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1.
J Virol ; 96(7): e0199521, 2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745826

ABSTRACT

C-type lectin domain-containing proteins (CTLDcps) shape host responses to pathogens and infectious disease outcomes. Previously, we identified the murine CTLDcp Cd302 as restriction factor, limiting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection of murine hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated in detail the human orthologue's ability to restrict HCV infection in human liver cells. CD302 overexpression in Huh-7.5 cells potently inhibited infection of diverse HCV chimeras representing seven genotypes. Transcriptional profiling revealed abundant CD302 mRNA expression in human hepatocytes, the natural cellular target of HCV. Knockdown of endogenously expressed CD302 modestly enhanced HCV infection of Huh-7.5 cells and primary human hepatocytes. Functional analysis of naturally occurring CD302 transcript variants and engineered CD302 mutants showed that the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) is essential for HCV restriction, whereas the cytoplasmic domain (CPD) is dispensable. Coding single nucleotide polymorphisms occurring in human populations and mapping to different domains of CD302 did not influence the capacity of CD302 to restrict HCV. Assessment of the anti-HCV phenotype at different life cycle stages indicated that CD302 preferentially targets the viral entry step. In contrast to the murine orthologue, overexpression of human CD302 did not modulate downstream expression of nuclear receptor-controlled genes. Ectopic CD302 expression restricted infection of liver tropic hepatitis E virus (HEV), while it did not affect infection rates of two respiratory viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the alpha coronavirus HVCoV-229E. Together, these findings suggest that CD302 contributes to liver cell-intrinsic defense against HCV and might mediate broader antiviral defenses against additional hepatotropic viruses. IMPORTANCE The liver represents an immunoprivileged organ characterized by enhanced resistance to immune responses. However, the importance of liver cell-endogenous, noncytolytic innate immune responses in pathogen control is not well defined. Although the role of myeloid cell-expressed CTLDcps in host responses to viruses has been characterized in detail, we have little information about their potential functions in the liver and their relevance for immune responses in this organ. Human hepatocytes endogenously express the CTLDcp CD302. Here, we provide evidence that CD302 limits HCV infection of human liver cells, likely by inhibiting a viral cell entry step. We confirm that the dominant liver-expressed transcript variant, as well as naturally occurring coding variants of CD302, maintain the capacity to restrict HCV. We further show that the CTLD of the protein is critical for the anti-HCV activity and that overexpressed CD302 limits HEV infection. Thus, CD302 likely contributes to human liver-intrinsic antiviral defenses.


Subject(s)
Hepacivirus , Hepatitis C , Lectins, C-Type , Receptors, Cell Surface , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Hepacivirus/physiology , Hepatitis C/immunology , Hepatocytes/immunology , Hepatocytes/virology , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/genetics , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Virus Replication
2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 4058, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735282

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a key host protein by which severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) enters and multiplies within cells. The level of ACE2 expression in the lung is hypothesised to correlate with an increased risk of severe infection and complications in COrona VIrus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). To test this hypothesis, we compared the protein expression status of ACE2 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in post-mortem lung samples of patients who died of severe COVID-19 and lung samples obtained from non-COVID-19 patients for other indications. IHC for CD61 and CD163 was performed for the assessment of platelet-rich microthrombi and macrophages, respectively. IHC for SARS-CoV-2 viral antigen was also performed. In a total of 55, 44 COVID-19 post-mortem lung samples were tested for ACE2, 36 for CD163, and 26 for CD61, compared to 15 non-covid 19 control lung sections. Quantification of immunostaining, random sampling, and correlation analysis were used to substantiate the morphologic findings. Our results show that ACE2 protein expression was significantly higher in COVID-19 post-mortem lung tissues than in controls, regardless of sample size. Histomorphology in COVID-19 lungs showed diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), acute bronchopneumonia, and acute lung injury with SARS-CoV-2 viral protein detected in a subset of cases. ACE2 expression levels were positively correlated with increased expression levels of CD61 and CD163. In conclusion, our results show significantly higher ACE2 protein expression in severe COVID-19 disease, correlating with increased macrophage infiltration and microthrombi, suggesting a pathobiological role in disease severity.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Antigens, CD/genetics , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism , Autopsy , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Integrin beta3/genetics , Integrin beta3/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687052

ABSTRACT

The evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 virus during the COVID-19 pandemic was accompanied by the emergence of new heavily mutated viral variants with increased infectivity and/or resistance to detection by the human immune system. To respond to the urgent need for advanced methods and materials to empower a better understanding of the mechanisms of virus's adaptation to human host cells and to the immuno-resistant human population, we suggested using recombinant filamentous bacteriophages, displaying on their surface foreign peptides termed "mimotopes", which mimic the structure of viral receptor-binding sites on the viral spike protein and can serve as molecular probes in the evaluation of molecular mechanisms of virus infectivity. In opposition to spike-binding antibodies that are commonly used in studying the interaction of the ACE2 receptor with SARS-CoV-2 variants in vitro, phage spike mimotopes targeted to other cellular receptors would allow discovery of their role in viral infection in vivo using cell culture, tissue, organs, or the whole organism. Phage mimotopes of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike S1 protein have been developed using a combination of phage display and molecular mimicry concepts, termed here "phage mimicry", supported by bioinformatics methods. The key elements of the phage mimicry concept include: (1) preparation of a collection of p8-type (landscape) phages, which interact with authentic active receptors of live human cells, presumably mimicking the binding interactions of human coronaviruses such as SARS-CoV-2 and its variants; (2) discovery of closely related amino acid clusters with similar 3D structural motifs on the surface of natural ligands (FGF1 and NRP1), of the model receptor of interest FGFR and the S1 spike protein; and (3) an ELISA analysis of the interaction between candidate phage mimotopes with FGFR3 (a potential alternative receptor) in comparison with ACE2 (the authentic receptor).


Subject(s)
Bacteriophages/genetics , Cell Surface Display Techniques/methods , Molecular Mimicry , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Bacteriophages/metabolism , Binding Sites , Humans , Protein Binding , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment
4.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(9): e1009918, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622376

ABSTRACT

Under RNA virus infection, retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in host cells recognizes viral RNA and activates the expression of type I IFN. To investigate the roles of protein methyltransferases and demethylases in RIG-I antiviral signaling pathway, we screened all the known related enzymes with a siRNA library and identified LSD1 as a positive regulator for RIG-I signaling. Exogenous expression of LSD1 enhances RIG-I signaling activated by virus stimulation, whereas its deficiency restricts it. LSD1 interacts with RIG-I, promotes its K63-linked polyubiquitination and interaction with VISA/MAVS. Interestingly, LSD1 exerts its function in antiviral response not dependent on its demethylase activity but through enhancing the interaction between RIG-I with E3 ligases, especially TRIM25. Furthermore, we provide in vivo evidence that LSD1 increases antiviral gene expression and inhibits viral replication. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that LSD1 is a positive regulator of signaling pathway triggered by RNA-virus through mediating RIG-I polyubiquitination.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation/physiology , Histone Demethylases/metabolism , RNA Virus Infections/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Ubiquitination , Vero Cells
5.
J Med Chem ; 64(19): 14332-14343, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621195

ABSTRACT

In addition to a variety of viral-glycoprotein receptors (e.g., heparan sulfate, Niemann-Pick C1, etc.), dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), from the C-type lectin receptor family, plays one of the most important pathogenic functions for a wide range of viruses (e.g., Ebola, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, etc.) that invade host cells before replication; thus, its inhibition represents a relevant extracellular antiviral therapy. We report two novel p-tBu-calixarene glycoclusters 1 and 2, bearing tetrahydroxamic acid groups, which exhibit micromolar inhibition of soluble DC-SIGN binding and provide nanomolar IC50 inhibition of both DC-SIGN-dependent Jurkat cis-cell infection by viral particle pseudotyped with Ebola virus glycoprotein and the HCMV-gB-recombinant glycoprotein interaction with monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing DC-SIGN. A unique cooperative involvement of sugar, linker, and calixarene core is likely behind the strong avidity of DC-SIGN for these low-valent systems. We claim herein new promising candidates for the rational development of a large spectrum of antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Calixarenes/chemistry , Cell Adhesion Molecules/antagonists & inhibitors , Glycoconjugates/metabolism , Glycoproteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Hydroxamic Acids/chemistry , Lectins, C-Type/antagonists & inhibitors , Phenols/chemistry , Receptors, Cell Surface/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Line , Cytomegalovirus/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/cytology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Ebolavirus/physiology , Glycoconjugates/chemistry , Glycoconjugates/pharmacology , Glycoproteins/genetics , Glycoproteins/metabolism , Humans , Jurkat Cells , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Models, Biological , Protein Binding , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/isolation & purification , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 3172, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550281

ABSTRACT

Secreted class 3 semaphorins (Sema3s) form tripartite complexes with the plexin receptor and neuropilin coreceptor, which are both transmembrane proteins that together mediate semaphorin signal for neuronal axon guidance and other processes. Despite extensive investigations, the overall architecture of and the molecular interactions in the Sema3/plexin/neuropilin complex are incompletely understood. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of a near intact extracellular region complex of Sema3A, PlexinA4 and Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) at 3.7 Å resolution. The structure shows a large symmetric 2:2:2 assembly in which each subunit makes multiple interactions with others. The two PlexinA4 molecules in the complex do not interact directly, but their membrane proximal regions are close to each other and poised to promote the formation of the intracellular active dimer for signaling. The structure reveals a previously unknown interface between the a2b1b2 module in Nrp1 and the Sema domain of Sema3A. This interaction places the a2b1b2 module at the top of the complex, far away from the plasma membrane where the transmembrane regions of Nrp1 and PlexinA4 embed. As a result, the region following the a2b1b2 module in Nrp1 must span a large distance to allow the connection to the transmembrane region, suggesting an essential role for the long non-conserved linkers and the MAM domain in neuropilin in the semaphorin/plexin/neuropilin complex.


Subject(s)
Nerve Tissue Proteins/ultrastructure , Neuropilin-1/ultrastructure , Receptors, Cell Surface/ultrastructure , Semaphorin-3A/ultrastructure , Animals , COS Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cryoelectron Microscopy , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mutation , Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics , Nerve Tissue Proteins/isolation & purification , Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/isolation & purification , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Protein Binding/genetics , Protein Domains/genetics , Protein Multimerization/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/isolation & purification , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/isolation & purification , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/ultrastructure , Semaphorin-3A/genetics , Semaphorin-3A/isolation & purification , Semaphorin-3A/metabolism
7.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538383

ABSTRACT

Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and their function is essential to configure adaptative immunity and avoid excessive inflammation. DCs are predicted to play a crucial role in the clinical evolution of the infection by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV)-2. DCs interaction with the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein, which mediates cell receptor binding and subsequent fusion of the viral particle with host cell, is a key step to induce effective immunity against this virus and in the S protein-based vaccination protocols. Here we evaluated human DCs in response to SARS-CoV-2 S protein, or to a fragment encompassing the receptor binding domain (RBD) challenge. Both proteins increased the expression of maturation markers, including MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors. DCs interaction with the SARS-CoV-2 S protein promotes activation of key signaling molecules involved in inflammation, including MAPK, AKT, STAT1, and NFκB, which correlates with the expression and secretion of distinctive proinflammatory cytokines. Differences in the expression of ACE2 along the differentiation of human monocytes to mature DCs and inter-donor were found. Our results show that SARS-CoV-2 S protein promotes inflammatory response and provides molecular links between individual variations and the degree of response against this virus.


Subject(s)
Dendritic Cells/pathology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Protein Domains , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , STAT Transcription Factors/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Tissue Donors
8.
Cell ; 184(26): 6243-6261.e27, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536467

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-induced "acute respiratory distress syndrome" (ARDS) is associated with prolonged respiratory failure and high mortality, but the mechanistic basis of lung injury remains incompletely understood. Here, we analyze pulmonary immune responses and lung pathology in two cohorts of patients with COVID-19 ARDS using functional single-cell genomics, immunohistology, and electron microscopy. We describe an accumulation of CD163-expressing monocyte-derived macrophages that acquired a profibrotic transcriptional phenotype during COVID-19 ARDS. Gene set enrichment and computational data integration revealed a significant similarity between COVID-19-associated macrophages and profibrotic macrophage populations identified in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. COVID-19 ARDS was associated with clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and ultrastructural hallmarks of pulmonary fibrosis. Exposure of human monocytes to SARS-CoV-2, but not influenza A virus or viral RNA analogs, was sufficient to induce a similar profibrotic phenotype in vitro. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 triggers profibrotic macrophage responses and pronounced fibroproliferative ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , Macrophages/pathology , Macrophages/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cell Communication , Cohort Studies , Fibroblasts/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/pathology , Phenotype , Proteome/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transcription, Genetic
10.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(42): 17465-17478, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469951

ABSTRACT

The C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN is a pattern recognition receptor expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. It has been identified as a promiscuous entry receptor for many pathogens, including epidemic and pandemic viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, Ebola virus, and HIV-1. In the context of the recent SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, DC-SIGN-mediated virus dissemination and stimulation of innate immune responses has been implicated as a potential factor in the development of severe COVID-19. Inhibition of virus binding to DC-SIGN, thus, represents an attractive host-directed strategy to attenuate overshooting innate immune responses and prevent the progression of the disease. In this study, we report on the discovery of a new class of potent glycomimetic DC-SIGN antagonists from a focused library of triazole-based mannose analogues. Structure-based optimization of an initial screening hit yielded a glycomimetic ligand with a more than 100-fold improved binding affinity compared to methyl α-d-mannopyranoside. Analysis of binding thermodynamics revealed an enthalpy-driven improvement of binding affinity that was enabled by hydrophobic interactions with a loop region adjacent to the binding site and displacement of a conserved water molecule. The identified ligand was employed for the synthesis of multivalent glycopolymers that were able to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein binding to DC-SIGN-expressing cells, as well as DC-SIGN-mediated trans-infection of ACE2+ cells by SARS-CoV-2 spike protein-expressing viruses, in nanomolar concentrations. The identified glycomimetic ligands reported here open promising perspectives for the development of highly potent and fully selective DC-SIGN-targeted therapeutics for a broad spectrum of viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
11.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2021: 7866992, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403126

ABSTRACT

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is posing a great threat to the global economy and public health security. Together with the acknowledged angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, glucose-regulated protein 78, transferrin receptor, AXL, kidney injury molecule-1, and neuropilin 1 are also identified as potential receptors to mediate SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, how to inhibit or delay the binding of SARS-CoV-2 with the abovementioned receptors is a key step for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. As the third gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Recently, survivors were reported to have significantly higher H2S levels in COVID-19 patients, and mortality was significantly greater among patients with decreased H2S levels. Considering that the beneficial role of H2S against COVID-19 and COVID-19-induced comorbidities and multiorgan damage has been well-examined and reported in some excellent reviews, this review will discuss the recent findings on the potential receptors of SARS-CoV-2 and how H2S modulates the above receptors, in turn blocking SARS-CoV-2 entry into host cells.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Hydrogen Sulfide/pharmacology , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Humans , Organ Specificity/drug effects , Protective Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
12.
Nature ; 598(7880): 342-347, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379317

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection-which involves both cell attachment and membrane fusion-relies on the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, which is paradoxically found at low levels in the respiratory tract1-3, suggesting that there may be additional mechanisms facilitating infection. Here we show that C-type lectin receptors, DC-SIGN, L-SIGN and the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 1 (SIGLEC1) function as attachment receptors by enhancing ACE2-mediated infection and modulating the neutralizing activity of different classes of spike-specific antibodies. Antibodies to the amino-terminal domain or to the conserved site at the base of the receptor-binding domain, while poorly neutralizing infection of ACE2-overexpressing cells, effectively block lectin-facilitated infection. Conversely, antibodies to the receptor binding motif, while potently neutralizing infection of ACE2-overexpressing cells, poorly neutralize infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN or L-SIGN and trigger fusogenic rearrangement of the spike, promoting cell-to-cell fusion. Collectively, these findings identify a lectin-dependent pathway that enhances ACE2-dependent infection by SARS-CoV-2 and reveal distinct mechanisms of neutralization by different classes of spike-specific antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Lectins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Fusion , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Female , Humans , Lectins/immunology , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Membrane Fusion , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 1/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(17)2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374426

ABSTRACT

The current spreading coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is highly infectious and pathogenic. In this study, we screened the gene expression of three host receptors (ACE2, DC-SIGN and L-SIGN) of SARS coronaviruses and dendritic cells (DCs) status in bulk and single cell transcriptomic datasets of upper airway, lung or blood of COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. In COVID-19 patients, DC-SIGN gene expression was interestingly decreased in lung DCs but increased in blood DCs. Within DCs, conventional DCs (cDCs) were depleted while plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) were augmented in the lungs of mild COVID-19. In severe cases, we identified augmented types of immature DCs (CD22+ or ANXA1+ DCs) with MHCII downregulation. In this study, our observation indicates that DCs in severe cases stimulate innate immune responses but fail to specifically present SARS-CoV-2. It provides insights into the profound modulation of DC function in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Lectins, C-Type/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Datasets as Topic , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Genome-Wide Association Study , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Nasopharynx/immunology , Nasopharynx/pathology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis
14.
JCI Insight ; 6(14)2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320462

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), remains a pandemic. Severe disease is associated with dysfunction of multiple organs, but some infected cells do not express ACE2, the canonical entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Here, we report that the C-type lectin receptor L-SIGN interacted in a Ca2+-dependent manner with high-mannose-type N-glycans on the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We found that L-SIGN was highly expressed on human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and lymph node lymphatic endothelial cells but not on blood endothelial cells. Using high-resolution confocal microscopy imaging, we detected SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins within the LSECs from liver autopsy samples from patients with COVID-19. We found that both pseudo-typed virus enveloped with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and authentic SARS-CoV-2 virus infected L-SIGN-expressing cells relative to control cells. Moreover, blocking L-SIGN function reduced CoV-2-type infection. These results indicate that L-SIGN is a receptor for SARS-CoV-2 infection. LSECs are major sources of the clotting factors vWF and factor VIII (FVIII). LSECs from liver autopsy samples from patients with COVID-19 expressed substantially higher levels of vWF and FVIII than LSECs from uninfected liver samples. Our data demonstrate that L-SIGN is an endothelial cell receptor for SARS-CoV-2 that may contribute to COVID-19-associated coagulopathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Capillaries , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Endothelial Cells , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Liver/blood supply , Lymphatic Vessels , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Capillaries/metabolism , Capillaries/pathology , Capillaries/virology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Humans , Liver/pathology , Lymphatic Vessels/metabolism , Lymphatic Vessels/pathology , Lymphatic Vessels/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Virus Internalization
15.
ChemMedChem ; 16(15): 2345-2353, 2021 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248684

ABSTRACT

The C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN mediates interactions with envelope glycoproteins of many viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, ebola, and HIV and contributes to virus internalization and dissemination. In the context of the recent SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, involvement of DC-SIGN has been linked to severe cases of COVID-19. Inhibition of the interaction between DC-SIGN and viral glycoproteins has the potential to generate broad spectrum antiviral agents. Here, we demonstrate that mannose-functionalized poly-l-lysine glycoconjugates efficiently inhibit the attachment of viral glycoproteins to DC-SIGN-presenting cells with picomolar affinity. Treatment of these cells leads to prolonged receptor internalization and inhibition of virus binding for up to 6 h. Furthermore, the polymers are fully bio-compatible and readily cleared by target cells. The thermodynamic analysis of the multivalent interactions reveals enhanced enthalpy-driven affinities and promising perspectives for the future development of multivalent therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/antagonists & inhibitors , Glycoconjugates/pharmacology , Lectins, C-Type/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Cell Surface/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Glycoconjugates/chemical synthesis , Glycoconjugates/metabolism , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Mannose/analogs & derivatives , Mannose/metabolism , Mannose/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Polylysine/analogs & derivatives , Polylysine/metabolism , Polylysine/pharmacology , Protein Binding/drug effects , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , THP-1 Cells , Thermodynamics , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism
16.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1191-1199, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246663

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to more than 159 million confirmed cases with over 3.3 million deaths worldwide, but it remains mystery why most infected individuals (∼98%) were asymptomatic or only experienced mild illness. The same mystery applies to the deadly 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic, which has puzzled the field for a century. Here we discuss dual potential properties of the 1918 H1N1 pandemic viruses that led to the high fatality rate in the small portion of severe cases, while about 98% infected persons in the United States were self-limited with mild symptoms, or even asymptomatic. These variations now have been postulated to be impacted by polymorphisms of the sialic acid receptors in the general population. Since coronaviruses (CoVs) also recognize sialic acid receptors and cause severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemics and pandemics, similar principles of influenza virus evolution and pandemicity may also apply to CoVs. A potential common principle of pathogen/host co-evolution of influenza and CoVs under selection of host sialic acids in parallel with different epidemic and pandemic influenza and coronaviruses is discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Sialic Acids/metabolism , Asymptomatic Diseases , Biological Evolution , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza, Human/mortality , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Saliva/metabolism , Saliva/virology
17.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(5): e1009576, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236599

ABSTRACT

The efficient spread of SARS-CoV-2 resulted in a unique pandemic in modern history. Despite early identification of ACE2 as the receptor for viral spike protein, much remains to be understood about the molecular events behind viral dissemination. We evaluated the contribution of C-type lectin receptors (CLRS) of antigen-presenting cells, widely present in respiratory mucosa and lung tissue. DC-SIGN, L-SIGN, Langerin and MGL bind to diverse glycans of the spike using multiple interaction areas. Using pseudovirus and cells derived from monocytes or T-lymphocytes, we demonstrate that while virus capture by the CLRs examined does not allow direct cell infection, DC/L-SIGN, among these receptors, promote virus transfer to permissive ACE2+ Vero E6 cells. A glycomimetic compound designed against DC-SIGN, enable inhibition of this process. These data have been then confirmed using authentic SARS-CoV-2 virus and human respiratory cell lines. Thus, we described a mechanism potentiating viral spreading of infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , Antigens, CD/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Jurkat Cells , Lung/metabolism , Mannose-Binding Lectins/metabolism , Mannosides/pharmacology , Protein Binding/drug effects , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Vero Cells
18.
J Infect Dis ; 224(Supplement_6): S631-S641, 2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195718

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) binding receptor ACE2 and the spike protein priming protease TMPRSS2 are coexpressed in human placentae. It is unknown whether their expression is altered in the context of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: We compared mRNA levels of SARS-CoV-2 cell-entry mediators ACE2, TMPRSS2, and L-SIGN by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 105 placentae: 45 from pregnant women with HIV (WHIV) on protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART, 17 from WHIV on non-PI-based ART, and 43 from HIV-uninfected women. RESULTS: ACE2 levels were lower, while L-SIGN levels were higher, in placentae from WHIV on PI-based ART compared to those on non-PI-based ART and to HIV-uninfected women. TMPRSS2 levels were similar between groups. Black race was significantly associated with lower expression of ACE2 and higher expression of L-SIGN. ACE2 levels were significantly higher in placentae of female fetuses. CONCLUSIONS: We identified pregnant women of black race and WHIV on PI-based ART to have relatively lower expression of placental ACE2 than those of white race and HIV-uninfected women. This may potentially contribute to altered susceptibility to COVID-19 in these women, favorably by reduced viral entry or detrimentally by loss of ACE2 protection against hyperinflammation.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , HIV Infections/blood , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Placenta/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics , Female , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/genetics , Pregnancy , RNA, Messenger , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(6)2021 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136499

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has resulted in significant morbidity and mortality across the world, with no current effective treatments available. Recent studies suggest the possibility of a cytokine storm associated with severe COVID-19, similar to the biochemical profile seen in hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), raising the question of possible benefits that could be derived from targeted immunosuppression in severe COVID-19 patients. We reviewed the literature regarding the diagnosis and features of HLH, particularly secondary HLH, and aimed to identify gaps in the literature to truly clarify the existence of a COVID-19 associated HLH. Diagnostic criteria such as HScore or HLH-2004 may have suboptimal performance in identifying COVID-19 HLH-like presentations, and criteria such as soluble CD163, NK cell activity, or other novel biomarkers may be more useful in identifying this entity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/etiology , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Receptors, Interleukin-2/metabolism , Sepsis/etiology
20.
Cornea ; 39(12): 1556-1562, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109355

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To confirm the ocular tropism of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by evaluating the expression of viral entry factors in human ocular tissues using immunohistochemistry. METHODS: Fresh donor corneas and primary explant cultures of corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelial cells were evaluated for the expression of viral entry factors. Using immunohistochemistry, the samples were tested for the expression of angiotension-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), DC-SIGN-related protein (DC-SIGNR), and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2). RESULTS: In total, 5 donor corneas were evaluated for the expression of viral entry factors. In all specimens, both ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were expressed throughout the surface epithelium (corneal, limbal, and conjunctival) and corneal endothelium. In corneal stromal cells, ACE2 was sporadically expressed, whereas TMPRSS2 was absent. DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR expression varied between donor specimens. Four specimens expressed DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR in a similar distribution to ACE2, but 1 specimen from a young donor showed no expression of DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR. ACE2, TMPRSS2, and DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR were all expressed in the cultured corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: Both corneal and conjunctival epithelia express ACE2, DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR, and TMPRSS2, suggesting that the ocular surface is a potential route for the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. The risk of viral transmission with corneal transplantation cannot be ruled out, given the presence of ACE2 in corneal epithelium and endothelium. Cultured corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelial cells mimic the expression of viral entry factors in fresh donor tissue and may be useful for future in vitro SARS-CoV-2 infection studies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Conjunctiva/metabolism , Epithelium, Corneal/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Cells, Cultured , Conjunctiva/cytology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Female , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Humans , Limbus Corneae/cytology , Male , Microscopy, Fluorescence , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Donors , Viral Tropism/physiology , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
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