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1.
Br J Psychiatry ; 217(4): 540-542, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-853428

ABSTRACT

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on population mental health are unknown. We need to understand the scale of any such impact in different sections of the population, who is most affected and how best to mitigate, prevent and treat any excess morbidity. We propose a coordinated and interdisciplinary mental health science response.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Mental Disorders , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Preventive Psychiatry/methods , Psychosocial Support Systems , Public Health/methods , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Mental Disorders/virology , Mental Health , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Quality Improvement , Research Design , Risk Assessment/methods
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(40): e22231, 2020 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835215

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a worldwide outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), at present, accumulative attention has been paid to COVID-19 due to its global prevalence. Acupuncture may play a beneficial role in patients who suffer from COVID-19. In China and East Asia, acupuncture has been widely used to treat diverse diseases for thousands of years, as an important method of treatment now, it plays an indispensable role in the treatment of respiratory diseases in China. This study is designed to determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in COVID-19. METHODS: We will search the following sources for the Randomized controlled trials (RCT): The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), Chinese Science, and the Wanfang Database. All the above databases will be searched from the available date of inception until the latest issue. No language or publication restriction will be used. Primary outcomes will include chest CT and nucleic acid detection of respiratory samples. RESULTS: The results will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence for researchers in this subject area. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of our study will provide evidence to evaluate whether acupuncture is an effective treatments for patients suffering from COVID-19. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020180875.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(39): e22273, 2020 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sparked global concern for its outbreak and pandemic. It caused severe respiratory tract infections and a significant proportion of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. Several studies have investigated the intestinal flora of COVID-19. However, so far there has been no evidence demonstrating the evidence on the association of COVID-19 with intestinal flora through meta-analysis. A systematic and comprehensive understanding of their relationship is essential to provide public health prevention or treatment strategy. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This systematic review and meta-analysis will be reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Observational studies (cohort studies, case-control, and cross-sectional studies) and clinical trials will be eligible. Studies eligible for inclusion must contain participants with COVID-19. Systematic searches will be conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Ovid, EBSCO, World Health Organization COVID-19 database, China National Knowledge Internet, WanFang Data, Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Databases. A pre-designed search strategy of medical subject headings and free text terms for COVID-19 and intestinal flora will be used. Two reviewers will independently screen the titles and abstracts, followed by full-text screening. Discrepancies will be resolved by consensus with a third reviewer. The reviewers will then extract data from each eligible article based on PECOS (Population, Exposure, Comparator, Outcomes, and Study design). The risk of bias and quality of included studies will be assessed using an appropriate tool. A random-effects meta-analysis will be considered where there are sufficiently homogeneous studies; otherwise, a narrative synthesis will be conducted. Heterogeneity among studies will be assessed using I statistics. If substantial heterogeneity detected, subgroup analyses and meta-regression will be conducted to look for the potential causes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not required as we will use data from published articles. Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal.PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020191640.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Research Design
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(39): e22316, 2020 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811172

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a worldwide outbreak of COVID-19, as the number of patients increases. External treatment of traditional Chinese medicine includes acupuncture, massage, fire needle, cupping, and other alternative therapies. Currently, there are no relevant articles for systematic review. METHODS: We will search the randomized controlled trials related to the external treatment of traditional Chinese medicine (such as, acupuncture, massage, etc) and COVID-19 from inception to June 2020. The following database is our focus area: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and Wan-Fang Database. All published randomized controlled trials in English or Chinese related to massage for COVID-19 will be included. Primary outcomes include the influence of external treatment of traditional Chinese medicine on the patients with COVID-19. Secondary outcomes include accompanying symptoms (such as myalgia, expectoration, stuffiness, runny nose, pharyngalgia, anhelation, chest distress, dyspnea, crackles, headache, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea) disappear rate, negative COVID-19 results rate on 2 consecutive occasions (not on the same day), average hospitalization time, Clinical curative effect, and improved quality of life. RESULTS: The results will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence for researchers in this subject area. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of our study will provide evidence to judge whether external treatment of traditional Chinese medicine is an effective intervention on the patients with COVID-19. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020181336.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus , Body Weights and Measures , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , Sex Factors
6.
BMJ Open ; 10(10): e038390, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810675

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In order to avoid unnecessary hospital admission and associated complications, there is an urgent need to improve the early detection of infection in nursing home residents. Monitoring signs and symptoms with checklists or aids called decision support tools may help nursing home staff to detect infection in residents, particularly during the current COVID-19 pandemic.We plan to conduct a survey exploring views and experiences of how infections are detected and managed in practice by nurses, care workers and managers in nursing homes in England and Sweden. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: An international cross-sectional descriptive survey, using a pretested questionnaire, will be used to explore nurses, care workers and managers views and experiences of how infections are detected and managed in practice in nursing homes. Data will be analysed descriptively and univariate associations between personal and organisational factors explored. This will help identify important factors related to awareness, knowledge, attitudes, belief and skills likely to affect future implementation of a decision support tool for the early detection of infection in nursing home residents. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was approved using the self-certification process at the University of Surrey and Linköping University ethics committee (Approval 2018/514-32) in 2018. Study findings will be disseminated through community/stakeholder/service user engagement events in each country, publication in academic peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. A LAY summary will be provided to participants who indicate they would like to receive this information.This is the first stage of a plan of work to revise and evaluate the Early Detection of Infection Scale (EDIS) tool and its effect on managing infections and reducing unplanned hospital admissions in nursing home residents. Implementation of the EDIS tool may have important implications for the healthcare economy; this will be explored in cost-benefit analyses as the work progresses.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections , Medical Overuse/prevention & control , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral , Skilled Nursing Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Cross-Sectional Studies , England/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/standards , Hospitalization , Humans , Patient Care Management/economics , Patient Care Management/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Management/economics , Research Design , Sweden/epidemiology
7.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0239554, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Without any pharmaceutical intervention and vaccination, the only way to combat Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is to slow down the spread of the disease by adopting non-pharmaceutical public health interventions (PHIs). Patient isolation, lockdown, quarantine, social distancing, changes in health care provision, and mass screening are the most common non-pharmaceutical PHIs to cope with the epidemic. However, there is neither systematic evidence on the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical PHIs in controlling the COVID-19 nor on how these interventions work in different contexts. Therefore, in this study we will address two main objectives: 1) to assess the effectiveness of the non-pharmaceutical PHIs in controlling the spread of COVID-19 using a systematic review and meta-analyses; 2) to explore why, how, and for whom these interventions work using a realist review. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This review study has two main phases. In the first phase of this study, we will extract data from two main types of studies including quasi-experimental studies (such as quasi-randomized trials, controlled before-after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series studies (ITSs)) and observational studies (such as cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies), written in the English language. We will explore effectiveness of the non-pharmaceutical PHIs targeted either suppression or mitigation strategies (or a combination of both) in controlling the COVID-19 epidemics in the community level. Effectiveness will be considered as the changes in mortality rate, incidence rate, basic reproduction number rate, morbidity rate, rates of hospitalization, rates of intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization, and other health outcomes where possible. We will perform random-effects meta-analyses, if possible, using CMA software. In the second phase, we will conduct a realist review to find out how, why, for whom, and in what circumstances the non-pharmaceutical PHIs work. At the realist review, we will identify and explore Context-Mechanism-Outcome configurations to provide a robust explanation on the effectiveness of the interventions in different contexts using Pawson's 5-step realist review template including: "clarify scope; search for evidence; appraise primary studies and extract data; synthesize evidence and draw conclusions; and disseminate, implement and evaluate". Although the steps are presented in a linear manner, in practice, we will follow them in iterative stages to fill any potential overlap. DISCUSSION: The findings of this research will provide a crucial insight into how and in which context the non-pharmaceutical PHIs work in controlling the spread of COVID-19. Conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis in line with a realist review will allow us to draw a robust conclusion on the effects and the way in which the interventions work. Understanding the role of contextual factors in the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical PHIs and the mechanism of this process could enable policymakers to implement appropriate policies and manage the COVID-19 epidemics more efficiently. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: CRD42020186855.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Basic Reproduction Number , Betacoronavirus , Controlled Before-After Studies , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Non-Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Observational Studies as Topic , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic
8.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 33(5): 645-649, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807208

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak is a stark reminder of the ongoing challenge of emerging and reemerging disease, the human cost of pandemics and the need for robust research.1 For primary care, the advent of COVID-19 has forced an unprecedented wave of practice change. In turn, Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs) must rapidly pivot to address the changing environment and the critical challenges faced by primary care. The pandemic has also impacted the ability of PBRNs to deploy traditional research methods such as face-to-face patient and provider interactions, practice facilitation, and stakeholder engagement. Providers need more relevant, patient-centered evidence and the skills to effect change. These skills will become more important than ever as primary care practices evolve in response to the current COVID-19 pandemic and the disparities in health outcomes highlighted by COVID-19 and the global Black Lives Matter social movement for justice. Throughout this issue, authors detail the work conducted by PBRNs that demonstrate many of these evolving concepts. Articles explore how PBRNs can evaluate COVID-19 in primary care, the role of PBRNs in quality improvement, stakeholder engagement, prevention and chronic care management, and patient safety in primary care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Community Networks/trends , Coronavirus Infections , Health Services Research/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Primary Health Care/trends , Community Networks/organization & administration , Health Services Research/methods , Health Services Research/organization & administration , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Research Design , Stakeholder Participation , United States
9.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 33(5): 774-778, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are critical laboratories for generating evidence from real-world settings, including studying natural experiments. Primary care's response to the novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic is arguably the most impactful natural experiment in our lifetime. EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF COVID-19: We briefly describe the OCHIN PBRN of community health centers (CHCs), its partnership with implementation scientists, and how we are leveraging this infrastructure and expertise to create a rapid research response evaluating how CHCs across the country responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 RESEARCH ROADMAP: Our research agenda focuses on asking: How has care delivery in CHCs changed due to COVID-19? What impact has COVID-19 had on the delivery of preventive services in CHCs? Which PBRN services (e.g., data surveillance, training, evidence synthesis) are most impactful to real-world practices? What decision-making strategies were used in the PBRN and its practices to make real-time changes in response to the pandemic? What critical factors in successfully and sustainably transforming primary care are illuminated by pandemic-driven changes? DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: PBRNs enable real-world evaluation of practice change and natural experiments, and thus are ideal laboratories for implementation science research. We present a real-time example of how a PBRN Implementation Laboratory activated a response to study a historic natural experiment, to help other PBRNs charting a course through this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Community Health Centers/trends , Community Networks/trends , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Health Services Research/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Primary Health Care/trends , Community Health Centers/organization & administration , Community Networks/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Evidence-Based Practice , Health Services Research/methods , Health Services Research/organization & administration , Humans , Implementation Science , Information Dissemination , Organizational Innovation , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Program Evaluation , Research Design , Stakeholder Participation , United States
10.
Trials ; 21(1): 815, 2020 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803067

ABSTRACT

An unprecedented volume of research has been generated in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there are risks of inefficient duplication and of important work being impeded if efforts are not synchronized. Excessive reliance on observational studies, which can be more rapidly conducted but are inevitably subject to measured and unmeasured confounders, can foil efforts to conduct rigorous randomized trials. These challenges are illustrated by recent global efforts to conduct clinical trials of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) as a strategy for preventing COVID-19. Innovative strategies are needed to help overcome these issues, including increasing communication between the Data Safety and Monitoring Committees (DSMCs) of similar trials. It is important to reinforce the primacy of high-quality trials in generating unbiased answers to pressing prevention and treatment questions about COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees/trends , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Post-Exposure Prophylaxis , Research Design/trends , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
11.
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis ; 15: 2127-2133, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-802252

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an important, evidence-based treatment that improves outcomes for people with COPD. Individualized exercise programmes aim to improve exercise capacity; self-management education and psychological support are also provided. Translating increased exercise capacity into sustained behavioural change of increased physical activity is difficult. Other unresolved problems with PR programmes include improving uptake, completion, response and sustaining long-term benefit. We offer a different perspective drawn from clinical experience of PR, quantitative and qualitative studies of singing groups for people with COPD, and stroke rehabilitation research that gives psychological factors a more central role in determining outcomes after PR. We discuss Take Charge; a simple but effective psychological intervention promoting self-management--that could be used as part of a PR programme or in situations where PR was declined or unavailable. This may be particularly relevant now when traditional face-to-face group programmes have been disrupted by COVID-19 precautions.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections , Exercise Therapy , Health Behavior , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Rehabilitation Research , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Exercise Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Psychosocial Support Systems , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/psychology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/rehabilitation , Research Design , Self-Management/methods , Self-Management/psychology , Treatment Outcome
12.
Drug Des Devel Ther ; 14: 3803-3813, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797376

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms of antiviral drugs against the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the study designs in clinical trials registered with the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). Methods: Clinical trials involving antiviral drugs for treating COVID-19 were retrieved from the ICTRP database. For each trial, the study design, number of participants, primary endpoints, source register, antiviral mechanism, and results were evaluated. Results: On June 10, 2020, 145 eligible clinical trials were retrieved from the ICTRP, of which 99 (68.3%) were randomized trials, 109 (75.2%) were parallel assignment trials, 38 (26.2%) were double or single blinded, 130 (89.7%) involved two groups, and 75 (51.6%) included more than 100 participants; and clinical improvement or recovery and virus-negative conversion were the two most common endpoints, accounting for 40.7% and 18.6%, respectively. The drugs were divided according to the antiviral mechanism into HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors, HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), hepatitis C virus NS3 PIs, and anti-influenza drugs. Conclusion: The design characteristics of clinical trials of antiviral drugs for treating COVID-19 as well as the mechanism of action and antiviral efficacy of the drugs were evaluated in this study. The results of these trials could constitute a reference for future clinical trials to be executed on COVID-19 treatment and prevention.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Registries , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Data Collection , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Data Management , Drug Combinations , Humans , Pandemics , Research Design
13.
Rev Soc Bras Med Trop ; 53: e20200475, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-788940

ABSTRACT

Two decades ago, Robert Proctor coined the term agnotology to refer to the study of ignorance that stems from scientific research. Amid the coronavirus disease pandemic, the world is witnessing the greatest natural experiment ever, and countries have adopted different response strategies. An evaluation of the effectiveness of different policies will play a valuable role in preparing for future public health emergencies. However, controversial issues such as the timing and pathways of viral emergence, the effectiveness of social distancing and lockdown strategies, and the use of antimalarial drugs as therapy have still not been fully resolved. This serves as a fertile breeding ground for agnotological strategies, whereby scientific studies are deliberately or unintentionally designed to create distractions or draw conclusions that are not supported by research findings. Researchers, public health authorities, and healthcare workers should be equipped to identify such agnotological strategies, distinguish them from scientific fraud, and avoid drawing misleading inferences based on an irrational adherence to hypotheses and a lack of criticism of implausible results.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Research Design , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Pandemics , Scientific Misconduct
14.
J Int Med Res ; 48(9): 300060520955037, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-788436

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The roles of inflammation and hypercoagulation in predicting outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are unclear. METHODS: Adult patients diagnosed with COVID-19 from 28 January 2020 to 4 March 2020 in Tongji Hospital, Wuhan were recruited. Data on related parameters were collected. Univariate analysis and multivariable binary logistic regression were used to explore predictors of critical illness and mortality. RESULTS: In total, 199 and 44 patients were enrolled in the training and testing sets, respectively. Elevated ferritin, tumor necrosis factor-α and D-dimer and decreased albumin concentration were associated with disease severity. Older age, elevated ferritin and elevated interleukin-6 were associated with 28-day mortality. The FAD-85 score, defined as age + 0.01 * ferritin +D-dimer, was used to predict risk of mortality. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FAD-85 were 86.4%, 81.8% and 86.4%, respectively. A nomogram was established using age, ferritin and D-dimer to predict the risk of 28-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Thrombo-inflammatory parameters provide key information on the severity and prognosis of COVID-19 and can be used as references for clinical treatment to correct inflammatory and coagulation abnormalities.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Thrombosis/mortality , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Research Design , Retrospective Studies , Serum Albumin/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/virology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22379, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787431

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The new coronavirus-related pneumonia is causing a global pandemic without specific antiviral drug. Ribavirin has activity against extensive RNA and DNA viruses. We plan to systematically review the use of ribavirin in patients with coronavirus-related pneumonia and meta-analyze the data with updated studies. METHODS: EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure will be searched from 2002 to June 2021 without language restriction to identify randomized controlled trials. Subjects consist of patients with coronavirus-related pneumonia. Ribavirin of any dose or route will be compared with the control group of other medication, placebo, or no medication. The primary outcome is the hospital mortality. The secondary outcome includes the hospital length of stay, ventilator-free days in 28 days, median time from start of study treatment to negative nasopharyngeal swab, and adverse events. The Mantel-Haenszel method will be used for analysis of dichotomous data and the risk ratios will be reported with 95% confidence interval; the inverse-variance method will be used for continuous data and the mean differences will be reported. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses will be further performed. The funnel plots or Egger test will be used for detection of publication bias. The GRADE methodology will be used for summarizing the quality of evidence. The trial sequential analysis will be conducted to test whether the current meta-analysis is conclusive. RESULTS: The efficacy and safety of ribavirin for treatment of coronavirus-related pneumonia will be systematically reviewed and summarized. The forthcoming results of the ongoing studies focusing on ribavirin in patients with the 2019 noel coronavirus disease will also be included. CONCLUSION: The relevant studies will be summarized and advanced evidence will be provided. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020178900.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ribavirin/therapeutic use , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , SARS Virus , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22345, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787430

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the end of 2019, peoples normal lives were disrupted by a sudden plague (COVID-19), the huge impact of COVID-19 on society has never been appeared. How to effectively prevent and treat COVID-19 is a concern for all health care workers. Exercise as a green and cheap complementary therapy, which has been proven to improve the immune capacity of the body and prevent infection. The main purpose of this study is to provide a reliable methodological guidance and credible evidence for exercise on COVID-19 therapeutic. METHODS: This protocol is guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols. We will search the following database sources for the Randomized controlled trials: the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), Chinese Science and the Wanfang Database. All randomized controlled trials of exercise therapy for COVID-19 in the above database will be considered for inclusion, and high-quality articles will be screened for data extraction and analysis, to summarize the therapeutic effect of exercise on COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: In this study, we hope to find strong evidence for the treatment of COVID-19 by exercise. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of our study will provide credible evidence to judge whether exercise is an effective intervention on the COVID-19 patients therapeutic, and guide future researches.PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020200883.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Exercise Therapy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22277, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787429

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a potentially fatal disease. clinical practice shows that Chinese Patent Medicine (CPM) has played an important role in the outbreak, Among them, Jinhua Qinggan granules, Lianhua Qingwen capsule, and Xuebiqing injection have an effect in treating COVID-19 patients, but it has not been systematically evaluated for efficacy and safety. We provide a protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrieved the database, including the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Database, Wan Fang database, and PubMed. The quality of each study is assessed according to the criteria of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Using Manager 5.3 software and STATA 16.0 software were used to perform the meta-analysis. RESULTS: The systematic review and meta-analysis aims to review and pool current clinical outcomes of CPM combined with routine western medicine (RWM) for the treatment of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: This study will provide evidence of CPM (including Jinhua Qinggan granule, Lianhua Qingwen capsule, and Xuebiqing injection) for the treatment on COVID-19 patients.INPLASY Registration number: INPLASY202050050.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22235, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, has emerged to be the biggest global health threat worldwide. COVID-19 marks the emergence of the third large-scale epidemic related to the coronavirus, after SARS-CoV in 2002 and Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERSCoV) in 2012. The pandemic has had a harmful effect on the public mental health, especially on depression. Increasing systematic reviews (SRs) of coronavirus were focusing on depression. However, the methodological quality of these SRs is unclear. Therefore, to evaluate and compare the normativity of report of SR, we conducted a comprehensive overview of depression during the SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 pandemics. METHODS: Two independent reviewers will conduct comprehensively searches in PubMed, EMBASE.com, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Chinese biomedical literature database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wan fang Database, Chongqing VIP (CQVIP). Reference lists of articles, gray literature, and conference proceedings will also be searched. We will extract the data and assess the methodological quality using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews-2 (AMSTAR-2) measurement tool and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. General characteristics of the eligible SRs will be summarized and described. We will provide AMSTAR-2 and PRISMA assessments in tabular form for each review, the total percentage of each item will be calculated. Endnote X8 and EXCEL will be used. RESULTS: Using the draft search strategy of databases, 8 SRs met the a priori criteria and were included. The overview of SRs will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: Our overview will be a comprehensive synthesis of the existing systemic review on depression with SARS, MERS, and COVID-19. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: INPLASY202080003.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/virology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Research Design , SARS Virus , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Systematic Reviews as Topic
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22177, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorder places a heavy burden in the clinical treatment of patients of COVID-19. Acupuncture is a recommended treatment of COVID-19 in China, and clinical researches showed the effectiveness of acupuncture. We will conduct this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for COVID-19. METHODS: Electronic databases of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Biomedical literature Database (CBM), Chinese Scientific and Journal Database (VIP), and Wan Fang database (Wanfang) will be searched for randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19 from inception of the database to August 10, 2020. Two reviewers will screen studies, collect information independently. We will utilize RevMan 5.3 for meta-analysis. RESULTS: We will publish the study result to a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: This study will contribute to provide high-quality evidence of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22041, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787419

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Qigong is a traditional Chinese exercise method for health care, keeping fit and getting rid of diseases. It has the advantages of simple operation and few side effects. Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2(SARS-COV-2). Its clinical manifestations mainly include fever, fatigue, and dry cough. Clinical practice showed that Qigong had some therapeutic effects on pulmonary dysfunction caused by novel Coronavirus, but there was lacking in evidence of evidence-based medicine. The purpose of this protocol is to systematically evaluate the effects of Qigong on lung function and quality of life in COVID-19 patients, and to add evidence to evidence-based medicine for the clinical application of Qigong therapy. METHODS: Use computer to retrieve English database (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library) and Chinese database (China Knowledge Network (CNKI), Wanfang Database, VIP Information Chinese Journal Service Platform (VIP), Chinese Biomedical Database). In addition, we manually retrieve randomized controlled clinical research from Baidu academic and Google academic from its establishment to July 2020. Two researchers independently extracted and evaluated the quality of the data included in the study, using RevMan5.3 to do meta-analyses of articles included, without language restrictions. RESULTS: This research evaluated the effectiveness and safety of Qigongs influence on patients pulmonary function and life quality by index such as 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second/Forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second/prediction (FEV1/PRE), Self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), etc. CONCLUSIONS:: This study will provide reliable evidence-based evidence for the clinical application of Qigong in the treatment of COVID-19. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020191877.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Qigong/methods , Quality of Life , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , Respiratory Function Tests , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
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