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1.
Hum Exp Toxicol ; 41: 9603271221089257, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Remdesivir is an anti-viral drug that inhibits RNA polymerase. In 2020, remdesivir was recognized as the most promising therapeutic agents against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the effects of remdesivir on cancers have hardly been studied. PURPOSE: Here, we reported that the anti-carcinogenic effect of remdesivir on SKOV3 cells, one of human ovarian cancer cell lines. RESEARCH DESIGN: We anlalyzed the anti-carcarcinogenic effect of remdesivir in SKOV3 cells by performing in vitro cell assay and western blotting. RESULTS: WST-1 showed that remdesivir decreased cell viability in SKOV3 cells. Experiments conducted by Muse Cell Analyzer showed that remdesivir-induced apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. We found that the expression level of FOXO3, Bax, and Bim increased, whereas Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-7 decreased by remdesivir in SKOV3 cells. Furthermore, we observed that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level increased after treatment of remdesivir in SKOV3 cells. Interestingly, cytotoxicity of remdesivir decreased after treatment of N-Acetylcysteine. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results demonstrated that remdesivir has an anti-carcinogenic effect on SKOV3 cells vis up-regulation of reactive oxygen species, which suggests that remdesivir could be a promising reagent for treatment of ovarian cancer.


Subject(s)
Anticarcinogenic Agents , COVID-19 , Ovarian Neoplasms , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Anticarcinogenic Agents/pharmacology , Apoptosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Female , Humans , Ovarian Neoplasms/drug therapy , Ovarian Neoplasms/genetics , Ovarian Neoplasms/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
2.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2022: 5589089, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736165

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused relatively high mortality in patients, especially in those with concomitant diseases (i.e., diabetes, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)). In most of aforementioned comorbidities, the oxidative stress appears to be an important player in their pathogenesis. The direct cause of death in critically ill patients with COVID-19 is still far from being elucidated. Although some preliminary data suggests that the lung vasculature injury and the loss of the functioning part of pulmonary alveolar population are crucial, the precise mechanism is still unclear. On the other hand, at least two classes of medications used with some clinical benefits in COVID-19 treatment seem to have a major influence on ROS (reactive oxygen species) and RNS (reactive nitrogen species) production. However, oxidative stress is one of the important mechanisms in the antiviral immune response and innate immunity. Therefore, it would be of interest to summarize the data regarding the oxidative stress in severe COVID-19. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative and antioxidant mechanisms in severe COVID-19 based on available studies. We also present the role of ROS and RNS in other viral infections in humans and in animal models. Although reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play an important role in the innate antiviral immune response, in some situations, they might have a deleterious effect, e.g., in some coronaviral infections. The understanding of the redox mechanisms in severe COVID-19 disease may have an impact on its treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Oxidative Stress/immunology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Reactive Nitrogen Species/immunology , Reactive Nitrogen Species/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/immunology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
3.
J Immunol Res ; 2022: 1433323, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697599

ABSTRACT

We performed a database mining on 102 transcriptomic datasets for the expressions of 29 m6A-RNA methylation (epitranscriptomic) regulators (m6A-RMRs) in 41 diseases and cancers and made significant findings: (1) a few m6A-RMRs were upregulated; and most m6A-RMRs were downregulated in sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock, and trauma; (2) half of 29 m6A-RMRs were downregulated in atherosclerosis; (3) inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis modulated m6A-RMRs more than lupus and psoriasis; (4) some organ failures shared eight upregulated m6A-RMRs; end-stage renal failure (ESRF) downregulated 85% of m6A-RMRs; (5) Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections modulated m6A-RMRs the most among viral infections; (6) proinflammatory oxPAPC modulated m6A-RMRs more than DAMP stimulation including LPS and oxLDL; (7) upregulated m6A-RMRs were more than downregulated m6A-RMRs in cancer types; five types of cancers upregulated ≥10 m6A-RMRs; (8) proinflammatory M1 macrophages upregulated seven m6A-RMRs; (9) 86% of m6A-RMRs were differentially expressed in the six clusters of CD4+Foxp3+ immunosuppressive Treg, and 8 out of 12 Treg signatures regulated m6A-RMRs; (10) immune checkpoint receptors TIM3, TIGIT, PD-L2, and CTLA4 modulated m6A-RMRs, and inhibition of CD40 upregulated m6A-RMRs; (11) cytokines and interferons modulated m6A-RMRs; (12) NF-κB and JAK/STAT pathways upregulated more than downregulated m6A-RMRs whereas TP53, PTEN, and APC did the opposite; (13) methionine-homocysteine-methyl cycle enzyme Mthfd1 downregulated more than upregulated m6A-RMRs; (14) m6A writer RBM15 and one m6A eraser FTO, H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1, and DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1, regulated m6A-RMRs; and (15) 40 out of 165 ROS regulators were modulated by m6A eraser FTO and two m6A writers METTL3 and WTAP. Our findings shed new light on the functions of upregulated m6A-RMRs in 41 diseases and cancers, nine cellular and molecular mechanisms, novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory disorders, metabolic cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, organ failures, and cancers.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Neoplasms/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Datasets as Topic , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Metabolic Diseases/genetics , Methylation
4.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 9(11): e2103982, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680237

ABSTRACT

Currently, the incidence of acute liver injury (ALI) is increasing year by year, and infection with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can also induce ALI, but there are still no targeted therapeutic drugs. ZnO-NiO particles is mainly used to clean up reactive oxygen species (ROS) in industrial wastewater, and it is insoluble in water. Its excellent properties are discovered and improved by adding shuttle-based bonds to make it more water-soluble. ZnO-NiO@COOH particles are synthetically applied to treat ALI. The p-n junction in ZnO-NiO@COOH increases the surface area and active sites, thereby creating large numbers of oxygen vacancies, which can quickly adsorb ROS. The content in tissues and serum levels of L-glutathione (GSH) and the GSH/oxidized GSH ratio are measured to assess the capacity of ZnO-NiO@COOH particles to absorb ROS. The ZnO-NiO@COOH particles significantly reduce the expression levels of inflammatory factors (i.e., IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α), macrophage infiltration, and granulocyte activation. ZnO-NiO@COOH rapidly adsorb ROS in a short period of time to block the generation of inflammatory storms and gain time for the follow-up treatment of ALI, which has important clinical significance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Zinc Oxide , Glutathione , Humans , Liver , Nickel/chemistry , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Water , Zinc Oxide/chemistry
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(2): 715-721, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675570

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is promising as a re-purposed drug for the adjunctive or supportive treatment of serious COVID-19, this article aimed to describe current evidence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A search was performed in PubMed/Medline for "NAC", "viral Infection", COVID-19", oxidative stress", "inflammation", retrieving preclinical and clinical studies. RESULTS: NAC is a pleiotropic molecule with a dual antioxidant mechanism; it may neutralize free radicals and acts as a donor of cysteine, restoring the physiological pool of GSH. Serious COVID-19 patients have increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals and often present with glutathione depletion, which prompts a cytokine storm. NAC, which acts as a precursor of GSH inside cells, has been currently used in many conditions to restore or protect against GSH depletion and has a wide safety margin. In addition, NAC has anti-inflammatory activity independently of its antioxidant activity. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical and experimental data suggest that NAC may act on the mechanisms leading to the prothrombotic state observed in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acetylcysteine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Acetylcysteine/chemistry , Antioxidants/chemistry , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Glutathione/chemistry , Glutathione/metabolism , Humans , Oxidative Stress , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/metabolism
6.
Am J Physiol Cell Physiol ; 322(2): C218-C230, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673516

ABSTRACT

Selective autophagy of mitochondria, known as mitophagy, is a major quality control pathway in the heart that is involved in removing unwanted or dysfunctional mitochondria from the cell. Baseline mitophagy is critical for maintaining fitness of the mitochondrial network by continuous turnover of aged and less-functional mitochondria. Mitophagy is also critical in adapting to stress associated with mitochondrial damage or dysfunction. The removal of damaged mitochondria prevents reactive oxygen species-mediated damage to proteins and DNA and suppresses activation of inflammation and cell death. Impairments in mitophagy are associated with the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancers, inflammatory diseases, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease. Mitophagy is a highly regulated and complex process that requires the coordination of labeling dysfunctional mitochondria for degradation while simultaneously promoting de novo autophagosome biogenesis adjacent to the cargo. In this review, we provide an update on our current understanding of these steps in mitophagy induction and discuss the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of altered mitophagy in the heart.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular System/metabolism , Mitochondria/metabolism , Mitophagy/physiology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Cardiovascular System/pathology , Humans , Mitochondria/pathology , Phagocytosis/physiology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(2)2022 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631216

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) and endothelin-1 receptor type A (ETAR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on the surface of a great variety of cells: immune cells, vascular smooth cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts express ETAR and AT1R, which are activated by endothelin 1 (ET1) and angiotensin II (AngII), respectively. Certain autoantibodies are specific for these receptors and can regulate their function, thus being known as functional autoantibodies. The function of these antibodies is similar to that of natural ligands, and it involves not only vasoconstriction, but also the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (such as interleukin-6 (IL6), IL8 and TNF-α), collagen production by fibroblasts, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) release by fibroblasts and neutrophils. The role of autoantibodies against AT1R and ETAR (AT1R-AAs and ETAR-AAs, respectively) is well described in the pathogenesis of many medical conditions (e.g., systemic sclerosis (SSc) and SSc-associated pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, and allograft dysfunction), but their implications in cardiovascular diseases are still unclear. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effects of AT1R-AAs and ETAR-AAs in cardiovascular pathologies, highlighting their roles in heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support, preeclampsia, and acute coronary syndromes.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/immunology , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/immunology , Receptor, Endothelin A/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Collagen/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Interleukin-8/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
8.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2022: 5397733, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635531

ABSTRACT

The infection of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) seriously threatens human life. It is urgent to generate effective and safe specific antibodies (Abs) against the pathogenic elements of COVID-19. Mice were immunized with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein antigens: S ectodomain-1 (CoV, in short) mixed in Alum adjuvant for 2 times and boosted with CoV weekly for 6 times. A portion of mice were treated with Maotai liquor (MTL, in short) or/and heat stress (HS) together with CoV boosting. We observed that the anti-CoV Ab was successfully induced in mice that received the CoV/Alum immunization for 2 times. However, upon boosting with CoV, the CoV Ab production diminished progressively; spleen CoV Ab-producing plasma cell counts reduced, in which substantial CoV-specific Ab-producing plasma cells (sPC) were apoptotic. Apparent oxidative stress signs were observed in sPCs; the results were reproduced by exposing sPCs to CoV in the culture. The presence of MTL or/and HS prevented the CoV-induced oxidative stress in sPCs and promoted and stabilized the CoV Ab production in mice in re-exposure to CoV. In summary, CoV/Alum immunization can successfully induce CoV Ab production in mice that declines upon reexposure to CoV. Concurrent administration of MTL/HS stabilizes and promotes the CoV Ab production in mice.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Apoptosis , COVID-19/immunology , Plasma Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Superoxide Dismutase-1/physiology , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Alcoholic Beverages , Alum Compounds , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Heat-Shock Response , Immunization, Secondary , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Janus Kinase 2/physiology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Oxidative Stress , Plasma Cells/drug effects , Plasma Cells/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , STAT1 Transcription Factor/physiology , Signal Transduction , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
9.
Inflamm Res ; 71(2): 169-182, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1615450

ABSTRACT

Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has potent influence on redox processes, cellular metabolism, and inflammation. It has been intensively studied in numerous animal models of systemic and organ-specific disorders whose pathogenesis involves a strong immune component. Here, basic chemical and biological properties of EP are discussed, with an emphasis on its redox and metabolic activity. Further, its influence on myeloid and T cells is considered, as well as on intracellular signaling beyond its effect on immune cells. Also, the effects of EP on animal models of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders are presented. Finally, a possibility to apply EP as a treatment for such diseases in humans is discussed. Scientific papers cited in this review were identified using the PubMed search engine that relies on the MEDLINE database. The reference list covers the most important findings in the field in the past twenty years.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Pyruvates/therapeutic use , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Myeloid Cells/drug effects , Pyruvates/pharmacology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
10.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 14(1): 49-56, 2022 Jan 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608662

ABSTRACT

The development of low-cost, non-toxic, scalable antimicrobial textiles is needed to address the spread of deadly pathogens. Here, we report a polysiloxane textile coating that possesses two modes of antimicrobial inactivation, passive contact inactivation through amine/imine functionalities and active photodynamic inactivation through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This material can be coated and cross-linked onto natural and synthetic textiles through a simple soak procedure, followed by UV cure to afford materials exhibiting no aqueous leaching and only minimal leaching in organic solvents. This coating minimally impacts the mechanical properties of the fabric while also imparting hydrophobicity. Passive inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is achieved with >98% inactivation after 24 h, with a 23× and 3× inactivation rate increase against E. coli and MRSA, respectively, when green light is used to generate ROS. Up to 90% decrease in the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 after 2 h of irradiated incubation with the material is demonstrated. These results show that modifying textiles with dual-functional polymers results in robust and highly antimicrobial materials that are expected to find widespread use in combating the spread of deadly pathogens.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Coated Materials, Biocompatible/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Textiles/analysis , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Coated Materials, Biocompatible/pharmacology , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Humans , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Photochemotherapy/methods , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Textiles/toxicity , Ultraviolet Rays
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580702

ABSTRACT

Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is common in a significant number of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. This study was conducted to assess whether the improved mitochondrial bioenergetics by cardiometabolic drug meldonium can attenuate the development of ventricular dysfunction in experimental RV and LV dysfunction models, which resemble ventricular dysfunction in COVID-19 patients. Effects of meldonium were assessed in rats with pulmonary hypertension-induced RV failure and in mice with inflammation-induced LV dysfunction. Rats with RV failure showed decreased RV fractional area change (RVFAC) and hypertrophy. Treatment with meldonium attenuated the development of RV hypertrophy and increased RVFAC by 50%. Mice with inflammation-induced LV dysfunction had decreased LV ejection fraction (LVEF) by 30%. Treatment with meldonium prevented the decrease in LVEF. A decrease in the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in pyruvate metabolism was noted in the cardiac fibers of the rats and mice with RV and LV failure, respectively. Meldonium treatment in both models restored mitochondrial bioenergetics. The results show that meldonium treatment prevents the development of RV and LV systolic dysfunction by enhancing mitochondrial function in experimental models of ventricular dysfunction that resembles cardiovascular complications in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Cardiotonic Agents/pharmacology , Methylhydrazines/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Cardiotoxicity/drug therapy , Disease Models, Animal , Endothelium/drug effects , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/metabolism , Heart Ventricles/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Male , Methylhydrazines/therapeutic use , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mitochondria/drug effects , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Reperfusion Injury/drug therapy , Stroke Volume/drug effects , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/drug therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/drug therapy
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580697

ABSTRACT

Viral infections have afflicted human health and despite great advancements in scientific knowledge and technologies, continue to affect our society today. The current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has put a spotlight on the need to review the evidence on the impact of nutritional strategies to maintain a healthy immune system, particularly in instances where there are limited therapeutic treatments. Selenium, an essential trace element in humans, has a long history of lowering the occurrence and severity of viral infections. Much of the benefits derived from selenium are due to its incorporation into selenocysteine, an important component of proteins known as selenoproteins. Viral infections are associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and may result in oxidative stress. Studies suggest that selenium deficiency alters immune response and viral infection by increasing oxidative stress and the rate of mutations in the viral genome, leading to an increase in pathogenicity and damage to the host. This review examines viral infections, including the novel SARS-CoV-2, in the context of selenium, in order to inform potential nutritional strategies to maintain a healthy immune system.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Selenium/immunology , Selenium/pharmacology , Virus Diseases/diet therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology , Animals , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Selenium/deficiency , Selenoproteins/physiology
13.
Infect Immun ; 89(12): e0031521, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575412

ABSTRACT

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease pathogen. To date, tuberculosis is a major infectious disease that endangers human health. To better prevent and treat tuberculosis, it is important to study the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. Based on early-stage laboratory research results, in this study, we verified the upregulation of sod2 in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and H37Rv infection. By detecting BCG/H37Rv intracellular survival in sod2-silenced and sod2-overexpressing macrophages, sod2 was found to promote the intracellular survival of BCG/H37Rv. miR-495 then was determined to be downregulated by BCG/H37Rv. BCG/H37Rv can upregulate sod2 expression by miR-495 to promote the intracellular survival of BCG/H37Rv through a decline in ROS levels. This study provides a theoretical basis for developing new drug targets and treating tuberculosis.


Subject(s)
Macrophages/microbiology , Macrophages/physiology , MicroRNAs/genetics , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/physiology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Superoxide Dismutase/genetics , Tuberculosis/etiology , Tuberculosis/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Mycobacterium bovis , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Tuberculosis/pathology
14.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 87(24): e0182421, 2021 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532953

ABSTRACT

As a result of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, strengthening control measures against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become an urgent global issue. In addition to antiviral therapy and vaccination strategies, applying available virucidal substances for SARS-CoV-2 inactivation is also a target of research to prevent the spread of infection. Here, we evaluated the SARS-CoV-2 inactivation activity of a copper iodide (CuI) nanoparticle dispersion, which provides Cu+ ions having high virucidal activity, and its mode of actions. In addition, the utility of CuI-doped film and fabric for SARS-CoV-2 inactivation was evaluated. The CuI dispersion exhibited time-dependent rapid virucidal activity. Analyses of the modes of action of CuI performed by Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription-PCR targeting viral proteins and the genome revealed that CuI treatment induced the destruction of these viral components. In this setting, the indirect action of CuI-derived reactive oxygen species contributed to the destruction of viral protein. Moreover, the CuI-doped film and fabric demonstrated rapid inactivation of the SARS-CoV-2 solution in which the viral titer was high. These findings indicated the utility of the CuI-doped film and fabric as anti-SARS-CoV-2 materials for the protection of high-touch environmental surfaces and surgical masks/protective clothes. Throughout this study, we demonstrated the effectiveness of CuI nanoparticles for inactivating SARS-CoV-2 and revealed a part of its virucidal mechanism of action. IMPORTANCE The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented number of infections and deaths. As the spread of the disease is rapid and the risk of infection is severe, hand and environmental hygiene may contribute to suppressing contact transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Here, we evaluated the SARS-CoV-2 inactivation activity of CuI nanoparticles, which provide the Cu+ ion as an antiviral agent, and we provided advanced findings of the virucidal mechanisms of action of Cu+. Our results showed that the CuI dispersion, as well as CuI-doped film and fabric, rapidly inactivated SARS-CoV-2 with a high viral titer. We also demonstrated the CuI's virucidal mechanisms of action, specifically the destruction of viral proteins and the genome by CuI treatment. Protein destruction largely depended on CuI-derived reactive oxygen species. This study provides novel information about the utility and mechanisms of action of promising virucidal material against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Copper/pharmacology , Disinfection/methods , Iodides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/transmission , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Nanoparticles , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
15.
J Clin Invest ; 131(22)2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518200

ABSTRACT

Metabolic pathways regulate immune responses and disrupted metabolism leads to immune dysfunction and disease. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is driven by imbalanced immune responses, yet the role of immunometabolism in COVID-19 pathogenesis remains unclear. By investigating 87 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, 6 critically ill non-COVID-19 patients, and 47 uninfected controls, we found an immunometabolic dysregulation in patients with progressed COVID-19. Specifically, T cells, monocytes, and granulocytes exhibited increased mitochondrial mass, yet only T cells accumulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), were metabolically quiescent, and showed a disrupted mitochondrial architecture. During recovery, T cell ROS decreased to match the uninfected controls. Transcriptionally, T cells from severe/critical COVID-19 patients showed an induction of ROS-responsive genes as well as genes related to mitochondrial function and the basigin network. Basigin (CD147) ligands cyclophilin A and the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein triggered ROS production in T cells in vitro. In line with this, only PCR-positive patients showed increased ROS levels. Dexamethasone treatment resulted in a downregulation of ROS in vitro and T cells from dexamethasone-treated patients exhibited low ROS and basigin levels. This was reflected by changes in the transcriptional landscape. Our findings provide evidence of an immunometabolic dysregulation in COVID-19 that can be mitigated by dexamethasone treatment.


Subject(s)
Basigin/physiology , COVID-19/immunology , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Adult , COVID-19/metabolism , Cyclophilin A/physiology , Fatty Acids/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
16.
J Infect Dis ; 224(8): 1333-1344, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lymphopenia is a key feature for adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), although it is rarely observed in children. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. METHODS: Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses were used to compare the apoptotic rate of T cells from COVID-19 adults and children and apoptotic responses of adult and child T cells to COVID-19 pooled plasma. Biological properties of caspases and reactive oxygen species were assessed in T cells treated by COVID-19 pooled plasma. RESULTS: Mitochondria apoptosis of peripheral T cells were identified in COVID-19 adult patient samples but not in the children. Furthermore, increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in COVID-19 plasma induced mitochondria apoptosis and caused deoxyribonucleic acid damage by elevating reactive oxygen species levels of the adult T cells. However, the child T cells showed tolerance to mitochondrial apoptosis due to mitochondria autophagy. Activation of autophagy could decrease apoptotic sensitivity of the adult T cells to plasma from COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in T cells of COVID-19 adult patients specifically, which may shed light on the pathophysiological difference between adults and children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphopenia/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Apoptosis/immunology , Autophagy , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/immunology , Mitochondria/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
17.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(43): 17891-17909, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483091

ABSTRACT

The emergence of multi-drug-resistant pathogens threatens the healthcare systems world-wide. Recent advances in phototherapy (PT) approaches mediated by photo-antimicrobials (PAMs) provide new opportunities for the current serious antibiotic resistance. During the PT treatment, reactive oxygen species or heat produced by PAMs would react with the cell membrane, consequently leaking cytoplasm components and effectively eradicating different pathogens like bacteria, fungi, viruses, and even parasites. This Perspective will concentrate on the development of different organic photo-antimicrobials (OPAMs) and their application as practical therapeutic agents into therapy for local infections, wound dressings, and removal of biofilms from medical devices. We also discuss how to design highly efficient OPAMs by modifying the chemical structure or conjugating with a targeting component. Moreover, this Perspective provides a discussion of the general challenges and direction for OPAMs and what further needs to be done. It is hoped that through this overview, OPAMs can prosper and will be more widely used for microbial infections in the future, especially at a time when the global COVID-19 epidemic is getting more serious.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Drug Design , Phototherapy/methods , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/drug effects , Biofilms/drug effects , Biofilms/radiation effects , Coloring Agents/chemistry , Coloring Agents/pharmacology , Equipment and Supplies/microbiology , Equipment and Supplies/virology , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Escherichia coli/physiology , Eye Diseases/drug therapy , Eye Diseases/pathology , Fungi/drug effects , Graphite/chemistry , Light , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Nanoparticles/toxicity , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use , Quantum Theory , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Viruses/drug effects
18.
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis ; 1867(10): 166186, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446450

ABSTRACT

The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases including primary and recurrent focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), diabetic nephropathy, and acute kidney injuries (AKI). Elevated serum suPAR concentration is a negative prognostic indicator in multiple critical clinical conditions. This study has examined the initial transduction steps used by suPAR in cultured mouse podocytes. We now report that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) co-immunoprecipitates with αV and ß3 integrin subunits, which have been previously shown to initiate suPAR signal transduction at the podocyte cell surface. siRNA knock-down of RAGE attenuated Src phosphorylation evoked by either suPAR or by glycated albumin (AGE-BSA), a prototypical RAGE agonist. suPAR effects on Src phosphorylation were also blocked by the structurally dissimilar RAGE antagonists FPS-ZM1 and azeliragon, as well as by cilengitide, an inhibitor of outside-in signaling through αV-integrins. FPS-ZM1 also blocked Src phosphorylation evoked by AGE-BSA. FPS-ZM1 blocked increases in cell surface TRPC6 abundance, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of the small GTPase Rac1 evoked by either suPAR or AGE-BSA. In addition, FPS-ZM1 inhibited Src phosphorylation evoked by serum collected from a patient with recurrent FSGS during a relapse. The magnitude of this inhibition was indistinguishable from the effect produced by a neutralizing antibody against suPAR. These data suggest that orally bioavailable small molecule RAGE antagonists could represent a useful therapeutic strategy for a wide range of clinical conditions associated with elevated serum suPAR, including primary FSGS and AKI.


Subject(s)
Integrin alphaVbeta3/metabolism , Podocytes/metabolism , Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products/metabolism , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , Animals , Cell Line , Humans , Kidney Diseases/metabolism , Mice , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
19.
Protein Sci ; 30(11): 2206-2220, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437079

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a pathogenic coronavirus causing COVID-19 infection. The interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and the human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, both of which contain several cysteine residues, is impacted by the disulfide-thiol balance in the host cell. The host cell redox status is affected by oxidative stress due to the imbalance between the reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and antioxidants. Recent studies have shown that Vitamin D supplementation could reduce oxidative stress. It has also been proposed that vitamin D at physiological concentration has preventive effects on many viral infections, including COVID-19. However, the molecular-level picture of the interplay of vitamin D deficiency, oxidative stress, and the severity of COVID-19 has remained unclear. Herein, we present a thorough review focusing on the possible molecular mechanism by which vitamin D could alter host cell redox status and block viral entry, thereby preventing COVID-19 infection or reducing the severity of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Reactive Nitrogen Species/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
20.
Redox Biol ; 46: 102099, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401817

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 has remained uncontained with urgent need for robust therapeutics. We have previously reported sex difference of COVID-19 for the first time indicating male predisposition. Males are more susceptible than females, and more often to develop into severe cases with higher mortality. This predisposition is potentially linked to higher prevalence of cigarette smoking. Nonetheless, we found for the first time that cigarette smoking extract (CSE) had no effect on angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) expression in endothelial cells. The otherwise observed worse outcomes in smokers is likely linked to baseline respiratory diseases associated with chronic smoking. Instead, we hypothesized that estrogen mediated protection might underlie lower morbidity, severity and mortality of COVID-19 in females. Of note, endothelial inflammation and barrier dysfunction are major mediators of disease progression, and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multi-organ failure in patients with COVID-19. Therefore, we investigated potential protective effects of estrogen on endothelial cells against oxidative stress induced by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S protein). Indeed, 17ß-estradiol completely reversed S protein-induced selective activation of NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that are ACE2-dependent, as well as ACE2 upregulation and induction of pro-inflammatory gene monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in endothelial cells to effectively attenuate endothelial dysfunction. Effects of IL-6 on activating NOX2-dependent ROS production and upregulation of MCP-1 were also completely attenuated by 17ß-estradiol. Of note, co-treatment with CSE had no additional effects on S protein stimulated endothelial oxidative stress, confirming that current smoking status is likely unrelated to more severe disease in chronic smokers. These data indicate that estrogen can serve as a novel therapy for patients with COVID-19 via inhibition of initial viral responses and attenuation of cytokine storm induced endothelial dysfunction, to substantially alleviate morbidity, severity and mortality of the disease, especially in men and post-menopause women. Short-term administration of estrogen can therefore be readily applied to the clinical management of COVID-19 as a robust therapeutic option.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Estrogens/therapeutic use , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Chemokine CCL2/genetics , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Female , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Male , NADPH Oxidase 2 , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Up-Regulation
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