Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 358
Filter
Add filters

Year range
3.
Trials ; 22(1): 229, 2021 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150419

ABSTRACT

Along with its heavy toll of morbidity and mortality, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic exposed several limitations of the current global research response. The slow and inefficient process of carrying out traditional randomized clinical trials led regulatory authorities to hastily approve treatments and tests without sufficient evidence of safety and efficacy.We here outline issues with the current research platform, summarize shortcomings of traditional randomized clinical trials particularly apparent at the time of pandemics, and highlight the advantages of pragmatic clinical trials as an alternative to rapidly generate the needed clinical evidence. We further discuss barriers and challenges to pragmatic clinical trials implementation and explore opportunities for research institutions and regulatory authorities to facilitate widespread adoption of this vital research tool.As a subsequent wave of COVID-19, and/or another epidemic, are all but inevitable in our lifetime, we must ensure that our research infrastructure is conducive to carrying out pragmatic clinical trials to expeditiously generate the needed evidence and blunt the epidemic's toll on human lives and livelihoods.


Subject(s)
/therapy , Pragmatic Clinical Trials as Topic , Research Design , /diagnosis , Drug Approval , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans
5.
BMJ Health Care Inform ; 28(1)2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147326

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telehealth became the most practical option for general practice consultations in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) as a result of the national lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. What is the consumer experience of access to telehealth and how do consumers and providers perceive this mode of care delivery going forward? METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A national survey of general practice consumers and providers who used telehealth services since the national lockdowns in 2020 will be distributed. It is based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology framework of technology acceptance and the access to care framework. The data will be statistically analysed to create a foundation for in-depth research on the use of telehealth services in NZ general practice services, with a specific focus on consumer experiences and health outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was granted by the Auckland Health Research Ethics Committee on 13/11/2020, reference AH2539. The survey will be disseminated online.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , General Practice/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Attitude to Computers , Humans , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Research Design , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , Videoconferencing
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e048317, 2021 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140339

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The emergence and rapid spread of COVID-19 have caused widespread and catastrophic public health and economic impact, requiring governments to restrict societal activity to reduce the spread of the disease. The role of household transmission in the population spread of SARS-CoV-2, and of host immunity in limiting transmission, is poorly understood. This paper describes a protocol for a prospective observational study of a cohort of households in Liverpool City Region, UK, which addresses the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 between household members and how immunological response to the infection changes over time. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Households in the Liverpool City Region, in which members have not previously tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 with a nucleic acid amplification test, are followed up for an initial period of 12 weeks. Participants are asked to provide weekly self-throat and nasal swabs and record their activity and presence of symptoms. Incidence of infection and household secondary attack rates of COVID-19 are measured. Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 will be investigated against a range of demographic and behavioural variables. Blood and faecal samples are collected at several time points to evaluate immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection and prevalence and risk factors for faecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2, respectively. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received approval from the National Health Service Research Ethics Committee; REC Reference: 20/HRA/2297, IRAS Number: 283 464. Results will be disseminated through scientific conferences and peer-reviewed open access publications. A report of the findings will also be shared with participants. The study will quantify the scale and determinants of household transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Additionally, immunological responses before and during the different stages of infection will be analysed, adding to the understanding of the range of immunological response by infection severity.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , /transmission , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Prospective Studies , Research Design , State Medicine , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e043983, 2021 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140333

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Public transport accessible to older people may offer a transformative solution to achieving healthy ageing. However, the evidence to support such transport infrastructure modifications is unclear. Previous studies on public transport use and elderly health were mostly observational studies using cross-sectional data. Few studies have examined the before-and-after effects of a new metro, for example, to see if it leads to improved elderly health. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We use a new metro line in Hong Kong as a natural experiment to examine the impact of the metro-led public transport intervention on elderly health. In Hong Kong, more than 90% of daily travels are made by public transport. The public transport modifications consist of the new metro line with eight stations and changes in the walking environment and bus services around the stations. We will look at the before-and-after differences in public transport use and health outcomes between elderly participants living in treatment neighbourhoods (400 m walking buffered areas of the new metro stations) and in control groups (living in comparable areas but unaffected by the new metro). Questionnaire-based baseline data were collected in 2019 before the COVID-19 pandemic, while some qualitative interviews are ongoing. Amid the pandemic, we conducted a quick telephone-based survey of COVID-19's potential impact on public transport use behaviours of our elderly cohort in September 2020. Note there is no lockdown in Hong Kong until the writing of the paper (January 2021). After the new metro opens, we will conduct a follow-up survey, tentatively in late 2022. We aim to investigate if the new metro and the associated changes in the built environment have any effects on public transport use behaviours, physical activity and wider health outcomes among the elderly (eg, social inclusion, quality of life, subjective well-being). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of Hong Kong reviewed and approved the study procedures and materials (reference number: EA1710040). Results will be communicated through scientific papers and research reports.


Subject(s)
Healthy Aging , Quality of Life , Research Design , Transportation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cities , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hong Kong , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(11): e25102, 2021 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138019

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), with the improvement of diagnosis and treatment level in various countries, more and more patients have been discharged after systematic treatment. In order to effectively promote the overall recovery of patients' physical and mental function and quality of life (QOL), the focus of clinical work should be gradually shifted to rehabilitation treatment. Dance-based mind-motor activities were defined as coordinated upright mind-motor movements that emphasize dynamic balance, structured through music or an inner rhythm (e.g., breathing) and distinctive instructions or choreography, and that involve social interaction. It has positive effects on motor function, lung function, psychological mood and other aspects, so it can be used as a safe alternative therapy for patients recovering from COVID-19. At present, there are no relevant articles for systematic review. METHODS: From its inception until March 2021, we will conduct a comprehensive electronic search, including Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, PubMed, Springer, EMBASE, Chinese Science Citation Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Wan-fang database. Two independent researchers will conduct article retrieval, screening, quality assessment, and data analysis through the Review Manager (V. 5.3.5). RESULTS: The results of this study will evaluate the effectiveness and safety of dance-based mind-motor activities for the improvement of QOL in COVID-19 patients during the recovery period. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of the study will provide an evidence to judge whether dance-based mind-motor activities is effective and safe for COVID-19 in recovery period. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This protocol will not evaluate individual patient information or infringe patient rights and therefore does not require ethical approval. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021232995.


Subject(s)
/rehabilitation , Dance Therapy/methods , Motor Activity , Quality of Life , Dancing , Humans , Martial Arts , Research Design , Treatment Outcome
11.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 36(2): 143-147, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135173

ABSTRACT

There has perhaps been no issue as contentious in Covid-19 as face masks. The most contentious scientific debate has been between those who argue that "there is no scientific evidence", by which they mean that there are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs), versus those who argue that when the evidence is considered together, "the science supports that face coverings save lives". It used to be a 'given' that to decide whether a particular factor, either exogenous or endogenous, can cause a particular disease, and in what order of magnitude, one should consider all reasonably cogent evidence. This approach is being increasingly challenged, both scientifically and politically. The scientific challenge has come from methodologic views that focus on the randomized controlled trial (RCT) as the scientific gold standard, with priority being given, either to evidence from RCTs or to observational studies which closely mimic RCTs. The political challenge has come from various interests calling for the exclusion of epidemiological evidence from consideration by regulatory and advisory committees.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Masks , Politics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , Humans
12.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e23984, 2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133814

ABSTRACT

The collection of data from a personal digital device to characterize current health conditions and behaviors that determine how an individual's health will evolve has been called digital phenotyping. In this paper, we describe the development of and early experiences with a comprehensive digital phenotyping platform: Health Outcomes through Positive Engagement and Self-Empowerment (HOPES). HOPES is based on the open-source Beiwe platform but adds a wider range of data collection, including the integration of wearable devices and further sensor collection from smartphones. Requirements were partly derived from a concurrent clinical trial for schizophrenia that required the development of significant capabilities in HOPES for security, privacy, ease of use, and scalability, based on a careful combination of public cloud and on-premises operation. We describe new data pipelines to clean, process, present, and analyze data. This includes a set of dashboards customized to the needs of research study operations and clinical care. A test use case for HOPES was described by analyzing the digital behavior of 22 participants during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Data Collection/methods , Machine Learning , Wearable Electronic Devices , Computers, Handheld , Humans , Mobile Applications , Phenotype , Research Design , Schizophrenia/diagnosis , Schizophrenia/therapy , Smartphone
13.
Syst Rev ; 10(1): 73, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused recurring and major outbreaks in multiple human populations around the world. The plethora of clinical presentations of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been described extensively, of which olfactory dysfunction (OD) was established as an important and common extrapulmonary manifestation of COVID-19 infection. The aim of this protocol is to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on peer-reviewed articles which described clinical data of OD in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This research protocol has been prospectively registered with the Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO; CRD42020196202). CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane Central, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PubMed, as well as Chinese medical databases China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP and WANFANG, will be searched using keywords including 'COVID-19', 'coronavirus disease', '2019-nCoV', 'SARS-CoV-2', 'novel coronavirus', 'anosmia', 'hyposmia', 'loss of smell', and 'olfactory dysfunction'. Systematic review and meta-analysis will be conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and the Meta-analyses Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Articles will be screened according to pre-specified inclusion and exclusion criteria to extract studies that include new clinical data investigating the effect of COVID-19 on olfactory dysfunction. Included articles will be reviewed in full; data including patient demographics, clinical characteristics of COVID-19-related OD, methods of olfactory assessment and relevant clinical outcomes will be extracted. Statistical analyses will be performed using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 3. DISCUSSION: This systematic review and meta-analysis protocol will aim to collate and synthesise all available clinical evidence regarding COVID-19-related OD as an important neurosensory dysfunction of COVID-19 infection. A comprehensive search strategy and screening process will be conducted to incorporate broad clinical data for robust statistical analyses and representation. The outcome of the systematic review and meta-analysis will aim to improve our understanding of the symptomatology and clinical characteristics of COVID-19-related OD and identify knowledge gaps in its disease process, which will guide future research in this specific neurosensory defect. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020196202.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Olfaction Disorders/pathology , Research Design , Humans
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e24409, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125185

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus seems to contribute significantly to increased postoperative complications and mortality after emergency surgical procedures. Additionally, the fear of COVID-19 contagion delays the consultation of patients, resulting in the deterioration of their acute diseases by the time of consultation. In the specific case of urgent digestive surgery patients, both factors significantly worsen the postoperative course and prognosis. Main working hypothesis: infection by COVID-19 increases postoperative 30-day-mortality for any cause in patients submitted to emergency/urgent general or gastrointestinal surgery. Likewise, hospital collapse during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic increased 30-day-mortality for any cause. Hence, the main objective of this study is to estimate the cumulative incidence of mortality at 30-days-after-surgery. Secondary objectives are: to estimate the cumulative incidence of postoperative complications and to develop a specific postoperative risk propensity model for COVID-19-infected patients.A multicenter, observational retrospective cohort study (COVID-CIR-study) will be carried out in consecutive patients operated on for urgent digestive pathology. Two cohorts will be defined: the "pandemic" cohort, which will include all patients (classified as COVID-19-positive or -negative) operated on for emergency digestive pathology during the months of March to June 2020; and the "control" cohort, which will include all patients operated on for emergency digestive pathology during the months of March to June 2019. Information will be gathered on demographic characteristics, clinical and analytical parameters, scores on the usual prognostic scales for quality management in a General Surgery service (POSSUM, P-POSSUM and LUCENTUM scores), prognostic factors applicable to all patients, specific prognostic factors for patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, postoperative morbidity and mortality (at 30 and 90 postoperative days). The main objective is to estimate the cumulative incidence of mortality at 30 days after surgery. As secondary objectives, to estimate the cumulative incidence of postoperative complications and to develop a specific postoperative risk propensity model for SARS-CoV-2 infected patients.The protocol (version1.0, April 20th 2020) was approved by the local Institutional Review Board (Ethic-and-Clinical-Investigation-Committee, code PR169/20, date 05/05/20). The study findings will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant national and international scientific meetings.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04479150 (July 21, 2020).


Subject(s)
Digestive System Diseases , Digestive System Surgical Procedures , Emergency Treatment , Infection Control , Postoperative Complications , Time-to-Treatment , Adult , /prevention & control , Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis , Digestive System Diseases/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/mortality , Digestive System Diseases/surgery , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/methods , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/mortality , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment/adverse effects , Emergency Treatment/methods , Emergency Treatment/mortality , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mortality , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Observational Studies as Topic , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Research Design , Risk Assessment/methods
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e24515, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture therapy for elderly patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Relevant articles from December 2019 to December 2020 will be searched in the following electronic databases: Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and China Scientific Journals Database. All published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and credible clinical observations about this topic will be included. Two independent researchers will operate article retrieval, duplication removing, screening and data analysis by EndNote X9.0 and Stata 15.0. We will use the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized trials to assess the risk of bias of included studies. Meta-analysis, subgroup analysis, and/or descriptive analysis will be performed according to the data conditions included. RESULTS: High-quality synthesis and/or descriptive analysis of current evidence will be provided from mortality rate, cure rate, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatine, troponin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and improvements in chest CT scans, clinical symptoms (including fever, fatigue, cough, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea) and the side effects of acupuncture. CONCLUSION: This study will provide evidence of whether acupuncture is an effective and safe intervention for the elderly with COVID-19. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020225245.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy/methods , /therapy , Aged , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
17.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e26997, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121849

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Artificial intelligence (AI) methods can potentially be used to relieve the pressure that the COVID-19 pandemic has exerted on public health. In cases of medical resource shortages caused by the pandemic, changes in people's preferences for AI clinicians and traditional clinicians are worth exploring. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to quantify and compare people's preferences for AI clinicians and traditional clinicians before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to assess whether people's preferences were affected by the pressure of pandemic. METHODS: We used the propensity score matching method to match two different groups of respondents with similar demographic characteristics. Respondents were recruited in 2017 and 2020. A total of 2048 respondents (2017: n=1520; 2020: n=528) completed the questionnaire and were included in the analysis. Multinomial logit models and latent class models were used to assess people's preferences for different diagnosis methods. RESULTS: In total, 84.7% (1115/1317) of respondents in the 2017 group and 91.3% (482/528) of respondents in the 2020 group were confident that AI diagnosis methods would outperform human clinician diagnosis methods in the future. Both groups of matched respondents believed that the most important attribute of diagnosis was accuracy, and they preferred to receive combined diagnoses from both AI and human clinicians (2017: odds ratio [OR] 1.645, 95% CI 1.535-1.763; P<.001; 2020: OR 1.513, 95% CI 1.413-1.621; P<.001; reference: clinician diagnoses). The latent class model identified three classes with different attribute priorities. In class 1, preferences for combined diagnoses and accuracy remained constant in 2017 and 2020, and high accuracy (eg, 100% accuracy in 2017: OR 1.357, 95% CI 1.164-1.581) was preferred. In class 2, the matched data from 2017 were similar to those from 2020; combined diagnoses from both AI and human clinicians (2017: OR 1.204, 95% CI 1.039-1.394; P=.011; 2020: OR 2.009, 95% CI 1.826-2.211; P<.001; reference: clinician diagnoses) and an outpatient waiting time of 20 minutes (2017: OR 1.349, 95% CI 1.065-1.708; P<.001; 2020: OR 1.488, 95% CI 1.287-1.721; P<.001; reference: 0 minutes) were consistently preferred. In class 3, the respondents in the 2017 and 2020 groups preferred different diagnosis methods; respondents in the 2017 group preferred clinician diagnoses, whereas respondents in the 2020 group preferred AI diagnoses. In the latent class, which was stratified according to sex, all male and female respondents in the 2017 and 2020 groups believed that accuracy was the most important attribute of diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals' preferences for receiving clinical diagnoses from AI and human clinicians were generally unaffected by the pandemic. Respondents believed that accuracy and expense were the most important attributes of diagnosis. These findings can be used to guide policies that are relevant to the development of AI-based health care.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , /epidemiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Propensity Score , Research Design , /isolation & purification
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e26718, 2021 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120328

ABSTRACT

This paper aims to provide a perspective on data sharing practices in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The scientific community has made several important inroads in the fight against COVID-19, and there are over 2500 clinical trials registered globally. Within the context of the rapidly changing pandemic, we are seeing a large number of trials conducted without results being made available. It is likely that a plethora of trials have stopped early, not for statistical reasons but due to lack of feasibility. Trials stopped early for feasibility are, by definition, statistically underpowered and thereby prone to inconclusive findings. Statistical power is not necessarily linear with the total sample size, and even small reductions in patient numbers or events can have a substantial impact on the research outcomes. Given the profusion of clinical trials investigating identical or similar treatments across different geographical and clinical contexts, one must also consider that the likelihood of a substantial number of false-positive and false-negative trials, emerging with the increasing overall number of trials, adds to public perceptions of uncertainty. This issue is complicated further by the evolving nature of the pandemic, wherein baseline assumptions on control group risk factors used to develop sample size calculations are far more challenging than those in the case of well-documented diseases. The standard answer to these challenges during nonpandemic settings is to assess each trial for statistical power and risk-of-bias and then pool the reported aggregated results using meta-analytic approaches. This solution simply will not suffice for COVID-19. Even with random-effects meta-analysis models, it will be difficult to adjust for the heterogeneity of different trials with aggregated reported data alone, especially given the absence of common data standards and outcome measures. To date, several groups have proposed structures and partnerships for data sharing. As COVID-19 has forced reconsideration of policies, processes, and interests, this is the time to advance scientific cooperation and shift the clinical research enterprise toward a data-sharing culture to maximize our response in the service of public health.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Information Dissemination/methods , /virology , Data Management/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Research Design , /isolation & purification
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(8): e24862, 2021 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119148

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spread around the world, a surge of evidence suggests that smell disorders are common symptoms in COVID-19 infection. This dysfunction may cause loss of appetite, malnutrition, poisoning, and depression. Obviously, the impairment has a strong impact on the quality of life. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify effective treatments. Various therapies have been studied to treat smell disorders after infection, and olfactory training (OT) is considered a promising treatment option. Assessing the effectiveness and safety of olfactory training for COVID-19 patients with smell disorders is the main purpose of this systematic review protocol. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang Database, ClinicalTrials.gov trials registry, and Chinese Clinical Trial Registry will be searched from January 2019 to January 2021. A combination of subject words and free text words will be applied in the searches. The language is limited to Chinese and English. The complete process will include study selection, data extraction, risk of bias assessment, and meta-analyses. Endnote X9.3 will be used to manage data screening. The statistical analysis will be completed by Review Manager V.5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration) or Stata V.16.0 software. RESULTS: This proposed study will assess the effectiveness and safety of OT for COVID-19 patients with smell disorders. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of this study will provide evidence to prove the effectiveness and safety of olfactory training for COVID-19 patients with smell disorders. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This protocol will not evaluate individual patient information or infringe patient rights and therefore does not require ethical approval. REGISTRATION: PEROSPERO CRD42020218009.


Subject(s)
/complications , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Olfaction Disorders/rehabilitation , Humans , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(8): e24415, 2021 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119145

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The worldwide impact of COVID-19 has reached all spheres of human health. Individuals may also experience unique changes in their sexual behaviors during the COVID-19 self-isolation/social distancing period. Studies in many countries have assess the effects of the pandemic on sexual behavior, or quality of sexual life. However, no systematic review has comprehensively explored the association between COVID-19 and the sexual behaviors of young women and men to date. This systematic review and meta-analysis protocol aims to ascertain the association between COVID-19 and sexual behaviors of young women and men that may get targeted interventions to improve health and well-being of young people's sexual health. METHODS: This systematic review and meta-analysis will be reported following the PRISMA guidelines. Observational designs (including cross-sectional, case-control, and cohort) will be eligible. Studies eligible for inclusion must contain participants aged 15 to 45 in any country affected by the pandemic of COVID-19. The search will be conducted in the following databases, including PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, EBSCO, Ovid, WHO COVID-19 database, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), WanFang Data, Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal Database (VIP), and Chinese Biomedical Databases (CBM). A pre-designed search strategy of medical subject heading (MeSH) terms and free words for the concepts "COVID-19" and "sexual behaviors" will be used. Two authors will independently complete literature screening, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment. Disagreements will be resolved by consensus with a third reviewer. The reviewer will follow the PECOS steps (population, exposure, comparator, outcomes, and study design) to obtain eligible extraction items. The risk of bias and quality of included studies will be assessed using RevMan 5.3. We will assess heterogeneity according to the I2 statistics. If there is substantial heterogeneity in the included trials, subgroup analysis will be carried out to seek the potential causes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: It is not necessary to obtain ethical approval as we will use data from published articles. The findings of this systematic review will be published in a peer- reviewed journal. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO 2020: CRD42020190867.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , China/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Research Design , Sexual Behavior , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL