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1.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(2): 149-152, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791821

ABSTRACT

Consecutive Royal College of Physicians' Research for all surveys have highlighted the challenges for doctors becoming involved in research. Local issues included under-representation of chief investigators (CIs) and reduction in dedicated research time. The West Midlands National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (CRN) established a clinical trials scholarship (CTS) initiative in 2019 to develop research-active consultants in smaller trusts, with a dedicated day per week embedded in a local clinical trials unit. In the initial round of 41 applications from 13 partner organisations, 17 CTSs were appointed, including nine consultant physicians, with one subsequently deferring. After 2 years, the remaining 16 CTSs have been awarded 40 grants totalling £18.35 million as CI or co-CI, including 10 NIHR grants, plus >200 publications. These scholarships are a proven cost-effective way to develop CIs, provide academic leadership and promote a research culture, even in small, previously less research-active trusts.


Subject(s)
Physicians , State Medicine , Humans , Leadership , Research Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Thorax ; 77(5): 511-513, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788989

ABSTRACT

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with significant comorbidity, preventable accidents and reduced quality of life. Little is known about the research priorities of patients with OSA, family members and clinicians. A James Lind Alliance research priority setting partnership was conducted. An initial survey (690 respondents who generated 1110 questions), a prioritisation survey (250 respondents), and a final workshop were used to identify the top 10 research priorities. Consensus was achieved on the top-ranked research priorities. Our results will inform the efforts of funders, researchers and policy-makers to align directly with stakeholder priorities related to OSA.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive , Health Priorities , Humans , Quality of Life , Research , Research Personnel , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/therapy
3.
Nurs Manage ; 53(4): 38-40, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788534

ABSTRACT

The following manuscript is one of the runner-up entries submitted to Nursing Management for the Visionary Leader Award in recognition of Carol Grove, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, the associate CNO at Meritus Medical Center in Hagerstown, Md.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , Nurse Administrators , Nursing Care , Humans , Leadership , Research Personnel
4.
Nature ; 604(7904): 203-205, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788271
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 749627, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775930

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a critical need to address mental health needs across the globe, especially in low and middle-income countries where mental health disparities are pervasive, including among children. The global mental health disparities suggest an imperative for culturally and contextually-congruent mental health services models that expand upon the existing services and interventions for these groups. Rigorous research is a key tool in providing the scientific evidence to inform public policy and practice efforts to effectively address these needs. Yet, there is a limited number of researchers, especially those from diverse backgrounds, who study these issues. In this paper, we describe the "Training LEAD ers to Accelerate Global Mental Health Disparities Research" (LEAD) program, a research training program funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities and focused on global mental health disparities research for early career researchers from under-represented minority groups. Methods: The LEAD program is designed as a two-phase training program for advanced pre-doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty from diverse backgrounds in the U.S., including groups underrepresented in biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social sciences research, interested in global mental health disparities research. Trainees are matched with mentors and participate in an intensive 12-week program. Discussion: The LEAD program seeks to provide a robust platform for the development, implementation and expansion of evidence-based culturally and contextually-congruent interventions and services models addressing global mental health disparities across the life cycle, especially in low-resource communities in the global context. By producing a sustainable network of well-trained investigators from underrepresented backgrounds, LEAD will potentially contribute to the shared lessons and efforts relevant to addressing global mental health disparities and improving care for vulnerable populations in low-resource settings.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Mental Health , Research Personnel , Child , Humans , Mentors , Minority Groups , Research Personnel/education
6.
Clin Invest Med ; 45(1): E1-4, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766288

ABSTRACT

Over the past two years, physician-scientist trainees have persevered in the face of evolving challenges presented by the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Research and healthcare institutions across the country continue to feel the impacts of the public health emergency. As scientists and physicians generate evidence to inform the prevention and treatment of COVID-19, physician-scientist trainees in all disciplines have adapted to the changing conditions of their education.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Physicians , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada , Humans , Research Personnel
7.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265252, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759952

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has caused death and economic injury around the globe. The urgent need for COVID-19 research created new ethical, regulatory, and practical challenges. The next public health emergency could be worse than COVID-19. We must learn about these challenges from the experiences of researchers and Research Ethics Committee professionals responsible for these COVID-19 studies to prepare for the next emergency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted an online survey to identify the ethical, oversight, and regulatory challenges of conducting COVID-19 research during the early pandemic, and proposed solutions for overcoming these barriers. Using criterion-based, convenience sampling, we invited researchers who proposed or conducted COVID-19 research to complete an anonymous, online survey about their experiences. We administered a separate but related survey to Institutional Review Board (IRB) professionals who reviewed COVID-19 research studies. The surveys included open-ended and demographic items. We performed inductive content analysis on responses to open-ended survey questions. RESULTS: IRB professionals (n = 143) and researchers (n = 211) described 19 types of barriers to COVID-19 research, related to 5 overarching categories: policy and regulatory, biases and misperceptions, institutional and inter-institutional conflicts, risks of harm, and pressure of the pandemic. Researchers and IRB professionals described 8 categories of adaptations and solutions to these challenges: enacting technological solutions; developing protocol-based solutions; disposition and team management; establishing and communicating appropriate standards; national guidance and leadership; maintaining high standards; prioritizing studies before IRB review; and identifying and incorporating experts. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: This inventory of challenges represents ongoing barriers to studying the current pandemic, and they represent a risk to research during future public health emergencies. Delays in studies of a pandemic during a pandemic threatens the health and safety of the public. We urge the development of a national working group to address these issues before the next public health emergency arises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ethics Committees, Research , Humans , Pandemics , Research Personnel , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(10): e2202107119, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758466
9.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 22(1): 74, 2022 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753106

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: In 2016, international standards governing clinical research recommended that the approach to monitoring a research project should be undertaken based on risk, however it is unknown whether this approach has been adopted in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) throughout critical care research. The aims of the project were to: 1) Gain an understanding of current research monitoring practices in academic-led clinical trials in the field of critical care research, 2) Describe the perceived barriers and enablers to undertaking research monitoring. METHODS: Electronic survey distributed to investigators, research co-ordinators and other research staff currently undertaking and supporting academic-led clinical trials in the field of critical care in ANZ. RESULTS: Of the 118 respondents, 70 were involved in the co-ordination of academic trials; the remaining results pertain to this sub-sample. Fifty-eight (83%) were working in research units associated with hospitals, 29 (41%) were experienced Research Coordinators and 19 (27%) Principal Investigators; 31 (44%) were primarily associated with paediatric research. Fifty-six (80%) develop monitoring plans with 33 (59%) of these undertaking a risk assessment; the most common barrier reported was lack of expertise. Nineteen (27%) indicated that centralised monitoring was used, noting that technology to support centralised monitoring (45/51; 88%) along with support from data managers and statisticians (45/52; 87%) were key enablers. Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) impacted monitoring for 82% (45/55) by increasing remote (25/45; 56%) and reducing onsite (29/45; 64%) monitoring. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to Good Clinical Practice guidance, risk assessments to inform monitoring plans are not being consistently performed due to lack of experience and guidance. There is an urgent need to enhance risk assessment methodologies and develop technological solutions for centralised statistical monitoring.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Attitude , Child , Clinical Trials as Topic , Critical Care , Humans , Research Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 31(4): 106385, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747726

ABSTRACT

The inaugural African Stroke Organization Conference (ASOC) aimed to create a forum to discuss the latest stroke science, highlight opportunities to address the high burden of stroke in Africa, develop a viable pipeline of emerging African stroke researchers, honor leading scientists and policy makers, and provide networking avenues to bolster future collaboration. Using a virtual platform, ASOC was held from Nov 3-4, 2021, and was attended by 236 participants. ASOC 2021 sessions included: (1) Osuntokun Award Lecture delivered by Prof. Richard Walker of Newcastle University; (2) Distinguished Policy Maker Lecture delivered by Dr. Raj Tajudeen of the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; (3) Invited presentations by prominent global stroke academicians on acute stroke, vascular malformations, vascular brain injury, Covid-19, nursing/allied care, rehabilitation/recovery, health services, imaging, pediatric stroke, precision medicine, and unusual causes of stroke; (4) six oral scientific abstract presentations; and (5) fifteen moderated oral poster presentations. Other sessions were (i) Vascular Brain Trust where early career African scholars presented manuscripts and grant proposals under development for feedback from seasoned researchers (ii) Moving on Up during which presentations were given to early career scholars about pathways for success in funding and advancement. A capstone event was the Frontiers of Research in Africa session which showcased the work and capabilities of 20 scientists and sites in Africa. All the ASOC sessions were lively and post-conference feedback from attendees showed high levels of satisfaction for the conference platforms and content. The ASOC marks a new dawn in the era of an escalating stroke burden in Africa, and it is anticipated to serve as a catalyst for exponentially building the capacity, careers, collaborations, and contributions of Africans to ameliorating stroke within and beyond the continent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Capacity Building , Child , Humans , Research Personnel , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , United States
12.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0262834, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741998

ABSTRACT

Taking place annually in more than 400 cities, European Researchers' Night is a pan- European synchronized event that aims to bring researchers closer to the public. In this paper audience profiles are compared from events in 2019 and 2020. In 2019, face-to-face events reached an estimated 1.6 million attendees, while in 2020, events shifted online due to the COVID-19 pandemic and reached an estimated 2.3 million attendees. Focusing on social inclusion metrics, survey data is analyzed across two national contexts (Ireland and Malta) in 2019 (n = 656) and 2020 (n = 506). The results from this exploratory, descriptive study shed light on how moving public engagement with research online shifted audience profiles. Based on prior research about the digital divide in access and use of online media, hypotheses were proposed that online European Researchers' Night events would attract audiences with higher educational attainment levels and greater self-reported, subjective economic well-being. While changes were observed from 2019 to 2020, results for each hypothesis show a mixed picture. The first hypothesis was upheld for the highest education levels but failed for the lowest levels suggesting that the pivot to online events simultaneously attracted participants with no formal education and those with postgraduate qualifications, while attracting less of those with undergraduate or lower levels of education. The second hypothesis was not upheld, with online European Researchers' Night events attracting audiences with slightly higher levels of economic well-being compared to face-to-face events. The findings of this study indicate that European Researchers' Night events present a clear opportunity to measure the effects of the digital divide in relation to public engagement with research across Europe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Marketing , Pandemics , Research Personnel , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male
13.
Health Promot Pract ; 23(2): 235-240, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741864

ABSTRACT

When our photovoice research intersected with the COVID-19 pandemic, we were thrust into a new world of adapting the method in the virtual environment. Between both authors, we had over two decades of experience implementing photovoice. However, that involved tried and true methods of working face to face and side by side with people in community-based settings. This article describes lessons learned from two virtual photovoice projects. One involved pivoting from a project already well underway in person to online and the other was designed for virtual implementation since that was the only option available. Key considerations discussed are navigating our institutional review boards, adapting project management, building community online, and sharing results and advocacy for social change. Dilemmas and key decisions in each of these areas are described for practitioners and community-based researchers who need or seek to transition their photovoice research to the virtual environment. Practical tips and strategies for implementation are described and offered to photovoice researchers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Photography , Research Design , Research Personnel
17.
Mol Biol Cell ; 33(3): vo1, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709244

ABSTRACT

Despite substantial investment and effort by federal agencies and institutions to improve the diversity of the professoriate, progress is excruciatingly slow. One program that aims to enhance faculty diversity is the Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award (IRACDA) funded by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences. IRACDA supports the training of a diverse cohort of postdoctoral scholars who will seek academic research and teaching careers. The San Diego IRACDA program has trained 109 postdoctoral scholars since its inception in 2003; 59% are women and 63% are underrepresented (UR) Black/African-American, Latinx/Mexican-American, and Indigenous scientists. Sixty-four percent obtained tenure-track faculty positions, including a substantial 32% at research-intensive institutions. However, the COVID-19 pandemic crisis threatens to upend IRACDA efforts to improve faculty diversity, and academia is at risk of losing a generation of diverse, talented scholars. Here, a group of San Diego IRACDA postdoctoral scholars reflects on these issues and discusses recommendations to enhance the retention of UR scientists to avoid a "lost generation" of promising UR faculty scholars.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cultural Diversity , Education, Graduate , Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Universities/statistics & numerical data , California , Education, Graduate/economics , Faculty, Medical/economics , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , National Institute of General Medical Sciences (U.S.) , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Research Personnel/economics , Research Personnel/education , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Salaries and Fringe Benefits/statistics & numerical data , United States , Universities/economics , Women/education
18.
Nurs Open ; 9(2): 900-907, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700483

ABSTRACT

AIM: This article describes the development and implementation of a virtual Consensus development project to address current challenges in adult nursing care in the UK. DESIGN: This is a Consensus Development Project (CDP). METHODS: The five stages of this CDP were: develop questions (informed by PPI representatives and a documentary review), generate evidence reviews, recruit and orient the lay panel, host Consensus seminars, and consult with panel members and stakeholders. RESULTS: To the best of our knowledge, a CDP has not previously been conducted in a UK nursing context, and this is the first of its kind to be hosted virtually. This article contributes a detailed outline of the Consensus development methodology and constructive commentary to support future Consensus development projects. Learning points include reflections on the impact of hosting this event virtually, the relationship between the project coordinator and chair, and the composition of the lay panel.


Subject(s)
Research Personnel , Consensus , Consensus Development Conferences as Topic , Humans
20.
Nature ; 602(7895): 169-171, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683957
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