Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 22
Filter
1.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg ; 28(5): 336-340, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788573

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a noticeable disruption in national medical and surgical care, including medical training. OBJECTIVES: We designed a survey to examine the educational effect of the pandemic on female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) training and secondarily to identify areas for innovation and opportunity in FPMRS fellowship training. STUDY DESIGN: We used an online survey, approved by the American Urogynecologic Society Scientific Committee and distributed it to FPMRS fellows with responses obtained and stored in REDCap. Demographic data, educational and surgical experiences, the implications of the changes, and data regarding working from home were collected. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 88 fellows, with 92% of respondents being obstetrics and gynecology- based. All 10 geographic regions had at least one response. Six regions had a 50% or greater redeployment rate. Only 16% of respondents were not redeployed or on-call to be redeployed. Eighty-five percent of the ob/gyn fellow redeployments were within their home department. There was no relationship between training region and redeployment. Only 31.7% of the respondents continued to perform any FPMRS surgery. Approximately 35% of the fellows desired the opportunity for surgical simulation training because surgical cases were reduced.No relationship was seen between either redeployment status and needs (P = 0.087-0.893) or difficulties (P = 0.092-0.864) nor training location and needs (P = 0.376-0.935) or difficulties (P = 0.110-0.921). CONCLUSIONS: There was a high rate of redeployment among fellows; however, this was not associated with their reported needs and difficulties. The FPMRS-related surgical experience was affected during this time, and the fellows desired increased surgical simulation training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
3.
J Laryngol Otol ; 136(3): 197-207, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586114

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has led to a need for alternative teaching methods in facial plastics. This systematic review aimed to identify facial plastics simulation models, and assess their validity and efficacy as training tools. METHODS: Literature searches were performed. The Beckman scale was used for validity. The McGaghie Modified Translational Outcomes of Simulation-Based Mastery Learning score was used to evaluate effectiveness. RESULTS: Overall, 29 studies were selected. These simulated local skin flaps (n = 9), microtia frameworks (n = 5), pinnaplasty (n = 1), facial nerve anastomosis (n = 1), oculoplastic procedures (n = 5), and endoscopic septoplasty and septorhinoplasty simulators (n = 10). Of these models, 14 were deemed to be high-fidelity, 13 low-fidelity and 2 mixed-fidelity. None of the studies published common outcome measures. CONCLUSION: Simulators in facial plastic surgical training are important. These models may have some training benefits, but most could benefit from further assessment of validity.


Subject(s)
Models, Anatomic , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Simulation Training , Face , Humans
4.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 149(1): 130e-138e, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the first documented case of coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), the greater New York City area quickly became the epicenter of the global pandemic, with over 500,000 cases and 50,000 deaths. This unprecedented crisis affected all aspects of health care, including plastic surgery residency training. The purpose of this study was to understand the specific impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on plastic surgery residencies. METHODS: A survey of all plastic surgery residency training programs in the greater New York City area was conducted. The impact to training during the peak months of infection (March and April of 2020) was evaluated using resident education as measured by case numbers, need for redeployment, and staff wellness as primary outcome variables. RESULTS: A total of 11 programs were identified in the region, and seven programs completed the survey, with a response rate 63.6 percent. When comparing productivity in March and April of 2019 to March and April of 2020, a total decrease in surgical volume of 64.8 percent (range, 19.7 to 84.8 percent) and an average of 940 (range, 50 to 1287) cancelled clinic visits per month were observed. These decreases directly correlated with the local county's COVID-19 incidence rates (p = 0.70). A total of 83 percent of programs required redeployment to areas of need, and correlation between local incidence of COVID-19 and the percentage of residents redeployed to non-plastic surgical clinical environments by a given program (ρ = 0.97) was observed. CONCLUSION: As the first COVID-19 wave passes the greater New York area and spreads to the rest of the country, the authors hope their experience will shed light on the effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and inform other programs on what to expect and how they can try and prepare for future public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/standards , Pandemics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surgery, Plastic/education , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , New York City/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
8.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 147(6): 1469-1471, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223413

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The health care crisis related to the spread of novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) has created new challenges to plastic surgery education, mostly because of the decreased volume of procedures. The plastic surgery program directors in Chicago decided to act and identify ways to promote surgical education through citywide, multi-institutional, systematic clinical case discussions. Although the initiative has no impact on the surgical skill of the trainees, it was welcomed by residents and faculty and promoted clinical core knowledge in plastic surgery and collaboration among the institutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surgery, Plastic/education , Universities/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Curriculum , Humans , Illinois/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
9.
Urology ; 152: 2-8, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144971

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the response to a virtual educational curriculum in reconstructive urology presented during the COVID-19 pandemic. To assess learner satisfaction with the format and content of the curriculum, including relevance to learners' education and practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A webinar curriculum of fundamental reconstructive urology topics was developed through the Society of Genitourinary Reconstructive Surgeons and partnering institutions. Expert-led sessions were broadcasted. Registered participants were asked to complete a survey regarding the curriculum. Responses were used to assess the quality of the curriculum format and content, as well as participants' practice demographics. RESULTS: Our survey yielded a response rate of 34%. Survey responses showed >50% of practices offer reconstructive urologic services, with 37% offered by providers without formal fellowship training. A difference in self-reported baseline knowledge was seen amongst junior residents and attendings (P < .05). Regardless of level of training, all participants rated the topics presented as relevant to their education/practice (median response = 5/5). Responders also indicated that the curriculum supplemented their knowledge in reconstructive urology (median response = 5/5). The webinar format and overall satisfaction with the curriculum was highly rated (median response = 5/5). Participants also stated they were likely to recommend the series to others. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate success of an online curriculum in reconstructive urology. Given >50% of practices surveyed offer reconstruction, we believe the curriculum's educational benefits (increasing access and collaboration while minimizing the risk of in-person contact) will continue beyond the COVID-19 pandemic and that this will remain a relevant educational platform for urologists moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Pandemics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Urologic Surgical Procedures/education , Urology/education , Curriculum , Humans , Internet Access , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Ann Plast Surg ; 86(2): 125, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138035

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In light of the most competitive match in history, the plastic and reconstructive surgery application process is in the midst of unprecedented times due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In-person visiting subinternships and interview processes have transitioned to online formats. The American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons, program directors, coordinators, faculty, and residents have demonstrated an outstanding commitment to providing meaningful experiences for prospective applicants. The passion of the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery is palpable, and the innovative virtual experiences have resulted in the formation of a community despite the lack of in-person experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surgery, Plastic/education , Personnel Selection , United States
12.
Laryngoscope ; 131(8): E2444-E2448, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114218

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: To assess the use of a three-dimensional (3D) printed, multilayer facial flap model for use in trainee education as an alternative method of teaching surgical techniques of facial reconstruction. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study. METHODS: A 3D printed facial flap simulator was designed from a computed tomography scan and manufactured out of silicone for low-cost, high-fidelity simulation. This simulator was tested by a group of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery trainees at a single institution. The simulator group was compared to a control group who completed an exercise on a traditional paper facial flap exercise. Both groups underwent didactic lectures prior to completing their respective exercises. Pre- and post-exercise Likert scale surveys measuring experience, understanding, effectiveness, and realism were completed by both groups. Central tendency, variability, and confidence intervals were measured to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS: Trainees completing the facial flap simulator reported a statistically significant (p < 0.05) improvement in overall expertise in facial flap procedures, design of facial flaps, and excision of standing cutaneous deformities. No statistically significant improvement was seen in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Trainees found the facial flap simulator to be an effective and useful training tool with a high level of realism in surgical education of facial reconstruction. Surgical simulators can serve as an adjunct to trainee education, especially during extraordinary times such as the novel coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, which significantly impacted surgical training. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: NA Laryngoscope, 131:E2444-E2448, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Face/surgery , Otolaryngology/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Simulation Training/methods , Adult , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Male , Models, Anatomic , Printing, Three-Dimensional , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Blind Method , Surgical Flaps/surgery
14.
Ann Plast Surg ; 86(2): 125, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889641

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In light of the most competitive match in history, the plastic and reconstructive surgery application process is in the midst of unprecedented times due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In-person visiting subinternships and interview processes have transitioned to online formats. The American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons, program directors, coordinators, faculty, and residents have demonstrated an outstanding commitment to providing meaningful experiences for prospective applicants. The passion of the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery is palpable, and the innovative virtual experiences have resulted in the formation of a community despite the lack of in-person experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surgery, Plastic/education , Personnel Selection , United States
15.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg ; 27(9): 575-580, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885724

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) fellowship program directors' opinions regarding the effectiveness of virtual interviews for selecting fellows and their future interview mode preferences. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional online survey of all FPMRS program directors in the United States conducted from April 29, 2020, to May 30, 2020. At the time of this study, there were 73 program directors and 69 obstetrics and gynecology and urology-accredited FPMRS programs nationwide. The primary outcome was to subjectively assess the effectiveness of virtual interviews as compared with in-person interviews for evaluating applicants. RESULTS: Fifty seven (82.6%) of the program directors completed the survey. A total of 80.7% (46/57) of the respondents had participated in interviews for the active match cycle. Of the programs that participated in the interview process, almost all conducted interviews using virtual platforms (97.8%, 45/46). Program directors who conducted interviews virtually found them effective in evaluating applicants (88.9%, 40/45) and were satisfied with the virtual interview process (86.7%, 39/45). A total of 31.1% of respondents (14/45) preferred a virtual platform to an in-person setting for future interviews, and 60% (27/45) reported that they will likely perform future interviews virtually. CONCLUSIONS: Although the pandemic resulted in a sudden reformatting of FPMRS fellowship interviews, most program directors nationally were satisfied with the process and found virtual interviews effective for assessing applicants. More than 50% of FPMRS program directors are likely to consider the virtual format for future interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic/methods , Pelvic Floor Disorders/therapy , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Adult , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Personnel Selection/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Orbit ; 39(6): 460-462, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883000

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, at the outset of the current pandemic, ESOPRS issued detailed advice on the appropriate procedures that practicing oculoplastic surgeons should consider to limit the transmission of COVID-19, with this information updated in April 2020. This paper highlights the threat to training opportunities for future generations of oculoplastic surgeons, adjustments in healthcare delivery, modifications of scientific activity, and the possible role of telemedicine in oculoplastics.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Europe , Female , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Risk Assessment , Societies, Medical
18.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 73(11): 2063-2071, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746093

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organisation characterised the spread of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) as a pandemic in March 2020, signalling medical governance and professional organisations worldwide to make urgent changes in their service. We have performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all published literature on plastic surgery and COVID-19, in an effort to summarise the evidence for future reference. Our search identified 1207 articles from electronic databases and 17 from manual search, out of which 20 were included in the final data synthesis. Out of the included studies, most originated from the United States (n = 12), five from Europe, two from China and one from Australia. Strategies described to limit the spread and impact of the virus could be divided into nine distinct categories, including the suspension of non-essential services, use of telemedicine, use of personal protective equipment, screening patients for COVID-19, restructuring the healthcare team, adapting standard management practices, using distance-learning for trainees, promoting public education and initiatives, and minimising intra-hospital viral transmission. The ever-changing nature of the COVID-19 may prompt plastic surgeons to adapt special strategies as pandemic progresses and subsequently declines. The findings of this review can prove beneficial to other plastic surgery departments in informing their response strategies to the pandemic and in a second wave of the disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Education, Distance , Health Education , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Triage
19.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 146(2): 447-454, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691847

ABSTRACT

Plastic surgeons have the unique perspective of working with all types of patients and care teams from almost all specialties in surgery and medicine, which creates unique challenges in times of distress. As the initial epicenter of coronavirus disease 2019 cases in the United States, the University of Washington program was required to rapidly develop strategies to deal with the escalating crisis. All aspects of the program were affected, including the need to triage the urgency of plastic surgery care, safe staffing of plastic surgery teams, and the role of plastic surgery in the greater hospital community. In addition, as a residency training program, limiting the impact of resident education and maintaining a sense of community and connection among members of the program developed into important considerations. The authors hope that the narrative of their experience will provide insight into the decisions made in the University of Washington health care system but also remind others that they are not alone in dealing with the challenges of this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/education , Universities/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/organization & administration , Universities/standards , Washington , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL