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1.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533815

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the contributing factors to more than one-third of human mortality and the leading cause of death worldwide. The death of cardiac myocyte is a fundamental pathological process in cardiac pathologies caused by various heart diseases, including myocardial infarction. Thus, strategies for replacing fibrotic tissue in the infarcted region with functional myocardium have long been a goal of cardiovascular research. This review begins by briefly discussing a variety of somatic stem- and progenitor-cell populations that were frequently studied in early investigations of regenerative myocardial therapy and then focuses primarily on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), especially induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which have emerged as perhaps the most promising source of cardiomyocytes for both therapeutic applications and drug testing. We also describe attempts to generate cardiomyocytes directly from cardiac fibroblasts (i.e., transdifferentiation), which, if successful, may enable the pool of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts to be used as an in-situ source of cardiomyocytes for myocardial repair.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure/therapy , Myocardium/pathology , Regeneration/physiology , Stem Cell Transplantation , Animals , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(22)2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524026

ABSTRACT

The rapid mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is now a major concern with no effective drugs and treatments. The severity of the disease is linked to the induction of a cytokine storm that promotes extensive inflammation in the lung, leading to many acute lung injuries, pulmonary edema, and eventually death. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) might prove to be a treatment option as they have immunomodulation and regenerative properties. Clinical trials utilizing MSCs in treating acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have provided a basis in treating post-COVID-19 patients. In this review, we discussed the effects of MSCs as an immunomodulator to reduce the severity and death in patients with COVID-19, including the usage of MSCs as an alternative regenerative therapy in post-COVID-19 patients. This review also includes the current clinical trials in utilizing MSCs and their potential future utilization for long-COVID treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Immunomodulation/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Regeneration/physiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
3.
Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) ; 26(10): 948-961, 2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498509

ABSTRACT

Background: Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by severe respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The primary pathogenesis is over-activation of the immune system. SARS-CoV-2 continues to mutate and spread rapidly and no effective treatment options are yet available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to induce anti-inflammatory macrophages, regulatory T cells and dendritic cells. There are a rapidly increasing number of clinical investigations of cell-based therapy approaches for COVID-19. Objective: To summarize the pathogenic mechanism of SARS-CoV-2, and systematically formulated the immunomodulation of COVID-19 by MSCs and their exosomes, as well as research progress. Method: Searching PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov and Chictr.cn for eligible studies to be published or registered by May 2021. Main keywords and search strategies were as follows: ((Mesenchymal stem cells) OR (MSCs)) AND (COVID-19). Results: MSCs regulate the immune system to prevent cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and to promote endogenous repair by releasing various paracrine factors and exosomes. Conclusions: MSC therapy is thus a promising candidate for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Exosomes/transplantation , Immunomodulation/immunology , Lung Injury/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Exosomes/immunology , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Lung Injury/physiopathology , Lung Injury/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Regeneration/immunology , Regeneration/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
4.
Stem Cells Transl Med ; 10(11): 1482-1490, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490914

ABSTRACT

As our life expectancy increases, specific medical conditions appear, and new challenges are met in terms of global health. Frailty has become a medical and scientific concept to define pathologies where inflammation, depressed immune system, cellular senescence, and molecular aging converge. But more importantly, frailty is the ultimate cause of death that limits our life span and deteriorates health in an increasing proportion of the world population. The difficulty of tackling this problem is the combination of factors that influence frailty appearance, such as stem cells exhaustion, inflammation, loss of regeneration capability, and impaired immunomodulation. To date, multiple research fields have found mechanisms participating in this health condition, but to make progress, science will need to investigate frailty with an interdisciplinary approach. This article summarizes the current efforts to understand frailty from their processes mediated by inflammation, aging, and stem cells to provide a new perspective that unifies the efforts in producing advanced therapies against medical conditions in the context of frailty. We believe this approach against frailty is particularly relevant to COVID-19, since people in a state of frailty die more frequently due to the hyperinflammatory process associated with this infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Inflammation/complications , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Aging/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Frailty/etiology , Frailty/therapy , Humans , Immunomodulation/physiology , Inflammation/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/trends , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Regeneration/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/physiology
5.
Biol Direct ; 16(1): 18, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477451

ABSTRACT

Skeletal muscle has an extraordinary regenerative capacity reflecting the rapid activation and effective differentiation of muscle stem cells (MuSCs). In the course of muscle regeneration, MuSCs are reprogrammed by immune cells. In turn, MuSCs confer immune cells anti-inflammatory properties to resolve inflammation and facilitate tissue repair. Indeed, MuSCs can exert therapeutic effects on various degenerative and inflammatory disorders based on their immunoregulatory ability, including effects primed by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). At the molecular level, the tryptophan metabolites, kynurenine or kynurenic acid, produced by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), augment the expression of TNF-stimulated gene 6 (TSG6) through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). In addition, insulin growth factor 2 (IGF2) produced by MuSCs can endow maturing macrophages oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent anti-inflammatory functions. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of the immunomodulatory characteristics of MuSCs and the issues related to their potential applications in pathological conditions, including COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Immune System/physiology , Muscles/physiology , Regeneration/physiology , Stem Cells/cytology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Cell Proliferation , Humans , Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase/metabolism , Inflammation , Insulin-Like Growth Factor II/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Kynurenic Acid/metabolism , Kynurenine/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Muscles/metabolism , Oxidative Phosphorylation , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , Tryptophan/chemistry , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 706244, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468338

ABSTRACT

The immune system's ability to resist the invasion of foreign pathogens and the tolerance to self-antigens are primarily centered on the efficient functions of the various subsets of T lymphocytes. As the primary organ of thymopoiesis, the thymus performs a crucial role in generating a self-tolerant but diverse repertoire of T cell receptors and peripheral T cell pool, with the capacity to recognize a wide variety of antigens and for the surveillance of malignancies. However, cells in the thymus are fragile and sensitive to changes in the external environment and acute insults such as infections, chemo- and radiation-therapy, resulting in thymic injury and degeneration. Though the thymus has the capacity to self-regenerate, it is often insufficient to reconstitute an intact thymic function. Thymic dysfunction leads to an increased risk of opportunistic infections, tumor relapse, autoimmunity, and adverse clinical outcome. Thus, exploiting the mechanism of thymic regeneration would provide new therapeutic options for these settings. This review summarizes the thymus's development, factors causing thymic injury, and the strategies for improving thymus regeneration.


Subject(s)
Regeneration/physiology , Thymus Gland/physiology , Animals , Humans
7.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444117

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells present in virtually all tissues; they have a potent self-renewal capacity and can differentiate into multiple cell types. They also affect the ambient tissue by the paracrine secretion of numerous factors in vivo, including the induction of other stem cells' differentiation. In vitro, the culture media supernatant is named secretome and contains soluble molecules and extracellular vesicles that retain potent biological function in tissue regeneration. MSCs are considered safe for human treatment; their use does not involve ethical issues, as embryonic stem cells do not require genetic manipulation as induced pluripotent stem cells, and after intravenous injection, they are mainly found in the lugs. Therefore, these cells are currently being tested in various preclinical and clinical trials for several diseases, including COVID-19. Several affected COVID-19 patients develop induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) associated with an uncontrolled inflammatory response. This condition causes extensive damage to the lungs and may leave serious post-COVID-19 sequelae. As the disease may cause systemic alterations, such as thromboembolism and compromised renal and cardiac function, the intravenous injection of MSCs may be a therapeutic alternative against multiple pathological manifestations. In this work, we reviewed the literature about MSCs biology, focusing on their function in pulmonary regeneration and their use in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Lung/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Regeneration/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Differentiation , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Culture Media , Extracellular Vesicles , Humans , Inflammation , Mice , Mice, SCID , Phenotype , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , Thromboembolism/blood , Thromboembolism/immunology , Thromboembolism/therapy
8.
Cells ; 10(7)2021 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389304

ABSTRACT

The lungs are affected by illnesses including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and infections such as influenza and SARS-CoV-2. Physiologically relevant models for respiratory conditions will be essential for new drug development. The composition and structure of the lung extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a major role in the function of the lung tissue and cells. Lung-on-chip models have been developed to address some of the limitations of current two-dimensional in vitro models. In this review, we describe various ECM substitutes utilized for modeling the respiratory system. We explore the application of lung-on-chip models to the study of cigarette smoke and electronic cigarette vapor. We discuss the challenges and opportunities related to model characterization with an emphasis on in situ characterization methods, both established and emerging. We discuss how further advancements in the field, through the incorporation of interstitial cells and ECM, have the potential to provide an effective tool for interrogating lung biology and disease, especially the mechanisms that involve the interstitial elements.


Subject(s)
Lab-On-A-Chip Devices , Lung Diseases/pathology , Lung/physiology , Regeneration/physiology , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Extracellular Matrix/physiology , Humans , Lung/cytology , Lung/pathology , Lung Diseases/physiopathology , Lung Diseases/therapy , Models, Biological , Respiratory Mucosa/pathology , Respiratory Mucosa/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tissue Culture Techniques/instrumentation , Tissue Culture Techniques/methods
9.
Cells ; 10(3)2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136461

ABSTRACT

Evidence has arisen in recent years suggesting that a tissue renin-angiotensin system (tRAS) is involved in the progression of various human diseases. This system contains two regulatory pathways: a pathological pro-inflammatory pathway containing the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE)/Angiotensin II (AngII)/Angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) axis and a protective anti-inflammatory pathway involving the Angiotensin II receptor type 2 (AGTR2)/ACE2/Ang1-7/MasReceptor axis. Numerous studies reported the positive effects of pathologic tRAS pathway inhibition and protective tRAS pathway stimulation on the treatment of cardiovascular, inflammatory, and autoimmune disease and the progression of neuropathic pain. Cell senescence and aging are known to be related to RAS pathways. Further, this system directly interacts with SARS-CoV 2 and seems to be an important target of interest in the COVID-19 pandemic. This review focuses on the involvement of tRAS in the progression of the mentioned diseases from an interdisciplinary clinical perspective and highlights therapeutic strategies that might be of major clinical importance in the future.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Receptors, Angiotensin/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Aging/metabolism , Aging/pathology , Animals , Autoimmunity/drug effects , Autoimmunity/genetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/metabolism , Receptors, Angiotensin/genetics , Regeneration/drug effects , Regeneration/genetics , Regeneration/physiology , Renin-Angiotensin System/genetics , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Vulvodynia/immunology , Vulvodynia/physiopathology
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(22)2020 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917002

ABSTRACT

Pro-inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) are upregulated during early responses to tissue damage and are expected to transiently compromise the mechanical microenvironment. Fibroblasts are key regulators of tissue mechanics in the lungs and other organs. However, the effects of IL-1ß on fibroblast mechanics and functions remain unclear. Here we treated human pulmonary fibroblasts from control donors with IL-1ß and used Atomic Force Microscopy to unveil that IL-1ß significantly reduces the stiffness of fibroblasts concomitantly with a downregulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) and alpha-smooth muscle (α-SMA). Likewise, COL1A1 mRNA was reduced, whereas that of collagenases MMP1 and MMP2 were upregulated, favoring a reduction of type-I collagen. These mechanobiology changes were functionally associated with reduced proliferation and enhanced migration upon IL-1ß stimulation, which could facilitate lung repair by drawing fibroblasts to sites of tissue damage. Our observations reveal that IL-1ß may reduce local tissue rigidity by acting both intracellularly and extracellularly through the downregulation of fibroblast contractility and type I collagen deposition, respectively. These IL-1ß-dependent mechanical effects may enhance lung repair further by locally increasing pulmonary tissue compliance to preserve normal lung distension and function. Moreover, our results support that IL-1ß provides innate anti-fibrotic protection that may be relevant during the early stages of lung repair.


Subject(s)
Interleukin-1beta/physiology , Lung/physiology , Actins/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Biomechanical Phenomena , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cell Movement/physiology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Cells, Cultured , Collagen Type I/genetics , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Collagen Type III/genetics , Collagen Type III/metabolism , Cyclooxygenase 2/metabolism , Elasticity/drug effects , Elasticity/physiology , Female , Fibroblasts/cytology , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Fibroblasts/physiology , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/pharmacology , Lung/cytology , Lung/drug effects , Male , Microscopy, Atomic Force , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Regeneration/genetics , Regeneration/physiology , Wound Healing/drug effects , Wound Healing/genetics , Wound Healing/physiology , Young Adult
12.
Life Sci ; 263: 118588, 2020 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-846721

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome-novel coronavirus mediated COVID-19 has been recently declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. The primary target of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is the human lungs governed by the ACE-2 receptor of epithelial type II cells/endothelial cells, which promote modulation of the immune response of host cells through generating cytokine storm, inflammation, severe pneumonia symptoms, and secondary complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although numerous antiviral and anti-parasitic drugs are under clinical trials to combat this pandemic, to date, neither a specific treatment nor any successful vaccine has been established, urging researchers to identify any potential candidate for combating the disease. Mesenchymal stem cells own self-renewal, differentiation, homing, immunomodulation and remains unaffected by the coronavirus on the virtue of the absence of ACE-2 receptors, indicating that MSC's could be used an ameliorative approach for COVID-19. MSCs have shown to combat the disease via various pathways such as repairing the lung epithelial and endothelial cells, reducing hyperimmune response, maintaining the renin-angiotensin system. Although MSCs-based treatment approaches for COVID-19 is still under consideration with limited data, many human clinical trials of MSC's has been initiated to explore their potential for COVID 19 treatment. The current review summarizes and emphasizes on how MSC's modulate the immune response, can repair the lungs from the impact of the virus, and various aspects of MSC's as a remedial source for COVID-19, to provide better insight for biomedical researchers and for those who are fascinated by stem cells as a therapeutic approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Humans , Immunomodulation/physiology , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Regeneration/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
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