level. Present findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that Glycyrrhiza glabra extract may reduce an entry point of SARS-CoV-2. Whether this phenomenon, when confirmed in additional studies, is linked to the susceptibility of cells to the virus requires further studies.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Glycyrrhiza , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Male , Plant Extracts/administration & dosage , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
15.
Life Sci ; 281: 119718, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271709

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hypoxia, a pathophysiological condition, is profound in several cardiopulmonary diseases (CPD). Every individual's lethality to a hypoxia state differs in terms of hypoxia exposure time, dosage units and dependent on the individual's genetic makeup. Most of the proposed markers for CPD were generally aim to distinguish disease samples from normal samples. Although, as per the 2018 GOLD guidelines, clinically useful biomarkers for several cardio pulmonary disease patients in stable condition have yet to be identified. We attempt to address these key issues through the identification of Dynamic Network Biomarkers (DNB) to detect hypoxia induced early warning signals of CPD before the catastrophic deterioration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The human microvascular endothelial tissues microarray datasets (GSE11341) of lung and cardiac expose to hypoxia (1% O2) for 3, 24 and 48 h were retrieved from the public repository. The time dependent differentially expressed genes were subjected to tissue specificity and promoter analysis to filtrate the noise levels in the networks and to dissect the tissue specific hypoxia induced genes. These filtered out genes were used to construct the dynamic segmentation networks. The hypoxia induced dynamic differentially expressed genes were validated in the lung and heart tissues of male rats. These rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (simulated altitude of 25,000 or PO2 - 282 mm of Hg) progressively for 3, 24 and 48 h. KEY FINDINGS: To identify the temporal key genes regulated in hypoxia, we ranked the dominant genes based on their consolidated topological features from tissue specific networks, time dependent networks and dynamic networks. Overall topological ranking described VEGFA as a single node dynamic hub and strongly communicated with tissue specific genes to carry forward their tissue specific information. We named this type of VEGFAcentric dynamic networks as "V-DNBs". As a proof of principle, our methodology helped us to identify the V-DNBs specific for lung and cardiac tissues namely V-DNBL and V-DNBC respectively. SIGNIFICANCE: Our experimental studies identified VEGFA, SLC2A3, ADM and ENO2 as the minimum and sufficient candidates of V-DNBL. The dynamic expression patterns could be readily exploited to capture the pre disease state of hypoxia induced pulmonary vascular remodelling. Whereas in V-DNBC the minimum and sufficient candidates are VEGFA, SCL2A3, ADM, NDRG1, ENO2 and BHLHE40. The time dependent single node expansion indicates V-DNBC could also be the pre disease state pathological hallmark for hypoxia-associated cardiovascular remodelling. The network cross-talk and expression pattern between V-DNBL and V-DNBC are completely distinct. On the other hand, the great clinical advantage of V-DNBs for pre disease predictions, a set of samples during the healthy condition should suffice. Future clinical studies might further shed light on the predictive power of V-DNBs as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers for CPD.


Subject(s)
Heart Diseases/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lung Diseases/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , Clinical Deterioration , Gene Expression Regulation , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/pathology , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/genetics , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases/pathology , Male , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
16.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253543, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282302

ABSTRACT

Based on several lines of evidence, numerous investigators have suggested that acetaminophen exposure during early development can induce neurological disorders. We had previously postulated that acetaminophen exposure early in life, if combined with antioxidants that prevent accumulation of NAPQI, the toxic metabolite of acetaminophen, might be innocuous. In this study, we administered acetaminophen at or below the currently recommended therapeutic dose to male laboratory rat pups aged 4-10 days. The antioxidants cysteine and mannitol were included to prevent accumulation of NAPQI. In addition, animals were exposed to a cassette of common stress factors: an inflammatory diet, psychological stress, antibiotics, and mock infections using killed bacteria. At age 37-49 days, observation during introduction to a novel conspecific revealed increased rearing behavior, an asocial activity, in animals treated with acetaminophen plus antioxidants, regardless of their exposure to oxidative stress factors (2-way ANOVA; P < 0.0001). This observation would suggest that the initial hypothesis is incorrect, and that oxidative stress mediators do not entirely eliminate the effects of acetaminophen on neurodevelopment. This study provides additional cause for caution when considering the use of acetaminophen in the pediatric population, and provides evidence that the effects of acetaminophen on neurodevelopment need to be considered both in the presence and in the absence of oxidative stress.


Subject(s)
Acetaminophen/pharmacology , Behavior, Animal/drug effects , Cysteine/pharmacology , Mannitol/pharmacology , Neurogenesis/drug effects , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Female , Male , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12787, 2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275960

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a pandemic affecting the most vulnerable in society, triggering a public health crisis and economic collapse around the world. Effective treatments to mitigate this viral infection are needed. Since the eye is a route of virus entrance, we use an in vivo rat model of corneal inflammation as well as human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) in culture challenged with IFNγ as models of the eye surface to study this issue. We explore ways to block the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) protein to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). We found that the lipid mediators, elovanoid (ELV)-N32 or Resolvin D6-isomer (RvD6i) decreased the expression of the ACE2 receptor, furin, and integrins in damaged corneas or IFNγ-stimulated HCEC. There was also a concomitant decrease in the binding of Spike RBD with the lipid treatments. Using RNA-seq analysis, we uncovered that the lipid mediators also attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatoy cytokines participating in hyper-inflammation and senescence programming. Thus, the bioactivity of these lipid mediators will contribute to open therapeutic avenues to counteract virus attachment and entrance to the body.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Corneal Injuries/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Docosahexaenoic Acids/analogs & derivatives , Docosahexaenoic Acids/pharmacology , Drug Discovery/methods , Protein Domains , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelium, Corneal/cytology , Humans , Lipoxins/pharmacology , Male , Protein Binding , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects
18.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 141: 111823, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272313

ABSTRACT

Here, we demonstrate that the two distinct formulations of our anti-sepsis drug candidate Rejuveinix (RJX), have a very favorable safety profile in Wistar Albino rats at dose levels comparable to the projected clinical dose levels. 14-day treatment with RJX-P (RJX PPP.18.1051) or RJX-B (RJX-B200702-CLN) similarly elevated the day 15 tissue levels of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as ascorbic acid in both the lungs and liver in a dose-dependent fashion. The activity of SOD and ascorbic acid levels were significantly higher in tissues of RJX-P or RJX-B treated rats than vehicle-treated control rats (p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference between tissue SOD activity or ascorbic acid levels of rats treated with RJX-P vs. rats treated with RJX-B (p > 0.05). The observed elevations of the SOD and ascorbic acid levels were transient and were no longer detectable on day 28 following a 14-day recovery period. These results demonstrate that RJX-P and RJX-B are bioequivalent relative to their pharmacodynamic effects on tissue SOD and ascorbic acid levels. Furthermore, both formulations showed profound protective activity in a mouse model of sepsis. In agreement with the PD evaluations in rats and their proposed mechanism of action, both RJX-P and RJX-B exhibited near-identical potent and dose-dependent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity in the LPS-GalN model of ARDS and multi-organ failure in mice.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/chemistry , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Magnesium Sulfate/chemistry , Magnesium Sulfate/therapeutic use , Niacinamide/chemistry , Niacinamide/therapeutic use , Pantothenic Acid/chemistry , Pantothenic Acid/therapeutic use , Pyridoxine/chemistry , Pyridoxine/therapeutic use , Riboflavin/chemistry , Riboflavin/therapeutic use , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/metabolism , Thiamine/chemistry , Thiamine/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Dogs , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Combinations , Drug Compounding , Female , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Magnesium Sulfate/pharmacology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Niacinamide/pharmacology , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pantothenic Acid/pharmacology , Pyridoxine/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Rats, Wistar , Riboflavin/pharmacology , Sepsis/pathology , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Thiamine/pharmacology
19.
Neurobiol Dis ; 156: 105422, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267874

ABSTRACT

Synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) such as dexamethasone (DEX), while used to mitigate inflammation and disease progression in premature infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), are also associated with significant adverse neurologic effects such as reductions in myelination and abnormalities in neuroanatomical development. Ciclesonide (CIC) is a sGC prodrug approved for asthma treatment that exhibits limited systemic side effects. Carboxylesterases enriched in the lower airways convert CIC to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist des-CIC. We therefore examined whether CIC would likewise activate GR in neonatal lung but have limited adverse extra-pulmonary effects, particularly in the developing brain. Neonatal rats were administered subcutaneous injections of CIC, DEX or vehicle from postnatal days 1-5 (PND1-PND5). Systemic effects linked to DEX exposure, including reduced body and brain weight, were not observed in CIC treated neonates. Furthermore, CIC did not trigger the long-lasting reduction in myelin basic protein expression in the cerebral cortex nor cerebellar size caused by neonatal DEX exposure. Conversely, DEX and CIC were both effective at inducing the expression of select GR target genes in neonatal lung, including those implicated in lung-protective and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, CIC is a promising, novel candidate drug to treat or prevent BPD in neonates given its activation of GR in neonatal lung and limited adverse neurodevelopmental effects. Furthermore, since sGCs such as DEX administered to pregnant women in pre-term labor can adversely affect fetal brain development, the neurological-sparing properties of CIC, make it an attractive alternative for DEX to treat pregnant women severely ill with respiratory illness, such as with asthma exacerbations or COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
Cerebellum/drug effects , Cerebral Cortex/drug effects , Glucocorticoids , Lung/drug effects , Pregnenediones/pharmacology , Prodrugs/pharmacology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Body Weight/drug effects , Brain/drug effects , Brain/growth & development , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Female , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Myelin Basic Protein/biosynthesis , Organ Size/drug effects , Pregnancy , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/drug effects
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266735

ABSTRACT

Soybean koji refers to steamed soybeans inoculated with microbial species. Soybean fermentation improves the health benefits of soybeans. Obesity is a serious health concern owing to its increasing incidence rate and high association with other metabolic diseases. Therefore, we investigated the effects of soybean and soybean koji on high-fat diet-induced obesity in rats. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8/group) as follows: (1) regular diet (RD), (2) high-fat diet (HFD), (3) HFD + steamed soybean (HFD+SS), and (4) HFD + soybean koji (HFD+SK). SK contained more free amino acids and unsaturated fatty acids than SS. In a rat model of obesity, SK consumption significantly alleviated the increase in weight of white adipose tissue and mRNA expression of lipogenic genes, whereas SS consumption did not. Both SS and SK reduced serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. SS and SK also inhibited lipid accumulation in the liver and white adipose tissue and reduced adipocyte size. Although both SS and SK could alleviate HFD-induced dyslipidemia, SK has better anti-obesity effects than SS by regulating lipogenesis. Overall, SK is an excellent functional food that may prevent obesity.


Subject(s)
Diet, High-Fat , Dyslipidemias , Animals , Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects , Dyslipidemias/etiology , Dyslipidemias/prevention & control , Liver , Male , Obesity/etiology , Obesity/prevention & control , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Soybeans
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...