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2.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(12): 3224-3238, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524470

ABSTRACT

Mechanisms of breast cancer progression and invasion, often involve alteration of hormonal signaling, and upregulation and/or activation of signal transduction pathways that input to cell cycle regulation. Herein, we describe a rationally designed first-in-class novel small molecule inhibitor for targeting oncogenic and hormonal signaling in ER-positive breast cancer. BC-N102 treatment exhibits dose-dependent cytotoxic effects against ER+ breast cancer cell lines. BC-N102 exhibited time course- and dose-dependent cell cycle arrest via downregulation of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), androgen receptor (AR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphorylated (p)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p-Akt, CDK2, and CDK4 while increasing p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling in breast cancer cell line. In addition, we found that BC-N102 suppressed breast cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and prolonged the survival of animals. Our results suggest that the proper application of BC-N102 may be a beneficial chemotherapeutic strategy for ER+ breast cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , G1 Phase/drug effects , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Resting Phase, Cell Cycle/drug effects , Animals , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Blotting, Western , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Cell Division , Cell Line, Tumor , Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2/genetics , Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/genetics , Female , Flow Cytometry , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/physiology , Humans , Maximum Tolerated Dose , Mice , Mice, Nude , Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
3.
Surgery ; 171(3): 666-672, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, guidelines recommended that breast cancer centers delay estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer surgeries with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. We aimed to evaluate pathologic upstaging of breast cancer patients affected by these guidelines. METHODS: Female patients with stage I/II breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy were prospectively identified and were matched to a historical cohort of stage I/II estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with upfront surgery ≤35 days. Primary outcomes were pathologic T and N upstaging versus clinical staging. RESULTS: After matching, 28 neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and 48 control patients remained. Median age in each group was 65 (P = .68). Most patients (78.6% and 79.2%) had invasive ductal carcinoma with a clinical tumor size of 0.9 cm vs 1.7 cm (P = .056). Time to surgery was 68 days in the neoadjuvant endocrine therapy group and 26.5 days in the control (P < .001). A total of 23 neoadjuvant endocrine therapy patients (82.1%) had the same or lower pT-stage compared with 31 (64.5%) control patients (P = .115). Only 3 (10.7%) neoadjuvant endocrine therapy patients had increased pN-stage vs 14 (29.2%) control patients (P = .063). CONCLUSION: Despite 2.5-times longer delays, patients with early-stage estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy did not experience pathologic upstaging during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings may support the use of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy in similar patients if delays to surgery are projected.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Prospective Studies , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism
4.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403545

ABSTRACT

Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality in women and it kills twice as many women as breast cancer. A key role in the pathophysiology of stroke plays the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) within the neurovascular unit. While estrogen induces vascular protective actions, its influence on stroke remains unclear. Moreover, experiments assessing its impact on endothelial cells to induce barrier integrity are non-conclusive. Since pericytes play an active role in regulating BBB integrity and function, we hypothesize that estradiol may influence BBB by regulating their activity. In this study using human brain vascular pericytes (HBVPs) we investigated the impact of estradiol on key pericyte functions known to influence BBB integrity. HBVPs expressed estrogen receptors (ER-α, ER-ß and GPER) and treatment with estradiol (10 nM) inhibited basal cell migration but not proliferation. Since pericyte migration is a hallmark for BBB disruption following injury, infection and inflammation, we investigated the effects of estradiol on TNFα-induced PC migration. Importantly, estradiol prevented TNFα-induced pericyte migration and this effect was mimicked by PPT (ER-α agonist) and DPN (ER-ß agonist), but not by G1 (GPR30 agonist). The modulatory effects of estradiol were abrogated by MPP and PHTPP, selective ER-α and ER-ß antagonists, respectively, confirming the role of ER-α and ER-ß in mediating the anti-migratory actions of estrogen. To delineate the intracellular mechanisms mediating the inhibitory actions of estradiol on PC migration, we investigated the role of AKT and MAPK activation. While estradiol consistently reduced the TNFα-induced MAPK and Akt phosphorylation, only the inhibition of MAPK, but not Akt, significantly abrogated the migratory actions of TNFα. In transendothelial electrical resistance measurements, estradiol induced barrier function (TEER) in human brain microvascular endothelial cells co-cultured with pericytes, but not in HBMECs cultured alone. Importantly, transcriptomics analysis of genes modulated by estradiol in pericytes showed downregulation of genes known to increase cell migration and upregulation of genes known to inhibit cell migration. Taken together, our findings provide the first evidence that estradiol modulates pericyte activity and thereby improves endothelial integrity.


Subject(s)
Brain/blood supply , Cell Movement/drug effects , Estradiol/pharmacology , Gene Expression Profiling , Pericytes/cytology , Cell Movement/genetics , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Pericytes/drug effects , Pericytes/metabolism , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
5.
Essays Biochem ; 65(6): 1025-1038, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334002

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 symptoms and mortality are largely due to its devastating effects in the lungs. The disease is caused by the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome)-CoV-2 coronavirus, which requires host cell proteins such as ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2) and TMPRSS2 (transmembrane serine protease 2) for infection of lung epithelia. The expression and function of the steroid hormone receptor family is important in many aspects that impact on COVID-19 effects in the lung - notably lung development and function, the immune system, and expression of TMPRSS2 and ACE2. This review provides a brief summary of current knowledge on the roles of the steroid hormone receptors [androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor (PR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and oestrogen receptor (ER)] in the lung, their effects on host cell proteins that facilitate SARS-CoV-2 uptake, and provides a snapshot of current clinical trials investigating the use of steroid receptor (SR) ligands to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Receptors, Steroid/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hormone Antagonists/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Receptors, Androgen/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/metabolism , Receptors, Mineralocorticoid/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Sex Factors
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(12)2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273461

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pandemic respiratory disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. The worldwide epidemiologic data showed higher mortality in males compared to females, suggesting a hypothesis about the protective effect of estrogens against severe disease progression with the ultimate end being patient's death. This article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the potential effect of estrogens and other modulators of estrogen receptors on COVID-19. While estrogen receptor activation shows complex effects on the patient's organism, such as an influence on the cardiovascular/pulmonary/immune system which includes lower production of cytokines responsible for the cytokine storm, the receptor-independent effects directly inhibits viral replication. Furthermore, it inhibits the interaction of IL-6 with its receptor complex. Interestingly, in addition to natural hormones, phytestrogens and even synthetic molecules are able to interact with the estrogen receptor and exhibit some anti-COVID-19 activity. From this point of view, estrogen receptor modulators have the potential to be included in the anti-COVID-19 therapeutic arsenal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Estrogen Receptor Modulators/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Estrogen Receptor Modulators/metabolism , Estrogen Receptor Modulators/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Receptors, Estrogen/chemistry , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Matrix Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
7.
Antiviral Res ; 186: 104990, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064808

ABSTRACT

The endocytic pathway is a common strategy that several highly pathogenic viruses use to enter into the cell. To demonstrate the usefulness of this pathway as a common target for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals, the inhibitory effect of drug compounds targeting endosomal membrane proteins were investigated. This study entailed direct comparison of drug effectiveness against animal and human pathogenic viruses, namely Ebola (EBOV), African swine fever virus (ASFV), and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). A panel of experimental and FDA-approved compounds targeting calcium channels and PIKfyve at the endosomal membrane caused potent reductions of entry up to 90% in SARS-CoV-2 S-protein pseudotyped retrovirus. Similar inhibition was observed against transduced EBOV glycoprotein pseudovirus and ASFV. SARS-CoV-2 infection was potently inhibited by selective estrogen receptor modulators in cells transduced with pseudovirus, among them Raloxifen inhibited ASFV with very low 50% inhibitory concentration. Finally, the mechanism of the inhibition caused by the latter in ASFV infection was analyzed. Overall, this work shows that cellular proteins related to the endocytic pathway can constitute suitable cellular targets for broad range antiviral compounds.


Subject(s)
African Swine Fever Virus/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Ebolavirus/drug effects , Endosomes/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , African Swine Fever Virus/physiology , Animals , Calcium/metabolism , Calcium Channel Blockers/pharmacology , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cholesterol/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Ebolavirus/physiology , Endocytosis/drug effects , Endosomes/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Phosphoinositide-3 Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Raloxifene Hydrochloride/pharmacology , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators/pharmacology , Vero Cells
8.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(1): 53-58, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066445

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review summarizes recent original publications addressing the topic of risk-adapted adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer (EBC). As neoadjuvant therapy has become a standard for triple negative and HER2+ EBC, it focusses on luminal EBC. RECENT FINDINGS: Gene expression assays have become standard of care in luminal EBC, at least for patients with node negative disease. Two prospective randomized clinical trials, TAILORx (Oncotype DX) and MINDACT (MammaPrint) have presented additional analyses underlining the clinical utility of the tests. In times of COVID-19, immunohistochemically determined ER, PR, and Ki67 and early Ki67 response to endocrine therapy can be used to safely allocate patients for preoperative endocrine therapy and delay surgeries if resources are scarce. In patients with luminal high-risk disease, adding a CDK 4/6 inhibitor (abemaciclib) improves patient outcome already after short-term follow-up. SUMMARY: Determination of recurrence risk will remain important in luminal EBC for optimal therapy decisions. In the future, risk-adapted treatment concepts will include decision making for chemotherapy but also for endocrine-based approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Piperazines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/genetics , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/genetics , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(1): 53-58, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990853

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review summarizes recent original publications addressing the topic of risk-adapted adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer (EBC). As neoadjuvant therapy has become a standard for triple negative and HER2+ EBC, it focusses on luminal EBC. RECENT FINDINGS: Gene expression assays have become standard of care in luminal EBC, at least for patients with node negative disease. Two prospective randomized clinical trials, TAILORx (Oncotype DX) and MINDACT (MammaPrint) have presented additional analyses underlining the clinical utility of the tests. In times of COVID-19, immunohistochemically determined ER, PR, and Ki67 and early Ki67 response to endocrine therapy can be used to safely allocate patients for preoperative endocrine therapy and delay surgeries if resources are scarce. In patients with luminal high-risk disease, adding a CDK 4/6 inhibitor (abemaciclib) improves patient outcome already after short-term follow-up. SUMMARY: Determination of recurrence risk will remain important in luminal EBC for optimal therapy decisions. In the future, risk-adapted treatment concepts will include decision making for chemotherapy but also for endocrine-based approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Piperazines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/genetics , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/genetics , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
11.
FASEB J ; 34(11): 14103-14119, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787296

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has provoked major stresses on the health-care systems of several countries, and caused the death of more than a quarter of a million people globally, mainly in the elderly population with preexisting pathologies. Previous studies with coronavirus (SARS-CoV) point to gender differences in infection and disease progression with increased susceptibility in male patients, indicating that estrogens may be associated with physiological protection against the coronavirus. Therefore, the objectives of this work are threefold. First, we aim to summarize the SARS-CoV-2 infection pathway and the roles both the virus and patient play in COVID-19 (Coronavirus disease 2019) progression, clinical symptomatology, and mortality. Second, we detail the effect estrogen has on viral infection and host infection response, including its role in both the regulation of key viral receptor expression and the mediation of inflammatory activity. Finally, we describe how ERs (estrogen receptors) and RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end-products) play a critical role in metabolic pathways, which we envisage could maintain a close interplay with SARS-CoV and COVID-19 mortality rates, despite a current lack of research directly determining how. Taken together, we present the current state of the field regarding SARS-CoV-2 research and illuminate where research is needed to better define the role both estrogen and metabolic comorbidities have in the COVID-19 disease state, which can be key in screening potential therapeutic options as the search for effective treatments continue.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Antigens, Neoplasm/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Estrogens/metabolism , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Signal Transduction
12.
J Exp Clin Cancer Res ; 39(1): 171, 2020 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733038

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has challenged hard the national health systems worldwide. According to the national policy issued in March 2020 in response to the evolving Covid-19 pandemic, several hospitals were re-configured as Covid-19 centers and elective surgery procedures were rescheduled according to the most recent recommendations. In addition, Covid-19 protected cancer hubs were established, including the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute of Rome, Central Italy. At our Institute, the Breast Surgery Department continued working under the sign of a multidisciplinary approach. The number of professional figures involved in case evaluation was reduced to a minimum and interactions took place in the full respect of the required safety measures. Treatments for benign disease, pure prophylactic surgery and elective reconstructive procedures were all postponed and priority was assigned to the histologically-proven malignant breast tumors and highly suspicious lesions. From March 15th though April 30th 2020, we treated a total of 79 patients. This number is fully consistent with the average quantitative standards reached by our Department under ordinary circumstances. Patients were mostly discharged the day after surgery and none was readmitted due to surgery-related late complications. More generally, post-operative complications rates were unexpectedly low, particularly in light of the relatively high number of reconstructive procedures performed in this emergency situation. A strict follow up was performed based on the close contact with the surgical staff by telephone, messaging apps and telemedicine.Patients ascertainment for their Covid-19 status prior to hospital admission and hospital discharge allowed to maintain the "no-Covid-19" status at our Institution. In addition, during the aforementioned time window, none of the care providers developed SARS-CoV-2 infection or disease, as shown by the results of anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin M and G profiling. In conclusions, elective breast cancer surgery procedures were successfully performed in a lockdown situation due to a novel viral pandemic. The well-coordinated regional and hospital efforts in terms of medical resource re-allocation and definition of clinical priorities allowed to maintain high quality standards of breast cancer care while ensuring safety to the cancer patients and care providers involved.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Carcinoma, Lobular/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/virology , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/pathology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/virology , Carcinoma, Lobular/pathology , Carcinoma, Lobular/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Am Coll Surg ; 231(4): 434-447.e2, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, surgical delays have been common for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and early-stage estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, often in favor of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET). To understand possible ramifications of these delays, we examined the association between time to operation and pathologic staging and overall survival (OS). STUDY DESIGN: Patients with DCIS or ER+ cT1-2N0 breast cancer treated from 2010 through 2016 were identified in the National Cancer Database. Time to operation was recorded. Factors associated with pathologic upstaging were examined using logistic regression analyses. Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze OS. Analyses were stratified by disease stage and initial treatment strategy. RESULTS: There were 378,839 patients identified. Among those undergoing primary surgical procedure, time to operation was within 120 days in > 98% in all groups. Among cT1-2N0 patients selected for NET, operations were performed within 120 days in 59.6% of cT1N0 and 30.9% of cT2N0 patients. Increased time to operation was associated with increased odds of pathologic upstaging in DCIS patients (ER+: 60 to 120 days: odds ratio 1.15; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.22; more than 120 days: odds ratio 1.44; 95% CI, 1.24 to 1.68; ER-: 60 to 120 days: NS; more than 120 days: odds ratio 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.82; 60 days or less: reference), but not in patients with invasive cancer, irrespective of initial treatment strategy. No difference in OS was seen by time to operation in DCIS or NET patients. CONCLUSIONS: Increased time to operation was associated with a small increase in pathologic upstaging in DCIS patients, but did not impact OS. In patients with cT1-2N0 disease, NET use did not impact stage or OS, supporting the safety of delay strategies in ER+ breast cancer patients during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mastectomy/methods , Neoplasm Staging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 184(2): 637-647, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716322

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted early breast cancer (EBC) treatment worldwide. This study analyzed how Brazilian breast specialists are managing EBC. METHODS: An electronic survey was conducted with members of the Brazilian Society of Breast Cancer Specialists (SBM) between April 30 and May 11, 2020. Bivariate analysis was used to describe changes in how specialists managed EBC at the beginning and during the pandemic, according to breast cancer subtype and oncoplastic surgery. RESULTS: The response rate was 34.4% (503/1462 specialists). Most of the respondents (324; 64.4%) lived in a state capital city, were board-certified as breast specialists (395; 78.5%) and either worked in an academic institute or one associated with breast cancer treatment (390; 77.5%). The best response rate was from the southeast of the country (240; 47.7%) followed by the northeast (128; 25.4%). At the beginning of the pandemic, 43% changed their management approach. As the outbreak progressed, this proportion increased to 69.8% (p < 0.001). The southeast of the country (p = 0.005) and the state capital cities (p < 0.001) were associated with changes at the beginning of the pandemic, while being female (p = 0.001) was associated with changes during the pandemic. For hormone receptor-positive tumors with the best prognosis (Ki-67 < 20%), 47.9% and 17.7% of specialists would recommend neoadjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal and premenopausal women, respectively. For tumors with poorer prognosis (Ki-67 > 30%), 34% and 10.9% would recommend it for postmenopausal and premenopausal women, respectively. Menopausal status significantly affected whether the specialists changed their approach (p < 0.00001). For tumors ≥ 1.0 cm, 42.9% of respondents would recommend neoadjuvant systemic therapy for triple-negative tumors and 39.6% for HER2 + tumors. Overall, 63.4% would recommend immediate total breast reconstruction, while only 3.4% would recommend autologous reconstruction. In breast-conserving surgery, 75% would recommend partial breast reconstruction; however, 54.1% would contraindicate mammoplasty. Furthermore, 84.9% of respondents would not recommend prophylactic mastectomy in cases of BRCA mutation. CONCLUSIONS: Important changes occurred in EBC treatment, particularly for hormone receptor-positive tumors, as the outbreak progressed in each region. Systematic monitoring could assure appropriate breast cancer treatment, mitigating the impact of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections , Mammaplasty , Mastectomy , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Brazil , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Disease Management , Female , Genes, BRCA1 , Genes, BRCA2 , Humans , Male , Mastectomy, Segmental , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Postmenopause , Premenopause , Prophylactic Mastectomy , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tumor Burden
16.
Med Hypotheses ; 143: 110091, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-642204

ABSTRACT

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and is the second most common cause of death in women. Estrogen plays an important role in breast tumor etiopathogenesis. Tamoxifen and other anti-estrogen drugs are used in breast cancer patients who have a positive estrogen receptor (ER). While angiotensin II plays a key role in breast cancer etiology and causes tamoxifen resistance, angiotensin 1-7 has been reported to may reduce the spread and invasion of breast cancer. During the COVID-19 infection, the virus blocks ACE2, and angiotensin 1-7 production discontinued. Angiotensin III production may increase as angiotensin II destruction is reduced. Thus, aminopeptidase upregulation may occur. Increased aminopeptidase may develop resistance to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Estrogen can have a protective effect against COVID-19. Estrogen increase causes ER-α upregulation in T lymphocytes. Thus, estrogen increases the release of interferon I and III from T lymphocytes. Increasing interferon I and III alleviates COVID-19 infection. Tamoxifen treatment causes down-regulation, mutation, or loss in estrogen receptors. In the long-term use of tamoxifen, its effects on estrogen receptors can be permanent. Thus, since estrogen receptors are damaged or downregulated, estrogen may not act by binding to these receptors. Tamoxifen is a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, independent of its effect on estrogen receptors. It suppresses T cell functions and interferon release. We think tamoxifen may increase the COVID-19 risk due to its antiestrogen and P-glycoprotein inhibitory effects.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Tamoxifen/administration & dosage , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 1/antagonists & inhibitors , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 1/metabolism , Betacoronavirus , Breast Neoplasms/complications , COVID-19 , Disease Susceptibility , Estrogen Antagonists/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Interferons , Pandemics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
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