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1.
J Perinat Med ; 50(3): 363-366, 2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561792

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We designed an electronic query that was distributed to healthcare workers in order to evaluate their attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination of women that wish to conceive and those that are pregnant. METHODS: An electronic survey was designed and distributed through a network of 5.654 e-mails. The query was uploaded in Google Forms. RESULTS: Overall, 1,226 answers were retrieved. Ninety percent of respondents replied that they prescribe COVID-19 vaccination in women that wish to conceive, however, the rate falls to 80% for those that have schedules for imminent artificial reproductive techniques. Approximately 1 in 2 physicians (obstetricians and pediatricians) suggests that a delay in assisted reproduction following immunization is not recommended. At least 13% of women of reproductive age and 30% of women wishing to conceive with ART declined to do so according to respondents, report. Only 75% of respondents favored immunization during pregnancy and of those 48% responded that vaccination could be done in all trimesters of pregnancy. Approximately 40% of women decline; however, to receive vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the directions provided by international organizations; physician and patient hesitancy towards vaccination during pregnancy (and particularly the first trimester) remains an issue that deserves further attention.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; 50(8): 102079, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062485

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: On March 8, 2020, the Italian Government implemented extraordinary measures to limit viral transmission of COV-19/SARS-CoV-2. We evaluated the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on lifestyle and emotional state in women planning infertility treatments. BASIC PROCEDURES: We performed a quantitative research study using a web-based survey, in 140 women referred to Assisted Reproductive Technologies Center. MAIN FINDINGS: We observed changes in body weight during lockdown in 80 % of women, and a significant increase in BMI in comparison to that observed before (p=.001). We observed a high percentage of non-adherence to the Mediterranean pattern during lockdown due to higher frequency of consumption of sweet/pastries, cheese and meat, rather than fruit, vegetables and legumes. Before lockdown 36.4 % women were snack consumers while during lockdown 55 % (p=.002). By considering individuals' attitude to snack consumption, we observed an increase related to boredom (p=<.0001) and anxiety (p=.05) during lockdown. Increased levels of anxiety and sadness were observed in about 30 %, and of boredom in 25 %. The percentage of women worried about their planning infertility treatment was more than 50 %. PRINCIPAL CONCLUSIONS: Quarantine-related restrictions strongly influenced lifestyle psychological behavior leading to an increased burden of cardiovascular disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Emotions/physiology , Life Style , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Diet , Feeding Behavior/physiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/psychology , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Hum Reprod ; 35(12): 2774-2783, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740175

ABSTRACT

STUDY QUESTION: What are the perceptions of infertility patients and the factors correlating with their psychological distress, following suspension of fertility treatments during the Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic? SUMMARY ANSWER: Most patients preferred to resume treatment given the chance regardless of background characteristics; higher self-mastery and greater perceived social support were associated with lower distress, while feeling helpless was associated with higher distress. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Infertility diagnosis and treatment frequently result in significant psychological distress. Recently published data have shown that clinic closure during the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a sharp increase in the prevalence of anxiety and depression among infertile patients undergoing IVF and was perceived as an uncontrollable and stressful event. Personal resources play an important protective role in times of crisis, helping reduce levels of distress. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This cross-sectional questionnaire study included patients whose fertility treatment was suspended following the COVID-19 pandemic, in a tertiary hospital. The survey was delivered to 297 patients within 12 days at the beginning of April 2020. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: The self-administered questionnaire included items addressing: (i) patients' demographic characteristics, (ii) anxiety related to COVID-19 infection risk and level of social support, (iii) patients' perceptions of the new guidelines and description of subsequently related emotions and (iv) two validated scales assessing levels of emotional distress and self-mastery. Multivariate analysis was conducted to assess factors alleviating or increasing emotional distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: There were 168 patients who completed the survey, giving a response rate of 57%. Study variables in the regression model explained 38.9% of the variance in psychological distress experienced by patients during treatment suspension. None of the background characteristics (e.g. age, marital status, parity, economic level or duration of treatments) had a significant contribution. Feeling helpless following the suspension of treatments was associated with higher distress (P < 0.01). Higher self-mastery and greater perceived social support were associated with lower distress (P < 0.01). Despite the ministry of health's decision, 72% of patients wished to resume treatment at the time of survey. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: This was a cross-sectional study, thus information about patients' characteristics prior to the COVID-19 pandemic was not available. The length and implications of this pandemic are unknown. Therefore, the ability to draw conclusions about the psychological consequences of the crisis is limited at this point of time. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Personal resources play an important protective role in times of crisis, helping to reduce levels of distress. Study findings suggest that attention should be paid to strengthening and empowering patients' personal resources together with directly confronting and containing feelings of helplessness. In line with the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) guidelines, especially at this time of high levels of distress, it is imperative to offer emotional support to reduce stress and concerns. Furthermore, as the pandemic is stabilizing, resumption of treatment should be considered as soon as appropriate according to local conditions. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): This study was funded by the IVF unit of the Shamir Medical Center. All authors declare no conflicts of interest. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: N/A.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fertility , Infertility/diagnosis , Infertility/psychology , Adult , Anxiety , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Fertilization in Vitro/adverse effects , Humans , Infertility/complications , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/psychology , Risk , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 253: 148-153, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726508

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE(S): to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on infertile couples' emotions, anxiety and future plans. STUDY DESIGN: An observational study was perfomed by Italian ART centers and online forums. In this study, infertile couples candidate to ART and whose treatment was blocked due to the COVID-19 lockdown were enrolled through an online survey. The psychological impact of COVID-19 was measured by Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and by a short form of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI); Self-perceived anxiety related either to pregnancy safety and to economic crisis measured by VAS scale. RESULTS: 627 patients completed the survey. The COVID-19 lock-down had a moderate/severe psychological impact on infertile patients (mean IES-R score 36.4 ± 16.6). The mean STAI score was 49.8 ± 15.3, with an overall incidence of STAI > 36 of 71 %. The mean VAS scale for anxiety perception was 45.3 ± 15.3. Women were more emotionally distressed, anxious and depressed than men (36.8 ± 16.4 vs 31.0 ± 18.4 for IES-R, respectively; p = 0.03). Notwithstanding the uncertainty about pregnancy safety, 64.6 % of respondents chose to maintain their reproductive programme. Economic crisis induced 11.5 % of the surveyed patients to give up their ART program. Respondents who had at least one relative affected by COVID-19 had a significantly higher IES-R score and anxiety VAS, but not higher STAI scores, than patients belonging to unaffected families. CONCLUSION(S): COVID-19 pandemic itself and the recommendation to stop ART program generated higher distress levels in infertile couples. The psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic in infertility patients should not be underestimated, and a specific psychological support should be planned.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Infertility/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Emotions , Female , Health Status , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 253: 71-75, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720509

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to follow up the monitoring, health and anxiety from women who became pregnant after an embryo transfer or a intrauterine insemination during the COVID-19 epidemic in France STUDY DESIGN: This is a single centre, retrospective study from December 2019 to March 2020 based on a phone call interview using a specific questionnaire sheet specially developed for this study. Questionnaires from 104 pregnant women were completed and descriptive data are then analyzed. RESULTS: Women with ongoing pregnancies (n = 88) did not change their physician visits. The COVID-19 outbreak has created no or few additional stresses for 77 % of pregnant women since the lockdown started. We report a miscarriage rate of 14.4 % (n = 15) and documented 10 patients (11.3 %) who had symptoms related to COVID-19. No severe symptoms and no hospitalization in intensive care unit were identified. CONCLUSION: The epidemic context did not disrupt the medical monitoring of pregnancies and we did not recover an increased rate of miscarriage after ART. None of the patients who had COVID-related symptoms presented with severe clinical manifestations. Surprisingly, pregnant women were psychologically able to experience the lockdown.


Subject(s)
Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Rate , Quarantine/psychology , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/statistics & numerical data , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Abortion, Spontaneous/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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