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1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21039, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493204

ABSTRACT

This study investigated pre-COVID-19 admission dependency, discharge assistive equipment, discharge medical follow-up recommendation, and functional status at hospital discharge of non-critically ill COVID-19 survivors, stratified by those with (N = 155) and without (N = 162) in-hospital rehabilitation. "Mental Status", intensive-care-unit (ICU) Mobility, and modified Barthel Index scores were assessed at hospital discharge. Relative to the non-rehabilitation patients, rehabilitation patients were older, had more comorbidities, worse pre-admission dependency, were discharged with more assistive equipment and supplemental oxygen, spent more days in the hospital, and had more hospital-acquired acute kidney injury, acute respiratory failure, and more follow-up referrals (p < 0.05 for all). Cardiology, vascular medicine, urology, and endocrinology were amongst the top referrals. Functional scores of many non-critically ill COVID-19 survivors were abnormal at discharge (p < 0.05) and were associated with pre-admission dependency (p < 0.05). Some functional scores were negatively correlated with age, hypertension, coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease, psychiatric disease, anemia, and neurological disorders (p < 0.05). In-hospital rehabilitation providing restorative therapies and assisting discharge planning were challenging in COVID-19 circumstances. Knowledge of the functional status, discharge assistive equipment, and follow-up medical recommendations at discharge could enable appropriate and timely post-discharge care. Follow-up studies of COVID-19 survivors are warranted as many will likely have significant post-acute COVID-19 sequela.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Rehabilitation/methods , Aftercare , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Critical Care , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26813, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a fatal epidemic has swept across the world, especially in India where the epidemic situation is the most serious. For COVID-19 patients, pulmonary rehabilitation training plays a significant role. However, it is still a controversial issue regarding the efficacy of WeChat APP-based pulmonary rehabilitation training in improving lung function, quality of life and bad mood of COVID-19 patients. To clarify this issue, a meta-analysis was conducted in this present study, so as to provide a basis for rehabilitation guidance of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed, medRxiv, Web of Science, Scopus, Chinese Science Citation Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Wan-fang databases in May 2021 to identify randomized controlled trials and evaluate the effects of WeChat APP-based pulmonary rehabilitation training for COVID-19. Two researchers independently carried out data extraction. On the other hand, literature quality evaluation on the quality and meta-analysis of the included literature was performed with Revman5.3 software. RESULTS: The results of this meta-analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSION: This study will provide reliable evidence-based evidence on the effects of WeChat APP-based pulmonary rehabilitation training on lung function, bad mood, and quality of life in patients with COVID-19. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was not required for this study. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, presented at conferences, and shared on social media platforms. OSF REGISTRATION NUMBER: DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/MKXCH.


Subject(s)
Clinical Protocols , Rehabilitation/instrumentation , Social Media/instrumentation , Teaching/standards , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Mood Disorders/etiology , Mood Disorders/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/psychology , Systematic Reviews as Topic
4.
Respir Med ; 184: 106470, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230755

ABSTRACT

Patients recovering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may not return to a pre-COVID functional status and baseline levels of healthcare needs after discharge from acute care hospitals. Since the long-term outcomes of COVID-19 can be more severe in patients with underlying cardiorespiratory diseases, we aimed at verifying the impact of a preexisting cardiorespiratory comorbidity on multidisciplinary rehabilitation in post-COVID-19 patients. We enrolled 95 consecutive patients referring to the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit of Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri Spa SB, IRCCS of Telese Terme, Benevento, Italy after being discharged from the COVID-19 acute care ward and after recovering from acute COVID-19 pneumonia. Forty-nine of them were not suffering from underlying comorbidities, while 46 had a preexisting cardiorespiratory disease. Rehabilitation induced statistically significant improvements in respiratory function, blood gases and the ability to exercise both in patients without any preexisting comorbidities and in those with an underlying cardiorespiratory disease. Response to the rehabilitation cycle tended to be greater in those without preexisting comorbidities, but DLco%-predicted was the only parameter that showed a significant greater improvement when compared to the response in the group of patients with underlying cardiorespiratory comorbidity. This study suggests that multidisciplinary rehabilitation may be useful in post-COVID-19 patients regardless of the presence of preexisting cardiorespiratory comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Interdisciplinary Communication , Patient Care Team , Rehabilitation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Carbon Monoxide/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Forced Expiratory Volume , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Recovery of Function , Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome , Vital Capacity , Walk Test
6.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115107

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dealt a devastating blow to healthcare systems globally. Approximately 3.2% of patients infected with COVID-19 require invasive ventilation during the course of the illness. Within this population, 25% of patients are affected with neurological manifestations. Among those who are affected by severe neurological manifestations, some may have acute cerebrovascular complications (5%), impaired consciousness (15%) or exhibit skeletal muscle hypokinesis (20%). The cause of the severe cognitive impairment and hypokinesis is unknown at this time. Potential causes include COVID-19 viral encephalopathy, toxic metabolic encephalopathy, post-intensive care unit syndrome and cerebrovascular pathology. We present a case of a 60 year old patient who sustained a prolonged hospitalization with COVID-19, had a cerebrovascular event and developed a persistent unexplained encephalopathy along with a hypokinetic state. He was treated successfully with modafinil and carbidopa/levodopa showing clinical improvement within 3-7 days and ultimately was able to successfully discharge home.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Carbidopa/administration & dosage , Hypokinesia , Ischemic Stroke , Levodopa/administration & dosage , Modafinil/administration & dosage , Rehabilitation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Blood Coagulation , Brain Diseases/physiopathology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Critical Care/methods , Drug Combinations , Humans , Hypokinesia/diagnosis , Hypokinesia/etiology , Hypokinesia/therapy , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/physiopathology , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Ventilator Weaning/methods
7.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(6): e24141, 2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101918

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global neo-coronary pneumonia epidemic has increased the workload of healthcare institutions in various countries and directly affected the physical and psychological recovery of the vast majority of patients requiring hospitalization in China. We anticipate that post-total knee arthroplasty kinesiophobia may have an impact on patients' postoperative pain scores, knee function, and ability to care for themselves in daily life. The purpose of this study is to conduct a micro-video intervention via WeChat to verify the impact of this method on the rapid recovery of patients with kinesiophobia after total knee arthroplasty during neo-coronary pneumonia. METHODS: Using convenience sampling method, 78 patients with kinesiophobia after artificial total knee arthroplasty who met the exclusion criteria were selected and randomly grouped, with the control group receiving routine off-line instruction and the intervention group receiving micro-video intervention, and the changes in the relevant indexes of the two groups of patients at different time points on postoperative day 1, 3 and 7 were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: There were no statistical differences in the scores of kinesiophobia, pain, knee flexion mobility (ROM) and ability to take care of daily life between the two groups on the first postoperative day (P > .05). On postoperative day 3 and 7, there were statistical differences in Tampa Scale for kinesiophobia, pain, activities of daily living scale score and ROM between the two groups (P < .01), and the first time of getting out of bed between the two groups (P < .05), and by repeated-measures ANOVA, there were statistically significant time points, groups and interaction effects of the outcome indicators between the 2 groups (P < .01), indicating that the intervention group reconstructed the patients' postoperative kinesiophobiaand hyperactivity. The level of pain awareness facilitates the patient's acquisition of the correct functional exercises to make them change their misbehavior. CONCLUSIONS: WeChat micro-video can reduce the fear of movement score and pain score in patients with kinesiophobia after unilateral total knee arthroplasty, shorten the first time out of bed, and improve their joint mobility and daily living ability. ETHICS: This study has passed the ethical review of the hospital where it was conducted and has been filed, Ethics Approval Number: 20181203-01.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Knee Joint/physiopathology , Knee Joint/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Pneumonia/virology , Postoperative Period , Prospective Studies , Range of Motion, Articular , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
8.
Med Sci (Basel) ; 9(1)2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100138
9.
Age Ageing ; 49(5): 696-700, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087659

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the response to the pandemic are combining to produce a tidal wave of need for rehabilitation. Rehabilitation will be needed for survivors of COVID-19, many of whom are older, with underlying health problems. In addition, rehabilitation will be needed for those who have become deconditioned as a result of movement restrictions, social isolation, and inability to access healthcare for pre-existing or new non-COVID-19 illnesses. Delivering rehabilitation in the same way as before the pandemic will not be practical, nor will this approach meet the likely scale of need for rehabilitation. This commentary reviews the likely rehabilitation needs of older people both with and without COVID-19 and discusses how strategies to deliver effective rehabilitation at scale can be designed and implemented in a world living with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Aging , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Rehabilitation , Aged , Aging/physiology , Aging/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/rehabilitation , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Forecasting , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Physical Functional Performance , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/organization & administration , Rehabilitation/trends , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(5): 652-657, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065714

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: More than 80% of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases are mild or moderate. In this study, a risk model was developed for predicting rehabilitation duration (the time from hospital admission to discharge) of the mild-moderate COVID-19 cases and was used to conduct refined risk management for different risk populations. METHODS: A total of 90 consecutive patients with mild-moderate COVID-19 were enrolled. Large-scale datasets were extracted from clinical practices. Through the multivariable linear regression analysis, the model was based on significant risk factors and was developed for predicting the rehabilitation duration of mild-moderate cases of COVID-19. To assess the local epidemic situation, risk management was conducted by weighing the risk of populations at different risk. RESULTS: Ten risk factors from 44 high-dimensional clinical datasets were significantly correlated to rehabilitation duration (P < 0.05). Among these factors, 5 risk predictors were incorporated into a risk model. Individual rehabilitation durations were effectively calculated. Weighing the local epidemic situation, threshold probability was classified for low risk, intermediate risk, and high risk. Using this classification, risk management was based on a treatment flowchart tailored for clinical decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed novel model is a useful tool for individualized risk management of mild-moderate COVID-19 cases, and it may readily facilitate dynamic clinical decision-making for different risk populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Rehabilitation/methods , Risk Management/methods , Time Factors , Adult , China , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors
11.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis ; 67: 2-10, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062545

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is one of the biggest health crises that the world has seen. Whilst measures to abate transmission and infection are ongoing, there continues to be growing numbers of patients requiring chronic support, which is already putting a strain on health care systems around the world and which may do so for years to come. A legacy of COVID-19 will be a long-term requirement to support patients with dedicated rehabilitation and support services. With many clinical settings characterized by a lack of funding and resources, the need to provide these additional services could overwhelm clinical capacity. This position statement from the Healthy Living for Pandemic Event Protection (HL-PIVOT) Network provides a collaborative blueprint focused on leading research and developing clinical guidelines, bringing together professionals with expertise in clinical services and the exercise sciences to develop the evidence base needed to improve outcomes for patients infected by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Cardiorespiratory Fitness , Exercise , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Exercise Tolerance , Health Policy , Humans , Organizational Policy , Rehabilitation/methods , Respiratory Tract Diseases/rehabilitation , Telemedicine
12.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(5): 1307-1315, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012244

ABSTRACT

We studied the outcomes of peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients enrolled in a structured in-home walking program right before the lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic emergency, to determine whether this intervention ensured the maintenance of mobility even in the case of movement restrictions.We selectively studied 83 patients (age 72 ± 11, males n = 65) enrolled in the program within 9-month before the lockdown. The usual intervention was based on two daily 8-min sessions of slow intermittent in-home walking prescribed in circa-monthly hospital visits. During the lockdown, the program was updated by phone. Six-minute (6MWD) and pain-free walking distance (PFWD) were measured pre- and post-lockdown as well as body weight (BW), blood pressure (BP), and ankle-brachial index (ABI). Sixty-six patients were measured 117 ± 23 days after their previous visit. A safe, pain-free execution of the prescribed sessions was reported (median distance: 74 km). Overall, the 6MWD was stable, while PFWD improved (p < 0.001). The improvement was not related to age/gender, comorbidities, type of home but to the time of enrollment before lockdown. The new-entry subjects (≤ 3 months; n = 35) obtained significant improvements post-lockdown for 6MWD and PFWD, while those previously enrolled (> 3 months; n = 31) were stable. Decreased BW with stable BP and ABI values were also recorded, with better outcomes for new-entry subjects. In PAD patients, a structured walking program performed inside home and purposely guided by phone was adhered to by patients and favored mobility and risk factor control during the COVID-19 pandemic, regardless of walking ability, type of home and external conditions.


Subject(s)
Exercise Therapy/methods , Home Care Services/standards , Peripheral Arterial Disease/therapy , Walking/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Chi-Square Distribution , Exercise Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Home Care Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , Statistics, Nonparametric , Surveys and Questionnaires , Walking/statistics & numerical data
13.
Acta Med Indones ; 52(3): 299-305, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-833749

ABSTRACT

AbstrakCOVID-19 telah menjadi pandemik di Indonesia sejak ditemukannya kasus pertama pada tanggal 2 Maret 2020 di Depok. Peningkatan kasus perhari semakin tinggi sejak akhir Agustus 2020 yang mencapai lebih dari 2000 kasus per hari. Sistem kesehatan di Indonesia perlu ditingkatkan dalam hal kapasitas, termasuk rehabilitasi medik yang harus dilibatkan dari fase akut hingga jangka panjang dalam penanganan pasien COVID-19. Rehabilitasi medik juga diperlukan untuk pasien lain yang bukan COVID-19. Pentingnya keterlibatan, pelayanan rehabilitasi medik dan implementasinya dimasa pandemic COVID-19 memerlukan strategi tersendiri yang harus dilakukan baik oleh pekerja kesehatannya, rumah sakit dan kebijakan pemerintah. Hal ini diperlukan untuk percepatan peningkatan kesehatan pasien, percepatan pemulangan dan menghindari readmisi pasien, dan juga pengoptimalan program kembali bekerja untuk pasien yang sembuh dari COVID-19.AbstractCOVID-19 has become a pandemic in Indonesia since the first cases have been positively diagnosed on 2 March 2020 in Depok. The cases have been increased gradually since the end of August 2020 that has reached 1000 cases per day. The health system in Indonesia needs to be improved in terms of capacity, including rehabilitation medicine that should be involved in all health phases (from acute to long-term) in managing patients with COVID-19. Rehabilitation is also still needed for other non-COVID-19 patients. The importance of involvement and implementation of rehabilitation services during the COVID-19 pandemic will need special strategies that should be done by rehabilitation professionals, hospitals, and government. These are necessary to accelerate the improvement of patients' health, discharge, and avoid re-admission, as well as optimize return-to-work for patients who are recovered from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Rehabilitation/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Hand Ther ; 33(2): 269-270, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-829757
16.
J Formos Med Assoc ; 120(1 Pt 1): 83-92, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716805

ABSTRACT

The COronaVIrus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), which developed into a pandemic in 2020, has become a major healthcare challenge for governments and healthcare workers worldwide. Despite several medical treatment protocols having been established, a comprehensive rehabilitation program that can promote functional recovery is still frequently ignored. An online consensus meeting of an expert panel comprising members of the Taiwan Academy of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation was held to provide recommendations for rehabilitation protocols in each of the five COVID-19 stages, namely (1) outpatients with mild disease and no risk factors, (2) outpatients with mild disease and epidemiological risk factors, (3) hospitalized patients with moderate to severe disease, (4) ventilator-supported patients with clear cognitive function, and (5) ventilator-supported patients with impaired cognitive function. Apart from medications and life support care, a proper rehabilitation protocol that facilitates recovery from COVID-19 needs to be established and emphasized in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols/standards , Infection Control , Rehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Consensus , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/standards , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Taiwan
18.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 101(11): 2027-2032, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709325

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the feasibility and acceptability of telemedicine as a substitute for outpatient services in emergency situations such as the sudden surge of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. DESIGN: Observational cohort study with historical control. SETTING: Tertiary referral outpatient institute. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive services provided to patients with spinal disorders (N=1207). INTERVENTIONS: Telemedicine services included teleconsultations and telephysiotherapy, and lasted as long as usual interventions. They were delivered using free teleconference apps, caregivers were actively involved, and interviews and counseling were performed as usual. Teleconsultations included standard, but adapted, measurements and evaluations by video and from photographs and videos sent in advance according to specific tutorials. During telephysiotherapy, new sets of exercises were defined and recorded as usual. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We compared the number of services provided in 3 phases, including corresponding periods in 2018 and 2019. During the control (30 working d) and COVID-19 surge (13d) only usual consultations and physiotherapy were provided; during the telemed phase (15d), only teleconsultations and telephysiotherapy were provided. If a reliable medical decision was not possible during teleconsultations, usual face-to-face interventions were prescribed. Continuous quality improvement questionnaires were also evaluated. RESULTS: During telemed, 325 teleconsulations and 882 telephysiotherapy sessions were provided in 15 days. We found a rapid decrease (-39%) of outpatient services from the control to the COVID-19 phase (R2=0.85), which partially recovered in the telemed phase for telephysiotherapy (from -37% to -21%; P<.05) and stabilized for teleconsultation (from -55% to -60%) interventions. Usual face-to-face interventions were required for 0.5% of patients. Patients' satisfaction with telemedicine was very high (2.8 out of 3). CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine is feasible and allows medical professionals to continue providing outpatient services with a high level of patient satisfaction. During the current pandemic, this experience can provide a viable alternative for many outpatient services while reducing the need for travel and face-to-face contact to a minimum.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/psychology , COVID-19 , Outpatients/psychology , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Rehabilitation/psychology , Spinal Diseases/rehabilitation , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Ambulatory Care/methods , Cohort Studies , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation , Rehabilitation/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Diseases/psychology
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