Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.171
Filter
1.
J Registry Manag ; 49(4): 201, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232425

ABSTRACT

After reading the educational posters and completing the quiz, participants will be able to: Describe how changes in access to medical care due to COVID-19 likely affect cancer incidence ratesUnderstand how state-specific patient claims databases can be leveraged to get an early picture of the impact of COVID-19 on cancer rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Continuing , Neoplasms/epidemiology , New York/epidemiology , Registries , Case Reports as Topic
2.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 14: 1167087, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231746

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most frequent comorbidities in patients suffering from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) with a higher rate of severe course of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, data about post-COVID-19 syndrome (PCS) in patients with DM are limited. Methods: This multicenter, propensity score-matched study compared long-term follow-up data about cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and other symptoms in 8,719 patients with DM to those without DM. The 1:1 propensity score matching (PSM) according to age and sex resulted in 1,548 matched pairs. Results: Diabetics and nondiabetics had a mean age of 72.6 ± 12.7 years old. At follow-up, cardiovascular symptoms such as dyspnea and increased resting heart rate occurred less in patients with DM (13.2% vs. 16.4%; p = 0.01) than those without DM (2.8% vs. 5.6%; p = 0.05), respectively. The incidence of newly diagnosed arterial hypertension was slightly lower in DM patients as compared to non-DM patients (0.5% vs. 1.6%; p = 0.18). Abnormal spirometry was observed more in patients with DM than those without DM (18.8% vs. 13; p = 0.24). Paranoia was diagnosed more frequently in patients with DM than in non-DM patients at follow-up time (4% vs. 1.2%; p = 0.009). The incidence of newly diagnosed renal insufficiency was higher in patients suffering from DM as compared to patients without DM (4.8% vs. 2.6%; p = 0.09). The rate of readmission was comparable in patients with and without DM (19.7% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.61). The reinfection rate with COVID-19 was comparable in both groups (2.9% in diabetics vs. 2.3% in nondiabetics; p = 0.55). Long-term mortality was higher in DM patients than in non-DM patients (33.9% vs. 29.1%; p = 0.005). Conclusions: The mortality rate was higher in patients with DM type II as compared to those without DM. Readmission and reinfection rates with COVID-19 were comparable in both groups. The incidence of cardiovascular symptoms was higher in patients without DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Reinfection , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Registries , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
3.
Aust Health Rev ; 47(3): 362-368, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237810

ABSTRACT

Objectives To project the prevalence of people receiving dialysis in Australia for 2021-30 to inform service planning and health policy. Methods Estimates were based on data from 2011 to 2020 from the Australia & New Zealand Dialysis & Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. We projected dialysis and functioning kidney transplant recipient populations for the years 2021-30. Discrete-time, non-homogenous Markov models were built on probabilities for transition between three mutually exclusive states (Dialysis, Functioning Transplant, Death), for five age groups. Two scenarios were employed - stable transplant rate vs a continued increase - to assess the impact of these scenarios on the projected prevalences. Results Models projected a 22.5-30.4% growth in the dialysis population from 14 554 in 2020 to 17 829 ('transplant growth') - 18 973 ('transplant stable') by 2030. An additional 4983-6484 kidney transplant recipients were also projected by 2030. Dialysis incidence per population increased and dialysis prevalence growth exceeded population ageing in 40-59 and 60-69 year age groups. The greatest dialysis prevalence growth was seen among those aged ≥70 years. Conclusion Modelling of the future prevalence of dialysis use highlights the increasing demand on services expected overall and especially by people aged ≥70 years. Appropriate funding and healthcare planning must meet this demand.


Subject(s)
Kidney Failure, Chronic , Kidney Transplantation , Humans , Australia/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , New Zealand/epidemiology , Prevalence , Registries , Renal Dialysis
4.
Lancet ; 401(10376): 568-576, 2023 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236778

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On the basis of low-quality evidence, international critical care nutrition guidelines recommend a wide range of protein doses. The effect of delivering high-dose protein during critical illness is unknown. We aimed to test the hypothesis that a higher dose of protein provided to critically ill patients would improve their clinical outcomes. METHODS: This international, investigator-initiated, pragmatic, registry-based, single-blinded, randomised trial was undertaken in 85 intensive care units (ICUs) across 16 countries. We enrolled nutritionally high-risk adults (≥18 years) undergoing mechanical ventilation to compare prescribing high-dose protein (≥2·2 g/kg per day) with usual dose protein (≤1·2 g/kg per day) started within 96 h of ICU admission and continued for up to 28 days or death or transition to oral feeding. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to high-dose protein or usual dose protein, stratified by site. As site personnel were involved in both prescribing and delivering protein dose, it was not possible to blind clinicians, but patients were not made aware of the treatment assignment. The primary efficacy outcome was time-to-discharge-alive from hospital up to 60 days after ICU admission and the secondary outcome was 60-day morality. Patients were analysed in the group to which they were randomly assigned regardless of study compliance, although patients who dropped out of the study before receiving the study intervention were excluded. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03160547. FINDINGS: Between Jan 17, 2018, and Dec 3, 2021, 1329 patients were randomised and 1301 (97·9%) were included in the analysis (645 in the high-dose protein group and 656 in usual dose group). By 60 days after randomisation, the cumulative incidence of alive hospital discharge was 46·1% (95 CI 42·0%-50·1%) in the high-dose compared with 50·2% (46·0%-54·3%) in the usual dose protein group (hazard ratio 0·91, 95% CI 0·77-1·07; p=0·27). The 60-day mortality rate was 34·6% (222 of 642) in the high dose protein group compared with 32·1% (208 of 648) in the usual dose protein group (relative risk 1·08, 95% CI 0·92-1·26). There appeared to be a subgroup effect with higher protein provision being particularly harmful in patients with acute kidney injury and higher organ failure scores at baseline. INTERPRETATION: Delivery of higher doses of protein to mechanically ventilated critically ill patients did not improve the time-to-discharge-alive from hospital and might have worsened outcomes for patients with acute kidney injury and high organ failure scores. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Critical Care , Critical Illness , Adult , Humans , Critical Illness/therapy , Intensive Care Units , Hospitalization , Respiration, Artificial , Registries
5.
J Registry Manag ; 49(4): 170-176, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245302

ABSTRACT

Background: As the February 2022 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Call for Data deadlines approached, the New York State Cancer Registry had received reports for approximately 10% fewer consolidated incident cases for 2020 than expected. We used claims data to examine changes in the volume of cancer claim records during the COVID-19 pandemic and possible contributors to the deficit in cancer reports. Methods: The New York State (NYS) Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) requires reporting of all patient encounters from licensed ambulatory surgery, emergency department, and hospital inpatient and outpatient providers. Each record includes patient demographics and up to 17 diagnosis codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM). For this project, we extracted 6,725,416 SPARCS records with any malignant neoplasm code for 2018 through June 2021 for NYS residents. Using SAS 9.4, we focused on comparing the cancer-related records for 2020 to the records from 2019. Results: Overall, there were 5% more cancer-related records in 2019 than in 2018 (2,009,600 vs 1,914,364), but 8.2% fewer records in 2020 (1,844,054 total) than in 2019. Looking by month and year, the number of claims in the first 2 months of 2020 exceeded the numbers from 2019 by 5%. However, a decrease in the number of claims started in March 2020, with the biggest drop in April 2020, where there was a deficit of 38.8% for cancer-related encounter reports relative to the same month the previous year. Although the numbers rose after April, the number of claims for the last half of 2020 was still 4% lower than the same time frame in 2019. There were substantial decreases in the number of records in 2020 for all encounter types and across levels of each covariate examined, including age, sex, race/ethnicity, and facility region of NYS. In analyses of all reporting facilities, facilities in New York City had a more pronounced and more prolonged drop in reporting in 2020 than facilities in the rest of the state. Conclusion: Although SPARCS data do not provide definitive evidence of decreases in incident cancer diagnoses, these data suggest that there were fewer cancers diagnosed among NYS residents in 2020. Additional analyses are needed to assess the impacts of COVID-19-related delays in cancer diagnosis and treatment on stage at diagnosis and outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , New York/epidemiology , New York City , Pandemics , Registries , Case Reports as Topic
6.
Eur Psychiatry ; 66(1): e50, 2023 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242118

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Current evidence on the risk of admission- or medication-requiring psychiatric sequelae of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is limited to selected populations, short durations, and loss to follow-up. This study examined if SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with increased long-term risk of psychiatric admissions and de novo prescription of psychoactive medication in the general population of Denmark. METHODS: Adults (≥18 years) were assigned to either the control or SARS-CoV-2 group based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests between 1 January 2020 and 27 November 2021. Infected subjects were matched 1:5 to control subjects by propensity score. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated. Adjusted Cox regression was applied to the unmatched population with SARS-CoV-2 infection as a time-dependent covariate. Follow-up time was 12 months or until the end of the study. RESULTS: A total of 4,585,083 adults were included in the study. Approximately 342,084 had a PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and were matched 1:5 with 1,697,680 controls. The IRR for psychiatric admission was 0.79 in the matched population (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73-0.85, p < 0.001). In the unmatched population, the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for psychiatric admission were either below 1.00 or with a 95% CI lower limit of 1.01. SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with an increased risk of de novo prescription of psychoactive medication in both the matched (IRR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.11, p < 0.01) and unmatched population (HR 1.31, 95% CI: 1.28-1.34, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: We found a signal of increased use of psychoactive medication, specifically benzodiazepines, among SARS-CoV-2-positive persons, but the risk of psychiatric admissions did not increase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Psychotropic Drugs/adverse effects , Registries , Denmark/epidemiology
7.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(3): 458-466, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242956

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To provide an overview of the spectrum, characteristics and outcomes of neurologic manifestations associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre retrospective study during the French coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic in March-April 2020. All COVID-19 patients with de novo neurologic manifestations were eligible. RESULTS: We included 222 COVID-19 patients with neurologic manifestations from 46 centres in France. Median (interquartile range, IQR) age was 65 (53-72) years and 136 patients (61.3%) were male. COVID-19 was severe or critical in 102 patients (45.2%). The most common neurologic diseases were COVID-19-associated encephalopathy (67/222, 30.2%), acute ischaemic cerebrovascular syndrome (57/222, 25.7%), encephalitis (21/222, 9.5%) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (15/222, 6.8%). Neurologic manifestations appeared after the first COVID-19 symptoms with a median (IQR) delay of 6 (3-8) days in COVID-19-associated encephalopathy, 7 (5-10) days in encephalitis, 12 (7-18) days in acute ischaemic cerebrovascular syndrome and 18 (15-28) days in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Brain imaging was performed in 192 patients (86.5%), including 157 magnetic resonance imaging (70.7%). Among patients with acute ischaemic cerebrovascular syndrome, 13 (22.8%) of 57 had multiterritory ischaemic strokes, with large vessel thrombosis in 16 (28.1%) of 57. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of encephalitis patients showed heterogeneous acute nonvascular lesions in 14 (66.7%) of 21. Cerebrospinal fluid of 97 patients (43.7%) was analysed, with pleocytosis found in 18 patients (18.6%) and a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR result in two patients with encephalitis. The median (IQR) follow-up was 24 (17-34) days with a high short-term mortality rate (28/222, 12.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Clinical spectrum and outcomes of neurologic manifestations associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection were broad and heterogeneous, suggesting different underlying pathogenic processes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 29(3): 175-180, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2328145

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Despite improvements over time, cardiac arrest continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Several methods can be used to achieve airway patency during cardiac arrest, and the optimal strategy continues to be debated. This review will explore and summarize the latest published evidence for airway management during cardiac arrest. RECENT FINDINGS: A large meta-analysis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients found no difference in survival between those receiving tracheal intubation and those treated with a supraglottic airway (SGA). Observational studies of registry data have reported higher survival to hospital discharge in patients receiving tracheal intubation or an SGA but another showed no difference. Rates of intubation during in-hospital cardiac arrest have decreased in the United States, and different airway strategies appear to be used in different centres. SUMMARY: Observational studies continue to dominate the evidence base relating to cardiac arrest airway management. Cardiac arrest registries enable these observational studies to include many patients; however, the design of such studies introduces considerable bias. Further randomized clinical trials are underway. The current evidence does not indicate a substantial improvement in outcome from any single airway strategy.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Emergency Medical Services , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest , Humans , United States , Airway Management/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy , Registries , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods
9.
Rev Invest Clin ; 75(2): 47-52, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326858

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the beginning of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, patients with chronic kidney disease vulnerable to suffering more severe COVID-19 disease and worse outcomes have been identified. Objectives: Our study's aim was to determine the incidence, characteristics, and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients of hemodialysis (HD) units in Mexico and to describe the availability of confirmatory testing. Methods: This study was multicentric study of 19 HD units, conducted between March 2020 and March 2021. Results: From a total of 5779 patients, 955 (16.5%) cases of suspicious COVID-19 were detected; a SARS-CoV-2 reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test was done in only 50.6% of patients. Forty-five percentages were hospitalized and 6% required invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). There was no significant difference in mortality between confirmed (131/483) and suspicious (124/472) cases (p = 0.74). The percentage of patients in need of hospitalization, IMV, and deceased was greater than in the rest of the study population. Conclusions: The study revealed that 49.4% of the cases were not confirmed, a worrisome observation given that this is a highly vulnerable population (higher probability of contagion and worse outcomes), in which 100% of patients should have a confirmatory test.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Mexico/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis , Registries
10.
Probl Endokrinol (Mosk) ; 69(1): 36-49, 2023 02 25.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies indicate a high incidence of various disorders of carbohydrate metabolism against the new coronavirus infection. These disorders aggravate the course of infection and increase mortality. Thereby, analysis of risk factors for unfavorable outcomes and assessment of the long-term consequences of COVID-19 in patients with impaired carbohydrate metabolism is of great importance. AIM: To investigate the association between carbohydrate metabolism disorders in COVID-19 patients and mortality, course of infection, long-term consequences, as well as to identify risk factors for an unfavorable disease course. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of data from the combined multicenter non-interventional real-world AKTIV and AKTIV 2 registries was performed. The sample included 9290 patients who had COVID-19 with varying severity from June 29, 2020, to November 29, 2020 (AKTIV) and from October 01, 2020, to March 30, 2021 (AKTIV 2). The patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 - patients with intact carbohydrate metabolism, n=6606; Group 2 - patients with newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), n=1073; Group 3 - patients with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), n=1611. The groups were assessed for clinical and laboratory parameters, comorbidities, mortality, carbohydrate metabolic status, and well-being during the infection and at 12 months. RESULTS: The prevalence of carbohydrate metabolism disorders (CMD) was 28,9%, with DM2 patients accounting for 17,3% and patients with newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH) for 11,6%. The mortality rate of patients with hyperglycemia of any origin was 10.6%, which was significantly higher compared to patients without hyperglycemia (3,9%). The probability of lethal outcome increased 2,48-fold in the group of patients with DM2 and 2,04-fold in the group of patients with NDH. At the same time, the probability of a lethal outcome decreased 2,94-fold in patients without CMD. At 12 months, patients with CMD showed a significantly higher frequency and longer persistence of complaints. This trend was more pronounced in patients with DM2 than in those with NDH. Only 1,7% of patients from the NDH group had type 2 diabetes and were receiving oral hypoglycemic medications one year after the infection. A prognostic model was developed to determine the risk of lethal outcome. The model included such known predictors as concomitant ischemic heart disease, history of myocardial infarction or stroke, blood glucose level, and age. CONCLUSION: Carbohydrate metabolism disorders aggravate the course of COVID-19 and increase mortality. One year after infection, patients with DM2 and NDH were more likely to have symptoms typical for post-COVID syndrome, and NDH resolved in most cases after the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hyperglycemia , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Carbohydrate Metabolism , Registries
11.
PLoS Med ; 20(4): e1004210, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the United Kingdom National Health Service aimed to reduce social inequalities in the provision of joint replacement, it is unclear whether these gaps have reduced. We describe secular trends in the provision of primary hip and knee replacement surgery between social deprivation groups. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used the National Joint Registry to identify all hip and knee replacements performed for osteoarthritis from 2007 to 2017 in England. The Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) 2015 was used to identify the relative level of deprivation of the patient living area. Multilevel negative binomial regression models were used to model the differences in rates of joint replacement. Choropleth maps of hip and knee replacement provision were produced to identify the geographical variation in provision by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs). A total of 675,342 primary hip and 834,146 primary knee replacements were studied. The mean age was 70 years old (standard deviation: 9) with 60% and 56% of women undergoing hip and knee replacements, respectively. The overall rate of hip replacement increased from 27 to 36 per 10,000 person-years and knee replacement from 33 to 46. Inequalities of provision between the most (reference) and least affluent areas have remained constant for both joints (hip: rate ratio (RR) = 0.58, 95% confidence interval [0.56, 0.60] in 2007, RR = 0.59 [0.58, 0.61] in 2017; knee: RR = 0.82 [0.80, 0.85] in 2007, RR = 0.81 [0.80, 0.83] in 2017). For hip replacement, CCGs with the highest concentration of deprived areas had lower overall provision rates, and CCGs with very few deprived areas had higher provision rates. There was no clear pattern of provision inequalities between CCGs and deprivation concentration for knee replacement. Study limitations include the lack of publicly available information to explore these inequalities beyond age, sex, and geographical area. Information on clinical need for surgery or patient willingness to access care were unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found that there were inequalities, which remained constant over time, especially in the provision of hip replacement, by degree of social deprivation. Providers of healthcare need to take action to reduce this unwarranted variation in provision of surgery.


Subject(s)
Osteoarthritis , State Medicine , Humans , Female , Aged , Cohort Studies , England/epidemiology , Social Deprivation , Registries
12.
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol ; 34(6): 1386-1394, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322295

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Brugada syndrome (BrS) has a dynamic ECG pattern that might be revealed by certain conditions such as fever. We evaluated the incidence and management of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) related to COVID-19 infection and vaccination among BrS patients carriers of an implantable loop recorder (ILR) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and followed by remote monitoring. METHODS: This was a multicenter retrospective study. Patients were carriers of devices with remote monitoring follow-up. We recorded VAs 6 months before COVID-19 infection or vaccination, during infection, at each vaccination, and up to 6-month post-COVID-19 or 1 month after the last vaccination. In ICD carriers, we documented any device intervention. RESULTS: We included 326 patients, 202 with an ICD and 124 with an ILR. One hundred and nine patients (33.4%) had COVID-19, 55% of whom developed fever. Hospitalization rate due to COVID-19 infection was 2.76%. After infection, we recorded only two ventricular tachycardias (VTs). After the first, second, and third vaccines, the incidence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) was 1.5%, 2%, and 1%, respectively. The incidence of VT was 1% after the second dose. Six-month post-COVID-19 healing or 1 month after the last vaccine, we documented NSVT in 3.4%, VT in 0.5%, and ventricular fibrillation in 0.5% of patients. Overall, one patient received anti-tachycardia pacing and one a shock. ILR carriers had no VAs. No differences were found in VT before and after infection and before and after each vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: From this large multicenter study conducted in BrS patients, followed by remote monitoring, the overall incidence of sustained VAs after COVID-19 infection and vaccination is relatively low.


Subject(s)
Brugada Syndrome , COVID-19 , Defibrillators, Implantable , Tachycardia, Ventricular , Humans , Brugada Syndrome/diagnosis , Brugada Syndrome/epidemiology , Brugada Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Incidence , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Tachycardia, Ventricular/diagnosis , Tachycardia, Ventricular/epidemiology , Tachycardia, Ventricular/therapy , Registries , Vaccination , Follow-Up Studies
15.
Herz ; 48(3): 184-189, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314862

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic placed a significant burden on the German healthcare system. Based on the experience of severe disease progression of the SARS-CoV­2 infection from neighboring European countries in the early 2020s, with ICU overload and high mortality rates, efforts were made in Germany to increase the capacity of available ICU beds. Subsequently, all documentation and reporting focused on the ICU capacities for COVID-19 patients. It was hypothesized that mainly a few large hospitals provided care for the majority of COVID-19 patients. The COVID-19 Registry RLP of Rhineland-Palatinate documented SARS-CoV­2 inpatients from daily mandatory queries of all hospitals throughout the pandemic from April 2020 to March 2023, distinguishing between patients in ICUs and normal wards. In its 18th Corona Ordinance, the state government required all hospitals to participate in the care of SARS-CoV­2 inpatients. We investigated the participation of hospitals at different levels of care in Rhineland-Palatinate in the management of the COVID-19 pandemic. Nine pandemic waves were documented during the pandemic and exemplary data on the respective pandemic peaks were evaluated. A distinction was made between the burden on hospitals at different levels of care: primary care hospitals, standard care hospitals, specialty hospitals, and maximal care hospitals. Analysis of the data showed that all hospital types participated equally in the care of SARS-CoV-2 patients. The requirement of the Ministry of Health of Rhineland-Palatinate to provide at least 20% of the available capacity was met by all levels of care and there were no disparities between hospitals of different levels of care in the management of the pandemic.Hospitals at all levels of care participated equally in the care of SARS-CoV­2 inpatients and thus contributed significantly to the management of the pandemic in Rhineland-Palatinate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Hospitals , Registries
16.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e326, 2022 12 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319058

ABSTRACT

The current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has placed unprecedented strain on underfunded public health resources in the Southeastern United States. The Memphis, TN, metropolitan region has lacked infrastructure for health data exchange.This manuscript describes a multidisciplinary initiative to create a community-focused COVID-19 data registry, the Memphis Pandemic Health Informatics System (MEMPHI-SYS). MEMPHI-SYS leverages test result data updated directly from community-based testing sites, as well as a full complement of public health data sets and knowledge-based informatics. It has been guided by relationships with community stakeholders and is managed alongside the largest publicly funded community-based COVID-19 testing response in the Mid-South. MEMPHI-SYS has supported interactive Web-based analytic resources and informs federally funded COVID-19 outreach directed toward neighborhoods most in need of pandemic support.MEMPHI-SYS provides an instructive case study of how to collaboratively establish the technical scaffolding and human relationships necessary for data-driven, health equity-focused pandemic surveillance, and policy interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Informatics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Pandemics , Registries
17.
BMC Nephrol ; 24(1): 130, 2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients on kidney replacement therapy (KRT) are vulnerable to severe illness from COVID-19. Timely, accurate surveillance is essential for planning and implementing infection control at local, regional and national levels. Our aim was to compare two methods of data collection for COVID-19 infections amongst KRT patients in England. METHODS: Adults receiving KRT in England were linked to two sources of data on positive COVID-19 tests recorded March-August 2020: (1) submissions from renal centres to the UK Renal Registry (UKRR) and (2) Public Health England (PHE) laboratory data. Patient characteristics, cumulative incidence by modality (in-centre haemodialysis (ICHD), home HD, peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplant), and 28-day survival were compared between the two sources. RESULTS: 2,783/54,795 patients (5.1%) had a positive test in the combined UKRR-PHE dataset. Of these 2,783, 87% had positive tests in both datasets. Capture was consistently high for PHE (> 95% across modalities) but varied for UKRR (ranging from ICHD 95% to transplant 78%, p < 0.0001). Patients captured only by PHE were more likely to be on transplant or home therapies (OR 3.5 95% CI [2.3-5.2] vs. ICHD) and to be infected in later months (OR 3.3 95%CI [2.4-4.6] for May-June, OR 6.5 95%CI [3.8-11.3] for July-August, vs. March-April), compared to patients in both datasets. Stratified by modality, patient characteristics and 28-day survival were similar between datasets. CONCLUSIONS: For patients undergoing ICHD treatment the collection of data submitted directly by renal centres allows constant monitoring in real time. For other KRT modalities, using a national swab test dataset through frequent linkage may be the most effective method. Optimising central surveillance can improve patient care by informing interventions and assisting planning at local, regional and national levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Registries , Data Collection , Cohort Studies , England
18.
Curr Med Res Opin ; 39(6): 811-817, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313486

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical profile, risk of complications and impact of anticoagulation in COVID-19 hospitalized patients, according to the presence of atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS: Multicenter, retrospective, and observational study that consecutively included patients >55 years admitted with COVID-19 from March to October 2020. In AF patients, anticoagulation was chosen based on clinicians' judgment. Patients were followed-up for 90 days. RESULTS: A total of 646 patients were included, of whom 75.2% had AF. Overall, mean age was 75 ± 9.1 years and 62.4% were male. Patients with AF were older and had more comorbidities. The most common anticoagulants used during hospitalization in patients with AF were edoxaban (47.9%), low molecular weight heparin (27.0%), and dabigatran (11.7%) and among patients without AF, these numbers were 0%, 93.8% and 0%. Overall, during the study period (68 ± 3 days), 15.2% of patients died, 8.2% of patients presented a major bleeding and 0.9% had a stroke/systemic embolism. During hospitalization, patients with AF had a higher risk of major bleeding (11.3% vs 0.7%; p < .01), COVID-19-related deaths (18.0% vs 4.5%; p = .02), and all-cause deaths (20.6% vs 5.6%; p = .02). Age (HR 1.5; 95% CI 1.0-2.3) and elevated transaminases (HR 3.5; 95% CI 2.0-6.1) were independently associated with all-cause mortality. AF was independently associated with major bleeding (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.1-5.3). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, patients with AF were older, had more comorbidities and had a higher risk of major bleeding. Age and elevated transaminases during hospitalization, but not AF nor anticoagulant treatment increased the risk of all-cause death.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , COVID-19 , Stroke , Thromboembolism , Humans , Male , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Atrial Fibrillation/complications , Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/complications , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Hemorrhage/complications , Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Stroke/etiology , Registries , Transaminases/therapeutic use
19.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e068981, 2023 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the characteristics of clinical study report (CSR) documents published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and for included pivotal trials, to quantify the timeliness of access to trial results from CSRs compared with conventional published sources. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of CSR documents published by the EMA from 2016 to 2018. METHODS: CSR files and medication summary information were downloaded from the EMA. Individual trials in each submission were identified using document filenames. Number and length of documents and trials were determined. For pivotal trials, trial phase, dates of EMA document publication and matched journal and registry publications were obtained. RESULTS: The EMA published documents on 142 medications that were submitted for regulatory drug approval. Submissions were for initial marketing authorisations in 64.1%. There was a median of 15 (IQR 5-46) documents, 5 (IQR 2-14) trials and 9629 (IQR 2711-26,673) pages per submission, and a median of 1 (IQR 1-4) document and 336 (IQR 21-1192) pages per trial. Of all identified pivotal trials, 60.9% were phase 3 and 18.5% were phase 1. Of 119 unique submissions to the EMA, 46.2% were supported by a single pivotal trial, with 13.4% based on a single pivotal phase 1 trial. No trial registry results were identified for 26.1% trials, no journal publications for 16.7% and 13.5% of trials had neither. EMA publication was the earliest information source for 5.8% of pivotal trials, available a median 523 days (IQR 363-882 days) before the earliest publication. CONCLUSIONS: The EMA Clinical Data website contains lengthy clinical trial documents. Almost half of submissions to the EMA were based on single pivotal trials, many of which were phase 1 trials. CSRs were the only source and a timelier source of information for many trials. Access to unpublished trial information should be open and timely to support decision-making for patients.


Subject(s)
Drug Approval , Research Report , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Drug Approval/methods , Registries , Clinical Studies as Topic
20.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 82(5): 698-709, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2311299

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate factors associated with severe COVID-19 in people with psoriasis (PsO), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). METHODS: Demographic data, clinical characteristics and COVID-19 outcome severity of adults with PsO, PsA and axSpA were obtained from two international physician-reported registries. A three-point ordinal COVID-19 severity scale was defined: no hospitalisation, hospitalisation (and no death) and death. ORs were estimated using multivariable ordinal logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 5045 cases, 18.3% had PsO, 45.5% PsA and 36.3% axSpA. Most (83.6%) were not hospitalised, 14.6% were hospitalised and 1.8% died. Older age was non-linearly associated with COVID-19 severity. Male sex (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.83), cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, metabolic and cancer comorbidities (ORs 1.25-2.89), moderate/high disease activity and/or glucocorticoid use (ORs 1.39-2.23, vs remission/low disease activity and no glucocorticoids) were associated with increased odds of severe COVID-19. Later pandemic time periods (ORs 0.42-0.52, vs until 15 June 2020), PsO (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.65, vs PsA) and baseline exposure to TNFi, IL17i and IL-23i/IL-12+23i (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.73; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.87; OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.98; respectively; vs no disease-modifying antirheumatic drug) were associated with reduced odds of severe COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Older age, male sex, comorbidity burden, higher disease activity and glucocorticoid intake were associated with more severe COVID-19. Later pandemic time periods, PsO and exposure to TNFi, IL17i and IL-23i/IL-12+23i were associated with less severe COVID-19. These findings will enable risk stratification and inform management decisions for patients with PsO, PsA and axSpA during COVID-19 waves or similar future respiratory pandemics.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Axial Spondyloarthritis , COVID-19 , Physicians , Psoriasis , Rheumatology , Adult , Humans , Male , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Psoriatic/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Psoriasis/complications , Glucocorticoids , Interleukin-12 , Registries
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL