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1.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 725967, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506113

ABSTRACT

The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is crucially involved in the physiology and pathology of all organs in mammals. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is a homolog of ACE, acts as a negative regulator in the homeostasis of RAS. ACE2 has been proven to be the receptor of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which caused the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. As SARS-CoV-2 enters the host cells through binding of viral spike protein with ACE2 in humans, the distribution and expression level of ACE2 may be critical for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Growing evidence shows the implication of ACE2 in pathological progression in tissue injury and several chronic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease; this suggests that ACE2 is essential in the progression and clinical prognosis of COVID-19 as well. Therefore, we summarized the expression and activity of ACE2 under various conditions and regulators. We further discussed its potential implication in susceptibility to COVID-19 and its potential for being a therapeutic target in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502439

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus, known as severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is causing a global pandemic. The virus primarily affects the upper and lower respiratory tracts and raises the risk of a variety of non-pulmonary consequences, the most severe and possibly fatal of which are cardiovascular problems. Data show that almost one-third of the patients with a moderate or severe form of COVID-19 had preexisting cardiovascular comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, heart failure, or coronary artery disease. SARS-CoV2 causes hyper inflammation, hypoxia, apoptosis, and a renin-angiotensin system imbalance in a variety of cell types, primarily endothelial cells. Profound endothelial dysfunction associated with COVID-19 can be the cause of impaired organ perfusion that may generate acute myocardial injury, renal failure, and a procoagulant state resulting in thromboembolic events. We discuss the most recent results on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 in patients with cardiometabolic diseases in this review. We also provide insights on treatments that may reduce the severity of this viral infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Endothelial Cells/cytology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Heart Failure/etiology , Humans , Renal Insufficiency/etiology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis/etiology
7.
Pharmazie ; 76(8): 342-350, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367725

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-2 converting enzyme (ACE2), a key element of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS), is not only the direct target of infection by the human SARS-Cov-2 virus but is at the same the root for the complex pathogenetic events of COVID-19. From a pharmaceutical perspective, several established classes of medicines are involved in different phases of the disease. From their known mechanisms of action, a comprehensive understanding of COVID-19 will be hopefully soon delineated. A set of proven medicines is available to cope at least with some of the pathologies involved. To arrive back to normal life, vaccinations and broad consideration of hygienic measures are to be complemented by effective medicines to treat airborne viral infections. Therapeutic schemes based on a comprehensive understanding of the disease will include drug combinations made up from both established drugs as well as novel drugs presently under development.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Drug Development , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
8.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 914-923, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343627

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus or COVID-19 has first been found in Wuhan, China, and became pandemic. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays a key role in the host cells as a receptor of Spike-I Glycoprotein of COVID-19 which causes final infection. ACE2 is highly expressed in the bladder, ileum, kidney and liver, comparing with ACE2 expression in the lung-specific pulmonary alveolar type II cells. In this study, the single-cell RNAseq data of the five tissues from different humans are curated and cell types with high expressions of ACE2 are identified. Subsequently, the protein-protein interaction networks have been established. From the network, potential biomarkers which can form functional hubs, are selected based on k-means network clustering. It is observed that angiotensin PPAR family proteins show important roles in the functional hubs. To understand the functions of the potential markers, corresponding pathways have been researched thoroughly through the pathway semantic networks. Subsequently, the pathways have been ranked according to their influence and dependency in the network using PageRank algorithm. The outcomes show some important facts in terms of infection. Firstly, renin-angiotensin system and PPAR signaling pathway can play a vital role for enhancing the infection after its intrusion through ACE2. Next, pathway networks consist of few basic metabolic and influential pathways, e.g. insulin resistance. This information corroborate the fact that diabetic patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. Interestingly, the key regulators of the aforementioned pathways are angiontensin and PPAR family proteins. Hence, angiotensin and PPAR family proteins can be considered as possible therapeutic targets. Contact: sagnik.sen2008@gmail.com, umaulik@cse.jdvu.ac.in Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available online.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Algorithms , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Ileum/metabolism , Ileum/pathology , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/pathology , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors/metabolism , Protein Interaction Maps , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Urinary Bladder/metabolism , Urinary Bladder/pathology
9.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(8): 863-872, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340915

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 entry in human cells depends on angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, which can be upregulated by inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We aimed to test our hypothesis that discontinuation of chronic treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) mitigates the course o\f recent-onset COVID-19. METHODS: ACEI-COVID was a parallel group, randomised, controlled, open-label trial done at 35 centres in Austria and Germany. Patients aged 18 years and older were enrolled if they presented with recent symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and were chronically treated with ACEIs or ARBs. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to discontinuation or continuation of RAS inhibition for 30 days. Primary outcome was the maximum sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score within 30 days, where death was scored with the maximum achievable SOFA score. Secondary endpoints were area under the death-adjusted SOFA score (AUCSOFA), mean SOFA score, admission to the intensive care unit, mechanical ventilation, and death. Analyses were done on a modified intention-to-treat basis. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04353596. FINDINGS: Between April 20, 2020, and Jan 20, 2021, 204 patients (median age 75 years [IQR 66-80], 37% females) were randomly assigned to discontinue (n=104) or continue (n=100) RAS inhibition. Within 30 days, eight (8%) of 104 died in the discontinuation group and 12 (12%) of 100 patients died in the continuation group (p=0·42). There was no significant difference in the primary endpoint between the discontinuation and continuation group (median [IQR] maximum SOFA score 0·00 (0·00-2·00) vs 1·00 (0·00-3·00); p=0·12). Discontinuation was associated with a significantly lower AUCSOFA (0·00 [0·00-9·25] vs 3·50 [0·00-23·50]; p=0·040), mean SOFA score (0·00 [0·00-0·31] vs 0·12 [0·00-0·78]; p=0·040), and 30-day SOFA score (0·00 [10-90th percentile, 0·00-1·20] vs 0·00 [0·00-24·00]; p=0·023). At 30 days, 11 (11%) in the discontinuation group and 23 (23%) in the continuation group had signs of organ dysfunction (SOFA score ≥1) or were dead (p=0·017). There were no significant differences for mechanical ventilation (10 (10%) vs 8 (8%), p=0·87) and admission to intensive care unit (20 [19%] vs 18 [18%], p=0·96) between the discontinuation and continuation group. INTERPRETATION: Discontinuation of RAS-inhibition in COVID-19 had no significant effect on the maximum severity of COVID-19 but may lead to a faster and better recovery. The decision to continue or discontinue should be made on an individual basis, considering the risk profile, the indication for RAS inhibition, and the availability of alternative therapies and outpatient monitoring options. FUNDING: Austrian Science Fund and German Center for Cardiovascular Research.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , COVID-19 , Hypertension , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/administration & dosage , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Risk Adjustment/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Withholding Treatment/statistics & numerical data
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325686

ABSTRACT

The present review is aimed at analysing the current evidence concerning the potential modulation of obesity and/or diet in adipose tissue ACE2. Additionally, the potential implications of these effects on COVID-19 are also addressed. The results published show that diet and obesity are two factors that effectively influence the expression of Ace2 gene in adipose tissue. However, the shifts in this gene do not always occur in the same direction, nor with the same intensity. Additionally, there is no consensus regarding the implications of increased adipose tissue ACE2 expression in health. Thus, while in some studies a protective role is attributed to ACE2 overexpression, other studies suggest otherwise. Similarly, there is much debate regarding the role played by ACE2 in COVID-19 in terms of degree of infection and disease outcomes. The greater risk of infection that may hypothetically derive from enhanced ACE2 expression is not clear since the functionality of the enzyme seems to be as important as the abundance. Thus, the greater abundance of ACE2 in adipose tissue of obese subjects may be counterbalanced by its lower activation. In addition, a protective role of ACE2 overexpression has also been suggested, associated with the increase in anti-inflammatory factors that it may produce.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Obesity/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Diet , Humans , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Hipertens Riesgo Vasc ; 37(4): 169-175, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322115

ABSTRACT

The first case of COVID-19 was reported on 31 December 2019 in Wuhan, China. Ever since there has been unprecedented and growing interest in learning about all aspects of this new disease. Debate has been generated as to the association between antihypertensive therapy with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and SARS-CoV-2 infection. While many questions as yet remain unanswered, the aim of this report is to inform health professionals about the current state of knowledge. Because this is an ever-evolving topic, the recommendation is that it be updated as new evidence becomes available. Below, we provide a review of pre-clinical and clinical studies that link coronavirus to the RAAS.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , ADAM17 Protein/physiology , Angiotensin II/physiology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/drug effects , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Receptors, Virus/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Viral Vaccines , Virus Internalization/drug effects
13.
OMICS ; 25(7): 408-416, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287972

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus is anticipated to transition to an endemic state as vaccines are providing relief in some, but not all, countries. Drug discovery for COVID-19 can offer another tool in the fight against the pandemic. Additionally, COVID-19 impacts multiple organs that call for a systems medicine approach to planetary health and therapeutics innovation. In this context, innovation for drugs that prevent and treat COVID-19 is timely and much needed. As the virus variants emerge under different ecological conditions and contexts in the long haul, a broad array of vaccine and drug options will be necessary. This expert review article argues for a need to expand the COVID-19 interventions, including and beyond vaccines, to stimulate discovery and development of novel medicines against SARS-CoV-2 infection. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) is known to play a major role in SARS-CoV-2 infection. Neprilysin (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) have emerged as the pharmaceutical targets of interest in the search for therapeutic interventions against COVID-19. While the NEP/ACE inhibitors offer promise for repurposing against COVID-19, they may display a multitude of effects in different organ systems, some beneficial, and others adverse, in modulating the inflammation responses in the course of COVID-19. This expert review offers an analysis and discussion to deepen our present understanding of the pathophysiological function of neprilysin in multiple organs, and the possible effects of NEP inhibitor-induced inflammatory responses in COVID-19-infected patients.


Subject(s)
Neprilysin/chemistry , Bradykinin/genetics , Bradykinin/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/genetics , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Drug Dev Res ; 82(1): 38-48, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279360

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-COV-2), a novel coronavirus responsible for the recent infectious pandemic, is known to downregulate angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). Most current investigations focused on SARS-COV-2-related effects on the renin-angiotensin system and especially the resultant increase in angiotensin II, neglecting its effects on the kinin-kallikrein system. SARS-COV-2-induced ACE2 inhibition leads to the augmentation of bradykinin 1-receptor effects, as ACE2 inactivates des-Arg9-bradykinin, a bradykinin metabolite. SARS-COV-2 also decreases bradykinin 2-receptor effects as it affects bradykinin synthesis by inhibiting cathepsin L, a kininogenase present at the site of infection and involved in bradykinin production. The physiologies of both the renin-angiotensin and kinin-kallikrein system are functionally related suggesting that any intervention aiming to treat SARS-COV-2-infected patients by triggering one system but ignoring the other may not be adequately effective. Interestingly, the snake-derived bradykinin-potentiating peptide (BPP-10c) acts on both systems. BPP-10c strongly decreases angiotensin II by inhibiting ACE, increasing bradykinin-related effects on the bradykinin 2-receptor and increasing nitric oxide-mediated effects. Based on a narrative review of the literature, we suggest that BPP-10c could be an optimally effective option to consider when aiming at developing an anti-SARS-COV-2 drug.


Subject(s)
Bradykinin/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Peptide Fragments/administration & dosage , Snake Venoms/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Bradykinin/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Snake Venoms/metabolism
16.
Physiol Rep ; 9(11): e14800, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268434

ABSTRACT

The objective of this review is to give an overview of the pathophysiological effects of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in relation to hypertension (HT), with a focus on the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) and the MAS receptor. HT is a multifactorial disease and a public health burden, as it is a risk factor for diseases like stroke, coronary artery disease, and heart failure, leading to 10.4 million deaths yearly. Blood pressure is regulated by the RAAS. The system consists of two counter-regulatory axes: ACE/ANG-II/AT1 R and ACE2/ANG-(1-7)/MAS. The main regulatory protein in balancing the RAAS is angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The protein also functions as the main mediator of endocytosis of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) into the host cell. SARS-CoV-2 is the cause of COVID-19 and has caused a worldwide pandemic; however, the treatment and prophylaxis of COVID-19 are limited. Several drugs and vaccines are currently being tested in clinical trials with a few already approved by EMA and FDA. HT is a major risk factor regarding the severity and fatality of COVID-19, and the RAAS plays an important role in COVID-19 infection since SARS-CoV-2 can lead to a dysregulation of the system by reducing the ACE2 expression. The exact mechanisms of HT in relation to COVID-19 remain uncertain, and more research is needed for further elucidation.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/physiopathology , Hypertension/virology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hypertension/physiopathology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
17.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(8): 1925-1939, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266906

ABSTRACT

Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) allow entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) into host cells and play essential roles in cancer therapy. However, the functions of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in kidney cancer remain unclear, especially as kidneys are targets for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: UCSC Xena project, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) databases (GSE30589 and GSE59185) were searched for gene expression in human tissues, gene expression data, and clinical information. Several bioinformatics methods were utilized to analyze the correlation between ACE2 and TMPRSS2 with respect to the prognosis of kidney renal clear cell carcinoma (KIRC) and kidney renal papillary cell carcinoma (KIRP). Results: ACE2 expression was significantly upregulated in tumor tissue, while its downregulation was associated with low survival in KIRC and KIRP patients. TMPRSS2 was downregulated in KIRC and KIRP, and its expression was not correlated with patient survival. According to clinical risk factor-based prediction models, ACE2 exhibits predictive accuracy for kidney cancer prognosis and is correlated with metabolism and immune infiltration. In an animal model, ACE2 expression was remarkably downregulated in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells compared to in the control. Conclusion: ACE2 expression is highly correlated with various metabolic pathways and is involved in immune infiltration.it plays a crucial role than TMPRSS2 in diagnosing and prognosis of kidney cancer patients. The overlap in ACE2 expression between kidney cancer and SARS-CoV-2 infection suggests that patients with KIRC or KIRP are at high risk of developing serious symptoms.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/complications , Kidney Neoplasms/complications , Receptors, Virus/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/immunology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/metabolism , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Chlorocebus aethiops , Down-Regulation , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Kidney Neoplasms/immunology , Kidney Neoplasms/metabolism , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Animal , Neoplasm Proteins/biosynthesis , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Organ Specificity , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Tissue Array Analysis , Vero Cells
18.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 23(1): 1-11, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259311

ABSTRACT

2020 marked the 20th anniversary of the discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This major event that changed the way we see the renin-angiotensin system today could have passed quietly. Instead, the discovery that ACE2 is a major player in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic has blown up the literature regarding this enzyme. ACE2 connects the classical arm renin-angiotensin system, consisting mainly of angiotensin II peptide and its AT1 receptor, with a protective arm, consisting mainly of the angiotensin 1-7 peptide and its Mas receptor. In this brief article, we have reviewed the literature to describe how ACE2 is a key protective arm enzyme in the function of many organs, particularly in the context of brain and cardiovascular function, as well as in renal, pulmonary and digestive homeostasis. We also very briefly review and refer to recent literature to present an insight into the role of ACE2 in determining the course of coronavirus diseases 2019.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensins/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mice , Organ Specificity , Rats , Receptors, Angiotensin/physiology , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
19.
Microcirculation ; 28(7): e12718, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236400

ABSTRACT

Recently, accumulating evidence has highlighted the role of endothelial dysfunction in COVID-19 progression. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD-related risk factors (eg, age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity). Equally, these are also risk factors for COVID-19. The purpose of this review was to explore CMD pathophysiology in COVID-19, based on recent evidence. COVID-19 mechanisms were reviewed in terms of imbalanced renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-systems (RAAS), systemic inflammation and immune responses, endothelial dysfunction, and coagulatory disorders. Based on these mechanisms, we addressed CMD pathophysiology within the context of COVID-19, from five perspectives. The first was the disarrangement of local RAAS and Kallikrein-kinin-systems attributable to SARS-Cov-2 entry, and the concomitant decrease in coronary microvascular endothelial angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) levels. The second was related to coronary microvascular obstruction, induced by COVID-19-associated systemic hyper-inflammation and pro-thrombotic state. The third was focused on how pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-related systemic hypoxia elicited oxidative stress in coronary microvessels and cardiac sympathetic nerve activation. Fourthly, we discussed how autonomic nerve dysfunction mediated by COVID-19-associated mental, physical, or physiological factors could elicit changes in coronary blood flow, resulting in CMD in COVID-19 patients. Finally, we analyzed reciprocity between the coronary microvascular endothelium and perivascular cellular structures due to viremia, SARS-CoV-2 dissemination, and systemic inflammation. These mechanisms may function either consecutively or intermittently, finally culminating in CMD-mediated cardiovascular symptoms in COVID-19 patients. However, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains to be clarified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Coronary Vessels/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Male , Microcirculation/physiology , Models, Cardiovascular , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/physiopathology
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(10)2021 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234743

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is still an ongoing global health crisis. Immediately after the inhalation of SARS-CoV-2 viral particles, alveolar type II epithelial cells harbor and initiate local innate immunity. These particles can infect circulating macrophages, which then present the coronavirus antigens to T cells. Subsequently, the activation and differentiation of various types of T cells, as well as uncontrollable cytokine release (also known as cytokine storms), result in tissue destruction and amplification of the immune response. Vitamin D enhances the innate immunity required for combating COVID-19 by activating toll-like receptor 2. It also enhances antimicrobial peptide synthesis, such as through the promotion of the expression and secretion of cathelicidin and ß-defensin; promotes autophagy through autophagosome formation; and increases the synthesis of lysosomal degradation enzymes within macrophages. Regarding adaptive immunity, vitamin D enhances CD4+ T cells, suppresses T helper 17 cells, and promotes the production of virus-specific antibodies by activating T cell-dependent B cells. Moreover, vitamin D attenuates the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by CD4+ T cells through nuclear factor κB signaling, thereby inhibiting the development of a cytokine storm. SARS-CoV-2 enters cells after its spike proteins are bound to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors. Vitamin D increases the bioavailability and expression of ACE2, which may be responsible for trapping and inactivating the virus. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) is responsible for tissue destruction, inflammation, and organ failure related to SARS-CoV-2. Vitamin D inhibits renin expression and serves as a negative RAS regulator. In conclusion, vitamin D defends the body against SARS-CoV-2 through a novel complex mechanism that operates through interactions between the activation of both innate and adaptive immunity, ACE2 expression, and inhibition of the RAS system. Multiple observation studies have shown that serum concentrations of 25 hydroxyvitamin D are inversely correlated with the incidence or severity of COVID-19. The evidence gathered thus far, generally meets Hill's causality criteria in a biological system, although experimental verification is not sufficient. We speculated that adequate vitamin D supplementation may be essential for mitigating the progression and severity of COVID-19. Future studies are warranted to determine the dosage and effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation among different populations of individuals with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Vitamin D/pharmacology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology
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