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1.
J Virol ; 96(4): e0160021, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759291

ABSTRACT

A comprehensive study of the B cell response against SARS-CoV-2 could be significant for understanding the immune response and developing therapeutical antibodies and vaccines. To define the dynamics and characteristics of the antibody repertoire following SARS-CoV-2 infection, we analyzed the mRNA transcripts of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires of 24 peripheral blood samples collected between 3 and 111 days after symptom onset from 10 COVID-19 patients. Massive clonal expansion of naive B cells with limited somatic hypermutation (SHM) was observed in the second week after symptom onset. The proportion of low-SHM IgG clones strongly correlated with spike-specific IgG antibody titers, highlighting the significant activation of naive B cells in response to a novel virus infection. The antibody isotype switching landscape showed a transient IgA surge in the first week after symptom onset, followed by a sustained IgG elevation that lasted for at least 3 months. SARS-CoV-2 infection elicited poly-germ line reactive antibody responses. Interestingly, 17 different IGHV germ line genes recombined with IGHJ6 showed significant clonal expansion. By comparing the IgH repertoires that we sequenced with the 774 reported SARS-CoV-2-reactive monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 13 shared spike-specific IgH clusters were found. These shared spike-specific IgH clusters are derived from the same lineage of several recently published neutralizing MAbs, including CC12.1, CC12.3, C102, REGN10977, and 4A8. Furthermore, identical spike-specific IgH sequences were found in different COVID-19 patients, suggesting a highly convergent antibody response to SARS-CoV-2. Our analysis based on sequencing antibody repertoires from different individuals revealed key signatures of the systemic B cell response induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection. IMPORTANCE Although the canonical delineation of serum antibody responses following SARS-CoV-2 infection has been well established, the dynamics of antibody repertoire at the mRNA transcriptional level has not been well understood, especially the correlation between serum antibody titers and the antibody mRNA transcripts. In this study, we analyzed the IgH transcripts and characterized the B cell clonal expansion and differentiation, isotype switching, and somatic hypermutation in COVID-19 patients. This study provided insights at the repertoire level for the B cell response after SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology
2.
Cell Rep ; 38(7): 110393, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719435

ABSTRACT

B cells are important in immunity to both severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and vaccination, but B cell receptor (BCR) repertoire development in these contexts has not been compared. We analyze serial samples from 171 SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals and 63 vaccine recipients and find the global BCR repertoire differs between them. Following infection, immunoglobulin (Ig)G1/3 and IgA1 BCRs increase, somatic hypermutation (SHM) decreases, and, in severe disease, IgM and IgA clones are expanded. In contrast, after vaccination, the proportion of IgD/M BCRs increase, SHM is unchanged, and expansion of IgG clones is prominent. VH1-24, which targets the N-terminal domain (NTD) and contributes to neutralization, is expanded post infection except in the most severe disease. Infection generates a broad distribution of SARS-CoV-2-specific clones predicted to target the spike protein, while a more focused response after vaccination mainly targets the spike's receptor-binding domain. Thus, the nature of SARS-CoV-2 exposure differentially affects BCR repertoire development, potentially informing vaccine strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Vaccination , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clonal Evolution , Humans , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/genetics , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/immunology , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/genetics , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/immunology , Immunoglobulin Variable Region/genetics , Immunoglobulin Variable Region/immunology , Kinetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
3.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 440, 2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641960

ABSTRACT

Dysregulated immune responses against the SARS-CoV-2 virus are instrumental in severe COVID-19. However, the immune signatures associated with immunopathology are poorly understood. Here we use multi-omics single-cell analysis to probe the dynamic immune responses in hospitalized patients with stable or progressive course of COVID-19, explore V(D)J repertoires, and assess the cellular effects of tocilizumab. Coordinated profiling of gene expression and cell lineage protein markers shows that S100Ahi/HLA-DRlo classical monocytes and activated LAG-3hi T cells are hallmarks of progressive disease and highlights the abnormal MHC-II/LAG-3 interaction on myeloid and T cells, respectively. We also find skewed T cell receptor repertories in expanded effector CD8+ clones, unmutated IGHG+ B cell clones, and mutated B cell clones with stable somatic hypermutation frequency over time. In conclusion, our in-depth immune profiling reveals dyssynchrony of the innate and adaptive immune interaction in progressive COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , Adaptive Immunity/genetics , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , Cells, Cultured , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Male , RNA-Seq/methods , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
4.
Hum Immunol ; 83(2): 119-129, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499900

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Great international efforts have been put into the development of prophylactic vaccines and neutralizing antibodies. However, the knowledge about the B cell immune response induced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus is still limited. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of the dynamics of immunoglobin heavy chain (IGH) repertoire in COVID-19 patients. By using next-generation sequencing technology, we examined the temporal changes in the landscape of the patient's immunological status and found dramatic changes in the IGH within the patient's immune system after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms. Although different patients have distinct immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection, by employing clonotype overlap, lineage expansion, and clonotype network analyses, we observed a higher clonotype overlap and substantial lineage expansion of B cell clones 2-3 weeks after the onset of illness, which is of great importance to B-cell immune responses. Meanwhile, for preferences of V gene usage during SARS-CoV-2 infection, IGHV3-74 and IGHV4-34, and IGHV4-39 in COVID-19 patients were more abundant than those of healthy controls. Overall, we present an immunological resource for SARS-CoV-2 that could promote both therapeutic development as well as mechanistic research.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/immunology , Male , Middle Aged
5.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 101(Pt A): 108292, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487772

ABSTRACT

Leukopenia is a common manifestation of many diseases, including global outbreak SAS-CoV-2 infection. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM -CSF) has been proved to be effective in promoting lymphocyte regeneration, but adverse immunological effects have also emerged. This study aim to investigate the effect of GM -CSF on BCR heavy chain CDR3 repertoire while promoting lymphocyte regeneration. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) and GM -CSF were used to inhibit and stimulate bone marrow hematopoiesis, respectively. High throughput sequencing was applied to detect the characteristics of BCR CDR3 repertoire in controls, CTX group and GM -CSF group. The white blood cells (WBCs) were quickly reduced (P < 0.05) with lymphocytes decreasing causing by CTX, and the WBCs and lymphocytes returned to the level of controls after GM -CSF treatment. The diversity of BCR heavy chain CDR3 repertoire was also significantly decreased in CTX group. Although there is still a big gap from the controls, the diversity was picked up after GM -CSF treatment. The expression of IGHD01-01, IGHD02-14 and IGHJ04-01 with high-frequency usage regularly and significantly changed in three groups, and many genes with low-frequency usage lost in CTX group and did not reappear in GM -CSF group. Moreover, two shared sequences and accounted for the highest proportion in GM -CSF group have been detected in animal model of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. These results revealed that GM -CSF can partially restore changes in the BCR heavy chain CDR3 repertoire while promoting lymphocyte regeneration, but it may also lead to rearrangement, proliferation and activation of abnormal B cells, which can provide a basis for further study on the adverse immunological effects and mechanism of GM -CSF treatment.


Subject(s)
Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Leukopenia/immunology , Lymphocytes/drug effects , Lymphocytes/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/drug effects , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/metabolism , Animals , Complementarity Determining Regions/drug effects , Complementarity Determining Regions/genetics , Complementarity Determining Regions/metabolism , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Female , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/drug effects , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/genetics , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/metabolism , Immunoglobulin Joining Region/drug effects , Immunoglobulin Joining Region/metabolism , Immunoglobulin Variable Region/drug effects , Immunoglobulin Variable Region/metabolism , Leukocytes/drug effects , Leukopenia/chemically induced , Leukopenia/drug therapy , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology
7.
Cell Rep ; 37(1): 109784, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442299

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) lineages that are more transmissible and resistant to currently approved antibody therapies poses a considerable challenge to the clinical treatment of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Therefore, the need for ongoing discovery efforts to identify broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 is of utmost importance. Here, we report a panel of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies isolated using the linking B cell receptor to antigen specificity through sequencing (LIBRA-seq) technology from an individual who recovered from COVID-19. Of these antibodies, 54042-4 shows potent neutralization against authentic SARS-CoV-2 viruses, including variants of concern (VOCs). A cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of 54042-4 in complex with the SARS-CoV-2 spike reveals an epitope composed of residues that are highly conserved in currently circulating SARS-CoV-2 lineages. Further, 54042-4 possesses uncommon genetic and structural characteristics that distinguish it from other potently neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. Together, these findings provide motivation for the development of 54042-4 as a lead candidate to counteract current and future SARS-CoV-2 VOCs.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitope Mapping/methods , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/chemistry , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vero Cells
8.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 345, 2021 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434094

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 infection causes severe immune disruption. However, it is unclear if disrupted immune regulation still exists and pertains in recovered COVID-19 patients. In our study, we have characterized the immune phenotype of B cells from 15 recovered COVID-19 patients, and found that healthy controls and recovered patients had similar B-cell populations before and after BCR stimulation, but the frequencies of PBC in patients were significantly increased when compared to healthy controls before stimulation. However, the percentage of unswitched memory B cells was decreased in recovered patients but not changed in healthy controls upon BCR stimulation. Interestingly, we found that CD19 expression was significantly reduced in almost all the B-cell subsets in recovered patients. Moreover, the BCR signaling and early B-cell response were disrupted upon BCR stimulation. Mechanistically, we found that the reduced CD19 expression was caused by the dysregulation of cell metabolism. In conclusion, we found that SARS-CoV-2 infection causes immunodeficiency in recovered patients by downregulating CD19 expression in B cells via enhancing B-cell metabolism, which may provide a new intervention target to cure COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD19/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Down-Regulation/immunology , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/etiology , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/virology , Immunologic Memory , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Vero Cells
9.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 342, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415923

ABSTRACT

While some individuals infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) present mild-to-severe disease, many SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals are asymptomatic. We sought to identify the distinction of immune response between asymptomatic and moderate patients. We performed single-cell transcriptome and T-cell/B-cell receptor (TCR/BCR) sequencing in 37 longitudinal collected peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from asymptomatic, moderate, and severe patients with healthy controls. Asymptomatic patients displayed increased CD56briCD16- natural killer (NK) cells and upregulation of interferon-gamma in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and NK cells. They showed more robust TCR clonal expansion, especially in effector CD4+ T cells, but lack strong BCR clonal expansion compared to moderate patients. Moreover, asymptomatic patients have lower interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) expression in general but large interpatient variability, whereas moderate patients showed various magnitude and temporal dynamics of the ISGs expression across multiple cell populations but lower than a patient with severe disease. Our data provide evidence of different immune signatures to SARS-CoV-2 in asymptomatic infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carrier State/immunology , Lymphocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
10.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4210, 2021 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303772

ABSTRACT

Neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to SARS-CoV-2 hold powerful potentials for clinical interventions against COVID-19 disease. However, their common genetic and biologic features remain elusive. Here we interrogate a total of 165 antibodies from eight COVID-19 patients, and find that potent nAbs from different patients have disproportionally high representation of IGHV3-53/3-66 usage, and therefore termed as public antibodies. Crystal structural comparison of these antibodies reveals they share similar angle of approach to RBD, overlap in buried surface and binding residues on RBD, and have substantial spatial clash with receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) in binding to RBD. Site-directed mutagenesis confirms these common binding features although some minor differences are found. One representative antibody, P5A-3C8, demonstrates extraordinarily protective efficacy in a golden Syrian hamster model against SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, virus escape analysis identifies a single natural mutation in RBD, namely K417N found in B.1.351 variant from South Africa, abolished the neutralizing activity of these public antibodies. The discovery of public antibodies and shared escape mutation highlight the intricate relationship between antibody response and SARS-CoV-2, and provide critical reference for the development of antibody and vaccine strategies to overcome the antigenic variation of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Epitopes/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Neutralization Tests , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
11.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(6)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236217

ABSTRACT

The world is facing a pandemic of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Adaptive immune responses are essential for SARS-CoV-2 virus clearance. Although a large body of studies have been conducted to investigate the immune mechanism in COVID-19 patients, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the BCR repertoire in patients. In this study, we used the single-cell V(D)J sequencing to characterize the BCR repertoire across convalescent COVID-19 patients. We observed that the BCR diversity was significantly reduced in disease compared with healthy controls. And BCRs tend to skew toward different V gene segments in COVID-19 and healthy controls. The CDR3 sequences of heavy chain in clonal BCRs in patients were more convergent than that in healthy controls. In addition, we discovered increased IgG and IgA isotypes in the disease, including IgG1, IgG3 and IgA1. In all clonal BCRs, IgG isotypes had the most frequent class switch recombination events and the highest somatic hypermutation rate, especially IgG3. Moreover, we found that an IgG3 cluster from different clonal groups had the same IGHV, IGHJ and CDR3 sequences (IGHV4-4-CARLANTNQFYDSSSYLNAMDVW-IGHJ6). Overall, our study provides a comprehensive characterization of the BCR repertoire in COVID-19 patients, which contributes to the understanding of the mechanism for the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , VDJ Exons/genetics , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/genetics , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Analysis , Single-Cell Analysis , VDJ Exons/immunology
12.
Cell Rep ; 35(8): 109173, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227991

ABSTRACT

Individuals with the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) show varying severity of the disease, ranging from asymptomatic to requiring intensive care. Although monoclonal antibodies specific to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been identified, we still lack an understanding of the overall landscape of B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires in individuals with COVID-19. We use high-throughput sequencing of bulk and plasma B cells collected at multiple time points during infection to characterize signatures of the B cell response to SARS-CoV-2 in 19 individuals. Using principled statistical approaches, we associate differential features of BCRs with different disease severity. We identify 38 significantly expanded clonal lineages shared among individuals as candidates for responses specific to SARS-CoV-2. Using single-cell sequencing, we verify the reactivity of BCRs shared among individuals to SARS-CoV-2 epitopes. Moreover, we identify the natural emergence of a BCR with cross-reactivity to SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 in some individuals. Our results provide insights important for development of rational therapies and vaccines against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cross Reactions , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , Epitopes , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Severity of Illness Index , Sf9 Cells , Single-Cell Analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
13.
Nat Med ; 27(5): 904-916, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195620

ABSTRACT

Analysis of human blood immune cells provides insights into the coordinated response to viral infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We performed single-cell transcriptome, surface proteome and T and B lymphocyte antigen receptor analyses of over 780,000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a cross-sectional cohort of 130 patients with varying severities of COVID-19. We identified expansion of nonclassical monocytes expressing complement transcripts (CD16+C1QA/B/C+) that sequester platelets and were predicted to replenish the alveolar macrophage pool in COVID-19. Early, uncommitted CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were primed toward megakaryopoiesis, accompanied by expanded megakaryocyte-committed progenitors and increased platelet activation. Clonally expanded CD8+ T cells and an increased ratio of CD8+ effector T cells to effector memory T cells characterized severe disease, while circulating follicular helper T cells accompanied mild disease. We observed a relative loss of IgA2 in symptomatic disease despite an overall expansion of plasmablasts and plasma cells. Our study highlights the coordinated immune response that contributes to COVID-19 pathogenesis and reveals discrete cellular components that can be targeted for therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Proteome , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Transcriptome , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Monocytes/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
14.
Science ; 372(6543): 738-741, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180894

ABSTRACT

Vaccination and infection promote the formation, tissue distribution, and clonal evolution of B cells, which encode humoral immune memory. We evaluated pediatric and adult blood and deceased adult organ donor tissues to determine convergent antigen-specific antibody genes of similar sequences shared between individuals. B cell memory varied for different pathogens. Polysaccharide antigen-specific clones were not exclusive to the spleen. Adults had higher clone frequencies and greater class switching in lymphoid tissues than blood, while pediatric blood had abundant class-switched convergent clones. Consistent with reported serology, prepandemic children had class-switched convergent clones to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 with weak cross-reactivity to other coronaviruses, while adult blood or tissues showed few such clones. These results highlight the prominence of early childhood B cell clonal expansions and cross-reactivity for future responses to novel pathogens.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Coronavirus/immunology , Immunologic Memory , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Child, Preschool , Cross Reactions , Ebolavirus/immunology , Female , Fetal Blood/immunology , Genes, Immunoglobulin , Humans , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunoglobulin D/genetics , Immunoglobulin D/immunology , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/genetics , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Infant , Lymph Nodes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin , Spleen/immunology , Young Adult
15.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 110, 2021 03 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118799

ABSTRACT

The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus is an ongoing global health emergency. However, the virus' pathogenesis remains unclear, and there is no cure for the disease. We investigated the dynamic changes of blood immune response in patients with COVID-19 at different stages by using 5' gene expression, T cell receptor (TCR), and B cell receptors (BCR) V(D)J transcriptome analysis at a single-cell resolution. We obtained single-cell mRNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) data of 341,420 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 185,430 clonotypic T cells and 28,802 clonotypic B cells from 25 samples of 16 patients with COVID-19 for dynamic studies. In addition, we used three control samples. We found expansion of dendritic cells (DCs), CD14+ monocytes, and megakaryocytes progenitor cells (MP)/platelets and a reduction of naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes in patients with COVID-19, along with a significant decrease of CD8+ T lymphocytes, and natural killer cells (NKs) in patients in critical condition. The type I interferon (IFN-I), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and ferroptosis pathways were activated while the disease was active, and recovered gradually after patient conditions improved. Consistent with this finding, the mRNA level of IFN-I signal-induced gene IFI27 was significantly increased in patients with COVID-19 compared with that of the controls in a validation cohort that included 38 patients and 35 controls. The concentration of interferon-α (IFN-α) in the serum of patients with COVID-19 increased significantly compared with that of the controls in an additional cohort of 215 patients with COVID-19 and 106 controls, further suggesting the important role of the IFN-I pathway in the immune response of COVID-19. TCR and BCR sequences analyses indicated that patients with COVID-19 developed specific immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 antigens. Our study reveals a dynamic landscape of human blood immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection, providing clues for therapeutic potentials in treating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Leukocytes/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis , Adult , COVID-19/genetics , Female , Ferroptosis/genetics , Ferroptosis/immunology , Humans , MAP Kinase Signaling System/genetics , MAP Kinase Signaling System/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
16.
Science ; 371(6530): 735-741, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066809

ABSTRACT

Protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and SARS-related emergent zoonotic coronaviruses is urgently needed. We made homotypic nanoparticles displaying the receptor binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 or co-displaying SARS-CoV-2 RBD along with RBDs from animal betacoronaviruses that represent threats to humans (mosaic nanoparticles with four to eight distinct RBDs). Mice immunized with RBD nanoparticles, but not soluble antigen, elicited cross-reactive binding and neutralization responses. Mosaic RBD nanoparticles elicited antibodies with superior cross-reactive recognition of heterologous RBDs relative to sera from immunizations with homotypic SARS-CoV-2-RBD nanoparticles or COVID-19 convalescent human plasmas. Moreover, after priming, sera from mosaic RBD-immunized mice neutralized heterologous pseudotyped coronaviruses as well as or better than sera from homotypic SARS-CoV-2-RBD nanoparticle immunizations, demonstrating no loss of immunogenicity against particular RBDs resulting from co-display. A single immunization with mosaic RBD nanoparticles provides a potential strategy to simultaneously protect against SARS-CoV-2 and emerging zoonotic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Nanoparticles , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cross Reactions , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Immune Sera/immunology , Immunization , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Neutralization Tests , Protein Domains , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Viral Zoonoses/immunology , Viral Zoonoses/virology
17.
J Autoimmun ; 118: 102596, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062442

ABSTRACT

Forty-seven samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from four groups of coronavirus disease (COVID)-19 patients (mild, severe, convalescent, retesting-positive) and healthy controls were applied to profile the immune repertoire of COVID-19 patients in acute infection or convalescence by transcriptome sequencing and immune-receptor repertoire (IRR) sequencing. Transcriptome analyses showed that genes within principal component group 1 (PC1) were associated with infection and disease severity whereas genes within PC2 were associated with recovery from COVID-19. A "dual-injury mechanism" of COVID-19 severity was related to an increased number of proinflammatory pathways and activated hypercoagulable pathways. A machine-learning model based on the genes associated with inflammatory and hypercoagulable pathways had the potential to be employed to monitor COVID-19 severity. Signature analyses of B-cell receptors (BCRs) and T-cell receptors (TCRs) revealed the dominant selection of longer V-J pairs (e.g., IGHV3-9-IGHJ6 and IGHV3-23-IGHJ6) and continuous tyrosine motifs in BCRs and lower diversity of TCRs. These findings provide potential predictors for COVID-19 outcomes, and new potential targets for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology
18.
Monoclon Antib Immunodiagn Immunother ; 40(1): 17-20, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054247

ABSTRACT

In this report we provide a hypothesis of how intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) (pooled therapeutic normal IgG) mitigates the severe disease after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. The disease is caused by an overreaction of the innate immune system producing a cytokine storm and inflicting multiple organ damage. Our interpretation of IvIg therapy hinges on a recent analysis of the immune dysregulation in Covid-19 infection. Previous infections with common cold coronavirus induce suppressor memory B cells that inhibit an immune response to Covid-19. The repertoire of natural antibodies (IvIg) contains suppressing antibodies in a symmetrically balanced network structure. When this repertoire interacts with the imbalanced network in the infected patient, it can neutralize the suppression of an antibody response against Covid-19. The described scenario for IvIg in Covid-19 infection may also apply in the therapy of autoimmune diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Models, Immunological , Adaptive Immunity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Humans , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology
19.
J Clin Invest ; 131(1)2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011060

ABSTRACT

Many individuals possess B cells capable of recognizing epitopes on the spike glycoprotein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In this issue of the JCI, Paschold and Simnica et al. interrogated the frequency of SARS-CoV-2-specific B cell receptor rearrangements in healthy subjects based on age and cancer status. The authors found that while SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody signatures can be identified in the repertoires of young, healthy individuals, such sequences are less frequent in elderly subjects or patients with cancer. Overall, this study sheds light on B cell repertoire restrictions that might lead to an unfavorable clinical course of coronavirus disease 2019 infection in at-risk populations.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/virology
20.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 19(11): 1023-1039, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948588

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Adjuvants are critical components of vaccines to improve the quality and durability of immune responses. Molecular adjuvants are a specific subclass of adjuvants where ligands of known immune-modulatory receptors are directly fused to an antigen. Co-stimulation of the B cell receptor (BCR) and immune-modulatory receptors through this strategy can augment downstream signaling to improve antibody titers and/or potency, and survival in challenge models. AREAS COVERED: C3d has been the most extensively studied molecular adjuvant and shown to improve immune responses to a number of antigens. Similarly, tumor necrosis superfamily ligands, such as BAFF and APRIL, as well as CD40, CD180, and immune complex ligands can also improve humoral immunity as molecular adjuvants. EXPERT OPINION: However, no single strategy has emerged that improves immune outcomes in all contexts. Thus, systematic exploration of molecular adjuvants that target B cell receptors will be required to realize their full potential as next-generation vaccine technologies.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccines/immunology , Animals , Antigens/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology
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