Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 156
Filter
1.
World J Gastroenterol ; 29(19): 3013-3026, 2023 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233965

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prolonged symptoms after corona virus disease 2019 (Long-COVID) in dialysis-dependent patients and kidney transplant (KT) recipients are important as a possible risk factor for organ dysfunctions, especially gastrointestinal (GI) problems, during immunosuppressive therapy. AIM: To identify the characteristics of GI manifestations of Long-COVID in patients with dialysis-dependent or KT status. METHODS: This observational, prospective study included patients with COVID-19 infection, confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, with the onset of symptoms between 1 January 2022 and 31 July 2022 which was explored at 3 mo after the onset, either through the out-patient follow-up or by telephone interviews. RESULTS: The 645 eligible participants consisted of 588 cases with hemodialysis (HD), 38 patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD), and 19 KT recipients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 infection during the observation. Of these, 577 (89.5%) cases agreed to the interviews, while 64 (10.9%) patients with HD and 4 (10.5%) cases of PD were excluded. The mean age was 52 ± 11 years with 52% women. The median dialysis duration was 7 ± 3 and 5 ± 1 years for HD and PD groups, respectively, and the median time post-transplantation was 6 ± 2 years. Long-COVID was identified in 293/524 (56%) and 21/34 (62%) in HD and PD, respectively, and 7/19 (37%) KT recipients. Fatigue was the most prevalent (96%) of the non-GI tract symptoms, whereas anorexia (90.9%), loss of taste (64.4%), and abdominal pain (62.5%) were the first three common GI manifestations of Long-COVID. Notably, there were 6 cases of mesenteric panniculitis from 19 patients with GI symptoms in the KT group. CONCLUSION: Different from patients with non-chronic kidney disease, there was a high prevalence of GI manifestations of Long-COVID in dialysis-dependent patients and KT recipients. An appropriate long-term follow-up in these vulnerable populations after COVID-19 infection is possibly necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Kidney Transplantation , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Male , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Prospective Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Cohort Studies , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology
2.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 59(5)2023 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232309

ABSTRACT

Hyperphosphatemia is a secondary disorder of chronic kidney disease that causes vascular calcifications and bone-mineral disorders. As per the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, renal damage requires first-priority medical attention for patients with COVID-19; according to a Johns Hopkins Medicine report, SARS-CoV-2 can cause renal damage. Therefore, addressing the research inputs required to manage hyperphosphatemia is currently in great demand. This review highlights research inputs, such as defects in the diagnosis of hyperphosphatemia, flaws in understanding the mechanisms associated with understudied tertiary toxicities, less cited adverse effects of phosphate binders that question their use in the market, socioeconomic challenges of renal treatment and public awareness regarding the management of a phosphate-controlled diet, novel biological approaches (synbiotics) to prevent hyperphosphatemia as safer strategies with potential additional health benefits, and future functional food formulations to enhance the quality of life. We have not only introduced our contributions to emphasise the hidden aspects and research gaps in comprehending hyperphosphatemia but also suggested new research areas to strengthen approaches to prevent hyperphosphatemia in the near future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperphosphatemia , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Humans , Hyperphosphatemia/complications , Hyperphosphatemia/therapy , Quality of Life , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy , Phosphates/therapeutic use
3.
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens ; 31(2): 185-190, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320393

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has upended maintenance dialysis in the United States. I review changes in prevalence, incidence, mortality, and other clinical outcomes among patients undergoing dialysis since March 2020, highlighting vulnerabilities in the current system and opportunities for improved care in the future. RECENT FINDINGS: The number of dialysis patients in the United States declined between March 2020 and March 2021, an unprecedented year-over-year drop in the census. Some of the decline can be attributed to an early drop in patients initiating dialysis but most of the decline can be attributed to excess mortality. Kidney transplants also declined during the early part of the pandemic. Home dialysis utilization increased during 2020 but that increase was largely in line with secular trends. The rate of hospitalization for causes other than COVID-19 fell significantly during 2020. SUMMARY: The epidemiology of dialysis in the United States is clearly modifiable, as it reflects decisions to initiate treatment, prescribe home therapies, and hospitalize patients with acute medical needs. On the other hand, some outcomes are powerfully guided by health outcomes in the general population, thus limiting the ability of dialysis providers and nephrologists to influence outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemodialysis, Home , Humans , Pandemics , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
4.
Front Immunol ; 13: 1006076, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313815

ABSTRACT

Background: The global burden of persistent COVID-19 in hemodialysis (HD) patients is a worrisome scenario worth of investigation for the critical care of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed an exploratory post-hoc study from the trial U1111-1237-8231 with two specific aims: i) to investigate the prevalence of COVID-19 infection and long COVID symptoms from our Cohort of 178 Brazilians HD patients. ii) to identify whether baseline characteristics should predict long COVID in this sample. Methods: 247 community-dwelling older (>60 years) patients (Men and women) undergoing HD (glomerular filtration rate < 15 mL/min/1.73m2) with arteriovenous fistula volunteered for this study. All patients presented hypertension and diabetes. Patients were divided in two groups: without long-COVID and with long-COVID. Body composition, handgrip strength, functional performance, iron metabolism, phosphate, and inflammatory profile were assessed. Patients were screened for 11-months after COVID-19 infection. Results were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results: We found that more than 85% of the COVID-19 infected patients presented a severe condition during the infection. In our sample, the mortality rate over 11-month follow was relatively low (8.4%) when compared to worldwide (approximately 36%). Long COVID was highly prevalent in COVID-19 survivors representing more than 80% of all cases. Phosphate and IL-10 were higher in the long COVID group, but only phosphate higher than 5.35 mg/dL appears to present an increased prevalence of long COVID, dyspnea, and fatigue. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of COVID-19 infection and long COVID in HD patients from the Brazilian trial 'U1111-1237-8231'. HD clinics should be aware with phosphate range in HD patients as a possible target for adverse post-COVID events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hand Strength , Humans , Interleukin-10 , Iron , Male , Phosphates , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Renal Dialysis/methods , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome
5.
Transplantation ; 107(5): 1136-1138, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305609

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immunocompromised patients have been at an increased risk of succumbing to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) since the beginning of the pandemic. METHODS: Here, we analyzed mortality and case fatality data from dialysis and kidney transplant patients, and compared each with an age-matched subgroup of the general population. RESULTS: We found that both patients on dialysis and kidney transplant patients remain at increased risk of succumbing to COVID-19 despite all available countermeasures. CONCLUSIONS: The analyses underline the need for additional protection for this vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Immunocompromised Host , Transplant Recipients
6.
BMC Nephrol ; 24(1): 84, 2023 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284978

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), a kind of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody associated vasculitis (AAV), predominantly affects small-sized vessels. MPA is a significant cause of the pulmonary-renal syndrome. Pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis is the typical renal histological feature of AAV. Tubulointerstitial lesions may occur and mostly form with inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. However, a few cases reported only tubulointerstitial involvement without glomerular lesions in patients with MPA. CASE PRESENTATION: We present an MPA case, a 70-year-old male patient diagnosed with acute kidney injury accompanying the dialysis requirement. Only acute tubulointerstitial nephritis was revealed in kidney biopsy without evidence of glomerular injury. Also, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis was determined on computerized tomography, and myeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody was positive. Consequently, we have considered the main diagnosis as MPA. We did not prefer a standard tubulointerstitial nephritis treatment regimen due to the presence of life-threatening systemic vasculitis. Treatment was established like crescentic glomerulonephritis. Induction therapy consisted of pulse steroid, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. Unfortunately, severe SARS-CoV-2 infection caused death during induction therapy in this case. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of glomerular injury and solely interstitial inflammation is atypical regarding AAV involvement in the kidney. This diversity might be initially considered as only a simple histological elaboration. However, it is a significant entity for guiding the treatment of AAV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glomerulonephritis , Microscopic Polyangiitis , Nephritis, Interstitial , Male , Humans , Aged , Microscopic Polyangiitis/complications , Microscopic Polyangiitis/diagnosis , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Kidney/pathology , Glomerulonephritis/complications , Glomerulonephritis/diagnosis , Nephritis, Interstitial/complications , Nephritis, Interstitial/diagnosis , Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(6)2023 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284509

ABSTRACT

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) incidence is growing worldwide, with a significant percentage of CKD patients reaching end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and requiring kidney replacement therapies (KRT). Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a convenient KRT presenting benefices as home therapy. In PD patients, the peritoneum is chronically exposed to PD fluids containing supraphysiologic concentrations of glucose or other osmotic agents, leading to the activation of cellular and molecular processes of damage, including inflammation and fibrosis. Importantly, peritonitis episodes enhance peritoneum inflammation status and accelerate peritoneal injury. Here, we review the role of immune cells in the damage of the peritoneal membrane (PM) by repeated exposure to PD fluids during KRT as well as by bacterial or viral infections. We also discuss the anti-inflammatory properties of current clinical treatments of CKD patients in KRT and their potential effect on preserving PM integrity. Finally, given the current importance of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease, we also analyze here the implications of this disease in CKD and KRT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Peritonitis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Humans , Peritoneum , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Dialysis Solutions/adverse effects , Peritonitis/chemically induced , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Inflammation/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Immunity
8.
Clin Nephrol ; 99(2): 51-57, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273261

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis and COVID-19 infection have an increased risk of in-hospital mortality, but whether these patients have a higher long-term mortality risk is unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective chart review of 958 patients admitted with COVID-19 infection or those with ESRD admitted for any other reason between February 2020 and August 2020. We collected data on demographics, comorbidities, laboratory tests, and mortality. The primary outcome was all-cause 1-year mortality. The secondary outcome was in-hospital mortality. We used primarily logistic regression models to assess the mortality risk. RESULTS: In total, 651 patients without ESRD with COVID-19 (COVID+ESRD-), 259 with ESRD without COVID-19 (ESRD+COVID-), and 48 with ESRD with COVID-19 (COVID+ESRD+) were hospitalized between February 2020 and August 2020. Patients were followed after discharge until September 2021. The all-cause 1-year mortality rates were 24% in patients with COVID+ESRD-, 22% in ESRD+COVID- patients, and 40% in those with COVID+ESRD+ (p < 0.05). Compared to the COVID+ESRD- group, the unadjusted and adjusted odds ratio (OR) for all-cause 1-year mortality in the COVID+ESRD+ group was 2.13 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.16 - 3.91) and 2.15 (95% CI,1.12 - 4.14), respectively. The unadjusted and adjusted OR for all-cause in-hospital mortality in the COVID+ESRD+ group was 1.79 (95% CI, 0.92 - 3.49); and 1.79 (95% CI, 0.88 - 3.65), respectively. We found no statistically significant difference between the COVID+ESRD- and ESRD+COVID- groups for both in-hospital and 1-year mortality (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID+ESRD+ have significantly higher odds for all-cause 1-year mortality compared to COVID+ESRD- patients. Future studies should investigate the mechanisms of long-term mortality risk in ESRD patients with COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Humans , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Hospital Mortality
9.
J Nephrol ; 36(5): 1321-1328, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272068

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage kidney disease on dialysis. Efficacy of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination to prevent severe COVID-19 disease in end-stage kidney disease patients remains limited. We compared the incidence of COVID-19-related hospitalization and death in dialysis patients based on SARS-CoV-2 vaccine status. METHODS: Retrospective study of adults on chronic dialysis within Mayo Clinic Dialysis System in the Midwest (USA) between April 1st, 2020 and October 31st, 2022, who had a laboratory test positive for SARS-CoV-2 by PCR. Incidence of both COVID-19-related hospitalization and death were compared between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 infection was identified in 309 patients, including 183 vaccinated and 126 unvaccinated. The incidence of death (11.1% vs 3.8%, p = 0.02) and hospitalization (55.6% vs 23.5%, p < 0.001) was significantly higher in unvaccinated compared to vaccinated patients. Age at infection, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, dialysis modality, and hospital stays did not differ between the two groups. The incidence of hospitalization was significantly higher in partially vaccinated (63.6% vs 20.9%, p = 0.004) and unboosted (32% vs 16.4%, p = 0.04) patients compared to fully vaccinated and boosted, respectively. Among the 21 patients who died in the whole cohort, 47.6% (n = 10) died during the pre-vaccine period. The composite risk of death or hospitalization was lower among vaccinated patients after adjusting for age, sex and Charlson comorbidity index (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.15-0.40). CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the use of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination to improve COVID-19 outcomes in patients on chronic dialysis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Kidney Failure, Chronic/diagnosis , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
10.
Int Urol Nephrol ; 55(8): 2091-2098, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255731

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Dialysis patients have a different response than the non-dialysis population to infection with COVID-19. This study evaluates the prevalence of infection and lethality in patients receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis in Panama, compared to non-dialysis adult population, and reports of adverse events of vaccination. METHODS: This is a prospective, multi-center cohort study of spatients aged 18 years or older and receiving in-center hemodialysis or ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in 13 centers in Panama from March 2021 to 2022. For comparison with general population, the study used an extended period of two years. RESULTS: A total of 1531 patients receiving dialysis treatment accepted to participate. PD patients represented an 18% of study patients. Lethality was higher in peritoneal dialysis patients with COVID-19 infection than in hemodialysis in the study group (p 0.02). Total deaths in dialysis patients for 2020 were 156 patients, before vaccination; 79 in 2021; and 25 for the first trimester of 2022. Lethality for the period of 2020-2022 was 9.3% for dialysis patients and 0.2% for non-dialysis population. There was no difference in symptoms in first dose, but with second dose, hemodialysis patients reported fewer symptoms than peritoneal dialysis patients (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Ninety one percent of people in the country received BNT162b2 Pfizer BionTech vaccine. Lethality decreased from 30 to 5% once vaccination was available. There were no severe adverse effects and symptoms reported were less frequent than in general population, probably due to low reactogenicity in dialysis patients, or better tolerance to pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Peritoneal Dialysis , Adult , Humans , BNT162 Vaccine , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/etiology , Panama/epidemiology , Peritoneal Dialysis/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Vaccination , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects
11.
Nephrology (Carlton) ; 28(4): 240-248, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251876

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maintenance haemodialysis (HD) patients are at higher risk for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Because of a limited number of facilities that can provide inpatient treatment for COVID-19 and HD, it is important to identify HD patients who are at high risk for severe COVID-19. For mild to moderate COVID-19 patients, chemokine CC-motif ligand 17 (CCL17) was reported to be a predictive marker for severe COVID-19; however, the validity of CCL17 among HD patients is unknown. METHODS: This retrospective observational study enrolled 107 HD patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 at hospitalization (mean age 70.1 ± 15.1 years; 71.0% male). Receiver operating characteristic and logistic regression analyses were used to examine the predictive validity of indices for severe COVID-19. RESULTS: During hospitalization, 32 patients developed severe COVID-19. Serum CCL17 collected at admission exhibited a higher area under the curve value (0.818) compared with that of other indicators including lactate dehydrogenase and C-reactive protein for the prediction of severe COVID-19. The optimal cut-off value for CCL17 was 150.5 pg/mL. A multi-variate logistic analysis revealed that CCL17 (above 150.5 pg/mL) was significantly associated with severe COVID-19 (Odds ratio, 0.063; 95% Confidence interval [CI], 0.017-0.227; p < .001) even after adjustment for covariates. The addition of the CCL17 to a model consisting of vaccination status, albumin, blood urea nitrogen, C-reacting protein and lactate dehydrogenase significantly improved classification performance for severe COVID-19 using the net reclassification (1.16, 95% CI: 0.82-1.50, p < .001) and integrated discrimination (0.18, 95% CI: 0.09-0.26, p < .001) improvement. CONCLUSION: CCL17 levels in HD patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 predict risk of developing severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Chemokines , Cholecalciferol , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Lactate Dehydrogenases , Ligands , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Nephrol ; 36(5): 1329-1340, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2247839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health authorities have struggled to increase vaccination uptake since the COVID-19 vaccines became available. However, there have been increasing concerns about declining immunity after the initial COVID-19 vaccination with the emergence of new variants. Booster doses were implemented as a complementary policy to increase protection against COVID-19. Egyptian hemodialysis (HD) patients have shown a high rate of hesitancy to COVID-19 primary vaccination, yet their willingness to receive booster doses is unknown. This study aimed to assess COVID-19 vaccine booster hesitancy and its associated factors in Egyptian HD patients. METHODS: A face-to-face interview was conducted with closed-ended questionnaires distributed to healthcare workers in seven Egyptian HD centers, mainly located in three Egyptian governorates, between the 7th of  March and the 7th of April 2022. RESULTS: Among 691 chronic HD patients, 49.3% (n = 341) were willing to take the booster dose. The main reason for booster hesitancy was the opinion that a booster dose is unnecessary (n = 83, 44.9%). Booster vaccine hesitancy was associated with female gender, younger age, being single, Alexandria and urban residency, the use of a tunneled dialysis catheter, not being fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Odds of booster hesitancy were higher among participants who did not receive full COVID-19 vaccination and among those who were not planning to take the influenza vaccine (10.8 and 4.2, respectively). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 booster-dose hesitancy among HD patients in Egypt represents a major concern, is associated with vaccine hesitancy with respect to other vaccines and emphasizes the need to develop effective strategies to increase vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Egypt , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects
13.
BMC Nephrol ; 24(1): 21, 2023 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2214548

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Kidney failure is rapidly rising in Palestine, as the number of patients receiving maintenance dialysis has quadrupled in the last 15 years. In this study, we share an overview of our experience growing a peritoneal dialysis (PD) program from zero to 178 patients in 5 years at An-Najah National University Hospital in Palestine, presenting some challenges and ways to overcome them. METHODS: This was a single-center retrospective study of patients treated with PD from November 2016 to December 2021. Demographic and clinical data were obtained for each patient. In addition, PD discontinuation, peritonitis, and mortality rates were calculated and presented as the primary patient outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were eligible for the study. The mean age was 51.8 ± 16.4 years, and 53.8% of patients were male. Diabetic nephropathy was the most common cause of kidney failure. 63 episodes of peritonitis were diagnosed in 48 patients (30.4%) for a rate of 1 episode/ 38.2 patient-months (0.31 episodes/ patient-years). 20 patients had their PD treatment discontinued, mainly due to psychosocial reasons and infectious and mechanical complications. Death was the fate of 27 patients, with cardiovascular disease and COVID-19 being the two main causes. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of this experience proved favorable and showed that PD could serve as a viable option for kidney failure patients in Palestine. Moreover, this study can serve as an example for other places where circumstances are challenging to take the initiative of starting their PD programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Peritoneal Dialysis , Peritonitis , Renal Insufficiency , Humans , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Female , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , Peritoneal Dialysis/adverse effects , Peritonitis/etiology , Renal Insufficiency/etiology
14.
Perit Dial Int ; 43(1): 23-36, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2194992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical course of COVID-19 in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients has so far only been analysed in relatively small, often single-centre case series. Therefore, we studied patient- and disease-related characteristics and outcomes of COVID-19 in a larger European cohort of PD patients. METHODS: We used data from the European Renal Association COVID-19 Database (ERACODA) on PD and haemodialysis (HD) patients with COVID-19 (presentation between February 2020 and April 2021). Hazard ratios (HR) for mortality at 3 months were calculated using Cox proportional-hazards regression. In addition, we examined functional and mental health status among survivors at this time point as determined by their treating physician. RESULTS: Of 216 PD patients with COVID-19, 80 (37%) were not hospitalised and 136 (63%) were hospitalised, of whom 19 (8.8%) were admitted to an intensive care unit. Mortality at 3 months for these subgroups was 18%, 40%, and 37%, respectively (p = 0.0031). Compared with HD patients, PD patients had higher mortality (crude HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.33-1.66), even when adjusted for patient characteristics and disease severity (adjusted HR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.39-1.75). Follow-up data on 67 of 146 patients who survived COVID-19 showed functional recovery to pre-COVID-19 levels in 52 (78%) and mental recovery in 58 patients (87%) at 3 months after the COVID-19 diagnosis. CONCLUSION: The mortality rate in the first 3 months after presentation with COVID-19 is high, especially among PD patients who were hospitalised. PD patients with COVID-19 had a higher mortality risk than HD patients. The majority of surviving patients recovered both functionally and mentally from COVID-19 within 3 months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Peritoneal Dialysis , Humans , Peritoneal Dialysis/adverse effects , Kidney Failure, Chronic/diagnosis , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Proportional Hazards Models
15.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 33(1): 16-30, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2201613

ABSTRACT

Much has now been learned about the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the general population, but data for hemodialysis (HD) patients are limited. This is the first study of COVID-19 disease in patients undergoing maintenance HD in Pakistan. We studied the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, and outcomes of a cohort of HD patients that contracted COVID-19 in our HD center from the first confirmed case on May 12, 2020, until September 9, 2020. Out of the total 423 patients being dialyzed in our center, 87 were suspected and 50 (11.8%) were confirmed for COVID-19. Male:Female ratio was nearly equal. The median age was 59.5 ± 9.99 years. Most patients developed mild disease. The most common symptoms were fever (82%). Ten (20%) had patchy bilateral opacity (ground-glass opacity) on the chest radiograph. Major complications were lymphocytopenia (36%), thrombocytopenia (30%), pneumonia (28%), and septic shock (6%). Eleven (22%) patients were hospitalized. Five required mechanical ventilation. Ten (20%) patients died. The relative risk of death with COVID-19 in HD patient was 1.46 with 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.84, (P = 0.003). The patients aged ≥60 years had 4.3 times more severe disease (P = 0.044) and died 3.3 times (P = 0.164) more than patients aged <60 years. HD patients have a high susceptibility to COVID-19 compared to the general population with an increased mortality rate and prolonged recovery time. Patients with age >60 years, female gender, diabetics, and those presented with more severe symptoms and laboratory parameters, had a higher fatal outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombocytopenia , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Pakistan/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies
16.
Semin Dial ; 36(1): 70-74, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152848

ABSTRACT

Peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis secondary to Ralstonia infection is very rare. Ralstonia pickettii is an organism that can grow in contaminated saline, water, chlorhexidine, and other medical products used in laboratories and the clinical setting. Infective endocarditis, prosthetic joint, and severe chest infections are previously reported with R. pickettii infection. We report a novel series of three cases diagnosed with PD-associated peritonitis caused by R. pickettii, where the cases appeared consecutively to our unit during a span of 4 weeks. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there were increased uses of non-sterile gloves by clinical staff as a form of personal protective equipment throughout patient interaction and PD exchange, as recommended by local hospital policy for all staff attending to patient care. A multidisciplinary team root cause analysis of our cases suggested non-sterile gloves being the likely source of environmental contamination, leading to PD-associated peritonitis caused by R. pickettii in this scenario.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections , Peritoneal Dialysis , Peritonitis , Ralstonia pickettii , Humans , Pandemics , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Peritoneal Dialysis/adverse effects , Peritonitis/diagnosis , Peritonitis/etiology
17.
Kidney360 ; 3(11): 1934-1938, 2022 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2164690

ABSTRACT

Dialysis facilities voluntarily reported severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections in vaccinated dialysis patients detected between January 1, 2021, and August 31, 2021, to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Among 4087 patients reported, most were symptomatic, a third required hospitalization, and 9% died within 30 days of diagnosis.Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 infections and outcomes among vaccinated people on dialysis provides valuable insight into this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , United States/epidemiology , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Patients , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S.
18.
Clin Nutr ; 41(12): 2683-2690, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2130449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients undergoing dialysis are less likely to develop immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Malnutrition is common in the dialysis population. However, whether malnutrition contributes to the impaired immunogenicity remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nutritional status and SARS-CoV-2 vaccine response in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. METHODS: A total of 206 hemodialysis patients (mean age, 67 ± 13 years) without prior SARS-CoV-2 infection were examined for the primary outcome of seroconversion, defined as the detection of IgG antibodies (≥50 AU/mL) to the receptor-binding domain of the S1 spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 one month after a priming dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, an adenovirus-vectored vaccine. Nutritional status was assessed by using the Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score, an objective indicator of nutrition incorporating serum albumin, total cholesterol, and total lymphocyte count, as well as the subjective global assessment (SGA). RESULTS: Overall, 16.5% of patients were classified as malnourished, and 64.1% of patients were at risk for malnutrition based on the CONUT score. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG were the highest in patients with normal nutrition. In multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, and use of immunosuppressants, patients with malnutrition remained less likely to develop an antibody response than those with normal nutrition (odds ratio 0.23, 95% CI, 0.07-0.76). SGA was a significant predictor of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroconversion in univariate but not multivariate analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Malnutrition according to CONUT score is associated with impaired humoral responses to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Our results highlight the importance of incorporating nutritional assessment into routine dialysis care to identify patients at risk for suboptimal immune responses after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Further research is needed to determine whether nutritional intervention can improve immune responses in these vulnerable patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Vaccines , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Immunoglobulin G
19.
Artif Organs ; 46(12): 2453-2459, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118471

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of respiratory infections, due to increased use of communal travel, waiting areas, close proximity to others when dialysing, and contact with healthcare personnel. We wished to determine the major factors associated with transmission of COVID-19 within dialysis centres. METHODS: We compared the differences in the number of COVID-19 infections in patients and staff in 5 dialysis centres during the 1st COVID-19 pandemic between March and June 2020, and analyzed differences between centres. Isolation policies and infection control practices were identical between centres. RESULTS: 224 (30.3%) patients tested positive for COVID-19, by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, ranging from 4.8% (centre 1 size 55 patients) to 41.5% (centre 5-248 patients) p = 0.007. Communal transport had a significant effect; with 160 of 452 (35.4%) patients using communal testing positive compared to 22.2% of those not using communal transport (X214.5, p < 0.001). Staff sickness varied; 35 of 36 (97.3% centre 5) dialysis staff contracting COVID-19, compared to 60% from centre 4 (189 patients 30 staff) (p < 0.001). Whereas centre 5 had no natural ventilation, and fan assisted ventilation did not meet standards for air changes and air circulation, centre 4 met ventilation standards. CONCLUSIONS: Although there are many potential risk factors accounting for the increased risk of COVID-19 infection in hemodialysis patients, we found that differences in communal transport for patients and ventilation between centres was a major contributor accounting for the differences in patients testing positive for COVID-19 and staff sickness rates. This has important practical applications for designing kidney dialysis centres.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Lung
20.
Kidney360 ; 3(8): 1317-1322, 2022 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2111635

ABSTRACT

Background: Persistent hyperkalemia (hyperK) and hyperphosphatemia (hyperP) despite renal replacement therapy (RRT) was anecdotally reported in COVID-19 and acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring RRT (CoV-AKI-RRT). However, observation bias could have accounted for the reports. Thus, we systematically examined the rate and severity of hyperK and hyperP in patients with CoV-AKI-RRT in comparison with the pre-COVID-19 era. Methods: We identified patients with CoV-AKI-RRT treated with sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED) for ≥2 days in March-April 2020. As pre-COVID-19 control, we included patients with AKI treated with SLED in December 2019. We examined the rates of hyperK (serum potassium [sK] ≥5.5 mEq/L), severe hyperK (sK ≥6.5 mEq/L), hyperP (serum phosphate [sP] ≥4.5 mg/dl), and moderate or severe hyperP (sP ≥7-10 and >10 mg/dl, respectively) as %SLED-days with an event. Results: Along the duration of SLED, the incidence of hyperK was greater in CoV-AKI-RRT (n=64; mean 19%±2% versus 14%±3% SLED-days, P=0.002) compared with control (n=60). The proportion of patients with one or more event of severe hyperK was greater in CoV-AKI (33% versus 7%, P<0.001). The incidence of hyperP was similar between groups (mean 56%±4% versus 53%±5% SLED-days, P=0.49). However, the proportion of patients with one or more event of moderate and severe hyperP was greater in CoV-AKI-RRT (86% versus 60%, P=0.001, and 50% versus 18%, P<0.001, respectively). Among those with CoV-AKI-RRT, sK and sP correlated with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; r=0.31, P=0.04, and r=0.31, P=0.04, respectively), whereas hyperP also correlated with shorter SLED runs (hours/run; r=-0.27, P=0.05). Conclusions: Refractory hyperK and hyperP were more frequent in CoV-AKI-RRT compared with the pre-COVID-19 era. Because of the correlation of sK and sP with higher LDH and sP with shorter SLED runs, intracellular ion release from cell injury due to cytokine storm and RRT interruptions may account for the findings.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Hyperkalemia , Hyperphosphatemia , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Hyperkalemia/epidemiology , Hyperphosphatemia/etiology , Lactate Dehydrogenases , Phosphates , Potassium , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL