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3.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 33(8): 647-656, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the course of the corona pandemic, digital media has increasingly been used in many areas of medical practice to reduce personal contact. As it is of interest whether this can be practiced in the context of anesthesia consultations without loss of quality, we interviewed parents whose children received a cardiac or neuro magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under sedation. Parents either received an on-site or a remote consultation conducted by an anesthesiologist. Both parents and anesthesiologist were asked to indicate their satisfaction with the respective consultation procedure in a questionnaire. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate if remote pre-anesthesia consultation, supported by an online video, for parents whose children are receiving MRI examinations under sedation can replace the commonly performed on-site consultation, without decreasing its quality. METHODS: In this randomized trial, a total of 200 patients were included, one half received pre-anesthesia consultation on-site and the other half was given a link to a video and pre-anesthesia consultation was conducted by phone. As a primary analysis, we compared the level of satisfaction for the general procedure, the quality of the pre-anesthesia consultation and the contact to the anesthesiologists (or parents). We further investigated the frequency of complications and the preference for a possible next informed consent. RESULTS: Both groups showed high levels of satisfaction. Some anesthesiologists and parents were less satisfied with the quality of on-site pre-anesthesia consultation than with the remote. In our patient cohort, there was no evidence for higher risk of complications when information was provided by telephone. Further, parents as well as anesthesiologists clearly favored the combined form of telephone information and online video. Overall, 61.2% of parents and 64% of anesthesiologists would choose this form of pre-anesthesia consultation for repeat anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS: We did not observe that combined telephone and video decreased the quality of pre-anesthesia consultation. A remote version seems feasible for simple procedures such as sedation for MRI. Further research on this topic in other areas of anesthesia would be beneficial.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthetics , Remote Consultation , Humans , Child , Remote Consultation/methods , Internet , Magnetic Resonance Imaging
4.
Pan Afr Med J ; 44: 89, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291170

ABSTRACT

Introduction: health care benefits have undergone major changes during the COVID-19 pandemic. This has led to an explosive growth in teleconsultation services mainly for cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the perception and experience of Moroccan oncologists with the use of teleconsultation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: a 17-question anonymous cross-sectional survey was conducted on Google forms and emailed to all Moroccan oncologists. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical software Jamovi (version 2.2). Results: out of a total of 500 oncologists who received the questionnaire, 126 responded, with a response rate of 25%. During the pandemic, only 59.5% of oncologists used teleconsultation, with no significant differences among the three groups (radiation oncologists, medical oncologists and cancer surgeons (p=0.294)). Most participants were satisfied with being able to explain medical diagnosis, provide assessment results, and provide treatment recommendations during teleconsultation. Finally, 47.2% of participants were willing to continue conducting teleconsultations after the COVID-19 pandemic, with no significant differences among the three groups. Conclusion: oncology physicians were satisfied with their experiences with teleconsultation and agreed that it is likely to be part of their long-term practice. Future studies are needed to assess patient satisfaction with teleconsultation and to improve patient care through this virtual technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Remote Consultation , Humans , Remote Consultation/methods , Pandemics , Morocco , Cross-Sectional Studies , Neoplasms/therapy , Personal Satisfaction
5.
Sex Med Rev ; 11(3): 231-239, 2023 06 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine gained wide acceptance during the COVID-19 pandemic, as it was deemed critical for patient care when lockdowns were implemented worldwide. While there is evidence to suggest that urology patients were receptive to telemedicine, no systematic review has been done to date on andrology patients and their perception of telemedicine. METHODS: Three electronic databases, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science, were searched from their inception until June 2022 for relevant articles. Two independent teams reviewed abstracts and extracted data from the selected manuscripts. A meta-analysis was completed in line with PRISMA 2020 and AMSTAR Guidelines. For our study, we limited telemedicine to communication through videoconferencing or telephone encounters between patients and medical professionals. Positive response to telemedicine was defined as patients "wishing for telemedicine consultation", "preferring telemedicine over in person", "accepting the current telemedicine arrangement", "having needs addressed with teleconsultation", or "willingness to do a teleconsultation". RESULTS: Of the 1128 retrieved abstracts, 56 underwent full-text review and 12 were included in the final analysis, comprising a total cohort of >4021 cases. Video visits were evaluated in 5 studies, telephone encounters were analyzed in 2 studies, and both methods were examined in 1 randomized control study. Three studies showed that andrology and sexual medicine are compatible with telemedicine, with few 30- and 90-day in-person revisit rates. Telemedicine was shown to save an average cost of US$149-$252 per patient, and 8 studies that directly assessed andrology patient perceptions of telemedicine showed that most patients had a "positive perception."Pooled analyses of the positive responses to telemedicine were 68.7% (95% CI, 49.4%-83.1%, P = 0.057), and those of patients who recommended telemedicine were 65.1% (95% CI, 18.4%-93.9%, P = 0.577). While the percentage of patients recommending telemedicine was high among studies using videoconferencing, the percentage dropped in studies using telephone visits only. The difference between recommending video and telephone practices was statistically significant, with 84.6% pooled proportion for recommending video practice compared to 38.9% pooled proportion for recommending telephone practice, P = 0.035. In the telephone-only encounters, up to 27.1% of patients preferred in-person visits, as security and privacy of any mode of telecommunication were of concern. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients have a positive perception of telemedicine, particularly with videoconferencing and less so with telephone visits. These results suggest that telemedicine will likely continue to play a pivotal role in andrology and sexual medicine practices.


Subject(s)
Andrology , COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Telemedicine/methods , Remote Consultation/methods
6.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 48(8): 101736, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297762

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease (COVID) -19 pandemic has led to a rapid transformation in the ways in which outpatient care is delivered. The need to minimise the risk of viral infection and transmission through social distancing resulted in the widespread adoption of remote consultations, traditional face-to-face appointments ceasing almost overnight in many specialties. The transition to remote consultations had taken place far faster than anticipated and under crisis conditions. As we work towards the "new normal", remote consultations have become an integral part of outpatient provision in secondary care. Adapting to this change in clinical practice requires a judicious approach to ongoing service development to ensure safe, effective, and equitable care for all patients. Medical societies have provided some initial guidance around effective delivery. In this article we discuss the potential benefits, limitations, types of remote consultations, and factors that require consideration when deciding on patient suitability for remote consultation in a hospital setting. We use cardiology as a specialty exemplar, although many of the principles will be equally applicable to other medical specialties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Humans , Remote Consultation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care , Pandemics , Hospitals
7.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 48(7): 785-789, 2023 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271546

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic catapulted dermatology services into a digital era, with the rapid introduction of teleconsultations. The UK National Health Service operational planning guidance recommends ≥ 25% of consultations are delivered remotely. There is a lack of data regarding the acceptability and effectiveness of paediatric dermatology teleconsultations. We surveyed UK healthcare professionals (HCPs) to explore their experiences of teleconsultations in paediatric dermatology, with a focus on follow-up consultations for paediatric eczema (PE), to inform a future clinical trial. There were 119 responses. Pre-pandemic, 37% provided some form of teleconsultation service, rising to 92% post-pandemic. In total, 41% (n = 49) now carry out > 25% of consultations remotely. We found 55% felt teleconsultations were less effective than face-to-face ones for PE follow-up. Eighty HCPs offered teleconsultations for PE. Among the HPCs who offered teleconsultations for PE, the most effective format for follow-up consultations was felt to be telephone with photographs (52/80, 65%). Our results demonstrate varying opinion on the effectiveness and optimal format of paediatric teleconsultations, supporting the need for further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Eczema , Remote Consultation , Humans , Child , Remote Consultation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , State Medicine , Eczema/diagnosis , Eczema/therapy , United Kingdom
8.
Dig Dis ; 41(4): 600-603, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colonoscopy is a commonly performed procedure, but most patients will not actually be found with colorectal cancer. Subsequent face-to-face consultations to explain post-colonoscopy findings are common despite the time and cost-saving benefits of teleconsultation, especially in a post-COVID-19 era. This exploratory retrospective study examined the proportion of post-colonoscopy follow-up consultations that could have been converted to teleconsultation within a tertiary hospital in Singapore. METHODS: A retrospective cohort of all patients who underwent colonoscopy in the institution from July to September 2019 was identified. All follow-up face-to-face consultations related to the index colonoscopy from the scope date to 6 months post-colonoscopy were traced. Clinical data relevant to the index colonoscopy and these consultations were extracted from electronic medical records. RESULTS: The cohort consisted of 859 patients (68.5% male, age range: 18-96 years). Of these, 15 (1.7%) had colorectal cancer, but the majority (n = 643, 74.9%) were scheduled for at least one post-colonoscopy visit - a total of 884 face-to-face clinical visits. The final sample was 682 (77.1%) face-to-face post-colonoscopy visits that did not involve any procedures performed or indicated the need for any subsequent follow-up. CONCLUSION: If such "unnecessary" post-colonoscopy consultations exist within our institution, then similar situations possibly occur elsewhere. As COVID-19 continues to periodically tax healthcare systems worldwide, preservation of resources will remain integral alongside quality standards of routine patient care. There is a need for detailed analyses and modeling to hypothesize potential savings by also considering the start-up and maintenance costs of switching to a teleconsultation-dominated system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Remote Consultation , Humans , Male , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Retrospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Remote Consultation/methods , Colonoscopy
9.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 33(7): 552-561, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266006

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted the development of anesthesia teleconsultation in many countries. In pediatric anesthesia, data about anesthesia teleconsultation are scarce. The main objective of this prospective descriptive study was to provide an evaluation of the feasibility of pediatric anesthesia teleconsultation. Perception of the safety and quality, parental and medical satisfaction were also assessed. METHODS: From September to December 2020, patients undergoing a pediatric anesthesia teleconsultation in Toulouse University Hospital, using the TeleO™ dedicated teleconsultation platform were prospectively included. Feasibility was defined as the rate of anesthesia teleconsultations successfully performed using the TeleO™ platform alone. Questionnaires regarding the quality, safety, and satisfaction were filled in by physicians and families. RESULTS: A total of 114 children (3 months-17 years) were included in the study. Feasibility was 82%, failure was mainly caused by technical issues. Physicians estimated that the safety and quality of anesthetic preparation were optimal in 100% of cases. Anesthetists were satisfied (VAS ≥70/100) with the medical, technical, and relational (child/parents) aspects of anesthesia teleconsultation in 91%, 64%, and 84%/90% of cases respectively. Almost all parents (97%) stated that they would agree to anesthesia teleconsultation for a future procedure. CONCLUSION: In this first assessment, pediatric anesthesia teleconsultation appears to be feasible, with high rates of medical and parental satisfaction. Physicians' perception of the safety and quality of this process were positive. Improving the technical process might be a key determinant to promote further development of pediatric anesthesia teleconsultation.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Remote Consultation/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Feasibility Studies , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , France
10.
Transplant Proc ; 54(5): 1324-1328, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931143

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to identify home care management strategies for patients undergoing liver transplant, through teleconsultation, during the COVID-19 pandemic for maintenance and improvements in treatment adherence. METHODS: This was a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive research study. Participants included patients who underwent liver transplant between 2020 and 2021. Through a semistructured script, data were analyzed according to the recommendations of content analysis and then simple statistics were applied. RESULTS: Twenty-two people participated in the study. Two analysis categories were developed, which resulted in 7 strategies and 22 care actions. The care strategy with the highest adherence involved actions related to the prevention of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Teleconsultation is an excellent tool to manage and supervise post-liver transplant care of patients. Considering that teleconsultation has presented strategies and care actions, which were developed by the patients, the patients have a direct effect on treatment adherence despite pandemic impositions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Liver Transplantation , Remote Consultation , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Remote Consultation/methods
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(7): e056408, 2022 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923238

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the use of telemedicine to maintain continuity of care for patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). This study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a nurse-led teleconsultation strategy for CVD management during the COVID-19 pandemic in India and evaluated the impact of nurse-led teleconsultations on patient treatment satisfaction. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We developed a two-stage teleconsultation strategy and tested the feasibility of implementing a nurse-led teleconsultation strategy to manage CVD in a northern state (Punjab) in India. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed the treatment protocol used for teleconsultations to manage CVD. Nurses were trained to provide teleconsultation, triaging of patients and referrals to the physicians. Patients with CVD who had an outpatient visit or hospitalisation between September 2019 and March 2020 at the Dayanand Medical College Hospital, Ludhiana, India, were contacted by phone and offered teleconsultations. Telemedicine strategy comprised: stage 1 nurse-led teleconsultations and stage 2 physician-led teleconsultations. Descriptive analysis was performed to report the proportion of patients triaged by the two-stage telemedicine strategy, and patient's clinical characteristics, and treatment satisfaction between the nurse-led versus physician-led teleconsultations. RESULTS: Overall, nurse-led stage 1 teleconsultations were provided to 12 042 patients with CVD. The mean (SD) age of the participants was 58.9 years (12.8), and men were 65.4%. A relatively small proportion of patients (6.3%) were referred for the stage-2 physician-led teleconsultations and of these only 8.4% required hospitalisations. During stage 1 nurse-led teleconsultations, patients were referred to the physicians due to uncontrolled diabetes (24.9%), uncontrolled hypertension (18.7%) and congestive heart failure (16.2%). The patient's treatment satisfaction was similar between the nurse-led versus physician-led teleconsultations (p=0.07). CONCLUSION: This study showed that a nurse-led telemedicine strategy is feasible to implement in a resource-constraint setting for triaging patients with CVD and reduces physician's burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse's Role , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/methods , Telemedicine/methods
12.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(2)2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865184

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology is an important subspecialty of telemedicine that continues to evolve with advances in telecommunication and mobile phone technology. A 19-week primary care quality improvement project collected baseline data and tested three change ideas, using the Model for Improvement method, with primary and secondary aims: to increase the weekly percentage of remote dermatological consultations with supporting images that were successfully concluded remotely to greater than 80% and to reduce the weekly percentage of dermatological face-to-face consultations to less than 50%. We hypothesised that by improving the quality of patient images and the confidence of reception staff in triaging skin complaints, there would be a decrease in the weekly number of face-to-face dermatological appointments, thereby decreasing the risk of COVID-19 transmission within the practice and community. Two change ideas focused on supporting patients to improve image quality by introducing '4 Key Instructions' and a patient information leaflet (PIL). The third focused on increasing reception staff confidence in triaging skin complaints by introducing a triage pathway guidance tool. A total of 253 dermatological consultations were analysed: 170 of these were telephone consultations with 308 supporting images. Process measures showed clear improvements in the quality of images provided by patients which likely contributed to an increase in completed remote consultation. Our primary outcome measure was achieved. Our secondary outcome measure suggested that in the absence of high-quality images, it might not be possible to reduce dermatological face-to-face consultations much below 50% in primary care. Process measures showed clear improvements in the quality of images provided by patients which likely contributed to the increase in remote consultation. The implications of these findings for the theory of change are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , Remote Consultation , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality Improvement , Remote Consultation/methods
13.
Infect Dis Now ; 52(4): 230-232, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821256

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Teleconsultation is an emerging tool whose utilization dramatically increased during the Covid-19 pandemic. Our aim was to determine its clinical accuracy. METHODS: This prospective study was carried out during the first wave of Covid-19. Patients were teleconsulted by either general practitioners or emergency doctors reporting clinical exam results to the ID physicians by phone. Five signs were specifically checked: dyspnea, fever, cough, anosmia and flu-like illness. Data collected by remote consultation were compared to face-to-face examination in an ID Department. RESULTS: From March to April 2020, 149 patients were seen by remote medical care. Dyspnea was found in 14.1% of the teleconsultation patients vs 3.4% in face-to-face consultation; fever in 47.0 vs. 15.4%; cough in 69.1 vs. 16.1%; anosmia in 3.4 vs. 1.3%; flu-like illness in 53.0 vs. 7.4% (all differences significant: P<0.001). CONCLUSION: We observed incongruency between remote and face-to-face consultation for the main clinical signs of Covid-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Anosmia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cough , Dyspnea , Family Practice , Fever , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Remote Consultation/methods , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(10): 1470-1478, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766992

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The general practitioners' increasing comprehensive pediatric health care provision in Austria faces great challenges in ensuring high-quality health care in the future as the shortage of pediatricians continues to grow. Tele-expertise services provide an excellent opportunity to facilitate and strengthen interdisciplinary collaboration and access medical expertise of uncertainties in diagnosis and treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to investigate and evaluate the usability, applicability, and clinical advantages of an Austrian tele-expertise platform for doctors, emphasizing its value to strengthen collaborative efforts to extend and ensure quality care in infant, child, and adolescent health while focusing on diagnostic acceleration, verification, and potential modification of a treatment plan. Materials and Methods: A mixed-method approach included the retrospective evaluation of data provided via Intercom to elicit professional and geographical distribution and analysis of four hypotheses (H1: geographic distribution of initial enquires; H2: pediatric expertise level of the requester; H3: teleconsultations will result in changes in diagnosis and therapeutic decisions; and H4: teleconsultations stimulate cooperation and collaboration between physicians of all specialties). The study was based on survey questionnaires and qualitative semi-structured interviews. Discussion: Benefits were the most apparent in shorter diagnosis times, a potential quality increase in care, and cooperative stimulation. Intended therapy plans were found to be more sensitive to modification. Nevertheless, an overall positive attitude toward the teleconsultation chat became obvious. Moreover, the potential regarding quality improvements in pediatric primary care, shorter diagnosis time, and improved treatment options was found. Conclusions: Outcomes are urging Austrian health authorities to establish political and legal structures for appropriate monetary compensation and broad application of an expert consultation system. The article further highlights the importance of teleconsultations in critical situations, such as pandemic times.


Subject(s)
Decision Support Systems, Clinical , General Practitioners , Remote Consultation , Adolescent , Austria , Child , Humans , Primary Health Care , Remote Consultation/methods , Retrospective Studies
15.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e14, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691374

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and impact of having paediatric clinicians working in the Clinical Assessment Services (CAS) within NHS 111, a national telephone advice service. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Six NHS 111 providers across England with CAS where volunteer paediatric clinicians (doctors and advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs)) worked between May and December 2020. A data reporting framework was used to compare the outcomes of calls taken by paediatric vs non-paediatric clinicians. PATIENTS: Under 16-year-olds prompting calls to NHS 111 over the study period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The disposition (final outcome of calls) taken by paediatric versus non-paediatric clinicians, paediatric clinicians' and patient experience. RESULTS: 70 paediatric clinicians (66 doctors and 4 ANPs) worked flexible shifts in six NHS 111 providers' CAS over the study period: 2535 calls for under 16-year-olds were taken by paediatric clinicians and 137 008 by non-paediatric clinicians. Overall, disposition rates differed significantly between the calls taken by paediatric versus (vs) non-paediatric clinicians: 69% vs 43% were advised on self-care only, 13% vs 18% to attend emergency departments (EDs), 13% vs 29% to attend primary care, 1% vs 4% to receive an urgent ambulance call out and 4% vs 6% referred to another health service, respectively. When compared with recent (all age) national whole data sets, the feedback from calls taken by paediatricians noted a greater proportion of patients/carers reporting that their problem was fully resolved (92% vs 27%). CONCLUSIONS: Introducing paediatric specialists into NHS 111 CAS is likely to increase self-care dispositions, and reduce onward referrals to primary care, ED and ambulances. Future work will evaluate the impact of a national paediatric clinical assessment service to which specific case types are streamed.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Pediatrics/methods , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , Adolescent , Ambulances/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , England , Humans , Physicians , Pilot Projects , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , State Medicine , Surveys and Questionnaires , Triage/methods
16.
Clin Nutr ; 41(3): 661-672, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683011

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The Remote Malnutrition Application (R-MAPP) was developed during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide support for health care professionals (HCPs) working in the community to complete remote nutritional assessments, and provide practical guidance for nutritional care. The aim of this study was to modify the R-MAPP into a version suitable for children, Pediatric Remote Malnutrition Application (Pedi-R-MAPP), and provide a structured approach to completing a nutrition focused assessment as part of a technology enabled care service (TECS) consultation. METHODS: A ten-step process was completed: 1) permission to modify adult R-MAPP, 2) literature search to inform the Pedi-R-MAPP content, 3) Pedi-R-MAPP draft, 4) international survey of HCP practice using TECS, 5) nutrition experts invited to participate in a modified Delphi process, 6) first stakeholder meeting to agree purpose/draft of the tool, 7) round-one online survey, 8) statements with consensus removed from survey, 9) round-two online survey for statements with no consensus and 10) second stakeholder meeting with finalisation of the Pedi-R-MAPP nutrition awareness tool. RESULTS: The international survey completed by 463 HCPs, 55% paediatricians, 38% dietitians, 7% nurses/others. When HCPs were asked to look back over the last 12 months, dietitians (n = 110) reported that 5.7 ± 10.6 out of every 10 appointments were completed in person; compared to paediatricians (n = 182) who reported 7.5 ± 7.0 out of every 10 appointments to be in person (p < 0.0001), with the remainder completed as TECS consultations. Overall, 74 articles were identified and used to develop the Pedi-R-MAPP which included colour-coded advice using a traffic light system; green, amber, red and purple. Eighteen participants agreed to participate in the Delphi consensus and completed both rounds of the modified Delphi survey. Agreement was reached at the first meeting on the purpose and draft sections of the proposed tool. In round-one of the online survey, 86% (n = 89/104) of statements reached consensus, whereas in round-two 12.5% (n = 13/104) of statements reached no consensus. At the second expert meeting, contested statements were discussed until agreement was reached and the Pedi-R-MAPP could be finalised. CONCLUSION: The Pedi-R-MAPP nutrition awareness tool was developed using a modified Delphi consensus. This tool aims to support the technological transformation fast-tracked by the COVID-19 pandemic by providing a structured approach to completing a remote nutrition focused assessment, as well as identifying the frequency of follow up along with those children who may require in-person assessment.


Subject(s)
Child Health , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Nutrition Assessment , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Remote Consultation/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , Dietetics/instrumentation , Dietetics/methods , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Male , Nutritional Status , Pediatrics/instrumentation , Pediatrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Lancet ; 398(10314): 1868-1869, 2021 11 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616827
19.
Ann Intern Med ; 175(2): 179-190, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579932

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although most patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection can be safely managed at home, the need for hospitalization can arise suddenly. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether enrollment in an automated remote monitoring service for community-dwelling adults with COVID-19 at home ("COVID Watch") was associated with improved mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis. SETTING: Mid-Atlantic academic health system in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Outpatients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 between 23 March and 30 November 2020. INTERVENTION: The COVID Watch service consists of twice-daily, automated text message check-ins with an option to report worsening symptoms at any time. All escalations were managed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by dedicated telemedicine clinicians. MEASUREMENTS: Thirty- and 60-day outcomes of patients enrolled in COVID Watch were compared with those of patients who were eligible to enroll but received usual care. The primary outcome was death at 30 days. Secondary outcomes included emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. Treatment effects were estimated with propensity score-weighted risk adjustment models. RESULTS: A total of 3488 patients enrolled in COVID Watch and 4377 usual care control participants were compared with propensity score weighted models. At 30 days, COVID Watch patients had an odds ratio for death of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.12 to 0.72), with 1.8 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (CI, 0.5 to 3.1) (P = 0.005); at 60 days, the difference was 2.5 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (CI, 0.9 to 4.0) (P = 0.002). Patients in COVID Watch had more telemedicine encounters, ED visits, and hospitalizations and presented to the ED sooner (mean, 1.9 days sooner [CI, 0.9 to 2.9 days]; all P < 0.001). LIMITATION: Observational study with the potential for unobserved confounding. CONCLUSION: Enrollment of outpatients with COVID-19 in an automated remote monitoring service was associated with reduced mortality, potentially explained by more frequent telemedicine encounters and more frequent and earlier presentation to the ED. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Remote Consultation/methods , Text Messaging , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Comparative Effectiveness Research , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Home Care Services , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e22790, 2021 02 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574794

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is one of the leading causes of pregnancy-related death. Prenatal health care providers can offer critical screening and support to pregnant people who experience IPV. During the COVID-19 shelter-in-place order, mobile apps may offer such people the opportunity to continue receiving screening and support services. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine cases of IPV that were reported on a prenatal care app before and during the implementation of COVID-19 shelter-in-place mandates. METHODS: The number of patients who underwent voluntary IPV screening and the incidence rate of IPV were determined by using a prenatal care app that was disseminated to patients from a single, large health care system. We compared the IPV screening frequencies and IPV incidence rates of patients who started using the app before the COVID-19 shelter-in-place order, to those of patients who started using the app during the shelter-in-place order. RESULTS: We found 552 patients who started using the app within 60 days prior to the enforcement of the shelter-in-place order, and 407 patients who used the app at the start of shelter-in-place enforcement until the order was lifted. The incidence rates of voluntary IPV screening for new app users during the two time periods were similar (before sheltering in place: 252/552, 46%; during sheltering in place: 163/407, 40%). The overall use of the IPV screening tool increased during the shelter-in-place order. A slight, nonsignificant increase in the incidence of physical, sexual, and psychological violence during the shelter-in-place order was found across all app users (P=.56). Notably, none of the patients who screened positively for IPV had mentions of IPV in their medical charts. CONCLUSIONS: App-based screening for IPV is feasible during times when in-person access to health care providers is limited. Our results suggest that the incidence of IPV slightly increased during the shelter-in-place order. App-based screening may also address the needs of those who are unwilling or unable to share their IPV experiences with their health care provider.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emergency Shelter/methods , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Quality Improvement/standards , Remote Consultation/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pilot Projects , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
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