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2.
Mol Biol Cell ; 32(19): 1795-1796, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1651151

ABSTRACT

No one maps out their tenure as a postdoc anticipating a life-altering tragedy. But mental health crises of all kinds affect academic trainees and staff at similar or higher levels than the general public. While the mental health resources available to trainees are often set by healthcare providers, all levels of university leadership can work to remove material and immaterial obstacles that render such resources out of reach. I describe how access to care via telemedicine helped me following a loss in my family.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Laboratories , Mental Health , Research Personnel/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Counseling/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Psychotherapeutic Processes , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Support
4.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251410, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604261

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to explore the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic on ongoing and upcoming drug clinical trials. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with clinical trial staff and clinical trial subjects were surveyed by questionnaire in this study. The results of interviews and questionnaire showed that coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has led to many changes in the implementation of drug clinical trials, including: a variety of meetings being held online webinars using various platforms, telemedicine and follow-up by video, A large number of deviations from protocol and losses of follow-up, delivery of clinical trial drugs by express, additional workload caused by screening for coronavirus, and anxiety of subjects. These results suggest that the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak has hindered the progress and damaged the quality of clinical trials. The online meeting, remote follow-up, express delivery of drugs and remote monitoring in the epidemic environment can ensure the progress of clinical trials to a certain extent, but they cannot fully guarantee the quality as before.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patients/psychology , Research Personnel/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261573, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581738

ABSTRACT

Drucker's knowledge-worker productivity theory and knowledge-based view of the firm theory are widely employed in many disciplines but there is little application of these theories in knowledge-based innovation among academic researchers. Therefore, this study intends to evaluate the effects of the knowledge management process on knowledge-based innovation alongside with mediating role of Malaysian academic researchers' productivity during the Pandemic of COVID-19. Using a random sampling technique, data was collected from 382 academic researchers. Questionnaires were self-administered and data was analyzed via Smart PLS-SEM. Knowledge management process and knowledge workers' productivity have a positive and significant relationship with the knowledge-based innovation among academic researchers during the Pandemic of COVID-19. In addition, knowledge workers' productivity mediates the relationship between the knowledge management process (knowledge creation, knowledge acquisition, knowledge sharing, and knowledge utilization) and knowledge-based innovation during the Pandemic of COVID-19. Results have also directed knowledge sharing as the key factor in knowledge-based innovation and a stimulating task for management discipline around the world during the Pandemic of COVID-19. This study provides interesting insights on Malaysian academic researchers' productivity by evaluating the effects of knowledge creation, acquisition, sharing, and application on the knowledge-based innovation among academic researchers during the Pandemic of COVID-19. These useful insights would enable policymakers to develop more influential educational strategies. By assimilating the literature of defined variables, the main contribution of this study is the evaluation of knowledge creation, acquisition, sharing, and utilization into knowledge-based innovation alongside the mediating role of knowledge workers productivity in the higher education sector of Malaysia during the Pandemic of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Knowledge Management/statistics & numerical data , Research Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Efficiency , Faculty/psychology , Humans , Knowledge , Malaysia , Pandemics , Research Personnel/trends , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 36(7): 545-549, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556715

ABSTRACT

One cannot spend >5 min on social media at the moment without finding a link to some conspiracy theory or other regarding the origin of SARS-CoV2, the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. From the virus being deliberately released as a bioweapon to pharmaceutical companies blocking the trials of natural remedies to boost their dangerous drugs and vaccines, the Internet is rife with far-fetched rumors. And predictably, now that the first immunization trials have started, the antivaccine lobby has latched on to most of them. In the last week, the trailer for a new "bombshell documentary" Plandemic has been doing the rounds, gaining notoriety for being repeatedly removed from YouTube and Facebook. We usually would not pay much heed to such things, but for retrovirologists like us, the name associated with these claims is unfortunately too familiar: Dr. Judy Mikovits.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Fraud , Medical Laboratory Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/virology , Research Personnel/psychology , Retroviridae Infections/complications , Retroviridae/physiology , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Deception , Humans , Male , Mice , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retroviridae Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media
7.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0259965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546945

ABSTRACT

As scientific research becomes increasingly cross-disciplinary, many universities seek to support collaborative activity through new buildings and institutions. This study examines the impacts of spatial proximity on collaboration at MIT from 2005 to 2015. By exploiting a shift in the location of researchers due to building renovations, we evaluate how discrete changes in physical proximity affect the likelihood that researchers co-author. The findings suggest that moving researchers into the same building increases their propensity to collaborate, with the effect plateauing five years after the move. The effects are large when compared to the average rate of collaboration among pairs of researchers, which suggests that spatial proximity is an important tool to support cross-disciplinary collaborative science. Furthermore, buildings that host researchers working in the same or related fields and from multiple departments have a larger effect on their propensity to collaborate.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Interdisciplinary Communication , Spatial Behavior , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Facility Design and Construction , Humans , Movement , Research Personnel/psychology , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data
10.
Elife ; 92020 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497821
15.
J Clin Epidemiol ; 138: 80-94, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454254

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We investigated systematic review automation tool use by systematic reviewers, health technology assessors and clinical guideline developerst. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: An online, 16-question survey was distributed across several evidence synthesis, health technology assessment and guideline development organizations. We asked the respondents what tools they use and abandon, how often and when do they use the tools, their perceived time savings and accuracy, and desired new tools. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. RESULTS: A total of 253 respondents completed the survey; 89% have used systematic review automation tools - most frequently whilst screening (79%). Respondents' "top 3" tools included: Covidence (45%), RevMan (35%), Rayyan and GRADEPro (both 22%); most commonly abandoned were Rayyan (19%), Covidence (15%), DistillerSR (14%) and RevMan (13%). Tools saved time (80%) and increased accuracy (54%). Respondents taught themselves to how to use the tools (72%); lack of knowledge was the most frequent barrier to tool adoption (51%). New tool development was suggested for the searching and data extraction stages. CONCLUSION: Automation tools will likely have an increasingly important role in high-quality and timely reviews. Further work is required in training and dissemination of automation tools and ensuring they meet the desirable features of those conducting systematic reviews.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , Automation/methods , Research Personnel/psychology , Systematic Reviews as Topic/methods , Technology Assessment, Biomedical/statistics & numerical data , Technology Assessment, Biomedical/standards , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
16.
Ann N Y Acad Sci ; 1508(1): 137-154, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430012

ABSTRACT

There is emerging literature on the disruptive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on college students, but little is known about the impacts on undergraduate researchers (UGRs). On the basis of survey data collected in Summer 2020, this paper examines how less competent mentorship and COVID-19-related difficulties shaped UGRs' graduate school intentions. Results suggest that the pandemic strengthened UGRs' graduate school intentions when UGRs experienced fewer COVID-19-related difficulties. The pandemic weakened URG's graduate school intentions when they had a less competent faculty mentor. Having a more competent postgraduate mentor had a positive effect on UGRs' graduate school intentions in response to the pandemic. Those findings indicate that higher quality postgraduate mentorship may serve as an effective surrogate for lower quality faculty mentorship. Findings suggest that immediate strategies are needed to bolster graduate school aspirations among specific groups of UGRs in response to the pandemic. UGRs of particular concern include those who were highly impacted by COVID-19 with less competent mentors, were first-generation college students, had less prior research experience, had their Summer 2020 research experiences canceled, and were social/behavioral sciences majors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Graduate , Intention , Research Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mentors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
19.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249127, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410564

ABSTRACT

The flexibility allowed by the mobilization of technology disintegrated the traditional work-life boundary for most professionals. Whether working from home is the key or impediment to academics' efficiency and work-life balance became a daunting question for both scientists and their employers. The recent pandemic brought into focus the merits and challenges of working from home on a level of personal experience. Using a convenient sampling, we surveyed 704 academics while working from home and found that the pandemic lockdown decreased the work efficiency for almost half of the researchers but around a quarter of them were more efficient during this time compared to the time before. Based on the gathered personal experience, 70% of the researchers think that in the future they would be similarly or more efficient than before if they could spend more of their work-time at home. They indicated that in the office they are better at sharing thoughts with colleagues, keeping in touch with their team, and collecting data, whereas at home they are better at working on their manuscript, reading the literature, and analyzing their data. Taking well-being also into account, 66% of them would find it ideal to work more from home in the future than they did before the lockdown. These results draw attention to how working from home is becoming a major element of researchers' life and that we have to learn more about its influencer factors and coping tactics in order to optimize its arrangements.


Subject(s)
Research Personnel/psychology , Work-Life Balance , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Performance , Young Adult
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