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1.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 431-444, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788336

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parent concerns about children's oral language, reading, and related skills and their children's performance on standardized assessments of language and reading, with a particular focus on whether those relationships differed between children recruited for in-school versus online participation. METHOD: This study used data from a larger, longitudinal project focused on children with and without developmental language disorder (DLD) and/or dyslexia. The "in-school" sample (n = 133) completed assessments in-person before school closures, and the "online" sample (n = 84) recruited via advertisements completed assessments online. Parents completed a checklist of concerns. All children completed norm-referenced assessments of language and reading. RESULTS: The two recruitment strategies yielded samples that differed in racial diversity (higher in the in-school sample), caregiver education levels (higher in the online sample), and word reading test scores (higher in the online sample). Parents in both samples reported higher levels of concerns about literacy skills than oral language skills, and the correlation between parent concerns about literacy and children's word reading test scores was stronger than the correlation between parent concerns about oral language and children's language test scores. CONCLUSIONS: Researchers and clinicians should be aware of how recruitment strategies and assessment modalities (e.g., in-person vs. tele-assessment) may impact participation in studies and clinical service. A reliance on parent concerns about oral language to prompt a language evaluation may contribute to low rates of identification of children who meet criteria for DLD. Future research can consider parent concerns about literacy, attention, and executive functions as indicators of a need for language evaluation, especially considering the high comorbidity between language and other developmental disorders.


Subject(s)
Dyslexia , Reading , Child , Dyslexia/diagnosis , Humans , Language Tests , Literacy , Parents
2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(3): e34003, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Online information on COVID-19 vaccination may influence people's perception and willingness to be vaccinated. Official websites of vaccination programs have not been systematically assessed before. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess and compare the readability and content quality of web-based information on COVID-19 vaccination posted on official/governmental websites. Furthermore, the relationship between evaluated website parameters and country vaccination rates were calculated. METHODS: By referring to an open data set hosted at Our World in Data, the 58 countries/regions with the highest total vaccination count as of July 8, 2021, were identified. Together with the websites from the World Health Organization and European Union, a total of 60 vaccination campaign websites were targeted. The "frequently asked questions" or "questions and answers" section of the websites were evaluated in terms of readability (Flesch Reading Ease score and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level), quality (Health On the Net Foundation code [HONcode] certification and Quality Evaluation Scoring Tool), and content stating vaccination duration of protection and potential side effects. RESULTS: In terms of readability, the Flesch Reading Ease score of the vaccination frequently asked questions websites ranged between 11.2 and 69.5, with a mean of 40.9 (SD 13.2). Meanwhile, the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level ranged between 6.5 and 17.6, with a mean of 12.1 (SD 2.8). In terms of quality, only 2 websites were HONcode certified, and the Quality Evaluation Scoring Tool score of the websites ranged between 7 and 20, with a mean of 15.3 (SD 3.1). Half of the websites (25/50) did not present a publication date or date of the last update. Regarding the duration of protection offered by the vaccines, 46% (23/50) of the websites stated that they do not know, and another 40% (20/50) did not address it. Five side effects of the vaccinations were most frequently mentioned, namely, fever/chill (41/50, 82%), various injection site discomfort events (eg, swelling, redness, or pain; 39/50, 78%), headache (36/50, 72%), fatigue (33/50, 66%), and muscle/joint pain (31/50, 62%). CONCLUSIONS: In general, the content quality of most of the evaluated websites was good, but HONcode certification should be considered, content should be written in a more readable manner, and a publication date or date of the last update should be presented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Comprehension , Humans , Reading , Vaccination
3.
Res Dev Disabil ; 124: 104198, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708929

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for accessible support for children with developmental disabilities. This study explored online literacy instruction with supplementary parent-led shared book reading (SBR) for children with autism. METHODS: Twenty-one children with autism (5-12 years) completed a battery of assessments (T1) before being assigned to ability matched Instruction (n = 10) and Control groups (n = 11). Instruction group participants completed 16 h of ABRACADABRA instruction working with a researcher 1:1 online and SBR activities at home with a parent over 8 weeks. All participants were reassessed after the instruction period (T2) and parents of children in the Instruction group were interviewed regarding their views and experiences. RESULTS: Quantitative analyses showed no significant improvements in reading for Instruction group children relative to Control group children. However, each child successfully participated in 16 online instruction sessions and qualitative data revealed that parents were generally positive about the program, with some observing improvements in their child's literacy skills and reading confidence. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: While it appears children with autism can participate in online literacy instruction, sixteen hours of online ABRACADABRA instruction with parent-led SBR may not be effective in improving their reading skills. Further research is required to explore whether more intensive and/or extended online instruction may be feasible and effective, and to improve uptake of parent-led book reading activities at home.


Subject(s)
Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Books , Child , Humans , Literacy , Pandemics , Parents , Reading
4.
Acta Gastroenterol Belg ; 85(1): III-IV, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689499

Subject(s)
Reading , Humans
5.
J. Hum. Growth Dev. (Impr.) ; 31(3): 484-490, Sep.-Dec. 2021. ilus, tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1595740

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the Covid-19 pandemic made discrepancies between the different educational realities more evident for schoolchildren in the beginning of literacy. OBJECTIVE: to characterize the performance of cognitive-linguistic skills of students in early literacy phases during the pandemic. METHODS: twenty-two elementary school students participated in this study, distributed in GI 1st year students and 2nd year GII students, submitted to the application of the Cognitive-Linguistic Skills Assessment Protocol for students in the initial stage of literacy RESULTS: students from GI and GII showed average performance for writing the name and writing the alphabet in sequence. The GI presented a refusal response for the subtests of word dictation, pseudoword dictation and picture dictation, word repetition and visual sequential memory of shapes and poor performance for alphabet recognition in random order and average performance for alphabet recognition in sequence. GII showed lower performance for the subtests of word dictation, pseudoword dictation, picture dictation and superior performance for alphabet recognition in random order, alphabet in sequence and visual sequential memory of shapes. DISCUSSION: the appropriation of the letter-sound relationship mechanism raises questions, since it evidenced the difficulty of all students in cognitive-linguistic skills necessary for the full development of reading and writing in an alphabetic writing system such as Brazilian Portuguese. CONCLUSION: students in the 1st and 2nd years showed lower performance in cognitive-linguistic skills important for learning reading and writing.


INTRODUÇÃO: a pandemia do Covid-19 tornou mais evidentes as discrepâncias entre as diferentes realidades educacionais para os escolares em início de alfabetização. OBJETIVO: caracterizar o desempenho de habilidades cognitivo-linguísticas de escolares em fase inicial de alfabetização durante a pandemia. MÉTODO: participaram deste estudo 22 escolares do Ensino Fundamental I, distribuídos em GI escolares do 1º ano e GII escolares do 2º ano, submetidos a aplicação do Protocolo de Avaliação das Habilidades Cognitivo-Linguísticas para escolares em fase inicial de alfabetização RESULTADOS: os escolares do GI e GII apresentaram desempenho médio para escrita do nome e escrita do alfabeto em sequência. O GI apresentou resposta de recusa para os subtestes de ditado de palavras, ditado de pseudopalavras e ditado de figuras, repetição de palavras e memória sequencial visual de formas e desempenho inferior para reconhecimento do alfabeto em ordem aleatória e desempenho médio para reconhecimento do alfabeto em sequência. O GII apresentou desempenho inferior para os subtestes de ditado de palavras, ditado de pseudopalavras, ditado de figura e desempenho superior para reconhecimento do alfabeto em ordem aleatória, alfabeto em sequência e memória sequencial visual de formas. DISCUSSÃO: a apropriação do mecanismo de relação letra-som traz questionamentos, uma vez que, evidenciou a dificuldade de todos os escolares em habilidades cognitivo-linguísticas necessárias para o pleno desenvolvimento da leitura e da escrita em um sistema de escrita alfabético como o Português Brasileiro. CONCLUSÃO: os escolares do 1º e 2º anos apresentaram desempenhos inferiores em habilidades cognitivo-linguística importantes para a aprendizagem da leitura e escrita.


Subject(s)
Reading , Child Development , Education, Primary and Secondary , Pandemics , Literacy , COVID-19 , Learning
6.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(1): 10-12, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598751

ABSTRACT

Health care studies that use Q methodology have increased dramatically in recent years, but most nurses have not learned about this mixed methods approach in their research classes. This teaching column will help readers understand some of the unique terms and characteristics of Q methodology. Understanding this method can help nurses performing evidence-based practice and education. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2022;53(1):10-12.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing , Reading , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Learning
8.
Patient Educ Couns ; 105(2): 290-296, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392473

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Care partners are key members of patients' health care teams, yet little is known about their experiences accessing patient information via electronic portals. OBJECTIVE: To better understand the characteristics and perceptions of care partners who read patients' electronic visit notes. PATIENT INVOLVEMENT: Focus groups with diverse patients from a community health center provided input into survey development. METHODS: We contacted patient portal users at 3 geographically distinct sites in the US via email in 2017 for an online survey including open ended questions which we qualitatively analyzed. RESULTS: Respondents chose whether to answer as care partners (N = 874) or patients (N = 28,782). Among care partner respondents, 44% were spouses, 43% children/other family members, and 14% friends/neighbors/other. Both care partners and patients reported that access to electronic notes was very important for promoting positive health behaviors, but care partners' perceptions of importance were consistently more positive than patients' perceptions of engagement behaviors. Open-ended comments included positive benefits such as: help with remembering the plan for care, coordinating care with other doctors, decreasing stress of care giving, improving efficiency of visits, and supporting patients from a geographical distance. They also offered suggestions for improving electronic portal and note experience for care partners such as having a separate log on for care partners; having doctors avoid judgmental language in their notes; and the ability to prompt needed medical care for patients. DISCUSSION: Care partners value electronic access to patients' health information even more than patients. The majority of care partners were family members, whose feedback is important for improving portal design that effectively engages these care team members. PRACTICAL VALUE: Patient care in the time of COVID-19 increasingly requires social distancing which may place additional burden on care partners supporting vulnerable patients. Access to patient notes may promote quality of care by keeping care partners informed, and care partner's input should be used to optimize portal design and electronic access to patient information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Portals , Caregivers , Child , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Reading , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Acta Gastroenterol Belg ; 84(2): 269-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332571
11.
Br J Educ Psychol ; 92(1): 258-279, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324979

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Online multiple-text comprehension is a key skill of the 21st Century, yet the study of its relations with boredom in young students has been disregarded. Boredom is an achievement emotion expected to be predicted negatively by antecedents like control and value appraisals and to be associated to a negative performance. Notwithstanding its documented domain-specificity, scarce attention has been paid to investigating these relations with primary-school students in the reading domain, and specifically for online multiple-text comprehension, and to how such relations are moderated by basic cognitive abilities. AIMS: Considering separately two settings (homework, test), we studied the mediation of boredom in the relation between control-value appraisals and online multiple-text comprehension in primary-school students, focusing on the moderating role of word-reading fluency. SAMPLE: Participants were 334 fourth and fifth graders. METHODS: We evaluated students' reading-related self-efficacy and task-value, reading-related boredom for homework and tests, word-reading fluency, and online multiple-text comprehension. RESULTS: Path analyses revealed negative relations between control-value appraisals and boredom for homework and tests, and between boredom and online multiple-text comprehension for tests only. For the latter, word-reading fluency moderated the relation between appraisals, boredom, and comprehension: Boredom negatively related to comprehension only for students with high word-reading fluency. CONCLUSIONS: Findings are discussed focusing on antecedents of online multiple-text comprehension as a literacy skill critical in the 21st Century. We underlined their implications for learning in general and specifically for the current educational changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Reading , Boredom , Comprehension , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(12)2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282478

ABSTRACT

Young children's use of digital devices is increasing as we progress through the 21st century and handheld and mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, have become increasingly available. While older children using tablets to read has been more broadly investigated, less is known about the impacts of digital reading on children at the stage of literacy acquisition. An analytical review was conducted on the effects of interactive e-book interventions for young children's literacy development when compared to (a) listening to print books, (b) regular school programs, and (c) reading non-enhanced and non-interactive e-books. A significant additional beneficial effect of e-book interventions was found for phonological awareness and vocabulary learning based on data from 1138 children in 14 randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies. When e-books are properly selected and used, children develop literacy skills equally well and sometimes better than with print books. Additionally, e-book interventions outperformed the regular school program in the development of literacy skills. Similarly, enhanced e-book conditions revealed benefits over the non-enhanced e-book interventions in literacy skill acquisition. The impact of these findings related to health issues, e-book design, disadvantaged populations, and adult-led e-book sharing is discussed.


Subject(s)
Literacy , Reading , Adolescent , Adult , Books , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Parent-Child Relations , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Vocabulary
13.
Semin Nucl Med ; 52(1): 71-78, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272863

ABSTRACT

Community SARS-CoV-2 has profoundly affected traditional elements of learning and teaching in nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology departments. The response of the nuclear medicine community to the challenges imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic can be described in 3 phases: accommodation, consolidation and optimization, and a return towards normalcy. Adoption of virtual communication platforms has emerged as the crucial interim tool for preservation of trainee supervision and diagnostic imaging education. Development of supplemental teaching materials, refocusing research interests, and relaxation of requirements have all contributed toward stabilization of the residency programs. As we embark on a gradual return to normalcy, many of the virtual solutions that were employed have gained a degree of enduring popularity and may find a place in the postpandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nuclear Medicine , Humans , Pandemics , Reading , SARS-CoV-2
15.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e2110843, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204592

ABSTRACT

Importance: Informed consent is a fundamental element of research ethics. The COVID-19 vaccine trials are high profile trials that have enrolled more than 100 000 participants. Consent documents must be succinct and understandable to ensure informed voluntary participation. Objective: To assess how well informed consent documents of the COVID-19 vaccine trials achieve the ideal of being succinct and understandable, and to create a shorter, more readable document. Design, Setting, and Participants: This quality improvement study collected and analyzed the informed consent documents used in 4 COVID-19 vaccine phase III randomized clinical trials to quantitatively assess readability and length and, based on this analysis, created a measurably more accessible informed consent document. Analysis was conducted from October 2020 to January 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcomes were number of words (measured as word count), time-to-read (measured at reading speeds of 175-300 words per minute), language complexity (measured using Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level assessment), and readability (measured using Flesch Reading Ease Score). Secondary outcomes included clarity of how the placebo group could access the vaccine if it is proven safe and effective. The study also examined the length and readability of an improved consent document. Results: The 4 informed consent documents were a mean (range) of 8333 (7821 to 9340) words long, with a mean (range) 35 (32.6 to 38.9) minutes to read at 240 words per minute. All documents exceeded grade 9 language complexity and scored lower than 60 in the formal reading ease metric, which constitutes difficult. Only 1 document specified that participants in the placebo group might receive vaccine. It was possible to write a document in fewer than 3000 words with a grade 7 to 8 reading level and a formal readability score that was not difficult. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that existing COVID-19 vaccine informed consent documents were too long, difficult to read, and exceeded grade 9 in language complexity. It was possible to create a shorter, more readable informed consent document for these trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Comprehension , Consent Forms/standards , Informed Consent , Language , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Reading , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry ; 62(5): 481-483, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203865

ABSTRACT

The past year was marked by upheaval, as countries across the globe shut down in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the topics for this year's Annual Research Review were decided long before most of had heard of the coronavirus, many readers may find themselves reading the papers in this issue through a pandemic lens. For some authors, the COVID-19 pandemic and the social unrest that characterized parts of the world where these authors live are likely to have shaped the way they ultimately framed the topics of their reviews. This issue serves as a reminder that it is critical to read science in social and historical context. Our preoccupations as psychologists and psychiatrists reflect our cultural values and societal experiences at a particular time and place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Refugees , Child , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Reading , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(5): e26666, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190248

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are many alternatives to direct journal access, such as podcasts, blogs, and news sites, that allow physicians and the general public to stay up to date with medical literature. However, there is a scarcity of literature that investigates the readership characteristics of open-access medical news sites and how these characteristics may have shifted during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess readership and survey data to characterize open-access medical news readership trends related to the COVID-19 pandemic and overall readership trends regarding pandemic-related information delivery. METHODS: Anonymous, aggregate readership data were obtained from 2 Minute Medicine, an open-access, physician-run medical news organization that has published over 8000 original, physician-written texts and visual summaries of new medical research since 2013. In this retrospective observational study, the average number of article views, number of actions (defined as the sum of the number of views, shares, and outbound link clicks), read times, and bounce rates (probability of leaving a page in <30 s) were compared between COVID-19 articles published from January 1 to May 31, 2020 (n=40) and non-COVID-19 articles (n=145) published in the same time period. A voluntary survey was also sent to subscribed 2 Minute Medicine readers to further characterize readership demographics and preferences, which were scored on a Likert scale. RESULTS: COVID-19 articles had a significantly higher median number of views than non-COVID-19 articles (296 vs 110; U=748.5; P<.001). There were no significant differences in average read times (P=.12) or bounce rates (P=.12). Non-COVID-19 articles had a higher median number of actions than COVID-19 articles (2.9 vs 2.5; U=2070.5; P=.02). On a Likert scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree), our survey data revealed that 65.5% (78/119) of readers agreed or strongly agreed that they preferred staying up to date with emerging literature about COVID-19 by using sources such as 2 Minute Medicine instead of journals. A greater proportion of survey respondents also indicated that open-access news sources were one of their primary sources for staying informed (86/120, 71.7%) compared to the proportion who preferred direct journal article access (61/120, 50.8%). The proportion of readers indicating they were reading one or less full-length medical studies a month were lower following introduction to 2 Minute Medicine compared to prior (21/120, 17.5% vs 38/120, 31.6%; P=.005). CONCLUSIONS: The readership significantly increased for one open-access medical literature platform during the pandemic. This reinforces the idea that open-access, physician-written sources of medical news represent an important alternative to direct journal access for readers who want to stay up to date with medical literature.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Open Access Publishing/statistics & numerical data , Reading , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
18.
Int J Lang Commun Disord ; 56(3): 456-472, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177379

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to COVID-19, many educators and allied health practitioners are facing the challenge of rapidly transitioning to telepractice delivery of instructional reading and spelling procedures without being fully informed of the evidence. AIMS: A rapid review was conducted to provide educators, allied health practitioners and policymakers with a synthesis of valid, relevant and actionable evidence relating to telepractice delivery of instructional reading and spelling procedures. The aim was to investigate the nature and outcomes of studies examining instructional reading and spelling procedures delivered via telepractice to school-aged students. METHODS & PROCEDURES: A rapid review was undertaken in accordance with the eight-step process published by the Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group. Medline (all databases), Embase, Cochrane and ProQuest Central were systematically searched with predefined search terms organized across four key concepts relating to the research questions. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: Nine studies were included in this rapid review. Reading and spelling instruction and intervention using telepractice can be feasible and engaging. Telepractice assessment for reading and spelling can be equally effective as onsite assessment. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: The evidence base for telepractice delivery of reading and spelling procedures is in its infancy in terms of both the quantity and the quality of the evidence. Insufficient evidence exists to draw clear conclusions about its efficacy, and therefore practitioners should proceed cautiously. What this paper adds What is already known on the subject For onsite delivery, evidence-based reading and spelling assessment, instruction and interventions delivered by educators and allied health practitioners have been shown to accelerate students' skills; less is known about the efficacy of instructional reading and spelling procedures in a telepractice model, which have rapidly become the new norm in many countries due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The benefits of telepractice include improved access to services, increased service availability, convenience, time efficiency, caseload management efficiency and removal of logistical barriers relating to cost and geographical location. During the COVID-19 pandemic, telepractice has facilitated continued access to services. What this study adds to existing knowledge Reading and spelling instruction and intervention delivered via telepractice can be feasible and engaging. Telepractice is a viable mode to deliver reading and spelling assessments with strong agreement between telepractice and onsite scores. Given their low methodological quality, the studies in this review provide valuable information around the how of telepractice reading and spelling procedures and highlight the factors that may contribute to positive outcomes with this service delivery model. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work? Educators and allied health practitioners need a thorough understanding of the student's telepractice environment and require adequate training and support to engage in telepractice service delivery. Educators and allied health practitioners should consider students for telepractice on a case-by-case basis. Practitioners should proceed cautiously with telepractice reading and spelling assessment, intervention and instruction, with the knowledge that the current available evidence is of limited quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Reading , Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Child , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Front Public Health ; 9: 602964, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170132

ABSTRACT

Background: Dialogic Literary Gatherings (DLG) are evidence-based interventions implemented in very diverse educational and health settings. The main elements that make DLG a co-creation intervention and promote health during the COVID-19 crisis lockdown are presented. This study focuses on the case of a DLG that is being promoted by an adult school in the city of Barcelona. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using a communicative approach. Seven in-depth interviews with participants in the online DLG have been conducted. Five of them are women without higher education ranging from 56 to 85 years old and two are educators of this school. Results: The main results are 2-fold. First, the factors that make DLG a co-creation intervention, such as egalitarian dialogue and dialogical creation of knowledge in the decision-making process, are found. Second, the results show how DLG is contributing to creating a supportive environment that breaks the social isolation of confinement and improving the participants' psychological and social well-being. Conclusions: The findings from this study contribute to generating knowledge about a co-creation process between adult education participants and educators in education and health promotion during the COVID-19 lockdown, which could be replicated in other contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance , Mental Health , Social Isolation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Nonprofessional , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Reading , Spain
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