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2.
Physiol Rep ; 10(22): e15512, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115675

ABSTRACT

Previous studies suggested that ongoing treatment with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor drugs may alter the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection and promote the development of more severe forms of the disease. The authors conducted a comparative, observational study to retrospectively analyze data collected from 394 patients admitted to ICU due to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. The primary aim of the study was to establish an association between the use of RAAS inhibitor drugs and mortality in the ICU. The secondary aims of the study were to establish an association between the use of RAAS inhibitor drugs and clinical severity at ICU admission, the need for tracheal intubation, total days of mechanical ventilation, and the ICU length of stay. The authors found no statistically significant difference in ICU mortality between patients on RAAS inhibitor drugs at admission and those who were not (31.3% versus 26.2% mortality, p-value 0.3). However, the group of patients taking RAAS inhibitor drugs appeared to be more critical at ICU admission, and this difference became statistically significant in the subgroup of non-hypertensive patients. ICU mortality in the subgroup of non-hypertensive patients treated with RAAS inhibitor drugs also tended to be higher. Overexpression of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in human cells, induced by RAAS inhibitor drugs, promotes viral entry-replication of SARS-CoV-2 and alters the basal balance of the RAAS, which may explain the findings observed in the present study. These phenomena may be amplified in non-hypertensive patients treated with RAAS inhibitor therapy.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , COVID-19 , Renin-Angiotensin System , Humans , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Prognosis , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Intensive Care Units , Hospitalization
3.
Ann Intern Med ; 173(6): JC35, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110753

ABSTRACT

SOURCE CITATION: Reynolds HR, Adhikari S, Pulgarin C, et al. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and risk of Covid-19. N Engl J Med. 2020;382:2441-8. 32356628.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Antihypertensive Agents , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Kidney Blood Press Res ; 47(9): 565-575, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064352

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as well as the transmembrane protease serine type 2 (TMPRSS2) have been found to play roles in cell entry for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 infection risk and severity of COVID-19 might be indicated by the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in the lung. METHODS: A high-salt diet rat model and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade were used to test whether these factors affect ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression in the lung. A normal (0.3% NaCl), a medium (2% NaCl), or a high (8% NaCl) salt diet was fed to rats for 12 weeks, along with enalapril or telmisartan, before examining the lung for histopathological alteration. Using immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR, the localization as well as mRNA expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were investigated. RESULTS: The findings provide evidence that both TMPRSS2 and ACE2 are highly expressed in bronchial epithelial cells as well as ACE2 was also expressed in alveolar type 2 cells. High-salt diet exposure in rats leads to elevated ACE2 expression on protein level. Treatment with RAAS blockers had no effect on lung tissue expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2. CONCLUSIONS: These findings offer biological support regarding the safety of these drugs that are often prescribed to COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular comorbidity. High salt intake, on the other hand, might adversely affect COVID-19 outcome. Our preclinical data should stimulate clinical studies addressing this point of concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Enalapril/pharmacology , Lung , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Rats , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Serine Endopeptidases , Sodium Chloride, Dietary/adverse effects , Telmisartan/pharmacology
7.
Crit Care Med ; 50(9): 1306-1317, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860941

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are associated with improved outcomes in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 according to sex and to report sex-related differences in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study comparing the effects of ARB or ACE inhibitors versus no ARBs or ACE inhibitors in males versus females. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 downregulates ACE-2, potentially increasing angiotensin II (a pro-inflammatory vasoconstrictor). Sex-based differences in RAS dysregulation may explain sex-based differences in responses to ARBs because the ACE2 gene is on the X chromosome. We recorded baseline characteristics, comorbidities, prehospital ARBs or ACE inhibitor treatment, use of organ support and mortality, and measured RAS components at admission and days 2, 4, 7, and 14 in a subgroup ( n = 46), recorded d -dimer ( n = 967), comparing males with females. SETTING: ARBs CORONA I is a multicenter Canadian observational cohort of patients hospitalized with acute COVID-19. This analysis includes patients admitted to 10 large urban hospitals across the four most populated provinces. PATIENTS: One-thousand six-hundred eighty-six patients with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed COVID-19 (February 2020 to March 2021) for acute COVID-19 illness were included. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Males on ARBs before admission had decreased use of ventilation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.52; p = 0.007) and vasopressors (aOR = 0.55; p = 0.011) compared with males not on ARBs or ACE inhibitors. No significant effects were observed in females for these outcomes. The test for interaction was significant for use of ventilation ( p = 0.006) and vasopressors ( p = 0.044) indicating significantly different responses to ARBs according to sex. Males had significantly higher plasma ACE-1 at baseline and angiotensin II at day 7 and 14 than females. CONCLUSIONS: ARBs use was associated with less ventilation and vasopressors in males but not females. Sex-based differences in RAS dysregulation may contribute to sex-based differences in outcomes and responses to ARBs in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Angiotensin II/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Canada , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Sex Characteristics
9.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 57, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702971

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly transmissible disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that poses a major threat to global public health. Although COVID-19 primarily affects the respiratory system, causing severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in severe cases, it can also result in multiple extrapulmonary complications. The pathogenesis of extrapulmonary damage in patients with COVID-19 is probably multifactorial, involving both the direct effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the indirect mechanisms associated with the host inflammatory response. Recognition of features and pathogenesis of extrapulmonary complications has clinical implications for identifying disease progression and designing therapeutic strategies. This review provides an overview of the extrapulmonary complications of COVID-19 from immunological and pathophysiologic perspectives and focuses on the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets for the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Lymphopenia/complications , Myocarditis/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/virology , Myocarditis/drug therapy , Myocarditis/immunology , Myocarditis/virology , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/immunology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
11.
Acta Biochim Biophys Sin (Shanghai) ; 54(1): 1-11, 2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674885

ABSTRACT

Since the first reported case in December of 2019, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has became an international public health emergency. So far, there are more than 228,206,384 confirmed cases including 4,687,066 deaths. Kidney with high expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is one of the extrapulmonary target organs affected in patients with COVID-19. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the independent risk factors for the death of COVID-19 patients. The imbalance between ACE2-Ang(1-7)-MasR and ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis in the kidney may contribute to COVID-19-associated AKI. Although series of research have shown the inconsistent effects of multiple common RAS inhibitors on ACE2 expression and enzyme activity, most of the retrospective cohort studies indicated the safety and protective effects of ACEI/ARB in COVID-19 patients. This review article highlights the current knowledge on the possible involvement of intrarenal RAS in COVID-19-associated AKI with a primary focus on the opposing effects of ACE2-Ang(1-7)-MasR and ACE-Ang II-AT1R signaling in the kidney. Human recombinant soluble ACE2 or ACE2 variants with preserved ACE2-enzymatic activity may be the best options to improve COVID-19-associated AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Kidney/physiology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Kidney/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
12.
Mol Biol Rep ; 49(3): 2321-2324, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664478

ABSTRACT

Numerous studies demonstrate parallels between CVD, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and COVID-19 pathology, which accentuate pre-existing complications in patients infected with COVID-19 and potentially exacerbate the infection course. Antidiabetic drugs such as sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors have garnered substantial attention recently due to their efficacy in reducing the severity of cardiorenal disease. The effect of SGLT-2 inhibitors in patients with COVID-19 remains unclear particularly since SGLT-2 inhibitors contribute to altering the RAAS cascade activity, which includes ACE-2, the major cell entry receptor for SARS-CoV2. A study, DARE-19, was carried out to unveil the effects of SGLT-2 inhibitor treatment on comorbid disease complications and concomitant COVID-19 outcomes and demonstrated no statistical significance. However, the need for further studies is essential to provide conclusive clinical findings.


Subject(s)
Benzhydryl Compounds/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Glucosides/therapeutic use , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Double-Blind Method , Drug Repositioning , Heart Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Kidney Diseases/prevention & control , Mitochondria/drug effects , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Receptors, Virus/physiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2/physiology , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/pharmacology
13.
Life Sci ; 293: 120324, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616648

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is the receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Viral cellular entry requires ACE2 and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin (Ang) receptor blockers (ARBs) influence ACE2 in animals, though evidence in human lungs is lacking. We investigated ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in type II pneumocytes, the key cells that maintain lung homeostasis, in lung parenchymal of ACEI/ARB-treated subjects compared to untreated control subjects. MAIN METHODS: Ang II and Ang-(1-7) levels and ACE2 and TMPRSS2 protein expression were measured by radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. KEY FINDINGS: We found that the ratio Ang-(1-7)/Ang II, a surrogate marker of ACE2 activity, as well as the amount of ACE2-expressing type II pneumocytes were not different between ACEI/ARB-treated and untreated subjects. ACE2 protein content correlated positively with smoking habit and age. The percentage of TMPRSS2-expressing type II pneumocytes was higher in males than females and in subjects under 60 years of age but it was not different between ACEI/ARB-treated and untreated subjects. However, there was a positive association of TMPRSS2 protein content with age and smoking in ACEI/ARB-treated subjects, with high TMPRSS2 protein levels most evident in ACEI/ARB-treated older adults and smokers. SIGNIFICANCE: ACEI/ARB treatment influences human lung TMPRSS2 but not ACE2 protein content and this effect is dependent on age and smoking habit. This finding may help explain the increased susceptibility to COVID-19 seen in smokers and older patients with treated cardiovascular-related pathologies.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/chemistry , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Angiotensin I/metabolism , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/analysis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Female , Humans , Lung/chemistry , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Retrospective Studies , Serine Endopeptidases/analysis , Smoking/metabolism , Smoking/pathology
14.
J Investig Med ; 70(3): 786-791, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605964

ABSTRACT

Hypertension is found frequently in patients with COVID-19 and is often treated with ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen of COVID-19, binds to the receptors of ACE2 to enter the alveolar cells, raising questions on whether these drugs are salutary or harmful with respect to any propensity for COVID-19 or to disease prognosis. We investigated the impact of ACEI/ARB and the clinical prognosis of patients with hypertension with COVID-19. In this study, 250 patients with hypertension (<45 years old) with COVID-19 were recruited. None of these patients had any chronic disease except for hypertension. The study population was grouped according to antihypertensive medication: ACEI/ARB user and non-ACEI/ARB user. Patients were followed for clinical prognosis and biochemical and radiological findings during their hospital stay. Adverse cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, all-cause death, stroke), transfer to the intensive care unit, severity of symptoms during the treatment course, length of hospital stay and effort capacity in the treadmill stress test were recorded. During hospital stay, there was no significant difference in terms of length of hospital stay, medication for COVID-19, left ventricular ejection fraction on echocardiography and metabolic equivalents in the treadmill stress test between patients treated with and without ACEI/ARB. During treatment of COVID-19, there was no significant difference in clinical adverse event, effort capacity and clinical course between patients with and without ACEI/ARB. It appears that patients with COVID-19 may continue to use ACEI/ARB or that ACEI/ARB may be added safely to their antihypertensive treatment.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Antihypertensive Agents , COVID-19 , Hypertension , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Middle Aged , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Function, Left
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24397, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585779

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important factor in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) interactions. Losartan (LOS) belongs to the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) family. Additionally, the protective role of ACE2 restored by LOS has been suggested and clinically examined in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, clinical trials with LOS have been conducted. However, the mechanism through which LOS enhances ACE2 expression remains unclear. In addition, the response of ACE2 to LOS differs among patients. Our LOS-treated patient data revealed a correlated mechanism of ACE2 with components of the renin-angiotensinogen system. We observed a significant positive regulation of MAS1 and ACE2 expression. In the context of LOS treatment of COVID-19, ACE2 expression could depend on LOS regulated MAS1. Thus, MAS1 expression could predict the COVID-19 treatment response of LOS.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Losartan/pharmacology , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Factual , Humans , Losartan/therapeutic use , /metabolism , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/genetics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Up-Regulation/drug effects
16.
J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst ; 2021: 6824259, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546597

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can occur due to contracting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). COVID-19 has no confined treatment and, consequently, has high hospitalization and mortality rates. Moreover, people who contract COVID-19 present systemic inflammatory spillover. It is now known that COVID-19 pathogenesis is linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). COVID-19 invades host cells via the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor-as such, an individual's susceptibility to COVID-19 increases alongside the upregulation of this receptor. COVID-19 has also been associated with interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, which leads to acute respiratory distress, cardiomyopathy, and shock. These outcomes are thought to result from imbalances in angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang-(1-7)/alamandine activity. ACE2, Ang-(1-7), and alamandine have potent anti-inflammatory properties, and some SARS-CoV-2 patients exhibit high levels of ACE2 and Ang-(1-7). This phenomenon could indicate a failing physiological response to prevent or reduce the severity of inflammation-mediated pulmonary injuries. Alamandine, which is another protective component of the RAS, has several health benefits owing to its antithrombogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic characteristics. Alamandine alleviates pulmonary fibrosis via the Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor D (MrgD). Thus, a better understanding of this pathway could uncover novel pharmacological strategies for altering proinflammatory environments within the body. Following such strategies could inhibit fibrosis after SARS-CoV-2 infection and, consequently, prevent COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Oligopeptides/therapeutic use , Angiotensin I/metabolism , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects
17.
ASN Neuro ; 13: 17590914211057635, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511685

ABSTRACT

Among the plethora of debilitating neurological disorders of COVID-19 syndrome in survivors, the scope of SARS-CoV-2-induced dysautonomia (DNS) is yet to be understood, though the implications are enormous. Herein, we present an inclusive mini-review of SARS-CoV-2-induced DNS and its associated complications. Although, the direct link between Covid-19 and DSN is still speculative, the hypothetical links are thought to be either a direct neuronal injury of the autonomic pathway or a para/post-infectious immune-induced mechanism. SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced stress may activate the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) leading to neuro-hormonal stimulation and activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines with further development of sympathetic storm. Sympathetic over-activation in Covid-19 is correlated with increase in capillary pulmonary leakage, alveolar damage, and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 can spread through pulmonary mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors to medullary respiratory center in a retrograde manner resulting in sudden respiratory failure. Taken together, DSN in Covid-19 is developed due to sympathetic storm and inhibition of Parasympathetic nervous system-mediated anti-inflammatory effect with development of cytokine storm. Therefore, sympathetic and cytokine storms together with activation of Renin-Angiotensin-System are the chief final pathway involved in the development of DSN in Covid-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , COVID-19/mortality , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Female , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Prospective Studies
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488613

ABSTRACT

The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key regulator of blood pressure and hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin-converting enzyme I (ACE) are two main components of the RAS that play a major role in blood pressure homeostasis. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) uses ACE2 as a receptor to enter cells. Despite some controversies, numerous studies have reported a significant association between the use of ACE inhibitors and reduced risk of COVID-19. In our previous studies, we produced and identified peptide sequences present in whey hydrolysates exhibiting high ACE inhibitory activity. Therefore, the aim of this work is to obtain an improved understanding of the function of these natural peptides as RAS inhibitors and investigate their potential therapeutic role in the COVID-19 pandemic. The molecular interactions between peptides IPP, LIVTQ, IIAE, LVYPFP, and human ACE2 were assessed by employing a molecular docking approach. The results show that natural whey-derived peptides have a dual inhibitory action against both ACE and ACE2. This dual activity distinguishes these ACE inhibitory peptides from synthetic drugs, such as Captopril and Lisinopril which were not shown to inhibit ACE2 activity, and may represent a potential strategy in the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptides/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Whey Proteins/chemistry
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