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1.
J Int Med Res ; 49(11): 3000605211059939, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy and inflammation are associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity. This study assessed D-dimer concentration and its correlation with inflammatory markers and COVID-19 severity. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 194 COVID-19 cases, with the severity of infection graded in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. We measured D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), and ferritin on admission and determined the cutoff values for D-dimer and CRP and evaluated the correlation between D-dimer and CRP and ferritin. RESULTS: Median D-dimer, CRP, and ferritin concentrations were 2240 µg/L, 73.2 mg/L, and 1173.8 µg/mL, respectively. The highest median D-dimer value was seen in mild and moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The highest ferritin concentration was seen in severe ARDS. There was a significant correlation between D-dimer value and CRP (r = 0.327), but no significant correlation between D-dimer and ferritin (r = 0.101). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the combination of CRP ≥72.65 mg/L and D-dimer ≥1250 µg/L as a marker of COVID-19 severity was 0.722 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.615-0.781). CONCLUSION: The combination of CRP ≥72.65 mg/L and D-dimer ≥1250 µg/L can be used as marker of COVID-19 severity, with moderate accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospitals , Humans , Indonesia , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
4.
BMJ Open ; 11(11): e047829, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508363

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Despite available effective treatments for mental health disorders, few patients in need receive even the most basic care. Integrated telepsychiatry services may be a viable option to increase access to mental healthcare. The aim of this qualitative process evaluation embedded in a randomised controlled feasibility trial was to explore health providers' experiences with a mental healthcare model integrating mental health specialist video consultations (MHSVC) and primary care. METHODS: A qualitative process evaluation focusing on MHSVC in primary care was conducted. In 13 semistructured interviews, we assessed the experience of all mental health specialists, primary care physicians and medical assistants who participated in the trial. A thematic analysis, focusing on the implementation, mechanisms of impact and context, was applied to investigate the data. RESULTS: Considering (1) the implementation, participants evaluated the consultations as feasible, easy to use and time saving. Concerning (2) the mechanisms of impact, the consultations were regarded as effective for patients. Providers attributed the patients' improvements to two key aspects: the familiarity of the primary care practice and the fast access to specialist mental healthcare. Mental health specialists observed trustful therapeutic alliances emerging and described their experience as comparable to same-room care. However, compared with same-room care, specialists perceived the video consultations as more challenging and sometimes more exhausting due to the additional effort required for establishing therapeutic alliances. Regarding (3) the intervention's context, shorter travel distances for patients positively affected the implementation, while technical failures, that is, poor Internet connectivity, emerged as the main barrier. CONCLUSIONS: MHSVCs in primary care are feasible and successful in improving access to mental healthcare for patients. To optimise engagement and comfort of both patients and health providers, future work should focus on empirical determinants for establishing robust therapeutic alliances with patients receiving MHSVC (eg, leveraging non-verbal cues for therapeutic purposes). TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: DRKS00015812; Results.


Subject(s)
Psychiatry , Telemedicine , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Primary Health Care , Referral and Consultation
5.
Retina ; 41(4): 701-705, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511061

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe our managing strategy for COVID-19 emergency, to evaluate the adherence to intravitreal treatment (AtT) rate during the outbreak in a referral hospital in Milan, and to correlate it with patients' clinical features. METHODS: The AtT rate of patients with scheduled intravitreal injections during the COVID-19 outbreak from February 23, 2020 to March 31, 2020 was compared with the previous trimester and with March 2019. The impact of age, sex, visual function, and diagnosis on the AtT rate during unlocked/locked weeks (from March 8th) was evaluated. RESULTS: Of 650 consecutive patients with scheduled intravitreal injections, the AtT rate during the COVID-19 outbreak was 0.37. This was significantly lower compared with AtT registered in the previous trimester (0.92) and in the same weeks in 2019 (0.90) (both P < 0.001). Patients adherent to treatment were significantly younger (P < 0.001) and had a lower best-corrected visual acuity in the fellow eye (P = 0.046). During the lockdown weeks, the AtT rate was significantly lower than in the two unlocked weeks (0.19 vs. 0.73, P < 0.001). In addition, the AtT rate in patients classified as "emergent" during the lockdown weeks was 0.60. CONCLUSION: These preliminary results can help the retina specialist community to foresee this unique scenario and to develop successful management strategies.


Subject(s)
Angiogenesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/epidemiology , Choroidal Neovascularization/drug therapy , Macular Edema/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Wet Macular Degeneration/drug therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , Choroidal Neovascularization/diagnostic imaging , Choroidal Neovascularization/physiopathology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Fluorescein Angiography , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Intravitreal Injections , Italy/epidemiology , Macular Edema/diagnostic imaging , Macular Edema/physiopathology , Male , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Tomography, Optical Coherence , Visual Acuity/physiology , Wet Macular Degeneration/diagnostic imaging , Wet Macular Degeneration/physiopathology
6.
Prim Dent J ; 10(3): 41-45, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501963

ABSTRACT

In response to the nationwide lockdown on 23 March 2020 in the UK, urgent dental hubs (UDHs) were established in the community to provide emergency dental care.Consecutive referrals to a primary care UDH were prospectively analysed over a one-month period, from 18 May 2020 to 18 June 2020.Of 400 referrals received, the most common were in relation to pain (87%). In 63% neither a radiograph nor photograph was provided with the referral. Seventy percent of patients were telephone triaged within 24 hours of receipt of referral. Fifty-three percent of referrals were accepted for face-to-face treatment, of which 69% were treated by extraction. Of rejected referrals (n=179; 45%), 79% were due to symptoms having settled or being manageable by the time of triage. A small number of referrals were redirected for specialist care. Referrals that were accepted were more likely to have been prescribed antibiotics and less likely to have been referred by the general dental practitioner (GDP) they regularly saw (p <0.01).Patients that were older and those that identified themselves as not having a regular GDP were less likely to have been referred to an UDH. The quality of referrals was poor and there may be a role for virtual consultations moving forwards. We found pre-referral antimicrobial prescriptions were high and a confused public health message may have been sent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Dentists , Humans , Primary Health Care , Professional Role , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(11): 505-510, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497419

ABSTRACT

Health care providers are challenged to meet the simultaneous demands of delivering clinical care and acquiring new information, especially in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, the opioid epidemic, and concurrent escalation in alcohol and other drug use. To address the gap in knowledge related to substance use, screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), a self-paced online educational program, was developed and delivered to 169 learners. Posttest knowledge scores increased for all learners and did not differ based on their pace of completion. Results indicated that this module provides a means for busy clinicians to increase their ability to manage substance use, even if their learning occurs in multiple sessions interrupted by other pressing demands. Future iterations of this course could further enhance clinical competency by addition of an online clinical simulation component. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(11):505-510.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Substance-Related Disorders , Clinical Competence , Humans , Mass Screening , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance-Related Disorders/diagnosis
8.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211051930, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has led to health service modification and temporary disruption of the routine care provided to patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in primary care. This was done to minimize outpatient visits, permit physical distancing, and ensure patients' and healthcare providers safety. There is no evidence that explored or measured the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on diabetes services and patients' glycemic outcome in Oman. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the accessibility of DM services in primary care after COVID-19 pandemic announcement, and measure patients' glycemic outcome. METHODS: Before and after, retrospective cohort study using Al-Shifa healthcare database in primary care. One thousand adult patients with diabetes who attended DM clinic before pandemic announcement in 2019 were randomly selected and followed up until end of 2020. Patients aged ≥18 years and had at least 2 visits in 2019 were included. Access to DM services was identified by number of patients received care, frequency of consultations, mode of consultation, and type of intervention given to patients. Patients' glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and other glycemic parameters after pandemic announcement in 2020 were determined and compared with the same parameters before pandemic in 2019. Association between patients' HbA1c and mode of consultation was measured using multivariable regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 937 patients continued to follow and received DM care after pandemic announcement. Median number of consultations was 2 with interquartile range (IQR): 3-2. 57.4% had face-to-face alone, 32.4% had combined face to face and telephone consultation, and 10% had telephone consultation alone. Mean difference in HbA1c (%) before and after pandemic announcement was 0.2 ± 1.4 (95% CI: 0.1 to 0.3), P = .002. With multivariable linear regression, the mean difference in HbA1c was -0.3 (-2.3 to 1.5), P = .734 for telephone consultation alone, -0.5 (-2.4 to 1.4), P = .613 for face-to-face alone, and -0.5 (-2.4 to 1.3), P = .636 for combined consultations, compared to those who did not receive any formal consultation. CONCLUSION: Despite service modification and disruption of comprehensive care in primary care after COVID-19 pandemic announcement, DM services were accessible as majority of patients maintained follow up. There was an overall increase in mean glycated hemoglobin, however, it was a less than 1 unit increase. After adjusting for multivariable, glycated hemoglobin was reduced among those who received consultation including telephone consultation compared to those who did not, however evidence was unconvincing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Adolescent , Adult , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Oman , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
9.
J Telemed Telecare ; 27(10): 609-614, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495799

ABSTRACT

This study describes and analyses the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) activity and cost data for specialist consultations in Australia, as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. To achieve this, activity and cost data for MBS specialist consultations conducted from March 2019 to February 2021 were analysed month-to-month. MBS data for in-person, videoconference and telephone consultations were compared before and after the introduction of COVID-19 MBS telehealth funding in March 2020. The total number of MBS specialist consultations claimed per month did not differ significantly before and after the onset of COVID-19 (p = 0.717), demonstrating telehealth substitution of in-person care. After the introduction of COVID-19 telehealth funding, the average number of monthly telehealth consultations increased (p < 0.0001), representing an average of 19% of monthly consultations. A higher proportion of consultations were provided by telephone when compared to services delivered by video. Patient-end services did not increase after the onset of COVID-19, signifying a divergence from the historical service delivery model. Overall, MBS costs for specialist consultations did not vary significantly after introducing COVID-19 telehealth funding (p = 0.589). Telehealth consultations dramatically increased during COVID-19 and patients continued to receive specialist care. After the onset of COVID-19, the cost per telehealth specialist consultation was reduced, resulting in increased cost efficiency to the MBS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Referral and Consultation , Telemedicine , Australia , Humans , National Health Programs , Referral and Consultation/economics , Referral and Consultation/trends
10.
BMC Geriatr ; 21(1): 610, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The infection by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has been especially serious in older patients. The aim of this study is to describe baseline and clinical characteristics, hospital referrals, 60-day mortality, factors associated with hospital referrals and mortality in older patients living in nursing homes (NH) with suspected COVID-19. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed during March and April 2020 of institutionalized patients assessed by a liaison geriatric hospital-based team. Were collected all older patients living in 31 nursing homes of a public hospital catchment area assessed by a liaison geriatric team due to the suspicion of COVID-19 during the first wave, when the hospital system was collapsed. Sociodemographic variables, comprehensive geriatric assessment, clinical characteristics, treatment received including care setting, and 60-days mortality were recorded from electronic medical records. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the factors associated with mortality. RESULTS: 419 patients were included in the study (median age 89 years old, 71.6 % women, 63.7 % with moderate-severe dependence, and 43.8 % with advanced dementia). 31.1 % were referred to the emergency department in the first assessment, with a higher rate of hospital referral in those with better functional and mental status. COVID-19 atypical symptoms like functional decline, delirium, or eating disorders were frequent. 36.9% had died in the 60 days following the first call. According to multivariate logistic regression age (p 0.010), Barthel index <60 (p 0.002), presence of tachypnea (p 0.021), fever (p 0.006) and the use of ceftriaxone (p 0.004) were associated with mortality. No mortality differences were found between those referred to the hospital or cared at the nursing home. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: 31% of the nursing home patients assessed by a liaison geriatric hospital-based team for COVID-19 were referred to the hospital, being more frequently referred those with a better functional and cognitive situation. The 60-days mortality rate due to COVID-19 was 36.8% and was associated with older age, functional dependence, the presence of tachypnea and fever, and the use of ceftriaxone. Geriatric comprehensive assessment and coordination between NH and the hospital geriatric department teams were crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Male , Nursing Homes , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Rev Neurol ; 73(9): 315-320, 2021 11 01.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485762

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To describe clinical characteristics and electrophysiological variants of GBS cases during the pandemic, we carried out a comparative analysis between SARS-CoV2 related GBS and non-SARS-CoV2 patients and then compared to the 2019 cases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study of GBS patients diagnosed according to Asbury and Cornblath criteria. We collected information on clinical and paraclinical variables. We defined a SARS-CoV-2 related GBS case according to the description of Ellul et al. We used Hadden criteria to classify the electrophysiological variants. We performed a comparative analysis between groups. RESULTS: Fourty-two patients were diagnosed with GBS in 2020, men 64.2%, age 46 ± 17.4 years, patients with obesity/overweight 42.8%, previous diarrhea 31%, history of respiratory tract infection 14.2%. Guillain Barre Disability Scale = 3 points 71.4% and, cranial nerve involvement 69%. The most frequent electrophysiological variant was acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) 53.5%. Seven (16.6%) cases were SARS-CoV2 related, four men, age 43.4 ± 13.4 years. When comparing patients with GBS in 2020 vs patients in 2019, we observed a decrease in the previous infection history during 2020 (45.2% vs 73.3%, p-value = 0.005) and a decrease in previous respiratory infection (14.2% vs 33.3%, p = 0.045), as well as a higher frequency of cranial nerve involvement, and albuminocytologic dissociation. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV2 virus infection preventive measures may be impacting the presentation of post-infectious diseases such as GBS. We did not observe an increase in GBS cases during 2020. Also, the AIDP variant were more frequent in our population in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Health Facilities , Humans , Male , Mexico , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation
12.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(5)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485270

ABSTRACT

Objective: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected all aspects of psychiatric care, including consultation-liaison psychiatry (CLP) services. The objective of this study was to assess the demographic and clinical profiles of psychiatric referrals made to CLP services during the pandemic period and compare to data during the same timeframe from the previous year at a tertiary care center in North India.Methods: Data of patients referred for CLP consultation and seen by the CLP team in the medical-surgical wards wherein COVID-negative patients were admitted during the period of March 24, 2020, to October 11, 2020 (approximately 6.5 months, 201 days) were extracted from the CLP register (routinely maintained). These data were compared with that of the same timeframe from the previous year (March 24, 2019, to October 11, 2019).Results: During 2020, a total of 562 patients were referred to CLP services, in contrast to 1,005 patients referred in 2019, suggesting a 44% reduction in the number of referrals made to CLP services. During 2020, CLP referral patients more often had metabolic/endocrine disorders, myocardial infarction, and peripheral vascular diseases and less often had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/asthma and autoimmune disorders compared to 2019. Also, the number of referrals made to CLP services in 2020 for treatment of new disorders declined significantly (P < .001), whereas referrals for abnormal behavior/uncooperativeness (P < .001), self-harm attempts (P = .007), and other reasons (evaluation for organ transplant, sleep disturbances; P = .029) increased significantly. Further, significantly higher percentages of patients were diagnosed with delirium (P = .03) and depressive disorders (P = .04) in 2020 compared to 2019.Conclusions: There was a significant increase in the number of psychiatric referrals for depressive disorders and self-harm attempts among admitted patients from medical-surgical units during the COVID period. These findings suggest that there is a need to modify CLP services to address the needs of patients referred to CLP services, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
14.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30068, 2021 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478315

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare consultations at the Otorhinolaryngological Department at a tertiary referral centre between the COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 and the same period in 2019, as well as to study the impact of deferring visits on disease progression. METHODS: The emergency consultations during these time periods were analysed retrospectively. The effect of postponing appointments on disease progression was examined for 122 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, for 50 patients with a benign tumour and for 22 patients with the diagnosis of a malignant tumour. To compare disease progression, patients with the diagnosis of a malignant tumour were matched to patients seen over the same period in 2019. RESULTS: During the lockdown, a reduction of 44.1% in emergency consultations compared with 2019 was observed. The largest significant decrease of consultation numbers was seen for otitis media and for Eustachian tube dysfunction. Fewer patients with tonsillitis sought emergency assistance; however, no difference in frequency of abscesses was observed. Disease progression was seen in 44.4% of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. In 2020, 18.8% of patients with the diagnosis of a malignant tumour showed disease progression, yet no difference from the previous year was observed. CONCLUSION: Fewer emergency consultations took place during the COVID-19 lockdown; among others, there were fewer visits due to otitis media and tonsillitis. However, no change in the incidence of complications was noted. Almost 50% of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis showed disease progression, leading to prolonged suffering due to the rescheduling of appointments. The treatment of patients with the diagnosis of a malignant tumour was not affected by the postponement of consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Progression , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Fam Med Community Health ; 9(3)2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476699

ABSTRACT

Although low-income countries have recently seen an exponential flourishing of digital health initiatives, the landscape is characterised by a myriad of small pilots that rarely reach scaling, sustainability and wide adoption. The case of Burkina Faso represents an exception where a digital health initiative initially conceived to improve the diagnosis of sick children under 5 has supported millions of consultations. Technical aspects such as interoperability, standardisation, and adaptation to the existing infrastructure were considered as they are prerequisites for scaling; so was the demonstration of the health impact and affordability of the initiative. Beyond those factors which are largely documented in the literature, the experience in Burkina Faso showed that the positive outcome was also determined by the support of numerous stakeholders. A vast network of stakeholders from the Ministry of Health to child caregivers is involved and each of them could have either blocked or promoted the digital health initiative. Thanks to an extensive, time-consuming and tailored stakeholder strategy, it was possible to avoid potential blockages from multiple actors and gain their engagement.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Stakeholder Participation , Burkina Faso , Child , Family , Humans , Referral and Consultation
18.
Br J Gen Pract ; 71(705): 157, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468508
19.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258391, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463319

ABSTRACT

In France, social distancing measures have been adopted to contain the spread of COVID-19, culminating in national Lockdowns. The use of hand washing, hydro-alcoholic rubs and mask-wearing also increased over time. As these measures are likely to impact the transmission of many communicable diseases, we studied the changes in common infectious diseases incidence in France during the first year of COVID-19 circulation. We examined the weekly incidence of acute gastroenteritis, chickenpox, acute respiratory infections and bronchiolitis reported in general practitioner networks since January 2016. We obtained search engine query volume for French terms related to these diseases and sales data for relevant drugs over the same period. A periodic regression model was fit to disease incidence, drug sales and search query volume before the COVID-19 period and extrapolated afterwards. We compared the expected values with observations made in 2020. During the first lockdown period, incidence dropped by 67% for gastroenteritis, by 79% for bronchiolitis, by 49% for acute respiratory infection and 90% for chickenpox compared to the past years. Reductions with respect to the expected incidence reflected the strength of implemented measures. Incidence in children was impacted the most. Reduction in primary care consultations dropped during a short period at the beginning of the first lockdown period but remained more than 95% of the expected value afterwards. In primary care, the large decrease in reported gastroenteritis, chickenpox or bronchiolitis observed during the period where many barrier measures were implemented imply that the circulation of common viruses was reduced and informs on the overall effect of these measures.


Subject(s)
Bronchiolitis/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chickenpox/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Gastroenteritis/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Diseases/virology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , Seasons , Young Adult
20.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1094, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To ensure safe delivery of oncologic care during the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has been rapidly adopted. However, little data exist on the impact of telemedicine on quality and accessibility of oncologic care. This study assessed whether conducting an office visit for thoracic oncology patients via telemedicine affected time to treatment initiation and accessibility. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with thoracic malignancies seen by a multidisciplinary team during the first surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia (March 1 to June 30, 2020). Patients with an index visit for a new phase of care, defined as a new diagnosis, local recurrence, or newly discovered metastatic disease, were included. RESULTS: 240 distinct patients with thoracic malignancies were seen: 132 patients (55.0%) were seen initially in-person vs 108 (45.0%) via telemedicine. The majority of visits were for a diagnosis of a new thoracic cancer (87.5%). Among newly diagnosed patients referred to the thoracic oncology team, the median time from referral to initial visit was significantly shorter amongst the patients seen via telemedicine vs. in-person (median 5.0 vs. 6.5 days, p < 0.001). Patients received surgery (32.5%), radiation (24.2%), or systemic therapy (30.4%). Time from initial visit to treatment initiation by modality did not differ by telemedicine vs in-person: surgery (22 vs 16 days, p = 0.47), radiation (27.5 vs 27.5 days, p = 0.86, systemic therapy (15 vs 13 days, p = 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid adoption of telemedicine allowed timely delivery of oncologic care during the initial surge of the COVID19 pandemic by a thoracic oncology multi-disciplinary clinic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Patient Care Team , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Time Factors
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