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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869630

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to reveal whether religiosity and trust in institutions are longitudinal predictors of change in fear of COVID-19 (FCV-19) across Poland, Germany, Slovenia, and Israel among young adults over a three-month period. The representative sample consisted of 1723 participants between the ages of 20 and 40 years (M = 30.74, SD = 5.74) across Poland (n = 446), Germany (n = 418), Slovenia (n = 431), and Israel (n = 428). The first measurement was carried out in February 2020 and the second was conducted in May/June 2020. A repeated-measures, two-way, mixed-factor ANOVA was performed to examine changes over time (T) and across countries (C) as well as the interaction of time and country (TxC) for FCV-19, religiosity, and trust in institutions. The results showed a significant decrease over time and differences between countries in all variables, as well as in TxC for FCV-19 and trust in institutions. Linear generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to assess the longitudinal change between T1 and T2 in FCV-19, including religiosity and trust in institutions as predictors, country as a factor, and gender and age as confounders. Female gender, religiosity, and trust in institutions were found to be significant longitudinal predictors of change in FCV-19. Country was a significant moderator of the relationship between trust in institutions and FCV-19, with the highest result achieved in Poland. Religiosity and trust in institutions were positive predictors of change in fear of COVID-19 among young adults across countries. Religious and governmental institutions should take this into consideration when communicating with believers and citizens during challenging situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fear , Female , Humans , Prospective Studies , Religion , Trust , Young Adult
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869579

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has dominated health, economic, and geopolitical issues for many months, but it also has great influence on individuals and families. The aim of this study was to verify whether the pandemic of COVID-19 changed religious practices and how religiosity moderated the influence of the pandemic on family interactions and attitudes towards health issues in adolescents. METHODS: The study groups included 561 adolescent high school students (314 females and 247 males) from two kinds of high schools: public and Catholic. RESULTS: Most Catholic school students have not changed their religious practices during the pandemic or just changed the form of attendance to TV or internet (59.7%). Moreover, 8.6% of them stopped the practices, in comparison with 12.9% of public school students, most of whom had not attended a mass before and during the pandemic. The results showed that in adolescents' opinions the pandemic caused family relations to be stronger, however this effect was modified by religiosity. CONCLUSION: Attending Catholic school and being a practicing believer influenced some aspects of faith and family relations during the pandemic, but in most aspects, they did not influence attitudes toward health issues. The results of the study highlight the need to secure, especially for non-believing adolescents, family support during the pandemic, while in believers faith may provide such support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Catholicism , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Religion , Students
3.
J Relig Health ; 61(3): 1767-1771, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844430

ABSTRACT

Four key themes are explored in this third issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022: (1) the lead topic for this issue considers the work and spiritual care provided by nurses, which is followed by a series of articles on the subject areas of (2) diabetes and (3) hemodialysis. Then, like previous issues, we again consider (4) research exploring the effects of COVID-19. Finally, this issue presents a miscellaneous collection of articles with respect to various faith dynamics and the findings from several national surveys.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Religion , Renal Dialysis , Spirituality
4.
J Relig Health ; 61(3): 2302-2318, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844428

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and continues to have, a significant effect on individuals worldwide, and it is clear that minority communities including the Sikh community have been particularly affected by the virus. The current study assessed the impact of the pandemic in a sample of 44 British Sikhs across 11 virtual focus groups. Three main themes emerged including making meaningful connections, struggling to adjust and the organisation of gurdware (Sikh places of worship) in coping with the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings highlight that faith may promote collective action for collective healing especially during mass trauma, with specific insight into what this may entail for the Sikh community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Minority Groups , Pandemics , Religion , United Kingdom/epidemiology
5.
J Relig Health ; 61(3): 2198-2211, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844427

ABSTRACT

We examined the effects of religiosity on COVID-19 vaccination rates using a cross-national comparison while controlling for socio-economic factors and culture. Our analysis, conducted on data from 90 countries representing 86% of the world population, showed that Christianity was negatively related to vaccination, while there was no relation with Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and nonbelief. The importance of religion, freedom of expression and belief, sex ratio, median age, and almost all cultural factors were not related to vaccination, whereas Human Development Index was. The influence of different religions on vaccination rates has also been described.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Christianity , Hinduism , Humans , Islam , Religion , Vaccination
6.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 60(7): e157-e158, 2022 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833717
7.
Health Promot Int ; 37(1)2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806409

ABSTRACT

Social distancing is crucial in breaking the cycle of transmission of COVID-19. However, many religions require the faithful to congregate. In Malaysia, the number of COVID-19 cases spiked up from below 30 in February 2020 to more than a thousand a month later. The sudden increase was mostly linked to a large Islamic gathering attended by 16,000 near the capital, Kuala Lumpur. Another large COVID-19 cluster was from a church gathering in Kuching, Sarawak. Within a few weeks, Malaysia became the worst hit country by COVID-19 in Southeast Asia. While religious leaders have advised social distancing among their congregants, the belief that "God is our shield" is often cited for gathering. There is a need to promote sound decision-making among religious adherents so that they will not prioritize their loyalty to the subjective interpretation of religion over evidence-based medicine. Malaysia, a multi-cultural and multi-faith country, is an example of how religious beliefs could strongly influence health behaviours at individual and community levels. In this article, we detail the religious aspects of COVID-19 prevention and control in Malaysia and discuss the possible role of religious organizations in encouraging sound decision-making among religious adherents in mitigating this crisis. We make recommendations on how to promote a partnership between the healthcare system and religious organizations, and how religion and faith could be integrated into health promotion channels and resources in the response of COVID-19 and future communicable diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Promotion , Humans , Islam , Pandemics , Religion , SARS-CoV-2
8.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265836, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775448

ABSTRACT

Praying for others in the wake of a disasters is a common interpersonal and public response to tragedy in the United States. But these gestures are controversial. In a survey experiment, we elicit how people value receiving a prayer from a Christian stranger in support of a recent hardship and examine factors that affect the value of the prayer. We find that people who positively value receiving the prayer do so primarily because they believe it provides emotional support and will be answered by God. Many also value the prayer because they believe it will improve their health and wealth, although empirical support of such effects is lacking. People who negatively value receiving the prayer do so primarily because they believe praying is a waste of time. The negative value is particularly large if people are offended by religion. Finally, the hardship experienced by the prayer recipient matters to the intensity by which recipients like or dislike the gesture, suggesting the benefit of prayers varies not only across people, but also across contexts.


Subject(s)
Motivation , Religion , Christianity , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
9.
J Relig Health ; 61(2): 1719-1733, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767559

ABSTRACT

Uncertainty, fear, and distress have become prevalent in the lives of U.S. residents since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The unpredictable reality of social distancing, shutdowns, and isolation have affected daily routines and influenced well-being and health. Drawing on consumer culture theory, we conducted an exploratory study to examine the mediating role of consumer spirituality in the subjective well-being of religious Christians during COVID-19 and to discover links between well-being and health outcomes. Participants from the United States (n = 104) were recruited via a Qualtrics' online panel. Findings show that religiosity among Christians enhanced subjective well-being, demonstrating the positive effect of religious beliefs, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, spiritual consumption mediated this relationship, suggesting the importance of possessions to religious expression and subjective well-being. Implications for messaging about health and well-being are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Religion , Spirituality , United States/epidemiology
10.
J Christ Nurs ; 39(2): 128, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730737

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Religion , SARS-CoV-2
11.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264722, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714784

ABSTRACT

Understanding vaccine hesitancy is becoming increasingly important, especially after the global outbreak of COVID-19. The main goal of this study was to explore the differences in vaccination conspiracy beliefs between people with a university degree coming from different scientific fields-Social Sciences & Humanities (SH) and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). The study was conducted on an online convenience sample of respondents with college and university degrees in Croatia (N = 577). The results revealed that respondents educated in SH proved to be more prone to vaccination conspiracy beliefs. The indirect effect through science literacy was confirmed, while this was not the case for the indirect effects through health beliefs (natural immunity beliefs) and trust in the healthcare system. However, all three variables were important direct predictors of vaccination conspiracy beliefs. Female gender and religiosity were positively correlated with vaccination conspiracy beliefs, while age was not a statistically significant predictor. The authors concluded by emphasizing the necessity of the more theoretically elaborated approaches to the study of the educational and other socio-demographic differences in vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Motivation , Religion , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Croatia/epidemiology , Female , Humanities , Humans , Male , Social Sciences
12.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264502, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714782

ABSTRACT

We investigated the relationships between political beliefs regarding two aspects of the right-left distinction (cultural and economic) and the acceptance of the pandemic restrictions using variable-centred and person-centred approaches. The community sample consisted of 305 participants. Four groups of the restrictions were considered. Religious fundamentalism predicted positively the acceptance of the restrictions associated with the limitations of labour rights and those limiting civil rights without a direct impact on safety. Anti-welfare negatively predicted the acceptance of the restrictions regarding social distancing and those limiting civil rights and increasing safety. These associations were discussed in relation to basic needs and values which motivate persons who endorse right-wing or left-wing political views. The latent profile analysis revealed three profiles of political beliefs, which were termed "Conservative Statists," "Liberal Laissez-fairists," and "Conservative Laissez-fairists." The profiles differed in terms of acceptance of the pandemic restrictions, and the patterns of these relationships were different for particular groups of restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Rights , Pandemics/prevention & control , Politics , Religion , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Poland/epidemiology
13.
J Relig Health ; 61(2): 1641-1656, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712283

ABSTRACT

This article considers the relationships between population religiosity and the coronavirus pandemic situation across different countries. Country-level analyses were based on data from the World Values Survey, Worldometer, and International Monetary Fund covering information about internal (beliefs) and external (practices) religiosity, religious fundamentalism, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the economic situation at two time points in 47 countries. Results showed that declared attendance at religious services is related to more COVID-19 infections and deaths, as well as when controlling for gross domestic product per capita and the number of coronavirus tests per 1 million population. This effect remained in the longitudinal perspective (of six months) and extended from external religiosity only, to both internal and external religiosity indices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Religion
14.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 1-5, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649885

ABSTRACT

Three topics are explored in this first issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022, namely: (1) mental health and religion, (2) clinical practice issues and the relevance of religion/spirituality, and finally (3) the continuing and expanding public health crisis of COVID-19 and the associated religious/spiritual impact and response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Religion , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality
16.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 348, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547772

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: since its appearance, the COVID-19 has exhausted global health systems. It was predictable that countries with weak health systems will be severly wiped out by the pandemic. Countries across Europe faced severe human loses and it was foreseable that Africa will experience an even worse tragedy. Suprisingly, since the evolution of the pandemic, there has been remarkable resistance from African countries, including Cameroon. METHOD: the study was phenomenographic. The data were collected successively from media observations (in particular the WHO site, national TV (CRTV) programs 'Parlons COVID'), social networks - Facebook and Whatsapp) and direct observations of some quarters of Garoua (Roumdé-Adjia, Foulbéré, Kakataré) and Mora for the Far North and the southern zone of Yaoundé (Ngoa-Ekelé, Nkolondom, Mokolo). These observations were associated with individual interview, reviews and note-taking around places of public circulation (places of worship, markets and discussion sites (Faada). The theory of functionalism was mobilized in this study. RESULTS: the results show that Cameroonians perceive the pandemic as an eminently metasocial phenomenon which explains their tendency to use prayers, nature to counter this attack. CONCLUSION: the study suggests that a multidimensional approach is capable of offering avenues of « liberation ¼. Also, the study once again raises the place of traditional medecine in health systems and shows the close link that exists between traditional medicine and spirituality.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Anthropology, Cultural , Cameroon/epidemiology , Humans , Poverty , Religion , Sociological Factors , Urban Health
17.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(49)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526139

ABSTRACT

Containing the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States requires mobilizing a large majority of the mass public to vaccinate, but many Americans are hesitant or opposed to vaccination. A significant predictor of vaccine attitudes in the United States is religiosity, with more-religious individuals expressing more distrust in science and being less likely to get vaccinated. Here, we test whether explicit cues of common religious identity can help medical experts build trust and increase vaccination intentions. In a preregistered survey experiment conducted with a sample of unvaccinated American Christians (n = 1,765), we presented participants with a vaccine endorsement from a prominent medical expert (NIH Director Francis Collins) and a short essay about doctors' and scientists' endorsement of the vaccines. In the common religious identity condition, these materials also highlighted the religious identity of Collins and many medical experts. Unvaccinated Christians in the common identity condition expressed higher trust in medical experts, greater intentions to vaccinate, and greater intentions to promote vaccination to friends and family than those who did not see the common identity cue. These effects were moderated by religiosity, with the strongest effects observed among the most religious participants, and statistically mediated by heightened perceptions of shared values with the medical expert endorsing the vaccine. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of common identity cues for promoting vaccination in a vaccine-hesitant subpopulation. More generally, the results illustrate how trust in science can be built through the invocation of common group identities, even identities often assumed to be in tension with science.


Subject(s)
Cues , Health Personnel , Intention , Religion , Trust , Vaccination , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , United States
19.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 75(1): e20201011, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515494

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to understand how religiosity can influence the health of individuals diagnosed with mental disorders, based on comprehensive care. METHODS: this is an integrative literature review, with the inclusion of articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish, between 2010 and 2018. RESULTS: the critical analysis and qualitative synthesis of the 24 selected studies were categorized into two subtopics: The influence of religiosity in promoting comprehensive mental health care; Mental health versus religiosity: influencing conditions for effective access to comprehensive care. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: a positive influence of religiosity was identified in the lives of individuals diagnosed with mental disorders; however, evidence shows that health teams do not feel comfortable and prepared to work with religiosity as an expression of spirituality. This being one of the dimensional aspects of health, it can be inferred, on the results, the existence of this gap in the comprehensive care approach.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Spiritual Therapies , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health , Religion , Spirituality
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 63, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513184

ABSTRACT

The objectives of this study were to explore the content of web-based communication on COVID-19 by religious authorities (RAs) in Uganda and to assess the level of integration of the Uganda Ministry of Health (MoH) and World Health Organisation (WHO) COVID-19 risk communication guidelines into the statements released by these RAs. A grey literature review was conducted by searching the websites of intra- and inter-religious bodies for the terms "COVID-19" and "coronavirus". Thematic analysis was used to assess the content of RA statements which were also mapped to the items of the MoH and WHO statements. Results indicate that RA communications were centred on COVID-19 description and management; the need to adhere to established guidelines; and the adoption of health-protective behaviours, notably, social distancing and avoidance of misinformation. RAs also discussed the effects of COVID-19 and its control measures on the population and spoke against pandemic-aggravated injustices (gender-based violence and embezzlement). The RA messages incorporated the WHO statement to a greater extent than the MoH statement. In conclusion, RAs played a critical role in delivering public health messages in Uganda during the COVID-19 pandemic, a position we believe should be maximized by public health authorities for effective communication during emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Public Health , Guideline Adherence , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Internet , Religion , Uganda
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