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2.
Surgery ; 171(2): 437-446, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the New Zealand government instituted a 4-level alert system, which resulted in the rapid dissolution of nonurgent surgical services to minimize occupational exposure to both patients and staff, with the primary health sector bearing most of the diverted caseload. Consequently, the study authors sought to collate information around the establishment of a supportive nonacute surgical liaison role in a public hospital surgical department, with an interest in establishing this role in New Zealand. METHODS: The narrative review conducted systematically in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Databases searched included Pubmed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials. A deductive analysis was applied using a demand management model developed by the Institute for Innovation and Improvement at Waitemata District Health Board. All included studies were rated using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence tool. RESULTS: Collation of 19 studies resulted in 3 key findings: first, that a surgical liaison could be utilized at the primary care to specialist interface to improve communication and workflow between services. Second, a liaison could be utilized directly communicating with patients as a means of increasing engagement and self-management. Finally, this service can be offered through multiple modalities including a noncontact telehealth service. CONCLUSION: Evidence of nonacute surgical liaisons both internationally and specifically within New Zealand has been collated to provide evidence for its application.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures , Nurse's Role , Physician's Role , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Secondary Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Global Health , Humans , Nurse Practitioners/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , Workflow
3.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e13, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484003

ABSTRACT

Around the UK, commissioners have different models for delivering NHS 111, General Practice (GP) out-of-hours and urgent care services, focusing on telephony to help deliver urgent and emergency care. During the (early phases of the) COVID-19 pandemic, NHS 111 experienced an unprecedented volume of calls. At any time, 25%-30% of calls relate to children and young people (CYP). In response, the CYP's Transformation and Integrated Urgent Care teams at NHS England and NHS Improvement (NHSE/I) assisted in redeploying volunteer paediatricians into the integrated urgent care NHS 111 Clinical Assessment Services (CAS), taking calls about CYP. From this work, key stakeholders developed a paediatric 111 consultation framework, as well as learning outcomes, key capabilities and illustrations mapped against the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) Progress curriculum domains, to aid paediatricians in training to undertake NHS 111 activities. These learning outcomes and key capabilities have been endorsed by the RCPCH Curriculum Review Group and are recommended to form part of the integrated urgent care service specification and workforce blueprint to improve outcomes for CYP.


Subject(s)
After-Hours Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Curriculum , Humans , Pediatrics/education , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine , Telephone , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102228, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333362

ABSTRACT

AIM: Amidst COVID-19 pandemic, the health care delivery in India faces major challenges owing to the overwhelming hospitals, exhausted healthcare workers, and shortage of crucial medical supplies such as ventilators and oxygen. The study aims to propose a novel successful interventional home care model, the Virtual COVID In-Patient (VCIP) care for effective COVID management. METHODS: The Covid-19 positive patients enrolled in VCIP were chosen for the study. A 24/7 active multidisciplinary WhatsApp group was created for each patient, for remote monitoring of temperature, blood pressure, blood glucose, respiratory and pulse rate along with the symptoms. Advice on sleep and exercises were given along with the medication via video-audio consultations. Lab facility was provided at the doorstep. Training on various devices, medications including steroids, delivering subcutaneous injections etc were given via video platforms. RESULTS: Among the 220 patients who availed the VCIP facility, only two were hospitalized, yielding a 99.5 % success rate in preventing hospitalizations and patients enrolled have been immensely satisfied with their experience. CONCLUSIONS: With similar pandemics anticipated in near future, VCIP model may be considered for successful domiciliary treatment and overcoming the challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Algorithms , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Internationality , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Nursing , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Pandemics , Prognosis , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome
5.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 487-492, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288676

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, our emergency general surgery (EGS) service underwent significant restructuring, including establishing an enhanced ambulatory service and undertaking nonoperative management of selected pathologies. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of our EGS service before and after these changes. METHODS: Patients referred by the emergency department were identified prospectively over a 4-week period beginning from the date our EGS service was reconfigured (COVID) and compared with patients identified retrospectively from the same period the previous year (Pre-COVID), and followed up for 30 days. Data were extracted from handover documents and electronic care records. The primary outcomes were the rate of admission, ambulation and discharge. RESULTS: There were 281 and 283 patients during the Pre-COVID and COVID periods respectively. Admission rate decreased from 78.7% to 41.7%, while there were increased rates of ambulation from 7.1% to 17.3% and discharge from 6% to 22.6% (all p<0.001). For inpatients, mean duration of admission decreased (6.9 to 4.8 days), and there were fewer operative or endoscopic interventions (78 to 40). There were increased ambulatory investigations (11 to 39) and telephone reviews (0 to 39), while early computed tomography scan was increasingly used to facilitate discharge (5% vs 34.7%). There were no differences in 30-day readmission or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Restructuring of our EGS service in response to COVID-19 facilitated an increased use of ambulatory services and imaging, achieving a decrease of 952 inpatient bed days in this critical period, while maintaining patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , General Surgery/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Conservative Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Treatment/methods , Emergency Treatment/standards , Female , Follow-Up Studies , General Surgery/standards , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety/standards , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
7.
Scott Med J ; 66(3): 142-147, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In 2010, a virtual sarcoma referral model was implemented, which aims to provide a centralised multidisciplinary team (MDT) to provide rapid advice, avoiding unnecessary appointments and providing a streamlined service. The aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of this screening tool in reducing the service burden and expediting patient journey. METHODS AND RESULTS: All referrals made to a single tertiary referral sarcoma unit from January 2010 to December 2018 were extracted from a prospective database. Only 26.0% events discussed required review directly. 30.3% were discharged back to referrer. 16.5% required further investigations. 22.5% required a biopsy prior to review. There was a reduction in the rate of patients reviewed at the sarcoma clinic, and a higher discharge rate from the MDT in 2018 versus 2010 (p < 0.001). This gives a potential cost saving of 670,700 GBP over the 9 year period. CONCLUSION: An MDT meeting which triages referrals is cost-effective at reducing unnecessary referrals. This can limit unnecessary exposure of patients who may have an underlying diagnosis of cancer to a high-risk environment, and reduces burden on services as it copes with increasing demands during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Oncology Service, Hospital , Patient Care Team , Referral and Consultation , Sarcoma/therapy , Triage/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Feasibility Studies , Female , Health Care Costs , Humans , Male , Oncology Service, Hospital/economics , Oncology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/economics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/economics , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Sarcoma/diagnosis , Sarcoma/economics , Scotland/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers/economics , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Triage/economics , Videoconferencing
10.
Br J Nurs ; 30(7): 404-408, 2021 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173065

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic has brought about an economic and healthcare crisis. This has resulted in delays in virtually all areas of patient care and has forced clinicians to review and adapt their processes, in order to ensure patients continue to have access to timely and effective services. In the author's local Trust, this manifested in altered protocols, developed in order to maintain patient and staff safety while conducting invasive and potentially virus-spreading investigations. A new (temporary) standard operating procedure was developed in conjunction with Cancer Alliance South West to introduce the quantitative faecal immunochemical test (qFIT) as an indicator for diagnostic testing after the majority of diagnostic services were suspended or drastically reduced. Patients would then have their investigation(s) deferred on the basis of a negative result (<10 mcg Hb/g). This cohort (n=120) were revisited once diagnostic services were resumed and referred for CT examination. Audits carried out on the data showed that nine cancers had been identified in the negative qFIT population (lung, prostate, breast, bladder, small bowel carcinoid, oesophageal and three occurrences of caecal carcinoma. This article provides an overview of the experiences and outcomes of a colorectal 2-week-wait service in response to this global pandemic and how this experience will shape the service in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Occult Blood , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Waiting Lists , Cohort Studies , Humans
12.
Fam Community Health ; 44(2): 78-80, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165533

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of social determinants of health in affecting health outcomes. Populations with high social risk are disproportionately impacted by the virus and its economic consequences. Primary care practices have a unique opportunity to implement interventions to mitigate their patients' unmet social needs, such as food and income insecurity. In this commentary, we outline key considerations for clinics implementing programs that identify and address patients' social needs in a way that promotes equity, quality, and sustainability. We provide examples from our own experience at a federally qualified health center.


Subject(s)
Health Equity , Primary Health Care/methods , Quality of Health Care , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Social Determinants of Health , Social Welfare , COVID-19 , Food Insecurity , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pandemics , Poverty , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(3): 241-245, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Utilisation of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 has been recommended during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic for the assessment of head and neck cancer referrals. As limited data were available, this study was conducted to analyse the use of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 in clinical practice. METHOD: Patients undergoing telephone triage in a two-week wait referral clinic were included. Data were collected and analysed using appropriate methods. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients in the study were risk-stratified into low-risk (51.6 per cent, 33 of 64), moderate-risk (14.1 per cent, 9 of 64) and high-risk (34.4 per cent, 22 of 64) groups. Of the patients, 53.1 per cent (34 of 64) avoided an urgent hospital visit, and 96.9 per cent (62 of 64) were cancer free, while 3.1 per cent (2 of 64) were found to have a head and neck malignancy. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy were 50.00 per cent, 66.13 per cent, 99.92 per cent and 66.11 per cent, respectively. CONCLUSION: It is reasonable to use the calculator for triaging purposes, but it must always be accompanied by a meticulous clinical thought process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Assessment , Sensitivity and Specificity , Telephone , Time Factors , United Kingdom
16.
Semin Ophthalmol ; 36(7): 461-468, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109026

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To examine the uptake, results, and patient assessment of virtual inpatient ophthalmology consultations at our academic medical center during the COVID-19 pandemic.Design: Retrospective review, pre and post COVID analysis, and teleophthalmology patient survey in the inpatient and emergency setting.Participants: Adult patients at our medical center for whom ophthalmology consultation was requested from February 24 through April 19, 2020.Methods: Patient encounters were retrieved and coded for all inpatient and emergency room ophthalmology consultations over a 4-week period before and a 4-week period after our department first offered virtual ophthalmology consultations. Theseconsultations took place over real-time video, audio, or photography between the on-call ophthalmologist and the patient and/or patient's primary physician. A four-item questionnaire was offered to patients who completed a virtual consultation.Main Outcome Measures: Virtual consultation diagnoses and management outcomes; patient assessment of virtual inpatient and emergent ophthalmic care.Results: Of all 423 included encounters, 258 (61%) occurred during the 4 weeks before offering virtual consultations and 165 (39%) encounters occurred during the subsequent 4-week period, indicating a 36% decrease in ophthalmology consultations over this pandemic period. A total of 120 (28%) encounters were conducted remotely during the 8-week period. In-person emergency department (ED) encounters (as percent of total encounters) decreased from 60% to 36% (p < .01) between the first and eighth weeks of the study period. In the 4 weeks since their implementation, virtual inpatient ophthalmology consultations were utilized in 34 of 165 (21%) consultations. Of those, 20 (59%) were high acuity and 1 (3%) was escalated to the ED for in-person evaluation. Most common management decisions made included medication prescription in 46 (55%) patients and scheduling follow-up for 44 (30%) patients. In a survey administered to all 120 patients who were managed over phone or video, 56 (47%) responded. Respondents were in general agreement (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92) and expressed satisfaction with phone and virtual encounters. Specifically, 42 (49%) of 86 patients who had phone encounters noted a mean weighted satisfaction score of 4.6 out of 5 and 14 (41%) responders of 34 virtual consultation encounters noted a mean weighted satisfaction score of 4.9 out of 5. The difference between the average weighted satisfaction scores favored virtual consultation over telephone encounters (p < .01).Conclusions: Virtual inpatient ophthalmology consultations are feasible and have reported high patient satisfaction. Implementing video-based technologies to deliver high-acuity ophthalmic triage and management may help to promote patient and provider safety. In our experience, patients favored virtual consultation over telephone encounters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Inpatients , Ophthalmology/methods , Patient Satisfaction , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Rev Esp Geriatr Gerontol ; 56(3): 157-165, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108647

ABSTRACT

Older people living in nursing homes fulfil the criteria to be considered as geriatric patients, but they often do not have met their health care needs. Current deficits appeared as a result of COVID-19 pandemic. The need to improve the coordination between hospitals and nursing homes emerged, and in Madrid it materialized with the implantation of Liaison Geriatrics teams or units at public hospitals. The Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología has defined the role of the geriatricians in the COVID-19 pandemic and they have given guidelines about prevention, early detection, isolation and sectorization, training, care homes classification, patient referral coordination, and the role of the different care settings, among others. These units and teams also must undertake other care activities that have a shortfall currently, like nursing homes-hospital coordination, geriatricians visits to the homes, telemedicine sessions, geriatric assessment in emergency rooms, and primary care and public health services coordination. This paper describes the concept of Liaison Geriatrics and its implementation at the Autonomous Community of Madrid hospitals as a result of COVID-19 pandemic. Activity data from a unit at a hospital with a huge number of nursing homes in its catchment area are reported. The objective is to understand the need of this activity in order to avoid the current fragmentation of care between hospitals and nursing homes. This activity should be consolidated in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Geriatrics/organization & administration , Homes for the Aged/organization & administration , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Pandemics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/legislation & jurisprudence , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Geriatric Assessment , Geriatricians/organization & administration , Geriatricians/supply & distribution , Health Services Administration , Homes for the Aged/classification , Hospitals, Public/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Homes/classification , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Public Health Administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Spain/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration
18.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(3): 191-195, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104392

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 has necessitated changes to 'usual' ways of practice in otolaryngology, with a view towards out-patient or ambulatory management of appropriate conditions. This paper reviews the available evidence for out-patient management of three of the most common causes for emergency referral to the otolaryngology team: tonsillitis, peri-tonsillar abscess and epistaxis. METHODS: A literature review was performed, searching all available online databases and resources. The Medical Subject Headings 'tonsillitis', 'pharyngotonsillitis', 'quinsy', 'peritonsillar abscess' and 'epistaxis' were used. Papers discussing out-patient management were reviewed by the authors. RESULTS: Out-patient and ambulatory pathways for tonsillitis and peritonsillar abscess are well described for patients meeting appropriate criteria. Safe discharge of select patients is safe and should be encouraged in the current clinical climate. Safe discharge of patients with epistaxis who have bleeding controlled is also well described. CONCLUSION: In select cases, tonsillitis, quinsy and epistaxis patients can be safely managed out of hospital, with low re-admission rates.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epistaxis/therapy , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Peritonsillar Abscess/therapy , Tonsillitis/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Emergencies , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration
19.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(Suppl): S95-S102, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and the associated coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) have presented immense challenges for health care systems. Many regions have struggled to adapt to disruptions to health care practice and use systems that effectively manage the demand for services. METHODS: This was a cohort study using electronic health records at a health care system in northeast Ohio that examined the effectiveness of the first 5 weeks of a 24/7 physician-staffed COVID-19 hotline including social care referrals for patients required to self-isolate. We describe clinical diagnosis, patient characteristics (age, sex race/ethnicity, smoking status, insurance status), and visit disposition. We use logistic regression to evaluate associations between patient characteristics, visit disposition and subsequent emergency department use, hospitalization, and SARS-Cov-2 PCR testing. PARTICIPANTS: In 5 weeks, 10,112 patients called the hotline (callers). Of these, 4213 (42%) were referred for a physician telehealth visit (telehealth patients). Mean age of callers was 42 years; 67% were female, 51% white, and 46% were on Medicaid/uninsured. RESULTS: Common caller concerns included cough, fever, and shortness of breath. Most telehealth patients (79%) were advised to self-isolate at home, 14% were determined to be unlikely to have COVID-19, 3% were advised to seek emergency care, and 4% had miscellaneous other dispositions. A total of 287 patients (7%) had a subsequent emergency department visit, and 44 (1%) were hospitalized with a COVID-19 diagnosis. Of the callers, 482 (5%) had a COVID-19 test reported, with 69 (14%) testing positive. Among patients advised to stay at home, 83% had no further face-to-face visits. In multivariable results, only a physician recommendation to seek emergency care was associated with emergency department use (odds ratio = 4.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.37-16.39, P = .014). Only older age was associated with having a positive test result. Patients with social needs and interest in receiving help were offered services to meet their needs including food deliveries (n = 92), behavioral health telephone visits (n = 49), and faith-based comfort calls from pastoral care personnel (n = 37). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Robust, physician-directed telehealth services can meet a wide range of clinical and social needs during the acute phase of a pandemic, conserving scarce resources such as personal protective equipment and testing supplies and preventing the spread of infections to patients and health care workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Ohio/epidemiology , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
20.
J Fr Ophtalmol ; 44(3): 307-312, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078008

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a freely accessible internet algorithm to correctly identify the need for emergency ophthalmologic consultation for correct diagnosis and management. METHOD: This retrospective observational cohort study was based on the first 100 patients who requested recommendations on the necessity of breaking the lockdown for emergency ophthalmology consultation during the period from March to May 2020. RESULTS: Ninety-one patients completed questionnaires. Forty-nine were directed to emergency consultation and 42 to differed scheduled visits or telemedicine visits. One patient sent for emergency consultation had an overestimated severity and could have been seen later, while two patients initially recommended for a scheduled visit were considered appropriate for emergency consultation. However, these patients' management did not suffer as a consequence of the delay. The sensitivity of the algorithm, defined as the number of emergency consultations suggested by the algorithm divided by the total number of emergency consultations deemed appropriate by the practitioner's final evaluation, was 96.0%. The specificity of the algorithm, defined as the number of patients recommended for delayed consultation by the algorithm divided by the number of patients deemed clinically appropriate for this approach, was 97.5%. The positive predictive value, defined as the number of appropriate emergency consultations divided by the total number of emergency consultations suggested by the algorithm, was 97.9%. Finally, the negative predictive value, defined as the number of appropriately deferred patients divided by the number of deferred patients recommended by the algorithm, was 95.2%. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the reliability of an algorithm based on patients' past medical history and symptoms to classify patients and direct them to either emergency consultation or to a more appropriate deferred, scheduled appointment. This algorithm might allow reduction of walk-in visits by half and thus help control patient flow into ophthalmologic emergency departments.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Eye Diseases/therapy , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , Quarantine , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/standards , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Young Adult
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