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1.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(11): 1031-1032, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537604

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This brief report summarizes the comparative experience of an inpatient rehabilitation facility dealing with two episodes of COVID-19 infection, one before and one after the availability of vaccination, which was deployed to staff. The experience exemplifies the high rate of infection and potential for asymptomatic presentation of COVID-19 as well as the protective advantage of the vaccine for healthcare workers in this report. With a significant reduction in the rate of infection, from nearly 30% before vaccination to only 2.5% after vaccination. The data presented should serve as an encouragement for vaccination across all populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Infection Control/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Rehabilitation Centers , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Female , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Mass Screening , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Acta Myol ; 40(3): 132-134, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464224

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 has forced the health care system to undergo profound rearrangements in services and facilities, especially during the periods of lockdown. In this context, inpatient and outpatient services had to rethink and reorganize their activities to meet the needs of severely disabled patients, as those affected by Muscular Dystrophies (MDs). We present the preliminary results of a survey aiming to explore the staff views on the changes in the care provided by the Gaetano Torre Rehabilitation Centre, and, the impact of these changes on professionals, patients and their families. The survey was carried out using an open-ended questionnaire including six-items, on the practical and psychological aspects emerged during the pandemic in relation to the healthcare services provided by the Centre and to the patients/caregivers conditions. The participants, most of them physiotherapists, highlighted 169 aspects emerging in the pandemic, 48.5% referring to the resources used to cope with critical issues and 51.5% concerning the difficulties encountered. Emotional aspects prevailed on practical aspects both in resources (52.4 vs 47.6%) and in difficulties (57.5 vs 42.5%) categories. In particular, with regard to patients' resources, psychological benefits, despite the burden, were greater than practical ones (87 vs 13%), in the form of improved intra-family relationships, feeling more cared for, and satisfaction for the received care. As for the patients' relatives, the staff indicated more resources than difficulties (72.8 vs 17.2%). Among the former, 75% concerned the emotional sphere, such as the perception of having a point of reference even in such a difficult time.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Muscular Diseases/rehabilitation , Rehabilitation Centers/organization & administration , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infection Control , Italy , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(12): 2167-2175, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439719

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to detect patients' characteristics who suffered severe and critical COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to the post-acute COVID-19 rehabilitation clinic in Ankara City Hospital, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Hospital and to share our experiences and outcomes of rehabilitation programmes applied. This study was designed as a single-centre, retrospective, observational study. Severe and critical COVID-19 patients, admitted to the post-acute COVID-19 rehabilitation clinic, were included in patient-based rehabilitation programmes, targeting neuromuscular and respiratory recovery. Functional status, oxygen (O2) requirement and daily living activities were assessed before and after rehabilitation. Eighty-five patients, of which 74% were male, were analysed, with the mean age of 58.27 ± 11.13 and mean body mass index of 25.29 ± 4.81 kg/m2. The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (49.4%) and diabetes mellitus (34.1%). Of the 85 patients, 84 received antiviral drugs, 81 low-molecular-weight heparin, 71 corticosteroids, 11 anakinra, 4 tocilizumab, 16 intravenous immunoglobulin and 6 plasmapheresis. 78.8% of the patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, with a mean length of stay of 19.41 ± 18.99 days, while those who needed O2 support with mechanic ventilation was 36.1%. Neurological complications, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, critical illness-related myopathy/neuropathy, cerebrovascular disease and steroid myopathy, were observed in 39 patients. On initial functional statuses, 55.3% were bedridden, 22.4% in wheelchair level and 20% mobilised with O2 support. After rehabilitation, these ratios were 2.4%, 4.7% and 8.2%, respectively. During admission, 71 (83.5%) patients required O2 support, but decreased to 7 (8.2%) post-rehabilitation. Barthel Index improved statistically from 44.82 ± 27.31 to 88.47 ± 17.56. Patient-based modulated rehabilitation programmes are highly effective in severe and critical COVID-19 complications, providing satisfactory well-being in daily living activities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy/methods , Rehabilitation Centers/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Rehabilitation Centers/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Turkey/epidemiology
4.
Phys Ther ; 101(11)2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402559

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: he objective of this study was to evaluate safety, feasibility, and outcomes of 30 patients within an inpatient rehabilitation facility following hospitalization for severe Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: This was an observational study of 30 patients (ages 26-80 years) within a large, metropolitan, academic hospital following hospitalization for complications from severe COVID-19. Ninety percent of the participants required critical care, and 83% required mechanical ventilation during their hospitalization. Within an inpatient rehabilitation facility and model of care, frequent, long-duration rehabilitation was provided by occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech language pathologists. RESULTS: The average inpatient rehabilitation facility length of stay was 11 days (ranging from 4-22 days). Patients averaged 165 min/d (ranging from 140-205 minutes) total of physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. Twenty-eight of the 30 patients (93%) were discharged to the community. One patient required readmission from an inpatient rehabilitation facility to an acute hospital. All 30 patients improved their functional status with inpatient rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: In this cohort of 30 patients, inpatient rehabilitation after severe COVID-19 was safe and feasible. Patients were able to participate in frequent, long-duration rehabilitation with nearly all patients discharging to the community. Clinically, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered for patients with functional limitations following severe COVID-19. Given 90% of our cohort required critical care, future studies should investigate the efficacy and effectiveness of inpatient rehabilitation following hospitalization for critical illness. Frequent, long-duration rehabilitation shows promising potential to address functional impairments following hospitalization for severe COVID-19. IMPACT: Inpatient rehabilitation facilities should be considered as a discharge location for hospitalized survivors of COVID-19, especially severe COVID-19, with functional limitations precluding community discharge. Clinicians and administrators should consider inpatient rehabilitation and inpatient rehabilitation facilities to address the rehabilitation needs of COVID-19 and critical illness survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Physical Therapy Modalities/statistics & numerical data , Rehabilitation Centers/organization & administration , Skilled Nursing Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life
5.
J Hosp Infect ; 105(4): 625-627, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385923

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is mainly transmitted by respiratory droplets and contact with contaminated surfaces. It can be retrieved in faeces but there is no evidence of faecal-oral transmission, which is the main route of contamination in recreational waters. Standard cleaning and disinfecting procedures, microbiological control and health rules aim to prevent infectious risk regardless of the micro-organisms. In the context of progressive lockdown exit and hospital activities recovery, we assessed the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in rehabilitation pools and therapeutic water environments in order to provide specific recommendations to control the spread of SARS-CoV-2 while ensuring essential rehabilitation care for patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Guidelines as Topic , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Rehabilitation Centers/standards , Safety Management/standards , Swimming Pools/standards , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Toxins (Basel) ; 13(8)2021 08 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367914

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted the function of medical facilities and rehabilitation services worldwide, including toxin services delivering Botulinum toxin treatments for neuromuscular conditions such as spasticity, dystonia, and sialorrhea. The aim of this paper is to understand how toxin services have dealt with the situation and what strategies have been adopted to continue services. The recommendations are based on a virtual round table held with toxin services experts from different European countries who shared their experiences and discussed the best practices. The challenges for toxin services were reviewed based on the experts' experiences and on relevant literature from 2020 and 2021. A set of recommendations and best practices were compiled, focusing firstly on guidance for clinical practice, including assessing patients' health and risk status and the urgency of their treatment. Secondly, it was discussed how patients on botulinum toxin therapy can be cared for and supported during the pandemic, and how modern technology and tele-medicine platforms can be generally used to optimize effectiveness and safety of toxin treatments. The technological advances prompted by the COVID-19 crisis can result in better and more modern patient care in the future.


Subject(s)
Botulinum Toxins/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Neuromuscular Diseases/drug therapy , Rehabilitation Centers , SARS-CoV-2 , Botulinum Toxins/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Europe , Humans , Telemedicine
7.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(8): 733-736, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310970

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The cause of neuralgic amyotrophy is often unknown but is commonly associated with a recent upper respiratory viral tract infection. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a tireless effort to understand the sequelae of the virus. A 46-yr-old woman who presented after a COVID-19 hospitalization complicated by hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation for 23 days was subsequently found to have lower limb sensorium changes as well as upper limb weakness. Left shoulder abduction and extension were both 3/5 in motor strength, and left hip flexion strength was 4/5 with diminished sensation to crude touch in the left lateral thigh. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography findings included a mild left median neuropathy at the wrist and motor unit recruitment pattern consistent with a chronic left upper trunk plexopathy with reinnervation. The case presented describes an extended neuralgic amyotrophy syndrome from an atraumatic mechanism in a previously diagnosed COVID-19 patient. An extended neuralgic amyotrophy syndrome has at least three immune mediated etiologies postulated (1) direct neuropathogenicity, (2) molecular mimicry, and (3) direct cytotoxic effects on peripheral nerves. As COVID-19 survivors continue to be seen in outpatient settings, practitioners should remain aware of diffuse neurological complications as sequelae of the virus persist.


Subject(s)
Brachial Plexus Neuritis/therapy , Brachial Plexus Neuritis/virology , COVID-19/complications , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Meloxicam/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Physical Therapy Modalities , Rehabilitation Centers , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Rev. gaúch. enferm ; 42(spe): e20200331, 2021.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1243896

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective Describe the experience lived in an interdisciplinary follow-up care center for mastectomized women at a public university in São Paulo during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic Method Experience report on the health care provided in the health center for mastectomized women. Results The care was provided three times a week by an interdisciplinary health team. The mentioned areas that cover the women care in the center: Physical, Psychological, Social Support and Health Education. Conclusions The attention by an interdisciplinary team becomes prevalent in the care of mastectomized women, since cancer and its treatment produce various changes in women's lives in the short and long term, so follow-up and support must be biopsychosocial, covering all areas that may be affected, especially during the pandemic.


RESUMO Objetivo Descrever a experiência vivida em um centro de acompanhamento interdisciplinar de mulheres mastectomizadas de uma universidade pública de São Paulo durante o início da pandemia COVID-19. Método Relato de experiência sobre cuidados de saúde prestados no centro de saúde para mulheres mastectomizadas. Resultados Os atendimentos foram realizados três vezes por semana por uma equipe interdisciplinar de saúde. São mencionadas as áreas que abrangem o atendimento à mulher no centro: Acompanhamento físico, psicológico, social e Educação em saúde. Conclusão A atenção por uma equipe interdisciplinar torna-se predominante no cuidado de mulheres mastectomizadas, pois o câncer e seu tratamento produzem diversas mudanças na vida das mulheres, a curto e longo prazo. Portanto o acompanhamento deve ser biopsicossocial, cobrindo todas as áreas que podem ser afetadas, especialmente durante a pandemia.


RESUMEN Objetivo Describir la experiencia vivida en un centro de atención interdisciplinaria de seguimiento a mujeres mastectomizadas de una universidad pública de Sao Paulo durante el inicio de la pandemia de COVID-19. Método Relato de experiencia sobre las atenciones de salud brindadas en el centro de salud para mujeres mastectomizadas. Resultados Las atenciones fueron realizadas tres veces por semana por un equipo interdisciplinario de salud. Se mencionan las áreas que abarcan la atención de las mujeres en el centro: Acompañamiento físico, Psicológico, Social y la Educación en Salud. Conclusión La atención por un equipo interdisciplinario se torna imperante en el cuidado de mujeres mastectomizadas, ya que el cáncer y su tratamiento producen diversos cambios en la vida de la mujer, a corto y largo plazo, por lo que el seguimiento y acompañamiento debe ser biopsicosocial, abarcando todas las áreas que pueden verse afectadas, especialmente durante la pandemia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Rehabilitation Centers , Breast Neoplasms , Women's Health , COVID-19 , Mastectomy/rehabilitation , Patient Care Team , Social Support , Universities , Comprehensive Health Care
9.
PM R ; 14(2): 202-209, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To describe patients with COVID-19 who are undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and their rehabilitation outcomes. DESIGN: Retrospective observational cohort study of all inpatients from a rehabilitation hospital between March 1 and September 30, 2020. SETTING: Inpatient rehabilitation hospital. PATIENTS: Among all inpatients, inclusion criteria are: ≥18 years of age and admission and discharge within the study time frame. The initial search yielded 920 patients; 896 met the inclusion criteria. Subjects were stratified by COVID-19 status and rehabilitation impairment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Data included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), length of stay (LOS), discharge location, and functional ability in self-care and mobility (FA-SC, FA-Mob). One-sample t-tests were used to assess the difference of age, BMI, LOS, FA-SC, FA-Mob, and FA efficiency between COVID-19+ and COVID-19- patients. RESULTS: COVID-19+ patients were younger (59.4 years vs 62.9 years; t[894] = -2.05, p = .04) with a higher mean BMI (32 vs 28; t[894] = 3.51, p < .01) than COVID-19- patients. COVID-19+ patients had equivalent or superior improvements in FA-SC and FA-Mob, functional change efficiency, and LOS relative to COVID-19- patients. When medically complex patients were compared, those with COVID-19 had greater FA-SC and FA-Mob efficiencies than COVID-19- patients. COVID-19+ patients had similar rates of return to the community. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 who meet the admission criteria for inpatient rehabilitation can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation similarly to their non-COVID-19 counterparts with similar rehabilitation-specific diagnoses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inpatients , Activities of Daily Living , Humans , Length of Stay , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation Centers , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(8): 733-736, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232243

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The cause of neuralgic amyotrophy is often unknown but is commonly associated with a recent upper respiratory viral tract infection. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a tireless effort to understand the sequelae of the virus. A 46-yr-old woman who presented after a COVID-19 hospitalization complicated by hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation for 23 days was subsequently found to have lower limb sensorium changes as well as upper limb weakness. Left shoulder abduction and extension were both 3/5 in motor strength, and left hip flexion strength was 4/5 with diminished sensation to crude touch in the left lateral thigh. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography findings included a mild left median neuropathy at the wrist and motor unit recruitment pattern consistent with a chronic left upper trunk plexopathy with reinnervation. The case presented describes an extended neuralgic amyotrophy syndrome from an atraumatic mechanism in a previously diagnosed COVID-19 patient. An extended neuralgic amyotrophy syndrome has at least three immune mediated etiologies postulated (1) direct neuropathogenicity, (2) molecular mimicry, and (3) direct cytotoxic effects on peripheral nerves. As COVID-19 survivors continue to be seen in outpatient settings, practitioners should remain aware of diffuse neurological complications as sequelae of the virus persist.


Subject(s)
Brachial Plexus Neuritis/therapy , Brachial Plexus Neuritis/virology , COVID-19/complications , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Meloxicam/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Physical Therapy Modalities , Rehabilitation Centers , SARS-CoV-2
13.
PM R ; 13(6): 618-625, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192605

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A subset of patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) can develop severe illness, resulting in significant functional and cognitive deficits that require acute inpatient rehabilitation. Guidelines following discharge from acute inpatient rehabilitation have not yet been established. This study seeks to establish outcomes of rehabilitation patients with COVID-19 and characterize their need for long-term care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the functional outcomes and utilization of follow-up medical care for patients with COVID-19 90 days following discharge from acute inpatient rehabilitation, as compared to rehabilitation impairment and age-matched controls. DESIGN: Prospective, single-center cohort study. SETTING: Inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF). PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients recovering from COVID-19 and 64 age and impairment group category controls were identified to answer survey questions following discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. A total of 36 patients participated in the study (18 patients with COVID-19 and 18 controls). INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Functional outcomes at discharge (GG Self-Care and Mobility Activities items of the IRF-PAI Version 3.0), hospital readmissions, and follow-up care sought by patients. RESULTS: The COVID-19 patient group had similar improvements in functional outcomes as compared to controls. Patients with COVID-19 required fewer 0-90 day readmissions than their matched controls (22.2% vs 61.1%, P < .05), but there were no differences in 0-90 day urgent care/emergency department visits, clinic visits and use of outpatient therapies. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with functional deficits as a result of COVID-19 who require multiple therapy disciplines should be considered for acute inpatient rehabilitation as this study demonstrates their ability to participate in and benefit from IRF level care.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19 , Physical Functional Performance , Aged , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Female , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , Rehabilitation Centers
15.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 201(11): P25-P26, 2020 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-644475
16.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(3): 203-208, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127413

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic affects a large number of patients. The impact on feasibility and outcome of rehabilitation during COVID-19 actually remains unclear. Nosocomial infection of healthcare workers or hospitalized patients is common, and prevention of nosocomial infections during rehabilitation is challenging. Therefore, we analyzed a cohort of nosocomial infected COVID-19 patients in a single-center inpatient rehabilitation clinic and described performance and outcome. DESIGN: The cohort (N = 27) describes patients with nosocomial SARS-CoV-2 infection while participating in neuromusculoskeletal rehabilitation. Infection was caused by an initially unidentified so-called superspreader. We compared this cohort with all neuromusculoskeletal rehabilitation inpatients of 2019 (comparison group). Normally distributed continuous variables were presented as mean with standard deviation and the t test was used for comparison between groups. Linear regression was used to assess the impact of COVID-19 on Functional Independence Measure at discharge. RESULTS: COVID-19 patients were mostly male (66.7%) with an age of 71.5 ± 12.3 yrs. Age, sex, and cumulated comorbidities of the comparison group (n = 786) were not different from the COVID-19 group. A total of 92.6% of COVID-19 patients had a mild or moderate course, two patients had to be referred to acute hospital because of respiratory failure, and one of these patients died in the acute hospital. After implementation of a strict hygiene concept, no further nosocomial COVID-19 infections were detected. The rehabilitation duration was significantly longer in the COVID-19 group (54.2 ± 23.6 days vs. 32.1 ± 17.7 days, P < 0.001). Daily therapy duration was 132.3 ± 44 mins before SARS-CoV-2 infection and reduced to 81.9 ± 27.3 mins during COVID-19 (P < 0.001). After discontinuation of isolation measures, therapy duration increased significantly (99.3 ± 70.2 mins, P < 0.05).The baseline Functional Independence Measure score was higher in the COVID-19 group (91.93 ± 25.64 points vs. 82.98 ± 22.73 points) and Functional Independence Measure improvements were lower in COVID-19 patients than in the 2019 comparison group (6.96 ± 8.96 points vs. 20.3 ± 15.98 points, P < 0.001). COVID-19 infection itself had a strong negative impact on Functional Independence Measure change as identified by regression analysis. Linear regression analysis showed that COVID-19 reduced the Functional Independence Measure at discharge by 8.9 points (95% CI = -14.725 to -3.097, P = 0.003) after correction for Functional Independence Measure at admission, age, sex, and morbidity index at admission. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 had a strong negative impact on rehabilitation benefits as assessed by Functional Independence Measure. Neuromusculoskeletal rehabilitation could be continued, but all patients received less therapy minutes during isolation. After implementation of a strict COVID-19-specific hygiene concept, no further infections were detected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Cross Infection/rehabilitation , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Rehabilitation Centers , Risk Assessment
17.
Gerontology ; 67(4): 425-432, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124909

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is the cause of an ongoing pandemic. The highest mortality rate is observed among the older adult population. During the first wave of the pandemic (March-June 2020), following a national health decree demanding that no visitors or family members be allowed in health institutions, our geriatric rehabilitation center closed gates to all visitors from the outside. We aimed to assess the rehabilitation outcomes of older patients with hip fractures in the first pandemic wave, who underwent rehabilitation under complete social isolation from primary care givers and family members. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study. It took place at a university-affiliated, major postacute geriatric rehabilitation center. Rehabilitation outcomes measured were discharge functional independence measure (FIM) score and motor FIM score, FIM score change, motor FIM score change, favorable motor FIM effectiveness, length of stay, discharge destination, and home aid at discharge. RESULTS: The study group included 36 patients who were admitted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 1, 2020, to June 30, 2020). The control group comprises 106 individuals with hip fractures who were admitted in the respective time periods during the previous 2 years, that is, March 1, 2018, to June 30, 2018, and March 1, 2019, to June 30, 2019. The facility's occupancy rates were much lower during the first wave of the pandemic in comparison with previous years (78 and 99%, respectively). Patients showed similar demographics and comorbidities, but the social isolation group was more severely deconditioned upon admission. All rehabilitation outcomes were similar between groups. CONCLUSION: According to the findings of this retrospective study, social isolation from family and caregivers did not have a detrimental effect on the rehabilitation outcomes of these patients. More evidence must be gathered and presented on the matter.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hip Fractures/rehabilitation , Hospitalization , Rehabilitation Centers , Social Isolation , Treatment Outcome , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Semin Speech Lang ; 42(1): 64-72, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087529

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine-conveying medical information virtually for planning, diagnosis, or treatment-has been a part of the American medical system for over 100 years. A constantly evolving modality, telepractice was a supplemental care delivery system for most speech-language pathologists (SLPs) until March 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic forced clinical operations to halt in-person activities and convert as much as possible to virtual platforms. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the need for telepractice prior to and beyond the current pandemic, the efficacy of telepractice for the voice-specialized SLP, limitations of telepractice, and best practices for providing care over telepractice with a specific focus on voice disorder diagnosis and treatment.


Subject(s)
Practice, Psychological , Rehabilitation Centers , Telerehabilitation/methods , User-Computer Interface , Voice Disorders/rehabilitation , Child , Humans
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